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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2954

post #88591 of 93719
Wont be as good as Benny Hills:

post #88592 of 93719
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 29, 2013

THE SIMPSONS MOVIE
Fox Movie Channel, 8:00 p.m. ET

This 2007 full-length Simpsons cartoon film is a joy to watch no matter what you’re paying special attention to. This time, though, I’d like you to note that part of this plot has to do with the residents of Springfield being trapped under an impenetrable dome – years before Stephen King got around to the same idea with Under the Dome.

CARSON ON TCM
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

Tonight’s collection of Johnny Carson Tonight Show interviews, presented by Conan O’Brien, begins at 8 p.m. ET with a 1980 interview with Henry Fonda. Set your recorders for 3:30 a.m. ET, and you’ll be able to watch Fonda play the President of the United States in a riveting 1964 drama, Fail-Safe, opposite Larry Hagman. Meanwhile, other Carson interviews tonight are a 1992 chat with Elizabeth Taylor (at 8:12 p.m. ET), a 1974 conversation with Susan Sarandon (8:24 p.m. ET), a 1976 talk with William Holden (at 8:36 p.m. ET), and a 1980 visit with Goldie Hawn (at 8:48 p.m. ET).

UNDER THE DOME
CBS, 10:00 p.m. ET

This can’t be good: On tonight’s show, the inside-the-dome town’s water supply is compromised. Water they going to do now?

P.O.V.: "NEUROTYPICAL"
PBS, 10:00 p.m. ET

This week’s documentary provides the POV, or Point of View, of three people on different points on the autism spectrum. Paula is an adult, Nicholas is a teen, and Violet is four years old. How do they perceive, and deal with, their behavioral and perceptual differences? That’s one focus of this program, which also challenges viewers to redefine their concepts of “normal.” Check local listings.

THE WRITERS' ROOM
Sundance, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
Refreshingly, this new series from Sundance, hosted by Jim Rash and focusing each week TV writers from a different current series, is more informed discussion than fan fest. Where, say, AMC’s The Talking Dead feels more like a small-screen Comic-Con, this show is hosted by Community actor Jim Rash, who won an Oscar for writing The Descendants. Jess Cagle from Entertainment Weekly comes in at the end with a few final questions, but Rash holds court nicely throughout. The only complaint is that this discussion – tonight’s opener features Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan, the writing team and star Bryan Cranston – takes place on a mockup set, rather than on location in each show’s real writing rooms. Why not visit these writers in their natural habitat, which would, in and of itself, say a lot?


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #88593 of 93719
TV Notes
The South Rises Again ... on Cable
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - Jul. 28, 2013

The South has risen again -- on cable.

AMC's Georgia-based "The Walking Dead" is the most-watched cable series and the top-rated scripted show on all of television. A&E's "Duck Dynasty," based in Louisiana, is the second biggest cable show.

The rest of cable's top 20 includes the Southern-set "Swamp People" on History, "The Real Housewives of Atlanta" (the most popular show in Bravo's "Housewives" franchise) and Discovery's "Moonshiners."

Why the Southern success? Tax incentives have helped, even drawing shows that aren't set entirely below the Mason-Dixon line, like NBC's "Revolution" and Showtime's "Homeland."

And cable's search for new settings and protagonists has made the storied South a popular setting for shows that don't even film there, like FX's Kentucky-set "Justified" and HBO's Louisiana-based "True Blood." Both shoot mostly in Los Angeles.

"I'm glad to see a resurgence of shows taking place there and even more importantly, shows being shot there," said "Breaking Bad" creator Vince Gilligan, a Richmond, Va., native who named his New Mexico-set show for a Southern expression.

"It's the only part of the country that's known defeat, as they say. In the Civil War, it was the side that lost," he told TheWrap. "Which I think is a good thing, because it would be a shame if we had two countries now. But when you're from the South, you grow up with this feeling of loss or having lost, and that breeds some interesting writers. I think of Flannery O'Connor or William Faulker. It breeds an interesting point of view on the world. It breeds an interesting kind of gallows sense of humor.

(Click here to see the full Top 20 cable chart.)

"The South per capita has more than its fair share of eccentric types. And I mean that with all affection," said Gilligan. "The South is full of eccentrics."

The Southern shows drawing the most viewers tend to highlight rural, uncompromising people happy to get their hands dirty. They include the Robertsons of "Duck Dynasty," the alligator hunting "Swamp People" of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin and even the rifle and crossbow-wielding survivalists of "The Walking Dead."

Also read: 'Duck Dynasty' Clan Working on Christmas Album (They Already Have the Santa Beards)

"I love the South. I built my career on it," said Discovery executive vice president Dolores Gavin, who grew up near Boston but developed shows including "Moonshiners."

The rise of Southern shows are partly a response to people feeling trapped in city and suburban life, she told TheWrap. "It is a backlash to people feeling constrained. They get up in the morning, and they drive in a box, and then they work in a box, and then they drive home in a box. There's a disconnect from man's connection to the earth and what it really means to get dirt on your bare hands and produce something that you can be proud of."

As Paula Deen has reminded us this summer, the South also has a tortured racial legacy that has provided no shortage of drama. But the most popular Southern shows aren't about race, for the most part. One of the backwoods brothers on "The Walking Dead" is a bigot, but one cagey enough to keep his prejudices to himself when it will help him.

"Duck Dynasty," "Swamp People" and "Moonshiners" all portray self-reliant eccentrics (to say the least) who take care of their own without anyone's help. So do non-Southern shows in cable's Top 20, like "Gold Rush," and "Ax Men."

It isn't hard to find a link between self-reliance and skepticism of outside authorities. The South has a long history of resenting perceived slights by the federal government. But state governments are playing a big role in its rise.

Georgia, home of "The Walking Dead," offers among the most generous tax incentives anywhere, giving qualified productions a 20 percent tax credit on investments of $500,000 or more. Georgia also knows how to advertise: It gives an additional 10 percent credit to productions like "The Walking Dead" that embed a Georgia Entertainment Promotional logo -- complete with Georgia peach -- in their credits.

Film and TV jobs were responsible for 22.9 million jobs and $1.3 billion in wages in the state in 2011, the most recent year for which the Motion Picture Association of America keeps records.

Only three states earned more wages from film and TV productions -- California, which pulled in $17 billion in 2011; New York, which pulled $8.2 billion, and Texas, which earned $1.5 billion. Georgia's $1.3 billion tied it with Florida.

Of the top 20 broadcast shows, NBC's "Revolution" is the only one shot in the South. And broadcast shows shot in the South don't necessarily take place there.

"Revolution" takes place all over a dystopian future United States, and the series, shot in Wilmington, N.C., for most of its first season, is moving to Texas for Season 2.

Wilmington also hosts CBS's "Under the Dome," which takes place in an unspecified region (New England in the Stephen King book of the same name) and Fox's upcoming "Sleepy Hollow," named for a famous town in New York.

ABC's "Nashville" may be the most Southern broadcast show: It is a weekly advertisement for the city where it is filmed.

Once, even shows set in the South weren't necessarily shot there. "The Andy Griffith Show" was filmed on Los Angeles-area soundstages. ("Hee Haw" may have taken place in fictional Kornfield County, but at least it was shot in Nashville.)

As advertisers sought urban big spenders, TV characters moved to big cities. Andy Griffith gave way to Jerry Seinfeld. In the 1990s, Southern-set shows like "Dawson's Creek" stood out.

But reality TV has broadened our horizons. The South no longer seems far away now that "Survivor" has taken us to Borneo. And a northerner named Tony Soprano has made cable shows ever more willing to look for eccentric -- to say the least -- protagonists.

Gavin says the success of Southern shows isn't about city folk laughing at their country cousins. "Moonshiners" actually does best with Southern audiences. And anyone tuning in to laugh at backward rednecks will be surprised.

The "Duck Dynasty" Robertsons were millionaires even before the show, thanks to their duck calls. Gavin describes Will Hayden, star of Discovery's "Sons of Guns," as "a blue-collar genius." She notes that "Moonshiners" star Tim Smith needs a brilliant scientific and legal mind to make moonshine without breaking laws. Smith's partner, Tickle, is about to get his own spinoff.

"On the one hand he says things that just have you rolling on the floor laughing. And then he'll tell you something about the solar system that is unbelievable," Gavin said. "And then we'll have a researcher on set say, 'He was right.'"

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/south-rises-again-cable-106311
post #88594 of 93719
SUNDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
So-so return for CBS’s ‘Unforgettable’
Second-season premiere draws a 1.3 in 18-49s
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Jul. 29, 2013

People didn’t exactly forget about “Unforgettable,” CBS’s canceled-then-revived drama that returned for its second season last night.

But they weren’t exactly clamoring for the show, either.

“Unforgettable” drew a 1.3 adults 18-49 rating last night at 9 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, finishing third in its timeslot behind Univision’s “Amores Verdaderos” finale and Fox’s animated repeats.

Even so, “Unforgettable” improved significantly on the repeats of “The Good Wife” that had been airing in the timeslot.

The premiere rating was barely half the 2.9 “Unforgettable” earned in for its first-season bow nearly two years ago, which is not a surprise.

That debut aired during the regular season, which has much higher television viewing levels. And “Unforgettable” has also been on a hiatus of more than a year, which likely resulted in many viewers forgetting that it was coming back.

Meanwhile, elsewhere last night, the Spanish-language networks drew very strong ratings. “Amores” averaged a 1.7 for its two-hour ender from 8 to 10 p.m., winning its timeslot in its final hour with a 1.9. It finished as the night’s No. 2 show to CBS’s “Big Brother.”

And the three-hour season finale of Telemundo’s hit show “La Voz Kids” built from a 0.7 at 8 p.m. to a 1.2 at 10 p.m., winning its final hour, a real rarity for a Telemundo series.

CBS and Univision tied for first for the night among 18-49s, each with a 1.3 average overnight rating and a 4 share. Fox was third at 1.2/4, ABC fourth at 0.9/3, Telemundo fifth at 0.8/2 and NBC sixth at 0.7/2.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-eight percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 7 p.m. CBS was first with a 1.0 for “60 Minutes,” while ABC and Fox tied for second at 0.8, ABC for a repeat of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” and Fox for reruns of “American Dad” and “The Simpsons.” Univision was fourth with a 0.7 for “Noticiero Univision” and “Aqui y Ahora,” NBC fifth with a 0.6 for a repeat of “America’s Got Talent” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for the movie “The Spy Next Door.”

CBS extended its lead at 8 p.m. with a 2.2 for “Brother,” followed by Univision with a 1.5 for “Verdaderos.” Fox was third with a 1.4 for reruns of “The Simpsons” and “Bob’s Burgers,” ABC fourth with a 1.1 for “Celebrity Wife Swap,” NBC fifth with a 0.8 for more of its “Talent” rerun and Telemundo sixth with a 0.7 for “Voz.”

Univision moved to first at 9 p.m. with a 1.9 for more “Verdaderos,” with Fox second with a 1.6 for reruns of “Family Guy.” CBS was third with a 1.3 for “Unforgettable,” ABC fourth with a 1.1 for “Whodunnit,” Telemundo fifth with a 1.0 for more “Voz” and NBC fifth with a 0.7 for a repeat of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”

Telemundo took the lead at 10 p.m. with a 1.2 for the final hour of “Voz,” while Univision slipped to second with a 0.9 for “Sal y Pimienta.” CBS was third with a 0.7 for a repeat of “The Mentalist,” ABC fourth with a 0.6 for a repeat of “Castle” and NBC fifth with a 0.5 for “Crossing Lines.”

Among households, CBS was first for the night with a 4.3 average overnight rating and a 7 share. ABC was second at 2.0/4, NBC third at 1.9/3, Univision fourth at 1.6/3, Fox fifth at 1.5/3 and Telemundo sixth at 1.0/2.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/so-so-return-for-cbss-unforgettable/

* * * *

TV Notes
On ‘Hurricane Hunters,’ the Sandy story
Profile of the superstorm that swept up the East Coast last year
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Jul. 29, 2013

Officially hurricane season in the Atlantic has been underway since June. But unofficially it really ramps up at midsummer, when the conditions become more likely to produce the storms that wreak deadly havoc on the East Coast.

The most recent such storm, last year’s Hurricane Sandy, is profiled in tonight’s second-season finale of “Hurricane Hunters,” airing on the Weather Channel at 9 p.m.

The show follows the Air Force Reserve Squadron from Biloxi, Miss., which flies into hurricanes in order to gather meteorological data that is then passed to weather services.

It’s not a thrill-seeking mission. Weather services rely on this data to predict where storms will hit and when to send out hurricane watches and warnings.

The show’s finale serves as a precursor to Weather Channel’s Hurricane Week, which will kick off a week from tonight, providing a special look at forecasts for the remainder of hurricane season.

It may sound macabre to focus on such a deadly weather force, but Weather Channel gets a huge kick in ratings when hurricanes threaten to strike, and people really are interested in tracking them.

Last year on the Sunday before Sandy hit the East Coast, Weather Channel averaged 1.4 million total viewers for the day, becoming the most-watched cable news network, according to Nielsen.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/on-hurricane-hunters-sandys-story/
post #88596 of 93719
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
CBS CEO Les Moonves Talks ‘Big Brother,’ Netflix, Bob Greenblatt Comments
By AJ Marechal, Variety.com Team - Jul. 29, 2013

CBS CEO Les Moonves addressed the recent controversy surrounding “Big Brother” early on at the network’s TCA exec session, calling the racist and homophobic remarks aired on the reality skein “absolutely appalling.”

“What you see there is unfortunately reflective of what certain people feel in America,” the chief stated. “Obviously a lot of it makes us feel uncomfortable.”

He later added: “You don’t want wallflowers on reality shows. Does that lead to controversy? Absolutely.”

Overall, Moonves believes the network is handling the remarks “appropriately,” noting that CBS “did not comment on some of the racial things that were happening until it really affected what was going on in the household.”

Moonves, who subbed in for prez Nina Tassler at the exec sesh after personal circumstances barred her from attending the confab, remarked numerous times about Netflix and Amazon’s role in the changing media landscape, and emphasized that the Eye was “one of the first to do a deal with Netflix.” Presently, CBS has a deal with Amazon where episodes of the recently-renewed “Under the Dome” roll out on the streaming platform just four days after its broadcast on the network. While Amazon has not disclosed viewership numbers of “Dome” to CBS, Moonves said he ran into Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos recently in Sun Valley and that the exec remarked on how “pleased” the site is with “Dome’s” success.

Some internet commenters have already groaned about “Dome’s” renewal for another summer run, stating that the Stephen King drama appeared to have an end squarely in sight before CBS offered it a new episode order. Moonves noted, however, that a show like “Under the Dome” or forthcoming drama “Hostages” is not limited by its concept when it comes to having substantial, multi-season runs on the network.

“We didn’t put ‘Hostages’ on to only have 15 episodes,” Moonves said to the journos packed in the Beverly Hilton ballroom. “And ‘Under the Dome’ is in a lot of ways a soap opera…Why can’t there be more ‘Under the Dome’?”

“Under the Dome” has produced strong ratings returns for the Eye, but, as Bob Greenblatt noted during NBC’s exec session, it’s difficult for any broadcast network to gain serious traction in overall viewership given the evolution of TV viewing habits and the emergence of competitive digital platforms. Greenblatt even stated that “flat is the new up” when it comes to ratings. Moonves, however, had different sentiments.

“I don’t agree with that statement [from Greenblatt],” the CEO remarked. “We’re confident we’re going to be up this year. And I don’t think we’re the ‘bastard child’ of TV,” as Greenblatt had referred to the Big Four during his TCA conference.

“When you look at the totality of it, the numbers can be as big [as they were in the past],” Moonves noted. “They’re just coming from different places…The model is never dead. It’s just changing.” The CEO also said the “beginning of the end” for NBC arrived when the Peacock was unable to find a hit to replace “Friends” after it went off the air.

Moonves drew comparisons between broadcast and cable throughout his session, noting that the biz models for CBS versus Eye-owned pay TV net Showtime are very distinct and profitable in their own way. He sees Netflix and Amazon as integral to the success of cable dramas since the platforms help building followings for programs, and hopes to see that success translate to more heavily serialized, small batch CBS dramas in the future.

“I’m sure ‘Hostages’ will appear on Netflix and Amazon so people can catch up,” he said.

When it comes to Emmy nominations, however, which CBS did not strongly represent in this year, Moonves thinks “the broadcast nets don’t get respect.”

“They’re competing against some phenomenal cable programs. It’s hard to put ‘The Good Wife’ up against ‘Game of Thrones,’” which Moonves, a ‘Thrones’ fan himself, reminded journos it costs “three times as much to make” when compared to broadcast skeins. “The cable shows get a lot of attention for fewer numbers.”

When thrown a tough question about the profitability of the CW, Moonves admitted that as a network, the CW loses money, but that the shows produced by CBS and Warner Bros. bring in more revenue to make up for the losses, so the value is still present in the youth-skewing net.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/tca-cbs-ceo-les-moonves-talks-big-brother-netflix-bob-greenblatt-comments-1200569198/

* * * *

TV Notes
CBS Renews ‘Under The Dome’ For Summer 2014

CBS has offered a second run to Stephen King’s “Under the Dome,” and will roll out the 13 new episodes next summer.

King will pen the first episode of that 13-episode arc.

“We’re excited to tell more stories about the mystery of the dome and the secrets in Chester’s Mill, and are thrilled to have the master storyteller himself, Stephen King, tell the first one of next season,” said CBS Entertainment President Nina Tassler.

Drama has secured strong ratings for the Eye this summer, averaging just under 14 million viewers and a 3.5 in adults 18-49. Show has also shown significant lift in DVR playback and digital viewing options.

“Under the Dome” is produced by CBS Television Studios in association Amblin Television. Neal Baer, Stephen King, Justin Falvey, Darryl Frank, Stacey Snider, Jack Bender and Brian K. Vaughan, who wrote the television adaptation, are executive producers.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/tca-cbs-renews-under-the-dome-for-summer-2014-1200569182/
post #88597 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoilerJim View Post

I'm sure the flashbacks won't show Raymond Burr as Ironside. rolleyes.gif
You and I read the same story and came away with different interpretations.
post #88598 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

The pool of "smart" cop shows on TV is minute in comparison to the cookie-cutter generic procedurals on the air. That's why Hollywood is now consistently looking to Europe for any attempt at originality or depth.

The majority of network viewers don't want smart. They want easily predictable and formulaic that they don't have to think about 58 minutes later. And knowing that is why television is saturated with them. Each network just trying to steal the same viewers from each other, because being the same is easy. 20 identical cop shows and 10 singing and dancing competitions is now the pinnacle of programming creativity.
I'll give " The Blacklist " a chance , one thing about taking a chance on a network show is there is no reason to say " I wasted money on that show " maybe your time I'll agree , but I do give them a fair chance to win me over . I don't just assume it's gonna suck after some critic gives a bad pre-view smile.gif
as I gave " The Following " (this one sucks , great cast extremely poor writing) a fair chance to win me over ,it didn't ! mad.gif
I myself just don't assume every new Cop show is gonna suck , I do feel every new dance/talent show is gonna Suck Big Time thou eek.gif
yes a lot of the current network shows do suck & some don't , but that's why we have a choice .
As for majority of network viewers being there for just providing bland baby pablin to ingest in the moment , the net's have only themselves to blame on that issue as most smart viewers have moved on to the cable shows, the premium channels .
Upper management of the networks really needs a complete change up & start taking some risks . I feel the tried & true old producers should all be fired as well as the CEO that hired them biggrin.gif
post #88599 of 93719
Look, let's face it. High concept, serialized shows don't appeal to the lowest common denominator. But that's where the Big Four make their bones. Every time they try something different or more ambitious they get burned.

I'd say they deserve to waste away from indifference, but indifference isn't their problem. Make it dumb or repetitive enough for "broad appeal" and you'll attract enough glazed eyeballs to make a profit. The "smart kids" have migrated off to the niche cablenets with targeted programming, perhaps where they belong.
post #88600 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

RE Ironside:
So how will they explain the change of race?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoilerJim View Post

It's not like Ironside is a historical figure... they can make him any race they want to. I'm sure the flashbacks won't show Raymond Burr as Ironside. rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

You and I read the same story and came away with different interpretations.
I'm gonna watch this as it should be great for a laff , As I grew up watching Raymond Burr as Perry Mason pull it all together in the last seven minutes , I don't see Blair Underwood as a replacement for Burr , Underwood just don't have the chops to pull off the character that Burr could do just with a stare , a pause , handing the bailiff a new piece of evidence & then forcefully commanding that he had just solved the case .
" Ironside " was just a remake of Perry Mason in a wheelchair smile.gif
So this new " Ironsides" is a remake of a remake , it's gonna be a comedy in my book rolleyes.gif
Edited by Fastslappy - 7/29/13 at 1:15pm
post #88601 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TCA Summer 2013 Notes
CBS CEO Les Moonves Talks ‘Big Brother,’ Netflix, Bob Greenblatt Comments
By AJ Marechal, Variety.com Team - Jul. 29, 2013

“We didn’t put ‘Hostages’ on to only have 15 episodes,” Moonves said to the journos packed in the Beverly Hilton ballroom. “And ‘Under the Dome’ is in a lot of ways a soap opera…Why can’t there be more ‘Under the Dome’?”

Hostages is supposed to be just a 15 episode story and if CBS had stuck with that premise I would tune in, but like Dome it's another case of winging it on the backs of ratings and not having a solid end date to lead to.

Dome proves that CBS audience will watch anything, because it is easily one of the worst King adaptations and outside of that has some terrible acting, flat direction and nonsensical story elements. It makes Falling Skies look Oscar worthy.
post #88602 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Dome proves that CBS audience will watch anything, because it is easily one of the worst King adaptations and outside of that has some terrible acting, flat direction and nonsensical story elements. It makes Falling Skies look Oscar worthy.

That's sadly true. I was hoping for so much more from 'Under the Dome' because the book was a ripping-good yarn. But to do a proper adaptation, it would have to actually have an ending, as the book left no room for any kind of continuation. rolleyes.gif
post #88603 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Look, let's face it. High concept, serialized shows don't appeal to the lowest common denominator. But that's where the Big Four make their bones. Every time they try something different or more ambitious they get burned.

I'd say they deserve to waste away from indifference, but indifference isn't their problem. Make it dumb or repetitive enough for "broad appeal" and you'll attract enough glazed eyeballs to make a profit. The "smart kids" have migrated off to the niche cablenets with targeted programming, perhaps where they belong.
Please don't take this personally, but I don't understand the demeaning tone of this and some other recent posts. Just because you and some others don't agree with the decisions the networks make or what they decide to air, what makes them wrong and you right? I just don't get it. I hate sitcoms, but I don't demean those who watch them by calling them "the lowest common denominator". The same with reality shows, etc. I happen to enjoy Naked And Afraid, but that's not going to tempt me to try other reality shows. I enjoy some of Masterpiece Theater, but I sure wouldn't want a schedule full of British dramas. If I wanted that, I'd move to England. smile.gif

I also don't agree with the "dumb" label. Just because not everyone wants to throw themselves into riveting TV night after night, doesn't make shows dumb, maybe it just makes them entertaining. That's one of the great things about the DVR, it lets me watch what I'm in the mood for, even something as (presumably) dumb as reruns of Leave It To Beaver. The channel up/down button is also a great tool to avoid those dumb shows, but you know all that. The point is I'm quite sure our definitions of what's good differ, so how in the heck are networks supposed to please us both? They can't, so they play the numbers game and shows sink or swim based on the numbers.

I don't even know what you and others consider "high concept, serialized shows" because examples are rarely offered. I hope you realize the term is very subjective. smile.gif I'll grant you that there are many who limit their TV time and naturally want what they consider higher quality at those times, but many use TV as an escape, background noise, or even something as silly as family entertainment and maybe low concept serialized shows, like Eureka, do the trick for them. I guess I just have trouble envisioning what you and others believe would be a solid TV schedule devoid of shows that appeal to the lowest common denominator among us. I have no trouble finding enough to watch, but then I'm probably part of that common denominator. I will admit there are many shows that have been cancelled that I'd rather be able to watch than some of what I watch today, but there isn't much I can do about that since my tastes obviously don't mesh with enough others to keep the shows on the air. Unfortunately, it's all a big numbers game with a lot of factors and I'm convinced a lot of cancellations are caused by things like high production costs (especially salaries) rather than simply ratings. CBS makes a lot of money, but I get the feeling not many of their shows would survive if you and some others held the reins. smile.gif
post #88604 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Wont be as good as Benny Hills:

Love the guy in black face.
post #88605 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

That's sadly true. I was hoping for so much more from 'Under the Dome' because the book was a ripping-good yarn. But to do a proper adaptation, it would have to actually have an ending, as the book left no room for any kind of continuation. rolleyes.gif
That is one thing I can definitely agree with. Under The Dome should have been a limited run and they could have made it so much more than it's turning out to be. To me, a lot of shows are like video games, the play is basically the same, just the graphics change. I guess that's why so many pick on cop and doctor shows. I've always lamented the demise of the mini-series for that reason. They take a good book that would have made a great mini-series and turn it into a so-so (at best) serial that goes on until the numbers just don't add up anymore. Unlike movie producers, TV producers just can't tell a story in a finite timeframe, they go on and on until they get the axe, dreaming up storylines that are oh so easy to spot.
post #88606 of 93719
Just calling 'em like I see 'em DD. My point was if it's not a cop/doc procedural it's not likely to make it as a scripted drama on broadcast TV. If it's not a soap opera, then a serialized drama has virtually no chance. The exceptions are rare ('Revolution' and 'The Following' for example, although they're not even close to the cream of the genre's crop).

Every time they try something new and different, especially if it has a sci-fi theme or undertone, it fails. 'Under the Dome' is succeeding (as a summer fill-in), but I submit that if they were doing a straight by-the-book adaptation, it probably wouldn't. Broadcast networks must, by definition, appeal to a broad audience. And that audience doesn't typically have the patience or attention span for top-notch, serialized television drama. That's just the way it is.
post #88607 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

You and I read the same story and came away with different interpretations.
Honestly didn't realize it was a book if that is what you mean by the "story"? Was the character of Ironside writing so that he could only be portrayed by a Caucasian actor?
post #88608 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Please don't take this personally, but I don't understand the demeaning tone of this and some other recent posts. Just because you and some others don't agree with the decisions the networks make or what they decide to air, what makes them wrong and you right? I just don't get it. I hate sitcoms, but I don't demean those who watch them by calling them "the lowest common denominator". The same with reality shows, etc. I happen to enjoy Naked And Afraid, but that's not going to tempt me to try other reality shows. I enjoy some of Masterpiece Theater, but I sure wouldn't want a schedule full of British dramas. If I wanted that, I'd move to England. smile.gif

I also don't agree with the "dumb" label. Just because not everyone wants to throw themselves into riveting TV night after night, doesn't make shows dumb, maybe it just makes them entertaining. That's one of the great things about the DVR, it lets me watch what I'm in the mood for, even something as (presumably) dumb as reruns of Leave It To Beaver. The channel up/down button is also a great tool to avoid those dumb shows, but you know all that. The point is I'm quite sure our definitions of what's good differ, so how in the heck are networks supposed to please us both? They can't, so they play the numbers game and shows sink or swim based on the numbers.

I don't even know what you and others consider "high concept, serialized shows" because examples are rarely offered. I hope you realize the term is very subjective. smile.gif I'll grant you that there are many who limit their TV time and naturally want what they consider higher quality at those times, but many use TV as an escape, background noise, or even something as silly as family entertainment and maybe low concept serialized shows, like Eureka, do the trick for them. I guess I just have trouble envisioning what you and others believe would be a solid TV schedule devoid of shows that appeal to the lowest common denominator among us. I have no trouble finding enough to watch, but then I'm probably part of that common denominator. I will admit there are many shows that have been cancelled that I'd rather be able to watch than some of what I watch today, but there isn't much I can do about that since my tastes obviously don't mesh with enough others to keep the shows on the air. Unfortunately, it's all a big numbers game with a lot of factors and I'm convinced a lot of cancellations are caused by things like high production costs (especially salaries) rather than simply ratings. CBS makes a lot of money, but I get the feeling not many of their shows would survive if you and some others held the reins. smile.gif
Yeah, take me for example... I have two advanced degrees and enjoy "highfalutin" shows AND Big Brother. Talk about lowest common denominators. Go figure. smile.gif

By the way, speaking of Leave it to Beaver, Lumpy Rutherford died recently.
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The one show I am actually interested in seeing next season is the remake of Shogun. I loved the original but it looks fairly dated and cheesy now. So I'm actually conflicted. It's another remake from the Department of No Ideas but if they gave it a real cinematic treatment like The Last Samurai then it would be quite epic.

Of course it's network TV so I expect "cinematic" and "epic" to be replaced by "bland" and "idiotic."

Plus it has an actual end date and a limited run, so no stretching the premise for ratings.
post #88610 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

The one show I am actually interested in seeing next season is the remake of Shogun. I loved the original but it looks fairly dated and cheesy now. So I'm actually conflicted. It's another remake from the Department of No Ideas but if they gave it a real cinematic treatment like The Last Samurai then it would be quite epic.

Of course it's network TV so I expect "cinematic" and "epic" to be replaced by "bland" and "idiotic."

Plus it has an actual end date and a limited run, so no stretching the premise for ratings.
What a shame, if it was on FX it might have a good chance of being worth watching.
post #88611 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Just calling 'em like I see 'em DD. My point was if it's not a cop/doc procedural it's not likely to make it as a scripted drama on broadcast TV. If it's not a soap opera, then a serialized drama has virtually no chance. The exceptions are rare ('Revolution' and 'The Following' for example, although they're not even close to the cream of the genre's crop).

Every time they try something new and different, especially if it has a sci-fi theme or undertone, it fails. 'Under the Dome' is succeeding (as a summer fill-in), but I submit that if they were doing a straight by-the-book adaptation, it probably wouldn't. Broadcast networks must, by definition, appeal to a broad audience. And that audience doesn't typically have the patience or attention span for top-notch, serialized television drama. That's just the way it is.

I can appreciate the appealling to the masses belief, I tend to agree. I just think the term "lowest common denominator" is usually demeaning, at least in my experience when talking about things like education, even though I know what you mean. I'm not sure what to make of Under The Dome yet, and didn't read the book, but I don't see it as anything other than a limited run summer series.

Anyway, I do find it interesting that you think both Revolution and The Following are exceptions while I see them as just more of the same old. The Following, in particular, while good, is stll a cop show and I find Kevin Bacon's acting pretty much the same as any of his other roles. IMHO, James Purefoy is the only reason it lasted and got renewed. Revolution is different, but it's still that cop/military genre and I don't think it's as good as Falling Skies. 24 was different, but that only lasts so long before it gets stale, or at least the writing begins to fail. Unfortunately, even Falling Skies wears thin because there is never an ending like there is in the movies. I think it's awfully hard to come up with a story that will resonate on network TV unless it has cops, doctors or lawyers. Grimm, Nashville, Once Upon A Tme, Revenge, and Scandal are some examples, but when you get right down to it, they all have the same elements as cop shows, just without the uniforms or dull suits. And while Blue Bloods, Rookie Blue, Elementary, NCIS, etc., are all cop shows, I find them totally different. But then, those are the kinds of books I read too, so I can't get enough of the genre. smile.gif

You are certainly right about Sci-Fi though. We flock to theaters to see sci-fi, but for some reason we reject it on TV. I think that's because they just don't know how to do sci-fi on the small screen or in an extended format. WB tries, but they cater mostly to teens or those of us who will watch just about any sci-fi because there is so little of it NBC has some success with Grimm and ABC with Once Upon A Time, but even though aren't what I consider sci-fi. Take away the graphics in Grimm and it boils down to just another cop show, a good one for me, but still..........

Now, I think part of the problem is what network TV is intended to be, not necessarily the networks themselves. Unless we accept network TV just like cable TV, not much is going to change. Many people do not want network TV to be as gritty as cable TV. They want family-safe while complaining all the time that the shows are not real enough, etc. Well, we can't have it both ways. Look at all the flack NYPD Blue took and it was one of the best TV shows ever. Shows like Justify would not make it simply because of the vocal minority would scream bloody murder and the networks/advertisers would cave. So, networks don't dare experiment too much until the masses are ready to accept cable TV-like realism.

BTW, do you think Downton Abbey would succeed on network TV, other than PBS? And even on PBS, is it really succeeding? I know Mastrpiece Theater is a faavorite on PBS, but I haven't followed how it matches up with the other network's fare.
Edited by DoubleDAZ - 7/29/13 at 6:36pm
post #88612 of 93719
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

I'm not sure what to make of Under The Dome yet, and didn't read the book, but I don't see it as anything other than a limited run summer series.

It's really nothing like the book, which I quite enjoyed. They ret-conned nearly everything except the characters' names. Oh, and there's a dome.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ 
Anyway, I do find it interesting that you think both Revolution and The Following are exceptions while I see them as just more of the same old.

You misunderstand. I think they're only exceptional in that they seem to have succeeded at garnering high enough ratings to be renewed. That makes them different from other serialized dramas on broadcast. I don't think either is particularly good compared to other serialized dramas on cablenets. You mentioned 'Justified'; that's a good example. For my money, 'Breaking Bad' is the best thing on TV at the moment. 'The Americans' is right up there too. It almost seems "criminal" to get to see those kind of shows for free. I almost feel I ought to be buying a ticket.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ 
BTW, do you think Downton Abbey would succeed on network TV, other than PBS? And even on PBS, is it really succeeding?

Beats me; never seen it. But from what I read, PBS is very happy with it and it seems to have been extended far beyond the normal lifespan of a typical British drama. Love their philosophy of doing a great show, telling (and finishing) their story, and getting the heck off the stage so somebody else can have a go.
Edited by archiguy - 7/29/13 at 6:56pm
post #88613 of 93719
TV/Business Notes
CBS And Time Warner Cable Fail To Reach Agreement, But Stations Stay Up For Now
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jul. 29, 2013

The fight is on. Time Warner Cable says that tonight it will drop CBS-owned stations in New York, Los, Angeles, and Dallas as well as Showtime, TMC, Flix and Smithsonian in all of its systems. It calls CBS’ price demands “out of line and unfair.” It adds that “Switching is not the answer; sooner or later CBS will threaten others and go dark, just as they have with DISH in the past and with us today.”

The dispute centers on the amount of the monthly fee that TWC pays for each subscriber who receives programming from the stations that CBS owns. The companies haven’t discussed proposals in detail, but RBC Capital Markets’ David Bank says the broadcaster was lobbying for as much as $2 per subscriber each month, more than twice the current rate the cable company pays. CBS chief Les Moonves has promised investors that he’ll collect higher fees from pay TV distributors to help offset the $3.6B the network spends each year for its content. The CEO has predicted that CBS will collect $500M in 2015 from pay TV fees, rising to about $1B by 2017. But TWC chief Glenn Britt is leading the cable industry’s effort to hold down skyrocketing programming costs which are cutting into TWC’s profit margins, and, if unchecked, could inspire widespread cord cutting. “People are starting to pay attention to the fact that the multichannel TV package, the big package which is in 90% of the homes, is starting to get too expensive for lower-income people,” he told analysts last month.

CBS will feel its pain from the black out right away as it sees ratings and ad dollars fall. TWC accounts for about 19% of WCBS’ New York area viewers, 37% of KCBS’ audience around Los Angeles, and 25% of KTVT’s market in Dallas, according to data from SNL Kagan. But time doesn’t appear to be on TWC’s side. Football fans will clamber to see NFL games on the network when the season begins in September. Viewer anger will intensify once the fall primetime schedule kicks in. Meanwhile Charter Communications and its leading shareholder, Liberty Media’s John Malone, are circling for an opportunity to make a bid for TWC. Britt is cool to the idea. But he just announced that he will step aside when his contract expires at the end of 2013.

Here’s the statement from Time Warner Cable:

The outrageous demands for fees by CBS Corporation have forced Time Warner Cable to remove several of its networks and broadcast stations from our customers’ lineups. As of midnight ET, Time Warner Cable customers in New York City, Dallas and Los Angeles will no longer receive their local CBS broadcast stations. In addition, we have been forced to remove Showtime, TMC, Flix and Smithsonian from our lineups across the country. We offered to pay reasonable increases, but CBS’s demands are out of line and unfair – and they want Time Warner Cable to pay more than others pay for the same programming.

Fortunately, CBS programming is still available free online at cbs.com and over the air with an antenna. Showtime subscribers can watch some programming at sho.com. For more information on other ways to watch these shows, customers should visit www.twcconversations.com. We regret any inconvenience caused by the CBS/Showtime blackout, and we’re working hard to restore the programming at a reasonable price. Switching is not the answer; sooner or later CBS will threaten others and go dark, just as they have with DISH in the past and with us today. We thank our customers for their patience, and we hope to resolve this situation soon.


UPDATE: Hold on. Time Warner Cable now says that “At the request of CBS, we have halted going dark on their channels.” WCBS is still on in the TWC system in New York. CBS says that the companies “have agreed to continue discussions” — shortly after it accused TWC of being “incapable of accepting the concept that the value of a company’s programming should be in line with its popularity.”

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/cbs-time-warner-cable-retransmission-consent/
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TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'Hostages' Panel Promises It Will Answer the Pilot's Central Question
By Jethro Nededog, TheWrap.com - Jul. 29, 2013

Will the surgeon and suburban mother assigned to operate on the president in fact kill him to save her family being held hostage?

That's the central question on CBS's new drama series, "The Hostages." But, upon viewing the pilot -- spoiler alert! -- the question isn't quite answered. Rather, she takes "Option C" as one producer at Monday's Television Critics Assn. press tour referred to the decision Toni Collette's Dr. Ellen Sanders makes in the pilot.

So, how do you stretch the idea of a family being held hostage in a house for 15 episodes and avoid what AMC's "The Killing" did when it peeved off viewers by not solving its central question of "Who killed Rosie Larson?"

"The Hostages" executive producer Jeffrey Nachmanoff provides some wiggle room for the series.

"'Hostages' is a metaphor," he said. He would also reveal that Episode 2 finds Ellen's family back on the outside.

We're no longer sure if "The Killing" curse still lingers with the viewers, but it clearly still resonates with reporters who in one way or another asked the same question: Will you resolve the conflict the drama series is based on during Season 1? It seems limiting to hold all dramas to that rule, but the producers continue to answer the question.

In responding, Nachmanoff refers to his fondness for the suspense of Alfred Hitchcock and its influence on the series.

"It's a cat and mouse tale," he said. "We want to give the audience that feeling and that drive of suspense. Suspense is a little different from surprise in that we're not making a horror film, but you feel on edge because you don't how it's going to play out."

"We know what he wants, we know what she wants," executive producer Rick Eid interjected. "The two trains are on a collision track and it's kind of fun and surprising when we put a switcher in right before they collide."

"We're not going to shy away from the dilemma," he would later say.

"The mission doesn't change, the goal we set in the pilot doesn't change," executive producer Jonathan Littman added. "It's the journey getting there."

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/tca-hostages-panel-promises-it-will-answer-pilots-central-question-106666

* * * *

TV Notes
Arsenio Hall's Late-Night Strategy? 'I Just Have to Be Better Than One Cat That's Out There'

Arsenio Hall doesn't seem overly worried about taking on late night's heavy hitters with the Sept. 9 return of his own late night talk show, "The Arsenio Hall Show."

Going against Jimmy Kimmel, David Letterman and Jay Leno as he hands off to Jimmy Fallon, Hall explained how he intends to thrive.

First, find those viewers who don't already have a favorite. "I know that not everybody has a late-night host," Hall told reporters at a Television Critics Association panel on Monday.

Second, try to get viewers who will tune in two or hopefully three nights a week.

"You have people who come up to you and say, 'I'm your biggest fan. I watch you every night, man!' and that's not true," the host said. "Your biggest fan doesn't watch you every night. He may watch you three nights and then two nights he'll watch other people. You just want to offer a good, fun show and you're serving a unique personality that's not there so that you'll just be in the game."

"I just want to be in the game," he continued. "I just have to be better than one cat that's there."

How does he plan to do that? Hall said he's still the same host he was two decades ago -- except for some aesthetic changes. "Less hair, no shoulder pads, kind of the same guy," he said.

Executive producer Neal Kendall said Hall's show may be the best place to not only hear music, but hear performers talk. Hall had very good luck attracting the most popular acts of the '90s, and let loose with them in interviews. (They included future president Bill Clinton, who famously played the saxophone on the show).

From CBS Television Distribution, the syndicated "The Arsenio Hall Show" is scheduled to air on more than 200 channels nationwide.

Hall already has one person in late night lending him a hand. While they were fierce competitors back in the day ("When you're in competition, it's easier to hate each other," Hall said), the host is now good friends with Leno.

In fact, last August when "The Tonight Show" had to cut 20 percent of its budget and was undergoing layoffs, Leno recommended some of his former writers to Hall.

"I hired them, too," Hall said.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/tca-arsenio-halls-late-night-strategy-i-just-have-be-better-one-106736
post #88615 of 93719
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'The Good Wife' Bosses Call Anthony Weiner and Edward Snowden Scandals a Gift
By Philiana Ng, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 29, 2013

The Good Wife isn't afraid to go headlong into the "shitstorm."

When CBS' critical darling ended its last season, Alicia (Julianna Margulies) was planning her exit from Lockhart Gardner with fellow associate Cary (Matt Czuchry). At Monday afternoon's Television Critics Association press tour session, reporters were presented with a first look at a scene in which Alicia is confronted by the firm's partners about fourth-year associates possibly defecting, not knowing that she was a part of that.

The decision to depict the calm before the storm was intentional on the part of executive producers Robert and Michelle King. "We really want to get the audience wet with this difficulty of betraying your firm," Robert King told reporters.

In fact, they spoke to people in the industry to provide context to the situation portrayed on the show, which hits its landmark (Robert King hints that it will be a "blowout") 100th episode this season. "We've been interviewing a lot of partners in agencies — and not just law firms — about what it's like when they leave and take clients, and it's a shitstorm. What we want is the quiet before the shitstorm."

"I think [Alicia]'s leaving the law firm because she knows if she stays there, in her peripheral vision [there] will always be Will (Josh Charles)," Margulies said, "and she can't move forward with her commitment to saying yes to being first lady of Illinois as long as her and Will are working together. I think in her heart of hearts, she thinks that's the smart move."
Margulies admitted that her "heart sank" when she read the season-four finale script, believing that the person who would appear at her door would be her sometimes lover Will. So when she found out it was Cary she was pleasantly surprised. "It was always going to be going for the professional and intentionally going for the misdirect," Michelle King said of the pivotal season-ending scene.

The Good Wife is known for incorporating real-life headlines and scandals in the political sphere into its episodes and arcs. With the Anthony Weiner "sexting" scandal resurfacing amid his bid for New York City mayor and the Edward Snowden/NSA situation (Robert King called it "fascinating" and said it provides a framework for the season), Margulies and the Kings admitted that they are the gifts "that keep on giving."

Robert King hinted that one of the big themes that will be explored will be whether sexual dalliance increases with power. "Does he find himself tempted?" Robert King asked, referring to Alicia's husband, Peter (Chris Noth), the recently crowned governor of Illinois, noting that new addition Melissa George will play an integral part in answering that question.

Returning to a position of power will be an intriguing journey for Alicia, and glimpses of how she will handle her new stature "started seeping in a little bit" last year. "It is incredibly provocative to be in a powerful situation," Margulies said. "She's very aware she's choosing a slippery slope. She isn't quite aware of this eruption that's about to happen because of the war she's causing at Lockhart Gardner."

Though The Good Wife has gathered a bevy of key guest players, the Kings affirmed that season five will be more centered on the core characters. "It's more about our team, not about the guest stars coming," Robert King said.

Carrie Preston, Gary Cole and America Ferrera will all return in the new season, with George, Juliet Rylance, Ben Rappaport and Jeffrey Tambor joining.

The Good Wife returns Sept. 29 at 9 p.m. on CBS.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/good-wife-bosses-call-anthony-594993

* * * *

TV Notes
'The Crazy Ones' at TCA: Product Placement, Ad-Libbing and Taming Robin Williams
By Michael O'Connell, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Jul. 29, 2013

To see Robin Williams riff onstage at Monday's Television Critics Association press tour -- or anywhere for that matter -- one would wonder about how easily his energy and fondness for improv might be contained on the set of a single-camera sitcom.

But the cast and executive producers of CBS' half-hour vehicle for the actor, The Crazy Ones, were adamant that the iconic comedian has been sticking to the script.

"He says my words pretty perfectly and then he uses his," said creator David E. Kelley. "He very much likes the box. He manages the box, and then we give him a few takes where he gets to break out of it. The architecture of the script is mainly the script, but you've got ad-libbing."

"People forget that Robin is a Juilliard-trained, Oscar-winning actor," said ep and pilot director Jason Winer. "His number one goal is to make his scene partner look good."
Williams' co-stars Sarah Michelle Gellar and James Wolk echoed the eps, saying that he was more concerned with them participating in the alternate takes than himself. And the trio's many unused moments will be used in weekly outtakes that will air after the episodes -- as they do in the pilot.

The star also emphasized that off-the-wall comedy would take a backseat to creating a relatable group of people. "You have to establish a character that people will buy into," said Williams. "Even in Mork and Mindy, I think they bought the innocence of the character."

Aside from the spectacle of Williams appearing without a script -- tangents included Anthony Weiner, several lines of Spanish and waking up in bed with a clown -- one of the most-discussed subjects on the panel the heavy presence of McDonalds in the pilot. The Crazy Ones, which finds Williams and Gellar playing a father and daughter in a company business, takes place in the world of advertising.

"McDonalds sort of organically made its way into the series," said Winer, who added that the chain was a client of advertising exec and Kelley's inspiration John Montgomery. "Using a brand is exciting because it makes the world seem more authentic. So far no money has exchanged hands. McDonalds did not pay anything for a role in the pilot, nor did they have approval for how they were portrayed."

Gellar, who says she landed the role after "stalking" both Williams and Kelly, got one of the bigger laughs of the afternoon when she briefly opened up about the demanding schedule of her short-lived CW series, Ringer -- where she played two characters.

"I don't think I really thought that whole twin thing through," she said. "'Yeah, I can handle that with children.' That was not my smartest day."

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/crazy-at-tca-product-placement-594991
post #88616 of 93719
Business Notes
‘The Simpsons’ Eyed for Billion-Dollar Cable Syndication Sale
By AJ Marechal, Variety.com - Jul. 29, 2013

“The Simpsons” may be headed to cable for the first time, as Twentieth Century Fox TV’s syndie arm plans to shop the toon’s vast library to cable nets in the near future.

A source confirmed to Variety that 20th TV is eyeing cable syndication deals that would not affect the existing syndication deals with TV stations already established for the Matt Groening comedy, which currently is 24 seasons deep on Fox. TV Guide first reported the potential sale.

With 500+ episodes of “The Simpsons” stocked up in 20th TV’s library, the move to cable would be a lucrative and long-awaited transition for the series that could bring in excess of $1 billion for News Corp. given each episode could cost a cable buyer over $1 million.

Another News Corp. cable net, FX Networks, is a likely buyer, perhaps for its comedy sibling net FXX. But Turner Broadcasting and Viacom could also be looking to buy the property.

However, unlike most syndication deals, the “Simpsons”-cable syndication does not spell doom for the program as a whole.

A source at Fox tells Variety that the net has no plans in the near term to cancel the animated skein, leaving “The Simpsons” potentially syndicated on both broadcast and cable, while still rolling out new episodes on Fox.

“The Simpsons,” which debuted on Fox in 1989, has been syndicated on exclusively broadcast TV stations since the early ’90s.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/the-simpsons-eyed-for-billion-dollar-cable-syndication-sale-1200569238/
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TV Notes
The CW renews 'Whose Line Is It Anyway?'
By Daniel Fineberg, HitFix.com - Jul. 29, 2013

Continuing a morning of unsurprising renewal news, The CW has ordered a second season for the resurrected summer smash "Whose Line Is It Anyway?"

The CW renewal announcement came just hours after CBS renewed one of the summer's other breakout hits, the Stephen King-based drama "Under the Dome."

The "Whose Line" renewal has been a foregone conclusion since the sketch comedy returned two weeks ago with a whopping 2.9 million viewers, making it The CW's most watched Tuesday 8 p.m. show in nearly five years. The second episode stayed above 2 million viewers, still a rousing success by both summer and CW standards.

"It’s clear that viewers are as excited to have ‘Whose Line’ back on the air as we are," blurbs CW President Mark Pedowitz. "We have wanted to bring comedy back to The CW for a long time, and Aisha, Wayne, Colin and Ryan have brought funny to the network in a big way. We’re very excited to have them back for another season."

The renewal is for 24 new half-hour "Whose Line" episodes. The CW originally resurrected the improvisational comedy series with a much more restrained 10-episode order.

ABC ran "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" from 1998 through 2004 to wildly varying amounts of success. Ryan Stiles, Wayne Brady and Colin Mochrie have all returned for the CW incarnation, with Aisha Tyler hosting.

http://www.hitfix.com/news/the-cw-renews-whose-line-is-it-anyway
post #88618 of 93719
TCA Summer 2013 Notes
'Homeland' homes in on third season
By Gary Levin, USA Today - Jul. 29, 2013

Brody Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
is missing.

The third season of Showtime's Homeland begins Sept. 29, and picks up exactly where it left off: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
After an explosion rocked a memorial service at the CIA, soldier-turned-terrorist Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis) splits for parts unknown, prompting a teary farewell with Claire Danes' addled analyst Carrie Mathison.

Lewis does not appear in early episodes.
And Carrie is, as usual, in a fragile state.

"Carrie is always sitting on her own personal ticking bomb," Danes says. "It's pretty weak in the beginning; she's gone off her meds for all sorts of reasons. It's an impossible dilemma because she's not great on the meds and she's even worse off of them."

Saul (Mandy Patinkin) is acting head of the CIA (now that the former one is dead), and testifying before Congress about the attack.

"One of the themes of Season 3 is the cost of being an intelligence officer," says executive producer Alex Gansa. "As a result of the attack last year, the CIA is itself on trial. If the CIA can't protect itself, how can it be expected to protect the country? Saul is confronted with that very question. He's been quite comfortable sitting on the sidelines," Gansa says. But now, "the man who is loath to make decisions is now forced to make the most important ones of his life."

As for Carrie, she's "been in isolation for much of the season," says Danes.

"She does feel a certain level of betrayal and enormous amount of guilt for this devastating bomb, this loss," Gansa says, compounded by a now-contentious relationship with her mentor and protector Saul. "Even though they're estranged from each other, they are very deeply connected. They experienced the trauma in a way no one else has."

Danes says she was "flattered" by Anne Hathaway's spot-on cry-face parody of Carrie on Saturday Night Live. She was in Toronto with husband Hugh Dancy, who stars in NBC's Hannibal, and worried when Hathaway began texting and sending her flowers. "It's all in good fun," she says, pleased that "we're cool enough to be made fun of."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/07/29/showtime-homeland-claire-danes/2597909/

* * * *

TV Notes
Motherhood gets put to the test in CBS' 'Mom'
By Bill Keveney, USA Today - Jul. 29, 2013

Maternal love expresses itself in unusual ways in CBS'Mom.

Anna Faris stars in the new Chuck Lorre sitcom (Sept. 23) as Christy, a newly sober mother of two whose life becomes more complicated with the re-appearance of her estranged mother, Bonnie (Allison Janney), a recovering alcoholic.

"This is a story that's very meaningful to me because it's about starting your life over again, repairing the damage you've done," says co-creator Lorre, speaking today at the Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif.

In the past, Lorre, the man behind The Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men and Mike & Molly, tried to explore that topic from a female perspective with Grace Under Fire and Cybill, although his tenure on each was short-lived.

In Mom, Faris' Christy is a waitress at a Napa Valley restaurant who is in a relationship with her married boss, Gabriel (Nate Corddry). French Stewart plays the hot-tempered chef, Rudy.

Upcoming guest stars include Octavia Spencer, who will play a woman with bigger problems than Christy, and Justin Long, who will play Christy's love interest, Lorre says. "He is going to be her first shot at a meaningful relationship in this new chapter of her life."

Faris says people will understand how Christy and Bonnie get along – or not.

"The mother-daughter relationship is very relatable" on the show, she says. "She's my biggest champion and harshest critic."

Janney says she will have her real-life mother's support, even if she doesn't embrace the edgier aspects of the show.

"There's some subject matter that we deal with and ways we deal with it that my mother will be uncomfortable with," she says. "She'll watch it and she'll love it, but she'll have issues."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/07/29/motherhood-gets-put-to-the-test-in-cbs/2597769/
post #88619 of 93719
TV Notes
USA Moves ‘Summer Camp’ To Mondays 11 PM
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Jul. 29, 2013

EXCLUSIVE: Three weeks into its run, USA Network’s new unscripted series Summer Camp is being relocated from its Thursday 8 PM time slot to Mondays 11 PM beginning August 5. There, the show will follow USA’s juggernaut WWE Raw.

Summer Camp got off to a slow start, drawing 1.1 million viewers for its July 11 premiere. That was a little better than the debut of USA’s other new unscripted series, The Moment, which pulled 950,000 in its April debut. (That show was eventually relocated to Fridays). But Summer Camp fared far better in the younger demos (661,000 adults 18-49, up 86%, 422,000 in 18-34, up 215%), leading to USA’s decision to give the show a shot in a different slot.

USA is getting behind Summer Camp’s move to Mondays — on Aug. 5, host Matt Rodgers and contestant Brooke will be featured on Raw. The network brass are hoping that the sizable Raw audience will stick for Summer Camp as the two programs have similar young median ages (36.3 for Summer Camp, 40.9 for Raw). Raw packs some two million adults 18-49 and one million adults 18-34 in the 10-11 PM hour leading to Summer Camp.

Meanwhile, Summer Camp has indicated it might perform better later in the the night — its 11PM encore on July 25 out-delivered the 8PM premiere by 17% in 18-49 and by 9% in 18-34 and was nearly 7 years younger.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/07/usa-moves-summer-camp-to-mondays-11-pm/
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Nielsen Notes (Late Night)
Solid bows for Fox’s new Saturday shows
By Media Life Magazine Staff - Jul. 29, 2013

Fox’s foray into late-night animation is off to a solid start.

The network’s two new 15-minute animated series, “Axe Cop” and “High School USA,” combined to average a 0.5 rating among viewers 18-49 from 11 to 11:30 p.m. on Saturday night, according to Nielsen overnights.

That was up 67 percent from the network’s previous summer timeslot average, which consisted of regionalized content.

The two shows also averaged 1.5 million total viewers, up 50 percent from the 1.0 million Fox had been averaging in the timeslot.

Fox notes that this falls in line with the numbers Adult Swim typically brings in on a given night. For example, the cable network’s show “Children’s Hospital” averaged a 0.6 among 18-49s in its most recent season.

Speaking of Adult Swim, the cable channel stealthily “welcomed” its new competition Saturday night by buying spots across a number of affiliates during and after the new programs that invited viewers to check out its own programming. Because the buys were made locally, Fox was not alerted to the ads in advance.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/solid-bows-for-foxs-new-saturday-shows/
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