or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2988

post #89611 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen Notes
Nielsen says 38% of Americans use Netflix
By Gary Levin, USA Today - Sep. 18, 2013

It's no surprise that more folks are streaming movies and "binge-watching" shows on Internet-based sites like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon. But a new study from Nielsen out Wednesday tries to measure just how prevalent so-called "over-the-top" services that don't rely on cable or satellite TV have become.

Though precise viewership data is kept secret by those companies, a July survey of 2,000 consumers, half of whom use Netflix, allowed Nielsen to venture some estimates:

• 38% of Americans "use or subscribe" to Netflix, up from 31% last year, although Netflix claims only about 30 million subscribing households.

• 18% use Hulu, up from 12% last year, with 12% saying they use the free version and 6% using the subscription-based Hulu Plus.

• And 13% said they use Amazon Prime Instant Video, nearly double the 7% who said so last year.

The study also found 88% of Netflix users reported watching three or more episodes of a TV show in a single day, and 45% said they watch original series on streaming services, such as Netflix's Emmy-nominated House of Cards.

Among Netflix users, 48% watch on a computer screen (up from 44% last year); 23% watch on a smartphone (up from 11%); 15% watch on their iPad, way up from 5% last year. But the percentage of users who reported using Roku or Nintendo's Wii game console dropped this year, reflecting the declining popularity of those devices.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/09/18/netflix-hulu-amazon-nielsen-viewership-data/2831535/

Does that mean only 14% are watching on a streaming device/TV? If that's the case, we should go back to 19" and 25" TVs.
post #89612 of 93710
Now that his show been on for a few weeks, although not on at the same time nightly on a consistent basis, how's Olbermann's ratings doing?
post #89613 of 93710
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
FRIDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Last Man Standing (Season Premiere)
8:30PM - The Neighbors (Season Premiere)
9PM - Shark Tank (Season Premiere)
10PM - 20/20
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Simon Cowell; TV show host Stacy Keibler; Gary Clark Jr. performs)
(R - Sep. 10)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - Undercover Boss: Boston Market
(R - Feb. 1)
9PM - Hawaii Five-0
(R - May 20)
10PM - Blue Bloods
(R - May 10)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Billy Crystal; Sheryl Crow performs)
(R - Sep. 10)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Neil Patrick Harris)

NBC:
8PM - Betty White's Off Their Rockers
(R - Feb. 26)
8:30PM - Betty White's Off Their Rockers
(R - Mar 5)
9PM - Dateline NBC (120 min.)
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Jimmy Fallon; mentalist Lior Suchard; Billy Currington performs)
12:36AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (James Spader; model Kate Upton; photographer Neal Preston; chef Ilan Hall)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Comic Deon Cole; "Dirty Wars''; Kimbra performs)
(R - Jun. 5)

FOX:
8PM - Bones
(R - Sep. 16)
9PM - Sleepy Hollow
(R - Sep. 16)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Washington Week
8:30PM - Charlie Rose: The Week
9PM - Great Performances - The Hollow Crown: Richard II (Three hours)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque el Amor Manda
9PM - Amores Verdaderos
10PM - Qué Bonito Amor

THE CW:
8PM - Perfect Score
8:30PM - Perfect Score
(R - Aug. 23)
9PM - America's Next Top Model

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Dama y Obrero
9PM - Marido en Alquiler
10PM - Santa Diabla

HBO:
10PM - Real Time with Bill Maher (LIVE; Billy Crystal; filmmaker Jeremy Seifert; comic Joy Behar; journalist David Frum; journalist Chris Hayes)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Tim Gunn; comic Moshe Kasher; comic Chris Farah; comic Chris Franjola)
(R - Sep. 12)
post #89614 of 93710
TV Notes
BBC America’s ‘Copper’ Cancelled After Two Seasons
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Sep. 19, 2013

There will be no third season for BBC’s period drama Copper, whose second-season finale this Sunday will be a series finale. Copper, BBC America‘s first original scripted series, got off to a strong start, setting a record for a BBC America series premiere. But, despite a cast infusion with Donal Logue and Alfre Woodard joining the series in Season 2, Copper lost momentum and was overshadowed by BBC America’s second drama series, the buzzy Orphan Black.

“Copper has been a fascinating and exciting experience for everyone involved,” said BBC America GM Perry Simon. “The opportunity to work with (executive producers) Tom Fontana, Barry Levinson, Will Rokos, Thomas Kelly and the extraordinary cast and crew on this journey is one that we are extremely proud of. Their vision to re-tell the immigrant experience through the melting pot of New York City was an original and fresh idea that melded well with the essence of BBC America’s programming. After 23 episodes, with Lincoln dead and the nation starting to heal, it seems a fitting moment to conclude this American story.”

http://www.deadline.com/2013/09/bbc-americas-copper-cancelled-after-two-seasons/
post #89615 of 93710
TV Sports/Business Notes
Mayweather-Canelo Fight Sets TV Pay-Per-View Record
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Sep. 19, 2013

Saturday’s fight between Floyd Mayweather and Saul “Canelo” Alvarez packed quite the punch in and out of the ring, setting a record for pay-per-view income with nearly $150 million in revenue reported to date.

The bout, which was titled “The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo” for its Showtime pay-per-view airing, generated a projected 2.2 million buys, according to preliminary reports from distributors.

The previous pay-per-view record was held by the 2007 fight between Mayweather and Oscar de la Hoya, which pulled in $136 million. That bout still holds the record for buys with 2.48 million, though when all is said and done, Saturday’s fight could surpass that.

The pay-per-view card also included a fight between Philadelphia boxer Danny “Swift” Garcia and Lucas “The Machine” Matthysse of Argentina.

Both the Mayweather-Canejo fight and the Garcia-Matthysse bout will air on Showtime on Sept. 21 at 9 p.m.

Mayweather was guaranteed a record $41.5 million for the fight, with Alvarez receiving $5 million.

http://www.thewrap.com/mayweather-canelo-fight-sets-tv-pay-per-view-record/
post #89616 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
BBC America’s ‘Copper’ Cancelled After Two Seasons
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Sep. 19, 2013

There will be no third season for BBC’s period drama Copper, whose second-season finale this Sunday will be a series finale. Copper, BBC America‘s first original scripted series, got off to a strong start, setting a record for a BBC America series premiere. But, despite a cast infusion with Donal Logue and Alfre Woodard joining the series in Season 2, Copper lost momentum and was overshadowed by BBC America’s second drama series, the buzzy Orphan Black.

“Copper has been a fascinating and exciting experience for everyone involved,” said BBC America GM Perry Simon. “The opportunity to work with (executive producers) Tom Fontana, Barry Levinson, Will Rokos, Thomas Kelly and the extraordinary cast and crew on this journey is one that we are extremely proud of. Their vision to re-tell the immigrant experience through the melting pot of New York City was an original and fresh idea that melded well with the essence of BBC America’s programming. After 23 episodes, with Lincoln dead and the nation starting to heal, it seems a fitting moment to conclude this American story.”

http://www.deadline.com/2013/09/bbc-americas-copper-cancelled-after-two-seasons/
It lost momentum with me also. Although I watched the entire first season, I quickly ran out of gas this second season. Too much TV, too little time...
post #89617 of 93710
Emmy/Critic's Notes
Emmys Seldom Blaze Trails
By Brian Lowry, Variety.com - Sep. 19, 2013

TV reporters are often out of their element when covering their own medium. So when one approached seeking a talking head to discuss “How Emmy nominations for Netflix have changed television,” they had it almost exactly wrong.

The Emmys don’t change TV, but rather — at key moments, anyway — can reflect how the industry is changing. They’re less about blazing trails then following them.

Whether or not “House of Cards” represented the year’s best series, the political drama starring Kevin Spacey clearly marked a step up for Web-delivered content in terms of ambition and buzz — a further indication that lines separating such programming from traditional TV are increasingly blurry and arbitrary.

Yet historically, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, which presents the awards, has a mixed track record regarding such trends. Simply put, voters are usually quick to identify significant new programs and recognize them with noms, but slow to take the bigger leap and let them walk away a winner.

For a time this translated to whatever would be the opposite of a sophomore jinx. Programs like “NYPD Blue” and “ER” — which took the industry by storm and invigorated the TV drama in the mid-1990s — were each showered with nominations in their first year, but didn’t actually win until their second. The same held true for the NBC comedy “Will & Grace” — groundbreaking in its portrayal of a gay leading character — two years after Ellen DeGeneres’ coming-out, in real life and on her eponymous ABC sitcom, was largely overlooked.

The next year the trophy went to another second-year comedy with long cultural legs, “Sex and the City.”

HBO’s other titan of that period, “The Sopranos” — perhaps one of the most influential programs in establishing cable’s growing influence — didn’t actually win the drama prize until its fifth season in 2004 (and again three years later). Then again, the show towered above a fellow HBO drama, “The Wire,” which earned a mere pair of nods (both for writing) and never won despite how widely it’s admired within the industry.

While the Emmys have often been slower to honor new programs than, say, the Golden Globes, there’s a certain logic to this prove-it-to-me attitude. TV, after all, is about repetition, about proving a good pilot can actually be replicated, and then for years beyond that.

Still, with the pace of the culture accelerating and TV storytelling becoming ever more intricate, the Emmys seem to be reflecting some of that sped-up metabolism. Perhaps that explains how “Mad Men,” “Modern Family” and last year “Homeland” could win in their first seasons, even if the first two held onto their crowns for multiple years thereafter.

Given how competitive some of these categories are, just being invited to the party as a nominee makes a statement (as Netflix has) that a show or service has earned a seat at the big kid’s table. As the acad’s awards guru, John Leverence, noted in TV Guide, cable became eligible for Emmy consideration 25 years ago and didn’t earn its first major honors (for movies “Stalin” and “Barbarians at the Gate”) until about five years later — roughly the same amount of time it’s taken for a Web series to make the cut since rules were amended to admit them in 2008.

Although the Emmys have been prone to follow trends, the academy has usually managed to get its act together. Despite perceptions the organization is a bit stodgy, it does appear slightly more sensitive to such shifts than it was in the past.

Then again, in a Web culture that thrives on a good argument and perceived “snubs,” who ultimately wins at the Emmys is often less interesting — and celebrated — than who didn’t.

And that, at least, seems unlikely to change.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/emmys-seldom-blaze-trails-1200615582/
post #89618 of 93710
Obituary
Hiroshi Yamauchi, Who Ran Nintendo for 53 Years, Dies at 85
By Robert Fenner & Takashi Amano, Bloomberg.com - Sep. 20, 2013

Hiroshi Yamauchi, who ran Nintendo Co. or 53 years and became Japan’s richest man with help from a mustachioed plumber named Mario, has died. He was 85.

Yamauchi passed away yesterday, Kyoto-based Nintendo said in an e-mailed statement. He was Nintendo’s second-largest shareholder with about 10 percent of the stock, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, and was the principal owner of the Seattle Mariners baseball team.

The great-grandson of Nintendo’s founder led the company from 1949 to 2002, transforming a maker of Japanese playing cards into the world’s biggest producer of video games on the back of hits including Mario, Zelda and Donkey Kong. He handed the reins to current president Satoru Iwata as he moved into an advisory role for three years.

“Yamauchi made the game industry what it is now,” Haruhiro Tsujimoto, president of game maker Capcom Co., said in an interview at the Tokyo Game Show today. “I appreciate his achievement.”

At the start of 1992, the year after the release of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, the company had a market value of 1.6 trillion yen. In 2007, it reached more than 10 trillion yen.

No Debt

In 2008, Yamauchi was ranked Japan’s richest man by Forbes Asia with a net worth of $7.8 billion amid surging sales of the Wii console. Nintendo shares have slumped more than 80 percent since its 2007 record amid competition from Sony Corp. and Microsoft Corp., lackluster sales of its new Wii U and a shift by casual game players to smartphones and tablet computers.

Yamauchi succeeded his father as president in 1949, and the company almost was forced to file for bankruptcy in the late 1960s after several failed attempts to expand its product lineup into toy guns, baby carriages and fast food, according to several books written on Nintendo’s history.

Chastened by the experience, Yamauchi vowed not to borrow money to fund Nintendo’s operations. More than a decade after he stepped down, the company holds about $8.7 billion of cash and equivalents and no debt as of June 30, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

“Nintendo will carry on Yamauchi’s spirit,” Iwata said. “Nintendo will continue to make changes accordingly to fit the era.”

Nintendo rose 4.2 percent to 11,560 yen at the close of trade in Tokyo. The stock’s 26 percent advance this year trails the broader Topix Index’s 42 percent climb. The stake held by Yamauchi is worth about $1.6 billion, based on the current price.

Content Focus

Yamauchi’s business philosophy was also that the quality of video games is more important than the hardware on which they’re played. That point was driven home in 1977 when he met and hired Shigeru Miyamoto, Nintendo’s chief game designer, who went on to create the company’s iconic game characters. Mario eventually starred in a 1993 live-action movie, in which he was played by Bob Hoskins, and a cartoon television show.

In 1980, Nintendo released Game & Watch, the world’s first hand-held game player. Next came the release of Famicom, or the Family Computer console, in 1983, a home video-game console system. That was followed by the introduction of the “Super Mario Bros.” game in 1985 and the unveiling of Famicom in the U.S. as the Nintendo Entertainment System.

“I played with a family computer and card game of Nintendo when I was a child,” Kazuki Morishita, CEO of GungHo Online Entertainment Inc., said in an interview today. “He gave me an experience to make games.”

Yamauchi became the first foreign owner of a Major League Baseball team in 1992 when he bought the Mariners, who were on the verge of moving to Florida. Under his ownership, the team made the playoffs for the first time, signed Japanese superstar Ichiro Suzuki and built a new stadium.

“The Seattle Mariners organization is deeply saddened” by Yamauchi’s death, the team said in a statement. “Yamauchi will be remembered for his role in moving forward the opportunity for Japanese baseball players to play in the United States.”

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-19/hiroshi-yamauchi-who-ran-nintendo-for-53-years-dies-at-age-85.html
post #89619 of 93710
Critic's Notes
A Very Simple Guide to Remembering Which New TV Show Is Which
By Margaret Lyons, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Sep. 20, 2013

It’s fall TV, the most glorious — and overwhelming — time of the year. The networks shower viewers with new shows, and it's hard to tell them apart; before actually seeing them, they all just seem like one big indistinguishable mass of TV about cops and filthy-talking parents and returning stars. You can fuzzily and indistinguishably recall seeing the titles all summer in posters and TV ads, but if someone specifically asks, "Are you gonna watch The Millers," who can remember whether that's the one with Jeff Garlin, Robin Williams, or Anna Farris? (It's none of the above!) To that end, we’ve put together a helpful guide to help you remember which show is which, based on the fuzzy details you remember from the barrage of run-up marketing.

If you're thinking, I know there are a bunch of spinoffs, but which shows are being spun off again?

The Vampire Diaries:
The new show is the CW's The Originals (Tuesdays at 8 p.m., starting October 3), set in New Orleans. It’s a lot like TVD, so if you like the original, you’ll probably enjoy the ironically titled Originals.

Once Upon a Time has cloned itself into ABC's Once Upon a Time in Wonderland (Thursdays at 8 p.m., starting October 10). It's only sort of about the Alice from Wonderland — like the original OUaT, there are tons of other fairy-tale characters jammed in there.

The Avengers has begat Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. on ABC (Tuesdays at 8 p.m., starting September 24), which resurrects Agent Coulson from the movie. He assembles a team of elite crime-fighters, like one does.

I feel like I've seen a lot of middle-aged and older famous stars waved in my face, right? Which ones?

Michael J Fox
is in The Michael J. Fox Show, which is easiest to remember. He plays a news anchor who retired when he was diagnosed with Parkinsons but, with the support of his wife and kids, decides to go back to work. Breaking Bad's Betsy Brandt plays his wife. (NBC, Thursdays at 9:30 p.m., starting September 26)

Robin Williams is in The Crazy Ones, a half-hour dramedy from David E. Kelley. Williams plays the eccentric (of course) head of an ad agency that he runs with his daughter, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar. It’s a lot of Robin Williams being Robin Williams, but it also has Mad Men’s James Wolk, so that balances the energy. (CBS, Thursdays at 9 p.m., starting September 26)

Sean Hayes is in Sean Saves the World, a multicamera sitcom where Hayes plays a dad whose teenage daughter moves in to live with him full-time. So many high jinks! (NBC, Thursdays at 9 p.m., starting October 3)

James Spader realized through The Office that sitcoms aren't his thing, so now he's in the FBI thriller The Blacklist; you've seen the posters of him in a trenchcoat and fedora, handcuffed. That's because he's a brilliant, very Spader-y globally wanted criminal who turns himself in — on the condition that he gets to work with a newbie FBI agent to take down the other crime lords on his “blacklist.” (NBC, Mondays at 10 p.m., starting September 23)

Blair Underwood is in a reboot of the classic cop show Ironside, playing the titular wheelchair-using detective. (NBC, Wednesdays at 10 p.m., starting October 2)

James Caan is a boozy, sports-crazed dad who ends up coaching his grandson's lousy Little League team when his single-mom daughter (Maggie Lawson) comes home to live with him, in the single-camera comedy Back in the Game. (ABC, Wednesdays at 8 p.m., starting September 25)

There are quirky families, right? How do I tell them apart?

You know the one with the pregnant teen? That's Welcome to the Family. Mike O’Malley and Mary McCormick play the parents of a ditzy white girl who announces she's been knocked up after her high-school graduation; Justina Machado and Ricardo Chavira play the parents of her boyfriend, a studious Latino boy. The kids are in love; the dads don’t get along; the moms demonstrate patience. (NBC, Thursdays at 8:30 p.m., starting October 3)

There's the one set in the eighties. That’s The Goldbergs, starring Wendi McLendon-Covey and Jeff Garlin, who you've seen on posters in matching, loud Cosby sweaters. It's told mostly from the perspective of 11-year-old Adam, who films his family’s antics on his VHS camcorder. The show is based on creator Adam F. Goldberg’s real life, which he really did film all the time. (ABC, Tuesdays at 9 p.m., starting September 24)

I noticed there are a bunch of ensembles that are pretty overwhelming, because everyone looks familiar from different past shows.

Let's break this down by the faces you've seen coming at you. First: Tony Shalhoub, Kal Penn, and Jerry O’Connell. That’s We Are Men, a single-camera comedy about recently divorced men who all live in the same apartment complex. One is lovelorn; one is playing the field like crazy; they all support one another in their own weird ways. (CBS, Mondays at 8:30 p.m., starting September 30)

Anna Farris, Allison Janney, Nate Corddry, French Stewart, and Matt Jones. That’s Mom, a half-hour sitcom with Farris as a newly sober single mom who finds herself back in touch with her own also-now-sober, still-pretty-crazy mom (Janney). It has that Chuck Lorre signature set-‘em-up, knock-‘em-down joke writing. But there’s a dark streak here, too, that’s more reminiscent of Grace Under Fire than Two and a Half Men. Lots of sitcoms are about dumb problems – how will these two crazy kids ever get along? But Mom is unabashedly about grown-up problems. (CBS, Mondays at 9 p.m., starting September 23)

Will Arnett, Beau Bridges, Margo Martindale, and J.B. Smoove. That’s The Millers. Arnett plays a recently divorced dude whose oppressive parents (Bridges and Martindale) descend upon him, bringing with them their own warped dynamic. (CBS, Thursdays at 8:30 p.m., starting October 3)

Malin Akerman, Bradley Whitford, Marcia Gay Harden, Michaela Watkins, and Natalie Morales. That’s Trophy Wife. Akerman plays Whitford’s third wife and sudden stepmom to his three children — think Modern Family, with only one narrator. (ABC, Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m., starting September 24)

Karl Urban, Lili Taylor, Minka Kelly, Michael Ealy, and Michael Irby. That’s Almost Human. It’s a futuristic cop show from J.J. Abrams’s production company: In the future, cops are partnered with robots! But one cop (Urban) gets partnered with a discontinued robot (Ealy), who has learned to love. (Fox, Mondays at 8 p.m., starting November 4)

Toni Collete, Dylan McDermott, and Tate Donovan. That’s Hostages. Collette plays a surgeon preparing to operate on the president when — dun dun DUN — a team of assailants, led by Dylan McDermott, invade her home and say they’ll kill her husband (Donovan) and kids unless she kills the president while he’s on the operating table. (CBS, Mondays at 10 p.m., starting September 23)

A lot of these seem like they're trying to channel some HBO shows.

Does the trailer remind you of the many flashbacks on True Blood? That’s Dracula, with Jonathan Rhys Meyers as the legendary vampire. Dracula is set in the 1890s, which means it has corsets and vampires. (NBC, Fridays at 10 p.m., starting October 25)

If it makes you think of Game of Thrones, it's Reign, the CW’s stab at historical fiction. It’s like Gossip Girl, except Serena is actually Mary Queen of Scots, but it's like GoT in that there’s a ton of sex, a rigid monarchy, a lot of vengeance afoot, and the score includes a lot of pensive cello riffs. (The CW, Thursdays at 9 p.m., starting October 17)

Does it give off a Girls vibe? That’s Super Fun Night, a single-camera comedy from Rebel Wilson. It’s not that much like Girls, really, but it is about female friendship and humiliation. (ABC, Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m., starting October 2)

A couple of these shows feel really familiar, like they're left over from 2006 or 2007.

There's a serious post-Lost identity to Lucky 7, about a group of people who win the lottery. They’re connected by this lottery thing, but they also are different and have different lives and goals! It's very much in the vein of The Nine or The Class, both of which debuted in 2006. (ABC, Tuesdays at 10 p.m., starting September 24)

But if there's a sort of sexy-fiasco energy, something more reminiscent of rich-people-behaving-badly soaps Dirty Sexy Money and Big Shots, that's Betrayal. (ABC, Sundays at 10 p.m., starting September 29)

http://www.vulture.com/2013/09/new-tv-shows-fall-guide-2013.html
post #89620 of 93710
TV Notes
Steven Bochco's 'Murder in the First' Gets Series Order at TNT
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Sep. 19, 2013

TNT is officially in business with Steven Bochco.

The Turner-owned cable network has greenlit drama series Murder in the First, starring Taye Diggs and Kathleen Robertson.

Bochco (NYPD Blue, Hill Street Blues) penned the pilot alongside co-creator Eric Lodal (Lawless) and executive produces. TNT has ordered 10 episodes of the drama, which hails from TNT Originals. Lodal will co-exec produce the series, which is slated to premiere in summer 2014. TBS International will handle distribution outside of the U.S. and Canada.

The drama revolves two seemingly unrelated high-profile murder cases and the subsequent police investigation, arrest and trial, offering viewers a window into the inner-workings of modern justice in an increasingly complex world.

Diggs stars as Terry Seagrave, a homicide detective who is dealing with his wife's terminal illness. For Terry, being a cop is his one chance to live right and "do good," and the job keeps him focused and off the sadness that tends to preoccupy his thoughts. Robertson will portray Hildy Mulligan, Terry's partner, who is described as self-assured and sexy without knowing it. She's divorced with a young daughter and a fearless detective who is keenly aware that her partner is grappling with a difficult situation. Both actors received multiple pilot offers this casting season.

"Murder in the First sets up an engrossing, season-long mystery that's certain to appeal to TNT fans," said Michael Wright, president and head of programming for TNT, TBS and TCM. "We are thrilled to be working with Steven Bochco once again. We look forward to seeing this fascinating mystery unspool in the hands of Steven, Eric Lodal and the incredible cast and crew of Murder in the First."

Tom Felton, Mimi Kirkland, Raphael Sbarge, Ian Anthony Dale, Bess Rous and Steven Weber co-star in the drama, that marks Diggs and Robertson's first series roles since Private Practice and Boss, respectively.

Murder in the First is one of four new scripted dramas heading to TNT. Frank Darabont drama Mob City will debut in December, with Michael Bay's The Last Ship and Howard Gordon's Legends also set for 2014. Murder in the First joins fellow summer dramas Falling Skies and Perception on the roster for next year. Meanwhile, the fate of original dramas Franklin & Bash and rookie King & Maxwell have yet to be determined. The Bochco drama was one of two in the works at the cabler. Geena Davis' bounty hunter drama was passed over in July.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/steven-bochcos-murder-first-gets-632457
post #89621 of 93710
TV/Critic's Notes
Hallmark Channel goes deeper with historical tale
By Rob Owen, Pittsbugh Post-Gazette - Sep. 19, 2013

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Hallmark Channel movies tend to be warm, fuzzy offerings, but with "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" (8 p.m. Friday), the network grows up a little in this adaptation of a 1996 Newberry Medal-winning children's book by Christopher Paul Curtis.

Set in 1963, the film follows the Watson family as the members travel from their home in Flint, Mich., to Birmingham, Ala., where they encounter prejudice and violence.

Told from the point of view of 12-year-old Kenny (Bryce Clyde Jenkins), the historical fiction film tracks the Watson family's trip to take troubled son Byron (Harrison Knight) to visit Grandma Sands (LaTanya Richardson Jackson). Anika Noni Rose ("The Good Wife") and David Alan Grier ("In Living Color") also star.

The film airs as part of Hallmark's new Friday night Walden Family Theater, which is sponsored by Walmart and Proctor & Gamble.

At a July press conference for the film, producers said they've been trying to get "Watsons" made for a decade. Writer Tonya Lewis Lee, who wrote the teleplay, said it was appropriate for the film to finally get made and air in the year of the 50th anniversary of the civil rights march on Washington.

"Maybe it's serendipity," she said. "What we really hope is that young people will look at the children's march that happened in Birmingham, which we depict in the film, as something that excites them as an example of ways to become active in your community to make change. And so I think for all young people, whether you're dealing with issues of bullying, or whatever your passion is, I think you can look to the Watsons and see how young people can raise their voices and make a difference and change in their communities."

Ms. Lee said the film does not attempt to sugarcoat the reality of the era.

"Walden was actually very excited about spending more time in Birmingham, different from the book," she said. "In the book you don't really spend a lot of time in Birmingham and get a sense of what it would be like to live in the segregated South. And Walden really wanted us to spend some time there. They really encouraged me to open up the story and delve into what it would be like to live for this family from Flint, Mich., to actually end up in Birmingham and have to deal with segregation."

'THE WATSONS GO TO BIRMINGHAM'
8 p.m. Friday, Hallmark Channel.


http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/ae/tv-radio/tv-preview-hallmark-channel-goes-deeper-with-historical-tale-703869/
post #89622 of 93710
THURSDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #89623 of 93710
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
CBS reruns top other networks’ originals
Repeat of 'The Big Bang Theory' is night's top show with a 2.2
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 20, 2013

There were plenty of original shows on broadcast last night but CBS still finished first on the strength of its repeats.

Two reruns of “The Big Bang Theory” finished as the night’s top shows, with the 8 p.m. edition averaging a 2.1 adults 18-49 rating, according to Nielsen, and the 9 p.m. edition rising to a 2.2.

Week two of Fox’s “The X Factor” averaged a series-low 1.9 in the 8 p.m. hour, down from a 2.2 for last week’s episode, though that aired two hours instead of one. The first hour of last week’s “Factor” drew a 2.0.

The season finale of ABC’s long-running competition “Wipeout” averaged a 1.2 at 8 p.m., equaling its best rating since May’s premiere.

And the season (likely series) finale of NBC’s “Million Second Quiz” rose to its highest number in six previous episodes, averaging a 1.4 from 8 to 10 p.m. and up from a 1.1 last week.

The network’s 10 p.m. special, “Valerie’s Story: A Meredith Vieira Special,” averaged a 1.0. The documentary showed Harper’s fight after being diagnosed with brain cancer.

CBS was first for the night among 18-49s with a 1.6 average overnight rating and a 5 share. Fox was second at 1.5/5, ABC and NBC tied for third at 1.3/4, Univision was fifth at 1.2/4, Telemundo sixth at 0.4/1 and CW seventh at 0.2/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-eight percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. Fox was first with a 1.9 for “Factor,” followed by CBS with a 1.8 for reruns of “Bang” and “Two and a Half Men.” Univision was third with a 1.5 for “Porque el Amor Manda.” ABC and NBC tied for fourth at 1.2, ABC for “Wipeout” and NBC for “Quiz.” Telemundo and CW tied for sixth at 0.3, Telemundo for “Dama y Obrero” and CW for a repeat of “The Vampire Diaries.”

CBS took the lead at 9 p.m. with a 1.9 for more repeats of “Bang” and “Men,” while NBC moved to second with a 1.7 for another hour of “Quiz.” ABC was third with a 1.4 for a repeat of “Grey’s Anatomy,” Univision fourth with a 1.2 for “La Tempestad,” Fox fifth with a 1.1 for repeats of “Dads” and “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for “Marido en Alquiler” and CW seventh with a 0.2 for a repeat of “America’s Next Top Model.”

ABC led at 10 p.m. with a 1.2 for a “Scandal” rerun, with CBS, NBC and Univision all tied for second at 1.0, CBS for a repeat of “Elementary,” NBC for “Valerie’s Story: A Meredith Vieira Special” and Univision for “Que Bonito Amor.” Telemundo was fifth that hour with a 0.5 for “Santa Diabla.”

CBS also finished first for the night among households with a 4.4 average overnight rating and a 7 share. NBC was second at 3.2/5, ABC third at 3.0/5, Fox fourth at 2.9/5, Univision fifth at 1.7/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cbs-reruns-top-networks-originals/

* * * *

TV Notes
Best tube bets this weekend
The top draws on broadcast and cable and in sports
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 20, 2013

FRIDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: ABC, “Shark Tank” 9 p.m. Season premiere.
Pitches on the season’s first episode include a line of gourmet pickles and a mobile app that would replace the traditional postcard.

Best bet on cable: Discovery Channel, “Inside Raising the Concordia” 10 p.m. A look at the operation to salvage the shipwrecked Costa Concordia.

Top sporting event: ESPN, “College Football,” 9 p.m. Another Friday night Mount West matchup, this between Boise State and Fresno State.

SATURDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: Fox, “College Football,” 7 p.m.
Game between No. 23 Arizona State and No. 5 Stanford should perform well against mainly reruns on broadcast.

Best bet on cable: A&E, “The Marriage Test,” 10 p.m. Four couples ponder their relationships in a special from executive producers Jay McGraw and Dr. Phil McGraw.

Top sporting event: NBC, “College Football,” 3:30 p.m. Undefeated Michigan State takes on No. 22 Notre Dame in South Bend.

SUNDAY

Best bet on broadcast
: CBS, “Primetime Emmy Awards,” 8 p.m.
The 65th annual awards ceremony, hosted this year by Neil Patrick Harris.

Best bet on cable: Showtime, “Dexter,” 9 p.m. Series finale. Dexter faces a dire situation as a hurricane looms in Miami. Will he survive the series’ last episode?

Top sporting event: ESPN, “NASCAR Racing,” 2 p.m. The Sylvania 300, the second of 10 Chase for the Sprint Cup races.


http://www.medialifemagazine.com/best-tube-bets-weekend-4/
post #89624 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV/Critic's Notes
Hallmark Channel goes deeper with historical tale
By Rob Owen, Pittsbugh Post-Gazette - Sep. 19, 2013

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Hallmark Channel movies tend to be warm, fuzzy offerings, but with "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" (8 p.m. Friday), the network grows up a little in this adaptation of a 1996 Newberry Medal-winning children's book by Christopher Paul Curtis.

Set in 1963, the film follows the Watson family as the members travel from their home in Flint, Mich., to Birmingham, Ala., where they encounter prejudice and violence.

Told from the point of view of 12-year-old Kenny (Bryce Clyde Jenkins), the historical fiction film tracks the Watson family's trip to take troubled son Byron (Harrison Knight) to visit Grandma Sands (LaTanya Richardson Jackson). Anika Noni Rose ("The Good Wife") and David Alan Grier ("In Living Color") also star.

The film airs as part of Hallmark's new Friday night Walden Family Theater, which is sponsored by Walmart and Proctor & Gamble.

At a July press conference for the film, producers said they've been trying to get "Watsons" made for a decade. Writer Tonya Lewis Lee, who wrote the teleplay, said it was appropriate for the film to finally get made and air in the year of the 50th anniversary of the civil rights march on Washington.

"Maybe it's serendipity," she said. "What we really hope is that young people will look at the children's march that happened in Birmingham, which we depict in the film, as something that excites them as an example of ways to become active in your community to make change. And so I think for all young people, whether you're dealing with issues of bullying, or whatever your passion is, I think you can look to the Watsons and see how young people can raise their voices and make a difference and change in their communities."

Ms. Lee said the film does not attempt to sugarcoat the reality of the era.

"Walden was actually very excited about spending more time in Birmingham, different from the book," she said. "In the book you don't really spend a lot of time in Birmingham and get a sense of what it would be like to live in the segregated South. And Walden really wanted us to spend some time there. They really encouraged me to open up the story and delve into what it would be like to live for this family from Flint, Mich., to actually end up in Birmingham and have to deal with segregation."

'THE WATSONS GO TO BIRMINGHAM'
8 p.m. Friday, Hallmark Channel.


http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/ae/tv-radio/tv-preview-hallmark-channel-goes-deeper-with-historical-tale-703869/
As a U-verse customer, that's another one we won't get to see. Thanks, AT&T. mad.gif
post #89625 of 93710
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 20, 2013

LA JETEE
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

Another Back to the Future night on TCM begins with this 1962 French peek into the future, a short film about a time-traveler seeking clues to the planet’s survival after the devastation of World War III. Also on tonight’s bill, two films that later were remade as inferior versions: the original, 1975 Rollerball, starring James Caan (8:45 p.m. ET), and the original, 1990 Total Recall (1:45 a.m. ET).

GREAT PERFORMANCES: "THE HOLLOW CROWN"
PBS, 9:00 p.m. ET

The Hollow Crown is PBS’s latest attempt to mount a version of some of William Shakespeare’s “history plays” – specifically, the four-play cycle of Richard II (premiering tonight), followed by Henry IV: Parts 1 & 2 and Henry V. The last time public television presented all of these was in the late Seventies, when PBS and the BBC spent seven years televising all of Shakespeare’s plays. That cycle’s Richard II, made in 1978, starred Derek Jacobi in the title role. This new version, overseen by director Sam Mendes, stars Ben Whishaw of The Hours, in a version that also features David Morrissey of The Walking Dead, James Purefoy of The Following, and Patrick Stewart. The acting is impressive, the effort commendable – and the scenery, especially of the outdoor scenes, sems appropriately Shakespearean. Continues on subsequent Fridays. Check local listings.

WRECK-IT RALPH
Starz!, 9:00 p.m. ET

Think of this 2012 Disney animated feature as Breaking Bad in reverse. A vintage videogame villain named Wreck-It Ralph, voiced by John C. Reilly, makes one decision after another that leads him to becoming a good person. Along the way, he travels through various videogame scenarios and styles, facing different challenges (visually as well as physically) while accompanied by a spunky and delightful companion named Vanellope (voiced, adorably, by Sarah Silverman). Lots of fun – and with its videogame-nostalgia elements, not just for kids.

REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER
HBO, 10:00 p.m. ET

Billy Crystal is one of Bill Maher’s guests tonight, and that’s a Real Time booking of the first magnitude. Crystal’s not on the panel – he’s scheduled for the top-of-the-show interview segment – but that still leaves plenty of time for commentary, and hilarity. Panelists this week include Joy Behar and David Frum, who, after tonight, might consider taking their act on the road – billed as Oil and Water.

LARS AND THE REAL GIRL
Style, 10:00 p.m. ET

This eccentric 2007 character study stars two performers whose career trajectories have risen substantially since this low-budget movie was made: Ryan Gosling and The Newsroom star Emily Mortimer. He pays Lars, a meek man so introverted that he finds solace, even love and acceptance, in the quiet company of a made-to-order life-size “doll.” She plays the “real girl” of the title, in one of the cinema’s strangest (but not mocking) romantic triangles.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

Emmy/Critic's Notes
Larry Hagman at The Emmys: Not 'In Memoriam' But in Absentia
By Ed Bark, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 20, 2013

In life, he never won an Emmy, although nominated twice.

In death he won’t receive one of the five separate special “In Memoriam” tributes during the Sunday, Sept. 22 awards ceremony on CBS. The program’s executive producer made that firmly if imperfectly clear when asked, by me, during a Wednesday afternoon teleconference.

Such is the lot of Larry Hagman, who came to international stardom on CBS as J.R. Ewing of Dallas. He died in the show’s namesake city on Nov. 23, during filming of the TNT reboot’s second season.

CBS announced Monday that Emmy’s traditional “In Memoriam” clip segment would be enhanced by five tributes interspersed throughout the telecast. Those selected for special treatment are James Gandolfini (to be remembered by Sopranos co-star Edie Falco); Jean Stapleton (Rob Reiner); Jonathan Winters (Robin Williams); Family Ties producer Gary Goldberg (Michael J. Fox); and Corey Monteith (Jane Lynch).

The criticism quickly took flight, most notably in a commentary by Variety digital editor-in-chief Andrew Wallenstein. He questioned whether Monteith, the former Glee star who died at age 31 of a drug overdose, merited “being elevated” in this fashion. After all, he’s never even been nominated for an Emmy.

“By putting Monteith in this elite group, the Academy is risking having its honorable intentions misconstrued as using the actor’s memory to cater to the younger audiences that are in decreasingly short supply for award shows these days,” Wallenstein wrote in part.

Wallenstein also mentioned the omission of Hagman, who died at age 81 and co-starred in another enduring if lightweight series, I Dream of Jeannie. “Monteith could have gone on to a tremendous career, but Larry Hagman, for instance, already had a tremendous career, and putting Monteith on a pedestal casts a shadow over the memory of this iconic Dallas star,” Wallenstein wrote.

During Wednesday’s teleconference, veteran producer Ken Ehrlich, who’s presiding over his sixth Emmy telecast, made it clear that he made the call on the chosen few.

“In all candor, this becomes a producer’s option,” he said, “knowing that there are certainly others that could have been treated this way.”

Asked specifically about Hagman, Ehrlich repeated the “producer’s option” talking point. “I don’t know that I want to go into that in greater depth . . . No matter what we do, I think there will be people who will say we had other options.”

But has he opened a veritable can of worms by going this route in the first place? “There was discussion that this was probably going to become an interesting topic of conversation, which obviously it has,” Ehrlich acknowledged.

Including Monteith “was a rather personal choice,” he said in response to another questioner. “But Corey’s appeal maybe was to a different generation than some of the others we’re honoring.

“At 31 he passed away under very tragic circumstances,” Ehrlich added, and perhaps “meant as much” to a younger generation as the likes of Stapleton and Winters.

Still, it’s all very puzzling, if not insulting. Although falling well outside of television’s advertiser-coveted 18-to-49-year-old demographic, Hagman was still very much of the here and now. He continued to play J.R. Ewing to the hilt right up until his death. Millions upon millions of teen to thirtysomething viewers know who J.R. Ewing is. Perhaps many more than know the name of Monteith’s Glee character (Finn Hudson).

This isn’t to say that Monteith shouldn’t be remembered on Emmy night. But Hagman most definitely should not have been excluded from Ehrlich’s final field. The bet here is that he’ll offer his version of a “make good” by showing Hagman’s grinning J.R. at the very end of Emmy’s standard clip collection of the year’s deceased. But no, that won’t be nearly enough. And CBS, the network that brought Hagman to full-blown household name stardom, should be ashamed of itself for essentially turning the other cheek and letting this final snub go unchecked.

* * * *

In other Emmy news, CBS announced Wednesday that the anniversaries of John F. Kennedy’s assassination and The Beatles' first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show just 80 days later will be intertwined during a segment presented by actor Don Cheadle. Carrie Underwood will then sing some Beatles tunes, although Ehrlich wouldn’t say which ones.

Elton John also will be on hand to sing in honor of Liberace after Michael Douglas and Matt Damon, stars of the HBO movie bio Behind the Candelabra, present an Emmy Award. Liberace, by the way, died in 1987. So perhaps Hagman’s tribute can be resurrected 26 years from now?

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=5853
post #89626 of 93710
TV Reviews
Questions to Ask a King Before You Are Beheaded
‘Hollow Crown’ Serves Up Shakespeare and Royal Contrasts
By Neil Genzlinger, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 20, 2013

If you want an interesting perspective on a police procedural, watch it with a real police officer. If you want insights into the accuracy of a medical drama, watch it with a doctor. It’s too bad there are no late-14th- or early-15th-century British kings around with whom to watch “The Hollow Crown,” a four-part serving of Shakespeare that begins on Friday on PBS’s “Great Performances.” Think of the questions you could ask:

“Did you guys really make a habit of spouting eloquent eulogies and speeches at improbable times? Were there really practically no women in England then, except Mrs. Weasley from the Harry Potter movies? Did kings ever do any actual governing, or did they just fight and fret about who was or wasn’t trying to unseat them?”

Of course, your pestering might just earn you a beheading, which seems to have been the method preferred by kings and would-be kings of yore for making annoyances go away. A couple of heads are graphically lopped off in “Richard II,” Friday’s opening installment of the series, which also includes on successive Fridays “Henry IV, Part 1,” “Henry IV, Part 2” and “Henry V.”

Those tumbling heads are worth noting. First, let’s get this caveat out of the way: Nothing beats a stage performance of a Shakespeare play if the cast is first-rate and the direction insightful. That said, a television (or film) treatment can be helpful, especially for the uninitiated, and especially for these plays, which are not as well known or audience-friendly as, say, “Romeo and Juliet.”

When a full battle is called for, you see a battlefield, with horses and armies. When a chorus recitation is demanded, it is recited (by John Hurt) over footage of a ship at sea, embarked on a cross-channel invasion. And when heads must be severed — pity poor Bushy and Green in “Richard II” — the director, Rupert Goold, has the option of showing you the unpleasant act, and he takes it. (Shakespeare had it occur offstage.) There are bloody moments in “The Hollow Crown,” but not gratuitously so. These are high-stakes plays, and graphically rendered deaths underscore that in a way that a stage production can’t.

For the most part, the flexibility that television provides is used to good advantage in “The Hollow Crown” to clarify the action and enhance the dynamics. Only occasionally does it feel misplaced, as in “Richard II,” when Mr. Goold goes all in with Jesus imagery. To have Richard view himself as a Christ figure is fine, but here it seems more the director’s choice than the king’s.

Grouping the four plays together provides the chance for a study in kingly contrasts, and the actors and directors provide it. Jeremy Irons, among the most familiar cast members to American audiences in these British productions, is Henry IV in the middle two plays (directed by Richard Eyre) and gives you pretty much what you’d expect from Mr. Irons: solidity, fury, precision.

Most interesting is Ben Whishaw’s airy, effeminate Richard II, a character who can’t seem to decide whether to be protective of his power or indifferent to it. Richard’s best speeches come late in the play, as he is losing his grip on both reality and his throne to the advancing Henry Bolingbroke (Rory Kinnear, who the next time we meet him has turned into King Henry IV and Mr. Irons).

Prince Hal, eventually to be Henry V, is played by Tom Hiddleston, who ably transitions from the devil-may-care fellow of “Henry IV, Part 1” to the serious monarch of “Henry V” (directed by Thea Sharrock). He may not make anyone forget Kenneth Branagh’s 1989 film portrayal, just as this “Henry V,” as a whole, doesn’t outshine that one, but he has his moments, especially the scene from “Henry IV, Part 1” in which he kills Hotspur and then pronounces one of those incongruously moving spur-of-the-moment epitaphs.

There are characters other than kings in these plays, of course, among them Julie Walters of the Harry Potter films as Mistress Quickly, one of the few female roles of any size. The most beloved is surely Falstaff, and Simon Russell Beale has great fun with the role, making the portly fellow feel like a person rather than a mere buffoon.

GREAT PERFORMANCES: THE HOLLOW CLOWN
On PBS stations on Fridays (check local listings).


http://tv.nytimes.com/2013/09/20/arts/television/hollow-crown-serves-up-shakespeare-and-royal-contrasts.html?ref=television&_r=0
post #89627 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 20, 2013

LA JETEE
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

Another Back to the Future night on TCM begins with this 1962 French peek into the future, a short film about a time-traveler seeking clues to the planet’s survival after the devastation of World War III. Also on tonight’s bill, two films that later were remade as inferior versions: the original, 1975 Rollerball, starring James Caan (8:45 p.m. ET), and the original, 1990 Total Recall (1:45 a.m. ET).
http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=5853

La Jetee is one of my favorite foreign films. It is a short, but is very unique and really packs a punch. I highly recommend it.

Side note: The 1995 Bruce Willis movie "12 Monkeys" was loosely based off of La Jetee.
post #89628 of 93710
TV Notes
'King & Maxwell' Canceled After One Season on TNT
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Sep. 20, 2013

TNT will not move forward with King & Maxwell.

The Turner-owned cable network has opted to cancel the Jon Tenney and Rebecca Romijn starrer after one season, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

The drama, which opened in June as part of TNT's summer lineup, premiered to a respectable 3.5 million total viewers -- a decent haul but down considerably from its lead-in, Major Crimes. The series did not rank high in the cable network's big roster of summer launches that also included Falling Skies. During the course of its 10-episode season, the series averaged 3.1 million total viewers.

Meanwhile, nearly all of the rest of TNT's summer scripted originals have been picked up for additional seasons save for the lone holdover, Franklin & Bash, which remains on the bubble.

King hailed from CBS Television Studios and Shane Brennan Productions, with NCIS: Los Angeles' Shane Brennan executive producing alongside Karen Spiegel (Absolute Power) and Grant Anderson (Third Watch). The hourlong drama centered on ex-secret service agents.

The news comes a day after TNT ordered Steven Bochco's Murder in the First to series, slotting it for summer 2014 and likely replacing King. The cabler has a roster of originals set to debut starting in December with Frank Darabont's Mob City, which will be joined in 2014 by Michael Bay's The Last Ship and Howard Gordon's Legends.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/king-maxwell-canceled-one-season-633500
post #89629 of 93710
TV/Business Notes
ABC Family President Michael Riley to Exit Cabler
By AJ Marechal and Cynthia Littleton, Variety.com - Sep. 20, 2013

He will remain aboard the net as it searches for his replacement.

News arrives as Riley’s contract nears its expiration. Riley joined the net three years ago after former chief Paul Lee transitioned to the broadcast sector to lead the ABC.

Before his tenure at ABC Family, Riley served as general manager of Radio Disney, and logged years working with Turner Broadcasting’s international divisions. He has spent six years in the Disney family.

“Michael has been a great leader over the past six years at Radio Disney and ABC Family, and his contributions will be felt for years to come,” said Anne Sweeney, prexy of Disney-ABC Television Group. “While we understand and support his decision to leave, it will be sad to see him go. We wish him the best of luck on his next adventure.”

Under Riley’s leadership, ABC Family has seen an increase in original content, particularly during summer months. Series including “Pretty Little Liars,” which launched shortly before Riley’s appointment to the top programming post, reign as some of the most social shows on TV thanks to a Twitter-hungry younger demographic base. Furthermore, frosh programs “The Fosters” and “Twisted” debuted strongly on the net, ranking as some of the top cable series in their time periods this summer.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/abc-family-president-michael-riley-to-exit-network-1200654562/
post #89630 of 93710
TV/Business Notes
Bob Greenblatt’s NBC Contract Renewed Through 2017
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - Sep. 20, 2013

NBC has renewed entertainment chief Bob Greenblatt’s contract through 2017.

The move represents a huge vote of confidence in Greenblatt, who has helped lead the network out of fourth place since taking the job in 2011, when Comcast acquired NBCU.

Since then, he has helped launched NBC’s biggest new hit, “The Voice,” as well as “Revolution,” the biggest new network show of the 2012-13 season.

The announcement came moments after NBC announced it had landed in second place in the 18-49 demographic from September 2012 thorugh September 2013 for the first time in a decade.

September to September is an odd time frame to count, and the announcement seemed designed to tout Greenblatt’s success just before the renewal news. Advertisers traditionally follow the September through May calendar, in which NBC has edged out ABC for third.

Also read: Steve Burke: NBC ‘Significantly’ Lags Rivals in Profits

The former Showtime boss has improved NBC’s place in the standings at a time when all the networks are down in the ratings. He has tried to eke out wins during traditional slow periods, like summer, a strategy his competition is also adopting as viewers become more scarce.

NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke said this month that NBC is $500 million to $1 billion behind its rivals in profitability, and needs higher ratings and more ad sales.

But Friday’s news signals that NBC thinks Greenblatt is on the right track.

http://www.thewrap.com/bob-greenblatts-nbc-contract-renewed-through-2017/
post #89631 of 93710
TV Review
‘Hostages,’ may not hold onto viewers
In its slow pace, CBS drama fails to make a convincing case
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 20, 2013

Since more and more TV drama series are using long story arcs that last for several episodes or even several seasons, more and more episodes are ending with a cliff-hanger that is supposed to be so intriguing that we can’t help tuning in next week.

The premiere episode of CBS’s new fall drama “Hostages” actually ends with a moment that pulls its main character back from the precipice and that will probably push many viewers back from the edge of their seats.

Signaling that the drama, which is scheduled to air only 15 episodes its first season, is going to let the story develop more slowly than we might have thought, the ending lets viewers judge more coolly whether the series will be worth all those hours.

Since the premise is better suited to a 90-minute movie than to a 15-episode series, the show’s creators will have to come up some clever twists to keep us interested. The first episode, unfortunately, suggests they don’t have enough tricks up their sleeves to go the distance.

In the first episode, airing on Monday, Sept. 23, at 10 p.m., Dr. Ellen Sanders (Toni Collette) is taken hostage in her home by four masked intruders, along with her husband, Brian (Tate Donovan), daughter, Morgan (Quinn Shephard), and son, Jake (Mateus Ward). Ellen is scheduled to perform brain surgery on President Kincaid (James Naughton) the next day.

Through a flashback showing the 12 hours leading up to that point, we learn that Ellen’s husband and kids each have a secret. We also see a handsome FBI agent, Duncan Carlisle (Dylan McDermott), being all badass and rule-breaky as he handles a different hostage-taking situation.

The home invaders plan to force Ellen to kill the president on the operating table. They promise that if she follows their orders no one in her family will be harmed.

The bad guys prove to be well organized, but they don’t seem to have put together one of those plots that are so ingenious and complex that they defy credibility, as on NBC’s new drama “The Blacklist,” which will premiere on the same date and in the same time slot.

Along the way, it’s hinted that the bad guys might not be as bad as their methods suggest. But it also seems that the driving force in the drama will be a clash of wits and will, not an examination of moral choices.

We’re a little surprised when we learn who is leading the hostage-taking team. We’re less surprised when we learn who is the big villain who hired the team.

It’s difficult to say exactly from where the writers may have drawn certain plot elements, but too many feel familiar.

Although Tate Donovan lays out his character’s shallow psyche quickly, the other principals are more opaque. Both Toni Collette and Dylan McDermott maintain their equilibrium in situations that would leave most of us unbalanced. They may be saving their emotional outbursts for later episodes, but so far, their underplaying leaves us viewers under-involved.

The fact that all of Ellen’s family members are somewhat morally compromised makes us care less about their fate, not more.

A show like “Hostages” really only has one chance to sink the hook into viewers. This premiere lets us get away.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/hostages-may-hold-onto-viewers/
post #89632 of 93710
TV Reviews
Suspense dramas 'Blacklist,' 'Hostages' to premiere
By David Wiegand, San Francisco Chronicle - Sep. 18, 2013

NBC's "The Blacklist" is the first really terrific new series of the fall season. It's also proof that broadcast TV can still compete with cable, even with a show whose basic plot has been reworked in film and TV with consistent regularity for decades.

Premiering Monday night, which also kicks of the first big week of the season, "The Blacklist" stars James Spader ("Boston Legal") as master career criminal Raymond "Red" Reddington, a longtime occupant of the FBI's most wanted list.

Red shows up at the FBI offices one day to turn himself in and to offer to help the agency stop an international terrorist who is supposed to be dead but clearly isn't. Red's only condition, at the outset, is that he will speak only to Agent Liz Keene (Megan Boone, "Law & Order: Los Angeles"), a talented profiler fresh from training at Quantico.

Nothing new here, on the surface, but creator Jon Bokencamp, who has a couple of Halle Berry thrillers under his belt, knows how to breathe new life into familiar set-ups. Having an actor like Spader in the lead role doesn't hurt, nor does having a smart director like Joe Carnahan for the pilot. You think you know this situation and how it will turn out, but there are surprise, yet entirely credible, twists throughout Monday's episode.

In general, broadcast TV gets dramas and thrillers right more often than it does sitcoms. As basic and premium cable push the boundaries of creativity with shows like "Mad Men," "Homeland," "Breaking Bad" and "The Walking Dead," broadcast is often taken to task for a perceived lack of imagination.

Reviving a concept

Yet a show like "The Blacklist" reminds us that "imagination" doesn't always mean coming up with a unique story idea for a new show: Sometimes it can mean reviving a familiar, even shopworn, concept like the bad guy helping the good guys solve crimes.

Some of the better dramas in recent years work - not "in spite of" using retread concepts, but rather, because they use our familiarity with those concepts to get our attention, and then give us reason to stick around. That's certainly true with two CBS hits from the last couple of years, "Elementary" and "Person of Interest."

One dusts off Sherlock Holmes and relocates him to the 21st century New York City, the other puts a new spin on the "Mission: Impossible" idea of experts stopping crimes before they happen.

Chock-full pilot

If Monday's other big thriller premiere, "Hostages," doesn't quite measure up to "The Blacklist," it's because of a little too much imagination, at least in the pilot. Granted, pilots have to cram a lot of establishing information into about 44 minutes, but there's so much information in the first episode of "Hostages," you're going to need some time after the show to process it all.

Toni Collette ("United States of Tara") stars as Dr. Ellen Sanders, a brilliant surgeon who has been chosen to operate on the president (James Naughton) to remove a small mass in his lung. She has a seemingly loving husband, Brian (Tate Donovan, "Deception"), and two normal teenage kids, daughter Morgan (Quinn Shephard, "Made in Jersey") and her younger brother, Jake (Mateus Ward, "Lab Rats").

The pilot begins with the family gathered on the living room couch - kind of like a real-life "Simpsons." Then the camera pulls back to reveal men in ski masks holding them hostage. The deal is: Either Ellen terminates the president on the operating table the next day or her family is history.

OK, we can work with that, but the show creators want to make sure they pack the first episode with enough subplots to keep things going beyond Monday. To begin with, the leader of the hostage-takers is FBI agent Duncan Carlisle (Dylan McDermott "The Practice"). But, wait: He's not really a bad guy. For one thing, he has a wife in a coma. For another, he has a young daughter he's trying to raise on his own, so we begin to suspect that he is being forced to engineer a presidential assassination.

And if that's not enough (it is, but who's counting?), Ellen's daughter is secretly seeing an older guy and her son owes a lot of money to a pot dealer who is known to use a baseball bat to collect his debts. And then there's dad's extramarital affair. In a better written show, that last bit might be considered a spoiler, but if you don't see that one coming a mile away, you're not a regular TV watcher.

It's easy to understand why the show creators - Alon Aranya ("Red Widow"), Omri Givon and Rotem Shamir - and developer Jeffrey Nachmanoff ("The Day After Tomorrow") essentially hedge their bets with so many plot possibilities.

Think about the basic premise for a minute: Either the president dies or he doesn't, either the rogue agent is stopped or he isn't - what happens when the "Hostages" are no longer hostages? You can't hold them hostage forever.

We believe her

But overstuffed though the pilot is, the show works because of the performances, especially Toni Collette's. One of the great chameleons of film and TV, Collette delivers a brilliantly nuanced characterization here: We believe her as a mom and dedicated medical professional, making sure everything is humming both at home and at the hospital, and we believe her as the terrified but resolute family protector as she goes head to head with Carlisle.

McDermott is OK in the role, but, at least in the pilot, doesn't get a chance to be as convincing because we have yet to understand why he's out to kill the president. That said, he's got his work cut out for him if he's going to share the screen with Collette. Donovan is properly oily as dad, and Shephard and Ward are completely convincing as the kids - blessedly avoiding coming off as Hollywood brats trying to play real kids.

Direct competitors

A very real challenge for "Hostages" is that it airs at the same time as "The Blacklist." Given how good "The Blacklist" is, the future of "Hostages" may depend on whether viewers get into it enough to save it to their DVRs while they're watching NBC's show. Because if you have to make a choice, the Peacock wins, hands-down.

There are other suspense dramas coming along this fall, as there are every year - probably more than the broadcast medium can support. Several recycle old set-ups, and one - NBC's "Ironside"- recycles an entire show. But as "The Blacklist" proves, the shows that survive and find loyal audiences don't need to re-invent the genre. They just need to add quality writing, casting and direction to it.


THE BLACKLIST
10 p.m. Monday, NBC



HOSTAGES
10 p.m. Monday, CBS


http://www.sfgate.com/tv/article/Suspense-dramas-Blacklist-Hostages-to-4825782.php
post #89633 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Can't think of not seeing NFL games on a Sunday without the RedZone Channel. Shame they had to sign out before the Bucs-Saints game was over, that game went down to the wire but only folks in New Orleans and Tamba Bay saw them because it wasn't on any national channel. frown.gif

Actually, all the CBS early game markets got Bucs-Saints on FOX at 4, so it had pretty good distribution. I watched it on the Baltimore affiliate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post

You'd think the league would get a waiver (after all, the NFL owns the channel) to allow them to broadcast beyond the 8:00 PM Eastern limit if circumstances beyond their control delayed a game (like the lightning delay).

Is it because they want eyes on the NBC game instead?

Yep even though the game doesnt kick til 8:31 their 8:00-8:30 FNIA show was the #11 rated show last year.

But in this case, even if RedZone had continued until NBC kickoff, you still would have missed the failed Bucs field goal attempt at 8:33pm with 1:10 on the game clock, and the game winning/ending Saints field goal at 8:36pm.
post #89634 of 93710
TV Review
'Mom': Goofy, biting, sentimental
By Verne Gay, Newsday - Sep. 20, 2013

CRIME DRAMA "Mom"

WHEN | WHERE Premieres Monday night at 9:30 on CBS/2

REASON TO WATCH
It's goofy. It's biting. It's sentimental.

WHAT IT'S ABOUT It's all over the place, this "Mom," the latest from CBS' comedy machine Chuck Lorre. Did that Plainview native cut his writer-producer teeth on "Roseanne"? And "Grace Under Fire"? And "Cybill"? Yes. Yes, he did.

Which explains the echoes infusing this portrait of what are actually two moms. Anna Faris plays waitress Christy, a spunky single parent who goes unrespected by her carousing teen daughter, her drug-dealing ex and her philandering boss/boyfriend. Allison Janney is Christy's bad-role-model mother, Bonnie, roaring back into town on the make for men and merriment. "While other mothers were cooking dinner," blames Christy, "you were cooking meth." "Otherwise known as working!" snaps Bonnie.

MY SAY The pilot's envelope-pushing is caustic and obvious, two things "Mom" seems better than. Faris is both gutsy and touching as the adult trying to get her act together, while Janney's crafty adolescence extends to a third generation around Faris' two kids. (There's also a young boy who seems smart: "My semen at work," brags his mostly AWOL dad.)

Lorre knows what he's doing with modern families -- he wrote some of "Roseanne's" best lines -- and he's got a better actress playing his new mom under fire. Her bistro workplace also features gonzo chef French Stewart ("3rd Rock From the Sun"), adding promise to the place.

BOTTOM LINE Could go either way. Just like mom's kids.

GRADE: B


http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/tv/mom-review-goofy-biting-sentimental-1.6110607
post #89635 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post

La Jetee is one of my favorite foreign films. It is a short, but is very unique and really packs a punch. I highly recommend it.

Side note: The 1995 Bruce Willis movie "12 Monkeys" was loosely based off of La Jetee.

”La Jetee” is one of my favorites, too.

Especially haunting because, iirc, it’s almost entirely b/w still photos with narration, except for one little bit.

(And it’s far superior to “12 Monkeys”, imo.)
post #89636 of 93710
TV Review
‘Lucky 7’ (ABC)
By Hank Stuever, Washington Post

Based on the British drama “The Syndicate” and sent through the Hollywood tweaking machine, this drama is about eight employees at a Queens gas station whose lives change after they win the state lottery.

Each week the gang at Gold Star Gas N’ Shop pools its money to bet the same lottery numbers. Just as things are getting desperate for Matt (Matt Long) and his ex-con brother Nicky (Stephen Louis Grush), the winning numbers miraculously come through. The group has won $45 million to split, but there’s immediate upset, since one of the workers didn’t put his money in the pool. This is just the beginning of a sequence of mo’-money problems that will form “Lucky 7’s” overall story arc, as each winner faces her or his own crises and demons.

I’m immediately impressed with “Lucky 7’s” ensemble cast and how quickly the story drew me in and hinted at some further mysteries. Part of that has to do with my relief at watching any drama that isn’t a crime procedural, yet “Lucky 7” also has some moral rumination and complexity to it. It’s basically a caper disguised as a drama, and we could use a caper on prime-time TV.

LUCKY 7
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 10 p.m., ABC


http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/tv/lucky-7-review/2013/09/13/b7b66d3a-1c93-11e3-8685-5021e0c41964_story.html
post #89637 of 93710
TV Review
“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” (ABC)
By Joanne Ostrow, Denver Post

You don’t have to know “The Avengers” or the Marvel comics universe to appreciate “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” — but it helps. The masterful Joss Whedon declared his goal is to welcome all viewers to the project, not just fankids, though he doesn’t start slowly and newcomers may need background.

The most buzzed-about show of the season, “S.H.I.E.L.D.” debuts on ABC on Sept. 24.

Agent Phil Coulson, who died in “The Avengers,” is brought back to life with Clark Gregg fortunately reprising the role. His gravity holds together the sometimes meandering story. Whedon’s trademark humor in the midst of action-adventure (per “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”) saves the day as often as the very human, yet very gifted heroes. That protects the fantastical from becoming ridiculous.

Those charged with “protecting the ordinary from the extraordinary”: Agent Grant Ward (Brett Dalton), highly trained in combat and espionage; Agent Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen), expert pilot and martial artist; Agent Leo Fitz (Iain De Caestecker), brilliant engineer; and Agent Jemma Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge) genius biochemist–together Caestecker and Henstridge are “Fitz/simmons”– and new recruit and computer hacker, Skye (Chloe Bennet).

A few story threads carry over from “The Avengers,” playing to the fan base, but the TV hour is designed to stand on its own. While there are aliens, paranormal events and superheroes, it’s ultimately all about emotion, camaraderie and the challenge of being human. Those of us who prefer the quippy moments to the big flashy explosions will have to hope the (expensive looking) pyrotechnics of the pilot aren’t Whedon’s ongoing focus.

MARVEL'S AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 8 p.m., ABC


http://blogs.denverpost.com/ostrow/2013/09/06/review-marvels-agents-of-s-h-i-e-l-d/16192/
post #89638 of 93710
TV Review
‘The Goldbergs' (ABC)
By Luis Sanchez, Slate.com - Sep. 18, 2013

The Goldbergs is being advertised as a '80s-style portrayal of a wacky suburban family. But while the sitcom makes all the obvious references to cultural touchstones of the decade (MTV, hair crimpers, VHS video cameras), and it's a testament to the producers that the family dysfunction it depicts doesn't get mired in the period styling, the show struggles to turn that dysfunction into something more engaging than a series of puerile, broadly staged situations.

The series premiere, "The Circle of Driving," introduces us to the titular clan's chaotic household, in which family members grate on each other almost as much as they do on the viewer. On his 16th birthday, Barry (Troy Gentile) gets angry when overprotective mom Beverly (Wendi McLendon-Covey) and hypercritical dad Murray (Jeff Garlin) don't give him the car he eagerly anticipated. He's just not mature enough, they tell him. It's a fairly relatable moment, but what could have been a more sensitive depiction of teenage resentment becomes a temper tantrum extended tediously beyond Barry's initial outburst, and Gentile's hammy acting seems much more suited to one of Glee's histrionic music numbers.

Such caricature extends to other family members as well: Older sister Erica (Hayley Orrantia) is a mostly forgettable sketch of a teenage girl, and Garlin is wasted in his role as a grouch who does little more than berate his children while lounging around in a dingy-looking bathrobe.

Loosely based on creator Adam F. Goldberg's real family and experiences growing up as a child of the '80s, The Goldbergs's ostensibly endearing premise is sadly also its biggest flaw. Goldberg's on-screen representation as prepubescent Adam (Sean Giambrone) fails to complement the voiceover narration and meaningful asides of adult Adam (Patton Oswalt) in any substantial way. There's a particularly cringe-worthy subplot in which young Adam's budding sexuality gets some encouragement from his grandfather, "Pops" Solomon (George Segal), a self-styled casanova who seems intent on becoming his grandson's wingman. Their shticky interactions feel like missed opportunities to set up a generational dynamic based on something more than asinine tit jokes. It might be tempting to draw some comparisons to The Wonder Years, but whereas the portrayal of young Kevin Arnold and Daniel Stern's narration were mutually constitutive strengths in that series, the one-dimensional depiction of Adam as little more than a boobs-obsessed kid fails to connect with the spirited and reflective tenor of Oswalt's performance.

One admirable standout is McLendon-Covey as the Goldbergs' overbearing matriarch. In spite of being the most visually stylized character (her big hair and flamboyant wardrobe might lead one to believe that she's an '80s-era suburban-mom superhero), it's the actress's ability to focus Beverly's intense energy with deft physical comedy and measured delivery of jokes that makes the character the funniest and most compelling member of the family. It's a shame that the rest of The Goldbergs fails to find the same pitch of well-crafted humor.

THE GOLDBERGS
Tuesday at 9 p.m. on ABC
Rating: ★★ (out of four)


http://www.slantmagazine.com/tv/review/the-goldbergs-season-one
post #89639 of 93710
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
'King & Maxwell' Canceled After One Season on TNT
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Sep. 20, 2013

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/king-maxwell-canceled-one-season-633500

Bummer, I liked the show and the characters and I thought the chemistry was getting there, besides the main stars, I liked Benny(Dichen Lachman) and Edgar(Ryan Hurst) too. I always seem to like the one and done shows on TNT.
post #89640 of 93710
TV Review
‘Trophy Wife’ (ABC)
By Brian Lowry, Variety.com

If ever a comedy pilot cried out for a one-hour premiere, it’s “Trophy Wife,” a series that races through so much plot in its introductory half-hour as to practically obliterate its central relationship. Essentially skipping the whole romantic-comedy and jumping straight into the sitcom part, the series has an appealing lead in Malin Akerman and a promising supporting cast. That said, the show is so intent on jumping to the “hot stepmom” gags that it doesn’t give its characters much room to breathe — much less time for us to get to know them, or each other.

Akerman’s Kate is a pretty, young party girl when she meets cute with Pete (Bradley Whitford), resulting in a bloody nose and emergency-room trip. A meaningful glance, and presto, they’re married, with her inheriting his kids and him dealing with two ex-wives, played by Marcia Gay Harden and “Saturday Night Live’s” Michaela Watkins.

Subjected to the inevitable barbs about being a “MILF” and Pete’s “child bride,” Kate labors to win over those around her, from trying to be the cool parent to earning a modicum of respect from the exes. Those efforts yield some funny visual bits and plenty of awkward moments, but little that qualifies as a genuine laugh.

The high divorce rate has certainly produced plenty of families with this kind of configuration, as well as sizable age gaps between spouses. Still, in asking the show’s likely predominantly female audience to identify with Akerman’s Kate, series creators Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern (the concept is described as being “loosely based” on Haskins’ real life) are asking an awful lot, and they don’t help their cause by doing so little to establish the chemistry between Kate and Pete.

“Trophy Wife” also didn’t land an especially desirable timeslot, paired as it is with “The Goldbergs,” another uneven family comedy; and following “Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD,” offering the slim chance a few fanboys still pining for Akerman from her “Watchmen” role will keep their hands off the remote.

So despite promising elements, there simply isn’t a lot in this premise that demands a second date, much less a longterm commitment. And while the pilot merits a second look, based on first impressions, “Trophy Wife” won’t win any prizes.

TROPHY WIFE
ABC, Tues. Sept. 24, 9:30 p.m.


http://variety.com/2013/tv/reviews/trophy-wife-tv-review-abc-1200613702/
Edited by dad1153 - 9/20/13 at 11:27pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information