or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2953

post #88561 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

SECONDED!

THIRDED!!!!!!!!!!
post #88562 of 93835
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
(R - Mar. 3)
8PM - Celebrity Wife Swap: Gerardo/Sisqó (Season Finale)
9PM - Whodunnit?
10PM - Castle
(R - Feb. 4)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - Big Brother SD
9PM - Unforgettable (Season Premiere)
10PM - The Mentalist
(R - Mar. 3)

NBC:
7PM - America's Got Talent (120 min.)
(R - Jul. 23)
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
(R - May 15)
10PM - Crossing Line

FOX:
7PM - American Dad
(R - Mar. 10)
7:30PM - The Simpsons
(R - Mar. 3)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - May 12)
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Mar. 10)
9PM - Family Guy
(R - Apr. 28)
9:30PM - Family Guy
(R - May 12)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - The Titanic with Len Goodman
(R - Apr. 10, 2012)
9PM - Masterpiece Mystery! - Endeavour, Series 1: Home (90 min.)
10:30PM - Call the Midwife
(R - Mar. 3)

UNIVISION:
7:20PM - Aquí y Ahora (50 min.)
8PM - Amores Verdaderos (Series Finale, 120 min.)
10PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
6PM - Movie: The Spy Next Door (2010)
8PM - La Voz Kids (Three hours)
post #88563 of 93835
TV Review
'Unforgettable' crime show gets second chance
By Verne Gay, Newsday

CRIME DRAMA "Unforgettable"

WHEN | WHERE Sunday at 9 p.m. on CBS/2

WHAT IT'S ABOUT
Carrie Wells (Poppy Montgomery) is a former Syracuse cop who came to New York, still haunted by a terrible crime, the murder of her sister when both were little girls. She has hyperthymestic syndrome -- she's able to remember everything -- except that one terrible day. She and an old colleague, and boyfriend, Det. Al Burns (Dylan Walsh), are now working cases for the NYPD in Queens, but a call comes in from the Major Crimes unit in Manhattan; her spectacular memory has helped the team notch a peerless track record, and its help is needed on a kidnapping/extortion case. Meanwhile, both are starstruck by the bright lights/big city that spreads out beyond the skyscraper office of Major Crimes; might Manhattan be more alluring than Queens?

MY SAY "Unforgettable" returns Sunday with the rarest of TV gifts: A second chance. Dumped after just one season last May, CBS then did something that networks almost never do -- admit a mistake had been made, and ordered a 13-episode second-season summer run. This is remarkable because TV has a scorched earth policy about failed series. They strike the set, pay off contracts, and brain-dump any memory of the expensive flop.

But "Unforgettable" wasn't so easily discarded -- in part because it wasn't a flop in the first place -- and just the briefest glance Sunday will explain why. As procedurals go, there's nothing particularly radical here -- crime committed, then solved by our heroes just after the last commercial break. Instead, what's special is something a bit harder to define, notably the chemistry, which Montgomery and Walsh have in abundance. The supporting cast is excellent, too: Dallas Roberts, last seen on "The Walking Dead" as an eccentric professor who studied zombie body parts in glass jars, as their new boss, Eliot; Jane Curtin, back as chief medical examiner; and Tawny Cypress ("Heroes") as their new colleague in Major Crimes. An added bonus: Northport's own John Scurti ("Rescue Me") makes an extended cameo Sunday as well.

BOTTOM LINE "Unforgettable" deserved this second chance, and if Sunday's opener is any indication, will earn a third one, too.

GRADE: B+


http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/tv/unforgettable-crime-show-gets-second-chance-1.5759429
post #88564 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
Michael J. Fox Is Ready for His Sitcom Return
By Bill Brioux, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 27, 2013

BEVERLY HILLS, CA — Michael J. Fox says his Parkinson's will be as much a part of his new NBC TV show as it is a part of his life.

"Parkinson’s itself, there’s nothing horrifying about it to me," he told critics at Saturday's packed NBC TCA session. "There’s nothing horrifying about someone with shaky hands… That’s just our reality; we have no control.”

Fox (above, with co-star Betsy Brandt) plays a network news anchor who comes out of retirement. Fox was never retired, but he did step away from anything but guest roles after Spin City, a year or so after going public with the state of his health. That move allowed him to pursue treatment for Parkinson's as well as enjoy many formative years with his three children. Their ages now are 24, 18 and 11.

Better medication has helped control side effects, but Fox said just being rested has helped bring him back to TV. Plus he realized he was good at being a sitcom star, missed it, and why the hell not.

Fox joked about his affliction during the session. Unable to locate where a question was coming from (something which tricks most stars in this giant ballroom), Fox muttered, "Parkinson's. I'll sync up with you sooner or later."

Later in the scrum he said he didn't really feel the disease affected his timing, often singled out as his greatest comedy gift. "Maybe in some physical stuff," he allowed. Although that could also be chalked up to age. "That's not Parkinson's, that's just being old," Fox, 52, says he often tells his wife.

The cast has already shot six episodes of the sitcom, which is based in New York. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has taped a guest segment as a newsroom guest.

Co-star Wendell Pierce, who plays his news boss Harris, says the two often talk hockey. Pierce is a big Rangers fan, while Fox pulls for his beloved Bruins. "He died a little in that Stanley Cup final," Pierce told this Leafs fan, who has no sympathy whatsoever.

It was also announced at the session that Anne Heche will be joining The Michael J. Fox Show as a nemesis who butts heads with Fox's character. The series premieres Sept. 26 on NBC.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=5482
post #88565 of 93835
TV Notes
'Breaking Pointe' tests relationships
By Maria Sciullo, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Jul. 27, 2013

"Breaking Pointe" is back on The CW and, as always, bringing the drama.

When last viewers saw the dancers of Salt Lake City's Ballet West, numerous personal relationships were on the line and some professional decisions up in the air. Monday's Season 2 debut (9 p.m.) quickly establishes that Chartiers Valley graduate Allison DeBona and Rex Tilton are no longer an item.

"It just didn't work out," she said.

Meanwhile, Ms. DeBona, 29, revealed, "I have come to realize that I probably didn't give Rex a real fair chance. I'm still in love with my ex-boyfriend ... Everybody knows him as 'the other guy.'

"I see a future with Jonathan. I see babies and a house. A marriage. With Rex, it always seemed day-to-day."

"I do love Allison, but I'm not in love with Allison," Mr. Tilton said.

On other fronts, it appears that young Beckanne Sisk is getting along better with the veterans and is still considered a threat. And soloist Ronnie Underwood, who was a big part of Season 1, is shown fracturing bones in his left foot during a performance of "Nutcracker" last winter.

He and the fabulously named Silver Barkes are platonically sharing a residence. They throw a party to kick off the new dance season, in which two newcomers are singled out by the filmmakers' cameras.

Josh Whitehead is an African-American dancer performing in a vastly white profession. He is, according to Mr. Tilton, "the ultimate hero story," a young man emerging from a childhood rooted in a tough neighborhood.

Then there is Zach Prentice, described by Ms. Sisk as "a gossip girl." He views another younger dancer, Ian Tanzer, as the competition and isn't happy when Mr. Tanzer appears to be sucking up to principal dancer Chris Ruud.

For his part, Mr. Tanzer says he has an advantage: He's better looking than Mr. Prentice. Ouch.

There's also a bunch of not-convincing drama at the party when Ms. Sisk appears preoccupied/flirty with everyone else and leaves new boyfriend, Chase O'Connell standing in the corner.

The episode concludes with Mr. Underwood going back to the doctor with an infected foot -- a graphic reminder that art is not pretty -- and being told that, worst-case scenario, he could lose it.

"Injuries are harsh," said Adam Sklute, the company's artistic director. "You either heal and get back on the stage, or you don't, and you've got to find something else to do."

• The CW's summer reality series, "Capture," debuts Tuesday at 9 p.m. Teams of two play a high-tech version of "capture the flag" during the course of one month, and commercials for the show make it look a lot like "The Hunger Games," without the bloodshed, of course.

Two Pittsburgh men comprise the green team, Antoine Burton and Kareem Dawson.

• Viewers got their first look at Grove City native and Pitt grad Christy Biberich on "Brother vs. Brother" (HGTV, Sundays at 10 p.m.) when the new home makeover show debuted earlier this week.

Teams of five experts -- ranging from real estate agents to architects -- are mentored by twins Drew and Jonathan Scott to see who can add the most value to properties in a just few days.

Ms. Biberich's Team Drew won the challenge. So Team Jonathan had to send home a perky woman whose specialty was interior design. After one episode, it's apparent that teams will always need people with technical skills: After all, someone has to take a sledge hammer to cabinets or redirect plumbing.

That means contestants such as Ms. Biberich, who does whole-house design and organization, must work especially hard to stand out.

• Turns out there's a local connection to "America's Got Talent" (NBC, Tuesdays and Wednesdays 9 p.m.) after all. Trey Richardson grew up in Pittsburgh and is part of the act SensEtion

They dance. They move around a light show of cubes. They have a good time. Hard to describe, really, but judges Howard Stern, Howie Mandel and Mel B liked them. Heidi Klum was the lone dissenter.

SensEtion is likely to appear on a live show from New York's Radio City Music Hall in mid-August.

http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/ae/tv-radio/breaking-pointe-tests-relationships-697043/
post #88566 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
NBC Announces Hillary Clinton Miniseries, New 'Rosemary's Baby' and 'Tommyknockers'
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com Team - Jul. 27, 2013

NBC announced four new limited-run series Saturday, including a four-hour Hillary Clinton miniseries starring Diane Lane.

The network also plans an updated remake and "sort of resetting" of "Rosemary's Baby," NBC entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt said at a Television Critics Association panel Saturday. He joked that the remake has "nothing to do with Hillary Clinton."

The role of President Bill Clinton has not yet been cast in the Clinton miniseries, and no script has been written. Greenblatt said NBC was uncertain about when it would air, and speculated that the former Secretary of State would likely announce a presidential run in late spring of early summer of 2015.

"This could well have aired before that," he said.

He didn't address a reporter's question about whether NBC should make shows about other prospective 2016 presidential candidates out of fairness.

The network also plans a new version of Stephen King's "The Tommyknockers." Greenblatt acknowledged it was partly in response to the success of CBS's adaptation of King's "Under the Dome." The network also plans the new Mark Burnett miniseries "Plymouth," about the arrival at Plymouth Rock.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/nbc-announces-hillary-clinton-miniseries-rosemarys-baby-update-new-tommyknockers-106406

* * * *

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
Why 'Ironside' Producers Didn't Cast a Paraplegic Actor

When NBC ordered the new series "Ironside," with Blair Underwood as a brilliant, paraplegic detective, paraplegic actors questioned why one of their own couldn't have gotten the part.

NBC declined to comment at the time about whether any paraplegic actors were given the chance to play the titular role. But on Saturday, the show's producers explained for the first time why it just wasn't viable to audition actors with disabilities: "Ironside" contains too many flashbacks to the days before his spinal chord was damaged in a shooting.

"It was always meant to [show] Ironside both in present day and go back into his life prior to the shooting," said executive producer Teri Weinberg. "So in this particular situation we needed an actor who was able to take on both of those roles. It was really about the best actor for the role, but it was one that required an actor to be on their feet in their previous life."

The producers said the show is about 10 percent flashbacks, which would have made it impossible to use special effects to make a paraplegic actor appear to walk. In the original 1960s series, Raymond Burr played Ironside.

Underwood said he learned to play a self-reliant wheelchair user with the help of a technical advisor, David Bryant, who lost the ability to walk in a skiing accident when he was 19.

"A lot of what you see in this portrayal of Ironside is inspired by him," Underwood said. "The first thing I noticed is there were no handles on his wheelchair and I said, 'Dude, why don't you have any handles on your wheelchair, man?' And he said, 'Why would I want to? Why would I want someone to help me out? Whatever I can do for myself, I'm going to do for myself.

"The first thing we did was cut the handles off the wheelchair. That speaks to some of his independence."

Ironside is a New York City detective, and the producers were asked if the city's department has any detectives in wheelchairs in real life. Executive producer Ken Sanzel said the department has two patrolmen with prosthetic limbs, but no paraplegic detectives.

He said he hopes the show could help open people's minds to make that possible.

"I think it's reaching a place where that could be very plausible," he said.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/tca-why-ironside-producers-didnt-cast-paraplegic-actor-106461
post #88567 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
‘Parenthood’ Finally Gets Some TLC from NBC
By Cynthia Littleton, Variety.com - Jul. 27, 2013

“Parenthood” has always been something of a strange animal for NBC.

It’s a pure family drama, with little in the way of built-in story engine other than chronicling the adulthood of three adult siblings in Northern California.

The show got to take a victory lap at TCA on Saturday for securing a fifth season order after notching some notable upticks in the second half of last season. For a time it looked like the curtain was going to fall on “Parenthood” after season four, which was a shorter order of 16 episodes.

But about halfway through that run last season, the demo numbers started to uptick — not gangbusters but enough to get noticed. The show got a lot of media attention for a dramatic storyline involving Monica Potter’s character dealing with a diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer.

In the fall, NBC is testing “Parenthood’s” mettle with a move to a higher-profile slot, Thursday 10 p.m. as the cap to its overhauled 8-10 p.m. lineup emphasizing family comedies, including new vehicles from Sean Hayes and Michael J. Fox.

“Parenthood” star Craig T. Nelson wasn’t shy last season about criticizing NBC for what he saw as a lack of marketing support for the show.

“You get frustrated with the fact that it doesn’t seem to be being honored in the way you feel it should be,” Nelson said. “I felt I had an obligation as the patriach of this dysfunctional family to speak out. I’m proud of that. It’s what Zeke Braverman does.”

“Parenthood” creator/exec producer Jason Katims said he had a good feeling about getting a fifth season because he knew how much internal affection there is for the show at NBC and Universal TV.

Katims has been there before with a show balanced on the bubble. “Friday Night Lights” was perpetually in danger of getting axed until NBC set a creative deal with DirecTV that took the show through five seasons.

“I’ve seen what can happen for a show when there’s a lot of internal support for it at the network,” Katims said. He never spent much time planning for a series finale; the (happy) outcome of the cancer storyline was set long before the crunch time of pickup decisions in the spring.

Nor was Katims surprised by the bump the show experienced in the second half of last season.

“I feel like there’s been a building passion for the show throughout the run,” he said.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/tca-parenthood-finally-gets-some-tlc-from-nbc-1200568947/

* * * *

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
NBC Olympics Coverage to Address Anti-Gay Issues ‘As They are Relevant’

NBC Sports chief Mark Lazarus on Saturday acknowledged that the network will address the controversy stirred by Russia’s new anti-gay laws in the Peacock’s coverage of February’s winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Lazarus sought to head off a questioning frenzy on the issue that has made headlines during the past week after Russian legislators enacted laws that could potentially lead to the arrest of gay athletes who travel to Sochi for the competition. Lazarus noted that the Olympics has long been affected by social and cultural issues of the day.

“We will address those issues as they are relevant at the time of the Games, as has always been done by NBC’s coverage,” Lazarus said at the start of the TCA sesh on the winter Games.

Public awareness of Russia’s move and how U.S. and the Olympic Committee may react was heightened earlier this week by an editorial in the New York Times by actor and gay activist Harvey Fierstein. There have been calls from LGBT activist orgs for a boycott of the Games — which would be a financial disaster for NBCUniversal.

Lazarus emphasized that the International Olympic Committee has pressed the Russian government on the new law and has been assured that “there will not be any issues regarding what takes place during the Games.”

The IOC will continue to monitor the situation, Lazarus said. He sought to distance NBC and the Olympics from a broader responsibility to make a statement from a human rights standpoint.

“Governments across the world have different laws” that many find distasteful but are not a source of friction “as long as it doesn’t affect us.”

Lazarus added: “If it is still their law and impacting any part of the Olympic games we will acknowledge it.” And he quickly sought to distance NBC and Comcast from any suggestion that they condone discrimination.

“We don’t believe in the spirit of the law that they have passed and are hopeful that the Olympic spirit will win out,” he said.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/tca-nbc-olympics-coverage-to-address-anti-gay-issues-as-they-are-relevant-1200568935/
post #88568 of 93835
TV Notes
Dying 'Simpsons' co-creator Sam Simon to give away fortune to charity
By Margaret Eby, New York Daily News - Jul. 27, 2013

Television writer Sam Simon, who co-created "The Simpsons" and directed "The Drew Carey Show," is facing down a terminal colon cancer diagnosis by planning to donate his millions to charity.

Simon, 58, has three to six months to live, according to his doctors. The small screen guru, who has won nine Emmys, plans to pledge the earnings from his royalties to philanthropic organizations after his death.

The producer is particularly passionate about animal rights and feeding the hungry, and sees no problem with giving away his considerable fortune.

"The truth is, I have more money than I'm interested in spending," Simon told The Hollywood Reporter. "Everyone in my family is taken care of. And I enjoy this."

Simon explained that his philanthropic impulses increased after an emergency operation for a perforated colon.

"When I woke up in the hospital, even though I did have a will, it did become that much more important to me to set this stuff up for the future," Simon said. "It's something that will be living after I'm gone."

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/dying-simpsons-co-creator-sam-simon-give-fortune-charity-article-1.1410492
post #88569 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'The Blacklist' Producers Insist the Show Isn't 'Silence of the Lambs'
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 27, 2013

Producers of NBC's buzzy freshman drama The Blacklist used their platform Saturday at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour to downplay any similarities that may exist between their crime thriller and Silence of the Lambs.

The Blacklist kicks off when the world's most-wanted criminal (James Spader as Raymond "Red" Reddington) mysteriously turns himself in and offers to give up everyone he has ever worked with. His one condition: He'll work only with newly minted FBI agent Elizabeth (Megan Boone), with whom he seemingly has no connection. It's both a case-of-the-week drama and a serial involving the mystery of why Red only will speak with Elizabeth.

The plot closely resembles the 1991 Jodie Foster-Anthony Hopkins feature The Silence of the Lambs, in which imprisoned cannibal Hannibal Lecter would work only with Clarice Starling, Foster's young FBI trainee.

"We are all fans of that movie and it's a great movie and we're lucky in some ways to be compared to it. But there's a big difference between the characters on our show and the characters of Hannibal and Clarice. Red is not a psychopath; he is someone who is more of an enigma," writer/executive producer John Eisendrath told reporters, noting the series will explore whether the terrorist's journey is one of redemption or revenge. "Is he good? Is he bad? What is he like is part of the question of the series."

"It's very distinct from Hannibal Lecter and the same is true of Elizabeth," he added of Red and Elizabeth's mysterious past. "While she may start out in a very Clarice Starling, naive, innocent place, this is much more a journey of discovery: Who she is. This is a journey of discovery not just for the audience but for the character. She's going to learn who she is in a way that will take her down a path very distinct from Clarice Starling. While we understand the idea that people would say this is similar or has comparisons, we think the characters and the journey that they're going to go on are distinctly different."

The drama, which many in the industry deemed one of the strongest scripts of the recently concluded jam-packed pilot season, built upon that buzz when NBC slotted the freshman series in the prime slot following The Voice on Mondays. The prime 10 p.m. real estate helped successfully launch Revolution into a second season. (Worth noting, Revolution fared poorly without NBC's singing competition.)

EP Jon Bokenkamp called the show a "strange hybrid" of procedural and serialized drama, noting each week will feature different criminals that the FBI may not have known even existed. "There's opportunity to have fun with the various people involved in crime in ways we haven't seen before. Each week different criminal but the reason you come back to the show are the people and the secrets that they have and what's happening at home," he said. "In most procedural-type shows you don't go home; you stay in the bullpen. … Here it's essential we go home and … meet these people."

As for the relationship between Red and Elizabeth, Spader said there is a past between Red and Elizabeth that she's not aware of but he has an intimate knowledge of her past and childhood as well as her relatives. "The relationship in the film is obsession, it's not based in any sort of reality at all," he noted. "As the story starts to unfold that becomes a driving force of what their relationship really is."

The Blacklist premieres Monday, Sept. 23 on NBC. Watch the trailer, below.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/nbcs-blacklist-producers-were-not-594421

* * * *

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'Will & Grace' Opened Door for 'Sean Saves the World'

There would be no Sean Saves the World were it not for Will & Grace, according to star Sean Hayes. The actor returns to NBC with a starring role on the fall comedy, where he plays an openly gay man adjusting to fatherhood when his daughter moves back in with him.

The actor, who rose to stardom on the 1990s comedy alongside Debra Messing and Eric McCormack, told reporters Saturday at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour that the eight-season show helped pave the way for gay characters on TV.

"I would like to believe it had a big influence on the gay movement in America," Hayes said, adding with a laugh a nod to the vice president's recent remarks: "According to Joe Biden it did!"

Hayes would like to think that gay characters on TV are now more widely accepted -- even if this past fall was notably brutal following the cancelation of The New Normal, Smash and Go On, among others.

"Thankfully [gay] is an afterthought like any minority now -- it's normal to everybody," Hayes noted. "Which is how it should be. It's sad it's even a question."

Writer/executive producer Victor Fresco (Better Off Ted) also noted that Hayes' Will & Grace allowed shows like Sean Saves the World to happen. "Without Will & Grace, we wouldn't be here now."

The series co-stars Alice's Linda Lavin as Hayes' onscreen mother and Smash's Megan Hilty as his best friend and colleague, with both helping to parent his teenage daughter (played by Samantha Isler).

The comments came shortly after NBC Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt noted that he didn't think the reason The New Normal didn't work was because of its central storyline about a same-sex couple having a baby via surrogate.

"We think the country is moving in the right direction; the Supreme Court made the right decision," Greenblatt said, noting Sean Saves the World would be less "issue-oriented" than the Ryan Murphy/Ali Adler vehicle. "It may have been slightly ahead of its time."

Meanwhile, the series has no plans to meet the mother of Hayes' onscreen daughter anytime soon. "We'll hear about her off-camera presence but we won't see her yet," Fresco said, noting the character could eventually show up.

"He will be dating but his focus is on his daughter, that's the big new thing in his life," Fresco said. "But he is a single man and he will be dating."

Sean Saves the World premieres Thursday, Oct. 3, at 9 p.m. on NBC. Watch the trailer, below. [CLICK LINK]

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/will-grace-opened-door-sean-594413
post #88570 of 93835
TV Notes
'Scandal' inspiration talks to ABC's 'This Week'
By Hal Boedeker, Orlando Sentinel's 'TV Guy' Blog - Jul. 27, 2013

Want to know more about the woman who was the inspiration for Olivia Pope on "Scandal"? Crisis management expert Judy Smith will be a guest on ABC's "This Week" at 11 a.m. Sunday on WFTV-Channel 9.

The very businesslike Smith is quite different from the scandal-plagued Pope, and Smith can expand on that point. Smith is also a co-executive producer of the ABC drama.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will be appearing on "This Week," "Fox News Sunday," CNN's "State of the Union" and NBC's "Meet the Press."

Other "This Week" guests will be Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga. The panel will be George Will, Peggy Noonan of The Wall Street Journal, Katrina vanden Heuvel of The Nation and Steven Rattner, former lead auto adviser. The program will feature former Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., co-author of "Gridlock."

Elsewhere Sunday morning:

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, visits "Fox News Sunday" at 10 a.m. on WOFL-Channel 35. The panel will be Brit Hume, Juan Williams, Nina Easton of Fortune magazine and Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report. The program will salute singer/songwriter Roberta Flack.

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., talk to CNN's "State of the Union" at 9 a.m. and noon. A panel on politics brings together radio host Chris Plante, CNN's Paul Begala, CNN's Cornell Belcher and CNN's Ana Navarro.

Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., discusses the NSA on NBC's "Meet the Press" at 9 a.m. on WESH-Channel 2. A panel on Washington brings together Maria Bartiromo of CNBC's "Closing Bell," GOP strategist Mike Murphy, former Obama adviser David Axelrod and Harold Ford, former Democratic congressman from Tennessee.
CBS' "Face the Nation" features Rep. Rogers of Michigan and Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., at 10:30 a.m. on WKMG-Channel 6. The program offers a panel with Dee Dee Myers of Vanity Fair, David Gergen of Harvard University and Michael Gerson of The Washington Post. Discussing baseball's steroid problem will be Bob Nightengale of USA Today and Bill Rhoden of The New York Times. Seth Doane of CBS will have a rare report from North Korea on the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/blogs/tv-guy/os-scandal-inspiration-talks-to-this-week-20130726,0,837559.post
post #88571 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
‘The Voice’ Not A Search For Singing Star, Say Celebrity Judges
By Lisa De Moraes, Deadline.com - Jul. 27, 2013

The point of NBC’s singing competition series The Voice is not to find a recording star, the show’s celebrity judges and host Carson Daly said, by way of dismissing a TV critic’s observation that the hit show had yet to turn one out. Things got tense during The Voice Q&A session at TCA Summer TV Press Tour 2013 when the celebrity judges and Daly seemed to take issue with having to take questions from TV critics in the room. When one critic asked about the show’s practice of bringing in ringers, Adam Levine called that critic a “**** stirrer.” Another critic wondered whether Levine could not be spontaneous on the show after last season saying “I hate this country” on national TV when two of his singers got the hook, and he had to issue a statement saying “I obviously love my country very much.”

“I think people can see through stupid media hype,” he shot back, adding later, “No offense.”

“None taken!” Daly jumped in, brightly. Daly’s the guy who first introduced the “we’re not looking for a star” motif into the conversation. The point of the show, he said, is that it’s an honor to be nominated. Fourth-season winner, Danielle Bradberry, “has eight years to figure it out, and in eight years she’ll be as old as Taylor Swift is today,” Daly said. Levine thinks “success” is overblown anyway, and that the goal of the competitors should be to pay their rent because, “We do it because we love music.”

“I guess the answer to the question is ‘I don’t know what the hell the question is’,” Levine concluded.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/tca-the-voice-not-a-search-for-singing-star-say-celebrity-judges/

* * * *

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
‘Welcome To The Family’ Stars, EP On Latino Stereotypes & ‘Devious Maids’

Ray Richmond contributes to Deadline’s TV coverage.

Despite standing as such a large percentage of the overall U.S. population, Latino culture remains a largely invisible piece of the network primetime television landscape. So the cast and producers of the new NBC comedy Welcome to the Family were asked their thoughts on helping to break that mold a bit during a TCA session this morning. The series chronicles how cultures collide when a white family and a Latino family in Los Angeles are bonded together by their children who fall in love, followed quickly by an unplanned pregnancy. Exec producer Mike Sikowitz maintained that he wasn’t necessarily looking to push Latino culture to the forefront in the show, however. “I just felt it was important to do a show that I feel reflects L.A. or really any area in the country today,” Sikowitz said. “I was just trying to bring two families together.”

Co-star Ricardo A. Chavira, an alumnus of Desperate Housewives, pointed out that when Latinos exist on TV, “we exist within the realm of specific stereotypes. You can’t always escape them, either. But that’s not the foundation of what this family [on the show] is. It’s more universal than that. It just adds texture to the story.” A critic followed that up by wondering aloud if Chavira might have been referring to the Lifetime drama Devious Maids (from Marc Cherry of Housewives fame) when talking about Latinos existing in the realm of stereotypes. But he didn’t want to get drawn into a war. “I wasn’t referring to anything at all,” Chavira insisted. “I think there’s some wonderful elements to [Devious Maids]. I’m very proud of the people I used to work with and what they’re doing on that show.” However, he allowed, “Myself personally, I probably have a couple of issues with it, that’s all.”

Chavira’s costar Justina Machado, a Latina, earlier emphasized that Latinos in Hollywood need to speak up for themselves more to get noticed and employed. “It’s true that we don’t exist as much as we’d like to see ourselves [in TV],” she said, “and we are huge in this country. We put [President] Obama over. So we absolutely have to start speaking up for ourselves.”

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/tca-welcome-to-the-family-latinos-devious-maids/
post #88572 of 93835
TV Review
‘Total Divas,’ totally not very interesting
E! series documents the lives of professional lady wrestlers
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Jul. 26, 2013

Given the intertwined nature of TV ownership these days, when we watch a show, we often ask ourselves not only “Do I want to watch this show?” but also “Do I want to watch the other shows it’s promoting?”

E!’s new documentary series “Total Divas,” about the lady wrestlers who work for the WWE, is inoffensive but only mildly interesting, and it’s unlikely to bring new viewers to the other WWE programs that air on E!’s corporate partners USA and Syfy. Only people who are curious to know what the Funkadactyls are really like will feel compelled to watch.

Premiering this Sunday, July 28, at 10 p.m., “Total Divas” focuses on seven WWE “Divas.” The twins Nikki and Brie Bella (not their real names) are a tag team that performs as the Bella Twins. Their chief rivals are a tag team called the Funkadactyls, whose stage names are Naomi and Cameron but who are called Trinity and Ariane on this show.

The Bella Twins say that the other women are gunning for them because they took a year off to film “an independent movie” but are coming back at the top.

Every such show needs a veteran; in this case it’s Natalya (real name Natalie Neidhart), the daughter of the wrestler Jim “the Anvil” Neidhart and the niece of Bret “Hit Man” Hart. The newbies are JoJo Offerman and Eva Marie, who are being groomed for stardom.

The episode builds up to Wrestlemania, which we are repeatedly told is the biggest event in the WWE calendar. Only one of the matches at the event will be a girls’ match.

Jane, a WWE executive, has to break the news to Natalie that the girls’ match will actually be a double tag team, with the Bella Twins and the Funkadactyls being paired with male teams. This plotline ends surprisingly but disappointingly.

To add insult to insult, Jane also tells Natalie that she wants her to help groom Jojo and Eva Marie. Then Natalie learns that Jane has asked Eva Marie to bleach her hair blond so that she won’t look too much like the Bella Twins. No one seems to care that Natalie is already blond.

We learn a lot about the Divas’ romantic lives. Several of them are involved with WWE wrestlers: Trinity is dating Jimmy Uso; Brie is dating Daniel Bryan; and Nikki is dating John Cena.

Nikki says that John’s divorce makes him reluctant to get married again. On a dinner date, they have one of those awkward reality-TV conversations about their future. One hopes that they’re merely reenacting previous discussions and that they didn’t save this important topic for the TV cameras.

Natalie is engaged to the WWE star Tyson Kidd, who doesn’t appear in the premiere. According to press materials, future episodes will feature her bachelorette party, dress shopping and the ceremony itself. It’s hard to imagine the typical pro-wrestling fan getting excited about all that.

After a rehearsal for Wrestlemania goes badly, one of the Funkadactyls’ male partners tells Ariane that she and Trinity “suck.” Ariane’s boyfriend, a tough-looking noncelebrity named Vincent, starts threatening to go into the locker room and “call him out.”

Although the editing plays up the women’s rivalry, with lots of eye rolling, they never get into any serious disputes. Perhaps the producers figured that if viewers wanted to see heavily made-up women with big chests screaming at each other and pulling hair, they would watch a “Real Housewives” show.

The few shots of the Divas and their boyfriends doing their job in the ring, taken out of context, look silly and, yes, fake.

By either pro-wrestling or reality-TV standards, “Total Divas” feels real-ish. If the stars are doing any damage to their reputations, it’s that they appear to be too nice. That might make their fans happy, but viewers expecting a smackdown can and will go elsewhere.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/total-divas-totally-not-very-interesting/
post #88573 of 93835
TV Reviews
A President and His Men
By Dorothy Rabinowitz, Wall Street Journal

Let there be no misconception about this playfully named film, bitter at the core, the edges and everywhere else.

"Our Nixon" was put together from some 500 reels of home movies taken by Richard Nixon's chief of staff H.R. Haldeman, domestic security adviser John Ehrlichman and special assistant Dwight Chapin, all of whom would end up doing prison time in the wake of Watergate. No member of this once youthfully happy trio—men who had considered themselves fortunate beyond belief to be where they were, serving in the Nixon White House—could have guessed that anything like such a future lay ahead as they took those endless films memorializing a time when life was all promise and working endless hours was a price willingly paid. There was the fun, the camaraderie—the faith in this president, mirrored in the film of the eager crowds, young and old, roaring their enthusiasm for him wherever he went—vivid reminders of Mr. Nixon's immense popularity. Already mired in Watergate when he ran for re-election in 1972, he would beat George McGovern in a huge landslide, losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.

The temptation to film everything came naturally enough to Messrs. Haldeman and Ehrlichman, both advertising men prior to their enlistment in the Nixon campaign.The resulting movies would be among the materials the FBI confiscated during the Watergate investigation. After moldering in the files of the National Archives for the next 40 years or so, they've now been shaped—along with audio excerpts of the Nixon tapes and archival news footage—into a small film of devastating power. Filmmakers Penny Lane and Bryan Frye have, to a degree that borders on the miraculous, avoided most of the stock dramatic images of Watergate, with the result that their film manages to bring it back afresh in all of its miserable absurdity. You won't soon forget the growing atmosphere of dread, the mix of panic and defiance that oozed from the White House as it was enveloped by the scandal.

The credit for the film's potent effects belongs almost entirely to Mr. Chapin and Messrs. Haldeman and Ehrlichman, both now deceased, or rather to their intimate view of events. In a snippet from a 1982 television interview, Mr. Ehrlichman says that the Nixon administration would not have gone under in the face of Watergate if the president had not had a compulsive need to control matters—if he'd been able to maintain his distance from the mess. He had instead involved himself obsessively and "pulled it into his office."

It would take time before the president's top aides had to come to grips with their chief's flaws and predilections. The Nixon team considered itself a family, one that could chuckle at the president's foibles. "You got the idea you were in the middle of a great big badly lighted television show," observes Mr. Ehrlichman. He had never laughed as much as he did in the Nixon White House, Mr. Chapin, surviving member of the trio, recalls.

They reveled in the first-term trip to Europe, a heady tour of eight countries that saw immense crowds turn out for the U.S. president, and the team's films show it. The zestful Mr. Ehrlichman shot everything—one minute the glory of the Arc de Triomphe; the next, the urinal in the hotel bathroom.

Things would change at home as the antiwar demonstrations—captured in the film's dramatic archival footage—grow in size and intensity. Their upsetting effect on the president also grows apace, as the taped recordings tell, not least the complaints directed at journalists—who, the president informs his aides, never show the crude and outrageous behavior of the demonstrators. The night Mr. Nixon gives his famous 1969 speech to the constituency he named "the silent majority"—that is, those Americans not out marching in the street and denouncing their government—he waits for the response from his cabinet. Which is, for the most part, silent. He's had messages from only three, he's heard telling one of the aides in chagrined wonderment. It's only a foreshadowing of the isolation to follow, with Watergate.

Still all is not gloom at the Nixon White House yet, far from it—though war protests had a way of breaking in unexpectedly, as we see in a vignette from January 1972 involving the Ray Conniff Singers, invited to perform for the president and guests. Among them would be a woman who unfurled an antiwar banner and then lectured the president on roughly the same subject while a frantic Ray Conniff tried to stop her. The president was forgiving, the audience was outraged and—too bad the film doesn't include this part—the redoubtable Martha Mitchell, wife of the attorney general, called for the woman to be torn limb from limb.

The president was somewhat less forgiving closer to home, as some of these insider reflections attest. He was not happy, for instance, that Henry Kissinger involved himself in flirtations with numerous gorgeous women, and directed aides to see to it that he wasn't, at least, seated next to glamorous beauties at White House dinners. Instead, he should be put next to some "interesting and intelligent woman." Qualities that would, the president evidently reasoned, pose no danger of glamour.

This highly personal view of the Nixon years is, for obvious reasons, a sad and wrenching one—a film that is nonetheless filled with spirit, humor and a bountiful sense of irony.

OUR NIXON
Thur., Aug. 1, at 9 p.m. on CNN


* * * *

Hard as it may be to imagine, there is still drama in the subject of crime families. And National Geographic Channel's contribution, the six-part "Inside the American Mob," is impressive on that score. Most of its persuasiveness derives from first-person reflections both by federal officials and by Mafiosi—and don't underestimate the impact of the latter. Michael Franzese, formerly of the Colombo family (now a devoutly religious man), is altogether compelling in his story of life in the mob and his experience as the son of Colombo mob underboss Sonny Franzese.

This is even more true of the history of FBI undercover agent Joe Piscone, who successfully infiltrated the Bonanno family, posing as a seductive character called Donnie Brasco. Everyone at the top of mob-family society is here, as are a number of famous names in law enforcement, Rudolph Giuliani included.

INSIDE THE AMERICAN MOB
Begins Sunday, July 28, at 9 p.m. on National Geographic Channel


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324110404578627964253211762.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_6
post #88574 of 93835
Critic's Notes
NBC's Jennifer Salke: No Time To Nurture Shows. Wait, What?
By Tim Goodman, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Bastard Machine' Blog - Jul. 27, 2013

The moment NBC entertainment president Jennifer Salke said the words, I flinched. Before I tell you what those words were, have I told you that I really like one of NBC's fall dramas and I'm rooting for one of its fall comedies?

Just so you know that it's not all negativity and snark when it comes to the failure analysis of the Peacock.

OK, so in Saturday morning's executives session with Bob Greenblatt, Chairman of NBC Entertainment, the talk was suddenly hovering around the topic of having to pull the plug on shows that weren't doing well even though you thought they would have done better. For your purposes at home, think about having to put down your dog. Or something similar. In this instance, the focus was on The New Normal and Go On, two shows that weren't particularly funny to begin with and thus not a source of great consternation about why they would be canceled. Well, not on my end anyway. But their failure had caused both executives to lament the need to cancel them and, as Greenblatt said, "you have to make those really difficult calls about what you sort of can renew at what rating. And we had to make a very difficult call."

That emotion is understandable for executives who put a lot of time and energy into the development process and then see their babies falter in the cruel Nielsen world.

But then Salke said this: "And with deteriorating ratings the tolerance for a show that’s struggling is just shorter than it’s ever been. So it’s frustrating for all of us that you can’t take the time to nurture a show and grow the audience as much as you might want to."

Wait. What?

In the hyper-competitive world of television, the track record for doing the opposite of nurturing -- that is, creating shows and canceling them -- has been hovering around the plus-80 percent range for years. It just hasn't worked out as a programming philosophy. Meaning, constant turnover driven by panic is not the answer. But it was Salke's answer. And there's part of me that completely gets what she's thinking. People have an overwhelming number of options out there. If they reject what you give them, you have to make the tough call and start over from scratch.

Seems flippantly reasonable.

And yet, patience and nurturing is in the NBC DNA. It's what helped build the network from the dregs into first place long ago (and more currently, it's what helped rebuild CBS). There's a history of patience at the Peacock. From Hill Street Blues to Seinfeld, from Friday Night Lights to 30 Rock. And, making Salke's statement particularly bizarre is that NBC had a session on the schedules later in the day for a series that instills a bunch of pride in the network. A series that Greenblatt rightly says deserves Emmy recognition: Parenthood.

That's a series that will go into its fifth season in September. Parenthood is coming off arguably its best season -- certainly one that fueled countless critics to rave about it and even go on Twitter to talk about how emotionally draining (tear everywhere!) it is to watch. Emmy snubs? Sure - in lots of categories.

And yet, Parenthood would not be on the air unless NBC was patient and nurtured it. A season hasn't gone by where Parenthood wasn't on the bubble to be axed. You don't panel a series going into its fifth season unless you're incredibly proud of it for surviving and being great even when most people have not been paying attention.

So, what was that again about tolerance for struggling shows being shorter in these difficult times?

But here's an important asterisk: A truly successful network -- hello, CBS! -- doesn't have to nurture anything. It doesn't have to be empathetic. It has the luxury to be patient if it wants to but also the license to weed out the weak. And that's its prerogative. A failing network must use patience as a strategy. Next time you're at dinner with Uncle Les Moonves from CBS, make him tell you the story about Everybody Loves Raymond again -- he loves that one. And do you know why? Because being patient with Raymond changed CBS's fate.

Now, let's be clear here -- NBC is a failing network. It fought ABC in a bloody death match last season for last place and luckily found third place by the slimmest of margins. The only smart tool in its tool box right now is patience.

Yes, you could make the argument that NBC has been patient with its Thursday night comedies for years and what did it get them? (Well, other than some Emmys and about the only loyal fans in the NBC stratosphere, probably not much else that will look good on paper.)

But being patient doesn't mean being stupid. If a network invests in a show that doesn't grow in two or three seasons, sure, it's probably time. But if everything else isn't growing on the network, it's probably time for a new network president as well. The art is picking the right show to be patient with when you're also finding shows that become immediate hits. If you just plow under your fields every year, you're not unlucky. You're a bad farmer.

Which brings us to the two shows I mentioned liking at the top. The first is The Blacklist, a new drama starring James Spader. It has tons of potential and the pilot was a lot of fun. The other show is The Michael J. Fox Show, a fall comedy that also has a lot of potential. Plus a beloved star. In many ways, you can't take your eyes off of either Spader or Fox, and that's generally a good sign. If those shows can be hits right out of the box, then it makes being patient with something else that much easier for Salke and Greenblatt.

So Salke is wrong to say you can't be patient. In fact, you must be patient. That you can't take the time to nurture a show is ludicrous. When you're stuck in the kind of ultra competitive TV landscape as that which pervades the industry right now, saying you can't be patient because viewers can't find you is a mistake. They probably haven't found you because they haven't had the time to find you yet. Shows need a chance. More than ever they need to be nurtured -- and that takes patience.

I'm willing to give Salke the benefit of the doubt. It's no fun to sit up there at TCA and answer questions about why the wheels have come off of your car. Sometimes you just say stuff without thinking. You say stuff maybe you don't even believe. The words just come out. Hell, I'm willing to even gloss over the fact that Salke said it was critical to support Hannibal and critical to support its creator Bryan Fuller, and thus that's why Hannibal is coming back. As if NBC was exercising, you know, patience -- when the network seems to have put Hannibal on without much support, seemed to forget the show was even on for a while and seemed very uncommitted to saving it until the pounding passion of the zeitgeist (and the fact Fuller had other options) prompted a renewal. Look, it doesn't matter how you express patience. Being patient by accident works too.

So here's to The Blacklist and The Michael J. Fox show being instant successes, so that NBC can be tolerant of the slow build.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/bastard-machine/nbcs-jennifer-salke-no-time-594435
post #88575 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'The Blacklist' Producers Insist the Show Isn't 'Silence of the Lambs'
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 27, 2013

EP Jon Bokenkamp called the show a "strange hybrid" of procedural and serialized drama, noting each week will feature different criminals that the FBI may not have known even existed. "There's opportunity to have fun with the various people involved in crime in ways we haven't seen before. Each week different criminal but the reason you come back to the show are the people and the secrets that they have and what's happening at home," he said. "In most procedural-type shows you don't go home; you stay in the bullpen. … Here it's essential we go home and … meet these people."

Buddy cop show, criminal-of-the-week and serial killers? Inconceivable! Instant skip from me.

And it doesn't matter how they try and spin it the show sounds exactly like any other procedural. In this show they go home? Wow, I have never ever seen that before in any USA, TNT or other network CotW show. It's easy to remember those scenes because they are usually the worst aspect of the shows in question. rolleyes.gif

I've had my fill of double act cop shows. I'm only watching The Bridge because it has the potential to break away from that trope.
post #88576 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
NBC Announces Hillary Clinton Miniseries, New 'Rosemary's Baby' and 'Tommyknockers'
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com Team - Jul. 27, 2013

The network also plans a new version of Stephen King's "The Tommyknockers." Greenblatt acknowledged it was partly in response to the success of CBS's adaptation of King's "Under the Dome."

Excellent, because the first version wasn't mediocre enough now NBC are following the example set by an even more bland and badly produced King translation on CBS.

Next thing you know NBC will be digging in the archive of lazy ideas to remake Ironside ...
post #88577 of 93835
TV Notes
'Unforgettable' hopes title is true as it returns to CBS
'Unforgettable,' starring Poppy Montgomery as a detective with a perfect memory, is back with a new approach after being canceled.
By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times - Jul. 27, 2013

NEW YORK — CBS' brooding procedural "Unforgettable" of 2011-2012 featured a detective with a mind so uncanny no memory ever truly disappeared.

It's a fitting premise.

After canceling "Unforgettable" at the end of the 2012 season, CBS is now bringing it back, believing a recognizable name and familiar characters can sell a show with a new setup, tone and schedule. When the debut episode airs on Sunday, it will pose a fraught question: In this age of "Arrested Development"-style reprisals, can a network successfully take a mulligan?

"What became increasingly clear to us after we canceled 'Unforgettable' is that it made a very strong impression on fans," said CBS president of entertainment Nina Tassler. "So we decided to give it a second chance.

"Unforgettable" has a Hollywood back story as twisty as a prime-time plot. Developed by CBS and Sony Pictures Television as a drama about Carrie Wells, a detective with the mixed blessing of perfect memory, the network passed on the series in 2010 when it couldn't find a suitable lead actress.

Most passes don't get another shot, but after producers were able to cast former "Without a Trace" star Poppy Montgomery a year later, CBS gave the series the greenlight. The network debuted the show in 2011 to strong numbers — it regularly pulled in an audience of 12 million viewers. But ratings dipped toward the end of the season and CBS executives, citing a strong crop of pilots, canceled the show.

After an aborted attempt by Sony to sell the show to a cable network, creators thought it dead. "We were sitting at home not expecting anything," said executive producer Ed Redlich. "And then a call came out of the blue."

CBS had wanted more original scripted programming to go with its big summer bet, the adaptation of Stephen King's "Under the Dome, and had rung Redlich and fellow executive producer John Bellucci. Grateful at the second chance, the pair and their team hammered out what was essentially "Unforgettable 2.0": lighter, breezier, more action-oriented. Rather than Montgomery's Carrie and partner Al (Dylan Walsh) solving grisly murders in outerborough New York, they'd investigate less forensic crimes — bank robberies, hostage situations — in a federal unit in Manhattan. "We knew," said Tassler, "the show could be bigger than Queens."

Writers also removed the haunting arc of the first season in which Carrie grapples with her sister's long-unsolved murder, and made her generally less burdened by her ability to recall every last painful moment. "We decided to have fun with her gift a little more," Redlich said. "I'm not sure we did enough of that in the first season." (Incidentally, Carrie's gift/affliction is similar to that carried by Marilu Henner, who serves as a consultant on the show.)

But true to form, there was another obstacle: Montgomery was now pregnant and would be in her third trimester as shooting was set to begin. She gamely agreed to start production barely a month after she would give birth, doing action scenes even as she recovered from labor.

"It's been a good way to get back into shape," said the actress, taking a break between takes on set. "But it also helps to have 19 red-haired [stunt] doubles of me running around," the ginger-haired Aussie laughed.

Still, the pregnancy meant shooting would need to be delayed by two months, forcing the show to debut at the end of July instead of early June — and five of its 13-episode order to be displaced to an as-yet undetermined place on the schedule.

But despite the challenges, the show's principals think they have a winning formula.

On location at a Brooklyn banquet hall overlooking the East River last week, that formula was on display. Amid extras dressed in SWAT uniforms, Montgomery brandished her weapon and used charm and steadfastness to talk down a post-traumatic-stress-afflicted former Army officer threatening hostages. "We can still be intense sometimes," she said, smiling to a reporter.

Whether audiences will respond to these new episodes is an open question. Despite its appealing star and recognizable name, "Unforgettable" is in the tricky position of trying to win back a fan base that may well have forgotten about the series in the 14 months it's been gone — and with episodes far different from the originals. (With the long-running murdered-sister story line scratched, for instance, the season is composed mostly of self-contained episodes and features no larger arc, a la early "Law & Order.")

And series comebacks are generally trickier than they appear, in part because new episodes, no matter how strong, must contend with fans' nostalgia about the quality of the original — see under: Netflix's Arrested Development."
But CBS hopes the quality of its creative team (Redlich and Bellucci also worked on "Without a Trace") and the size of the initial fan base can overcome these obstacles. "What we have faith in is the track record of our show runners and our concept," Tassler said. "And," she added, "other networks have current shows on the air that do lower numbers than 'Unforgettable.'"

'UNFORGETTABLE'
Where: CBS
When: 9 p.m. Sunday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-unforgettable-cbs-return-20130727,0,7877871.story
post #88578 of 93835
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 28, 2013

UNFORGETTABLE
CBS, 9:00 p.m. ET
SERIES RETURN:
Yet another series that has returned from the dead, this Poppy Montgomery crime series was canceled by CBS, then eventually given a reprieve, and orders for new episodes, once its global popularity was factored in and costs were amortized and adjusted. So here comes the start of Season 2, with Poppy’s I-remember-everything heroine transferred to a new investigative unit. Fans of this series can pick up where they left off – if they remember back that far.

THE KILLING
AMC, 9:00 p.m. ET

This is the show’s penultimate installment of the season. And sure enough, we’re at the point where both cops realize they’ve made terrible mistakes in judgment, and where we’re still supposed to be confused about the identity of the actual killer. That’s true, at least, regarding Ray Seward (Peter Sarsgaard), who’s in his last day of life on death row, still proclaiming his innocence, while Linden (Mireille Enos) just became less certain of it.

DEXTER
Showtime, 9:00 p.m. ET

Last week, while Dexter (Michael C. Hall) was Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
driving, Debra (Jennifer Carpenter) grabbed the wheel and ran them both into the bay, where they almost drowned, but didn’t. Now they’re both back on the job, but that watery detour may have made their sibling relationship even more complicated.
This is the first episode of the season I haven’t previewed in advance, so I don’t know what happens next. But I’m hoping for more Dr. Vogel, less Debra. I’m just saying.

THE NEWSROOM
HBO, 10:00 p.m. ET

This episode hands Jeff Daniels a clever extended scene to play as Will McAvoy, as he tries to intervene personally to stave off the latest crisis. But there’s yet another crisis brewing, one that won’t be so easy to handle.

RAY DONOVAN
Showtime, 10:00 p.m. ET

Liev Schreiber continues to juggle his work life (as a fixer for Hollywood bigwigs, most of them jerks) and home life (especially his ex-con father, played by Jon Voight, an absolute jerk), in ways suggesting he’s much better at the former than the latter. At least for now.[/size]

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #88579 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Here's a clue for not being the "bastard child":

Instead of lazy, derivative shows full of stupid people doing silly things.
While I totally agree with the sentiments, I always find myself wondering just what specific shows you and others put in this category. I watch a lot of shows for a lot of different reasons. I assume some fall into this category, but I still enjoy them, sometimes I just want an hour of mindless entertainment.
post #88580 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

While I totally agree with the sentiments, I always find myself wondering just what specific shows you and others put in this category. I watch a lot of shows for a lot of different reasons. I assume some fall into this category, but I still enjoy them, sometimes I just want an hour of mindless entertainment.

Yeah, I love Family Guy too smile.gif
post #88581 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonwolf615 View Post



Yeah, I love Family Guy too smile.gif

Funny, but that's not what I was thinking. wink.gif

The list of the shows he and others are talking about is always subjective, but I'm still curious how many shows I watch, and enjoy, are on "the list". I've given up on quite a few of the "new" summer series and believe the networks are barking up the wrong tree if they think that kind of stuff will allow them to mimic cablenet's ~13-week seasons. Such short seasons work because the quality is generally there and there are enough niche viewers to pacify advertisers. Let's face it, Justify, Sons of Anarchy and Hell On Wheels are not for everyone. smile.gif

Eidt: Forgot to mention I don't watch Family Guy because my wife doesn't like it and it usually conflicts with something else I'd rather watch.
post #88582 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

While I totally agree with the sentiments, I always find myself wondering just what specific shows you and others put in this category. I watch a lot of shows for a lot of different reasons. I assume some fall into this category, but I still enjoy them, sometimes I just want an hour of mindless entertainment.
For one, all the remakes out there. While some have worked, NBC is the laziest with them, with Knight Rider being the king. I expect Ironside to be no different.

Next is all the copycat reality shows all trying to be the next Survivor or American Idol. Granted, cable is full of that crap, too, but there are a few cable channels that mostly avoid that stuff and have some of the most well recognized shows out there.

Then you have spinoffs...and spinoffs of the spinoffs. Granted, CBS is king of those, but NBC isn't free of guilt here.

Finally, you have all the high concept and low content shows out there that advertise themselves solely on the merits of the over sized production team. From The Event to V (which was also a remake) to Terra Nova, you have shows that have way too many hands in the stew and way too few good writers. The result? A concept that goes nowhere but to mid-season cancellation.

Instead, we get silly stuff that somehow nets viewers, like Revolution or The Following - then the network wonders why they don't have a high profile Emmy recognized drama in the mix.

This all doesn't even take into account NBC's mess surrounding Jay Leno that will likely happen again - which caused them to dump the one show that could have been an Emmy contender if given time to thrive: Southland.
post #88583 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'The Blacklist' Producers Insist the Show Isn't 'Silence of the Lambs'
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 27, 2013

Producers of NBC's buzzy freshman drama The Blacklist used their platform Saturday at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour to downplay any similarities that may exist between their crime thriller and Silence of the Lambs.

The Blacklist kicks off when the world's most-wanted criminal (James Spader as Raymond "Red" Reddington) mysteriously turns himself in and offers to give up everyone he has ever worked with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Buddy cop show, criminal-of-the-week and serial killers? Inconceivable! Instant skip from me.

And it doesn't matter how they try and spin it the show sounds exactly like any other procedural. In this show they go home? Wow, I have never ever seen that before in any USA, TNT or other network CotW show. It's easy to remember those scenes because they are usually the worst aspect of the shows in question. rolleyes.gif

I've had my fill of double act cop shows. I'm only watching The Bridge because it has the potential to break away from that trope.
Me I look forward to a smart Cop show & love the casting (James Spader plays a wacko , I'm in ! smile.gif )
I never get tried of a well written Cop show . Hopefully this will as good or better than what's on cable in Cop shows . biggrin.gif
post #88584 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastslappy View Post

Me I look forward to a smart Cop show & love the casting (James Spader plays a wacko , I'm in ! smile.gif )
I never get tried of a well written Cop show . Hopefully this will as good or better than what's on cable in Cop shows . biggrin.gif

The pool of "smart" cop shows on TV is minute in comparison to the cookie-cutter generic procedurals on the air. That's why Hollywood is now consistently looking to Europe for any attempt at originality or depth.

The majority of network viewers don't want smart. They want easily predictable and formulaic that they don't have to think about 58 minutes later. And knowing that is why television is saturated with them. Each network just trying to steal the same viewers from each other, because being the same is easy. 20 identical cop shows and 10 singing and dancing competitions is now the pinnacle of programming creativity.
post #88585 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

For one, all the remakes out there. While some have worked, NBC is the laziest with them, with Knight Rider being the king. I expect Ironside to be no different.

Next is all the copycat reality shows all trying to be the next Survivor or American Idol. Granted, cable is full of that crap, too, but there are a few cable channels that mostly avoid that stuff and have some of the most well recognized shows out there.

Then you have spinoffs...and spinoffs of the spinoffs. Granted, CBS is king of those, but NBC isn't free of guilt here.

Finally, you have all the high concept and low content shows out there that advertise themselves solely on the merits of the over sized production team. From The Event to V (which was also a remake) to Terra Nova, you have shows that have way too many hands in the stew and way too few good writers. The result? A concept that goes nowhere but to mid-season cancellation.

Instead, we get silly stuff that somehow nets viewers, like Revolution or The Following - then the network wonders why they don't have a high profile Emmy recognized drama in the mix.

This all doesn't even take into account NBC's mess surrounding Jay Leno that will likely happen again - which caused them to dump the one show that could have been an Emmy contender if given time to thrive: Southland.
I can't believe how much I agree with you.

The remakes have been terrible, as have the comics-to-TV shows. While I enjoyed Smallville and enjoy Arrow, they could have been so much more.

Don't have much more to say about the reality stuff, except that I don't even like the originals there. I guess I got burned out with The Ted Mack Original Amateur Hour when I was a kid. smile.gif

I don't know how many spinoffs I actually watch. I'm a fan of NCIS and watch :LA, but I can see that even NCIS needs to revamp the writing. I watched the CSI spinoffs, but never really cared for them and even gave up on the original when Fishburne joined the cast. I don't think I've liked any of the sitcom spinoffs, but I do have a short memory. I'd actually have to reserach spinoffs to comment accurately on those.

And I completely agree about high concept/low content stuff. In the case of Revolution and The Following specifically, I think they had enough ideas to sell the project, but ran out of gas after that. It's almost like they weren't prepared to get picked up and had to scramble. I don't even remember The Event, but "V" was probably the biggest disappointment because I expected them to get it right the second time. I don't know what to say about Terra Nova. I expected them to focus more on building a new world rather than the same old conflicts. Some shows like that I watch just for the scenery, but even that was lacking. There's more scenery in Cedar Cove on Hallmark.

I'm also bummed that Southland didn't make it, but that's just the way it is. I gave up trying to figure out the viewing public and the people that make the decisions to cancel quality shows. I understand the economics of pricing themselves out of the market (NCIS next?), etc., but it doesn't seem like a show like Southland would have cost that much. Unfortunately, we rarely get the full story of why shows get cancelled.
post #88586 of 93835
SATURDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #88587 of 93835
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
ReelzChannel Unveils ‘JFK: The Smoking Gun,’ ‘The Capones,’ ‘Hollywood Hillbillies’
By The Deadline.com Team - Jul. 27, 2013

Ray Richmond contributes to Deadline’s TV coverage.

Cable’s ReelzChannel announced three new original programs this morning at TCA — one JFK-themed documentary and a pair of unscripted series, along with a second season of the workplace docuseries Beverly Hills Pawn — premiering Nov. 6. The new originals include:

– JFK: The Smoking Gun, an investigative doc premiering Nov. 3 that’s based on the forensic work of veteran police detective Colin McLaren and his cold-case look into the Kennedy assassination in advance of its 50th anniversary. It purports to finally “solve” the case and reveal the identity of a second shooter in addition to Lee Harvey Oswald.

– The Capones (premiering Nov, 9), following the goings-on at a family-run restaurant called Capone’s Restaurtant and Pizzeria headed by Dom Capone.

– Hollywood Hillbillies (premiering January 2014), chronicling the antics of Internet superstars Michael “The Angry Ginger,” his “Mema” and Aunt Dee Dee in their move from rural Georgia to Hollywood.

ReelzChannel was put on the map by its acquisition and airing of the 2011 original miniseries The Kennedys, which won four Emmys. It starred Greg Kinnear, Barry Pepper, Katie Holmes and Tom Wilkinson.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/tca-reelzchannel-jfk-the-smoking-gun-the-capones-hollywood-hillbillies/

* * * *

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
“Good Time” To Be Director In TV, Says DGA Prez & FX Series Helmers

It’s long been a truism of entertainment that film is a director’s medium and television a writer’s medium. But a distinguished group of directors for FX original series gathered for an afternoon panel to TCA to insist that this is no longer the case and that directors have a greater influence on the set — and ultimately on the finished product — than ever before. So agreed a gathering headed by DGA president Paris Barclay (who works on Sons of Anarchy) and also featured Michael Dinner (Justified), Randall Eimhorn (Wilfred), Alfonso Gomez-Rejomn (American Horror Story), Gwyneth Horder-Payton (The Bridge), Dan Sackheim (The Americans) and Jeff and Jackie Schaffer (The League). Barclay confirmed at the outset that “this is a damned good time to be a director in television.” Why? Because directors in TV command greater respect and are permitted creative challenges once thought the exclusive domain of the writer. “In the world that we live in at FX, there’s now a major contribution that directors provide,” he maintained. “A good script really helps, of course. But even if it isn’t so good, we can move in and save the baby. In this brave new world, we’re making little movies.” Jackie Schaffer built on that “little movies” model when she pointed out that TV’s distribution model via Netflix and Hulu and the Internet “has turned television into a more lasting medium and given what we do as directors more of a lasting resonance. And thank God for that.”

Indeed, in the new Golden Age of TV Drama, Dinner believes that the director’s continues to escalate in importance. “Television has grown, just in the past few years, more ambitious, more cinematic,” he said. He credits Michael Mann and his work with Miami Vice in the mid-1980s for helping to launch TV directing away from its previous cookie-cutter approach, where directors were simply hired guns tasked to fulfill the writer’s vision. “I think people are starting to recognize how much more important we’ve become to the process,” Dinner emphasized. He shared that he often gets phone calls from his directing friends on the feature side asking how they can do what he’s doing on TV, demonstrating just how full circle things have traveled. “They’re frustrated in features because they things take forever and they don’t get to work,” Dinner explained, “Directors need to be able to direct. And you get that opportunity in television.” However, directors still can’t simply insert their own singular vision into a series, particularly when so many freelancers typically are used over the course of a season on a series. “You can put a piece of yourself in, but you need to have respect for what got the show there. And the thing is, TV is really hard. You have to make decisions very quickly.” That’s the down side.

The digital age also has helped to change the director’s job in television for the better. Barclay points out how not having to cut and begin scenes scenes nearly as often, and can let the film and tape roll, alters the game. He shared about how he has gone 14 straight minutes on Sons of Anarchy without cutting, allowing actors to do several simultaneous takes without losing their edge and momentum. “It makes for a more efficient production,” he said, “and that allows us to do our jobs as directors better.”

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/tca-fx-directors-tv-dga-paris-barclay/
post #88588 of 93835
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Bachelorette (120 min.)
10:01PM - Mistresses
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Neil Patrick Harris; MLB player Clayton Kershaw; Pepper performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - How I Met Your Mother
(R - Feb. 18)
8:30PM - Mike & Molly
(R - Mar. 18)
9PM - 2 Broke Girls
(R - Nov. 26)
9:30PM - Mike & Molly
(R - Apr. 29)
10PM - Under the Dome
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Denzel Washington; James McCartney performs)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Singer Courtney Love)

NBC:
8PM - America Ninja Warrior
9PM - Get Out Alive With Bear Grylls
10PM - Siberia
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Kristen Bell; Jake Johnson; Phillip Phillips performs)
12:36AM - Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (Mark Wahlberg; Poppy Montgomery; The Virgins perform; J Mascis performs with The Roots)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (David Duchovny; director Derek Cianfrance; Gold Fields perform)
(R - Mar. 28)

FOX:
8PM - Raising Hope
(R - Nov. 8)
8:30PM - Raising Hope
(R - Nov. 29)
9PM - New Girl
(R - Apr. 9)
9:30PM - The Mindy Project
(R - Mar. 19)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Vintage Richmond
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Biloxi
(R - May. 9, 2011)
10PM - POV: Neurotypical

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque el Amor Manda
9PM - La Tempestad (Series Premiere)
10PM - Qué Bonito Amor

THE CW:
8PM - Hart of Dixie
(R - Jan. 29)
9PM - Breaking Pointe

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Dama y Obrero
9PM - Marido en Alquiler
10PM - El Señor de los Cielos

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Mark Leibovich)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Music group The Lumineers)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Eric McCormack; Mitchie Brusco; Franz Ferdinand)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Lisa Kudrow; Brad Wollack; Jen Kirkman; Gary Valentine)
post #88589 of 93835
RE Ironside:
Quote:
The producers said the show is about 10 percent flashbacks, which would have made it impossible to use special effects to make a paraplegic actor appear to walk. In the original 1960s series, Raymond Burr played Ironside

So how will they explain the change of race?
post #88590 of 93835
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

RE Ironside:
So how will they explain the change of race?
It's not like Ironside is a historical figure... they can make him any race they want to. I'm sure the flashbacks won't show Raymond Burr as Ironside. rolleyes.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information