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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 3015

post #90421 of 93656
I wouldn't necessarily classify SNF as a "show." If you ask people what their favorite "show" is, they probably won't mention a sporting event. But that's just me.
post #90422 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

I wouldn't necessarily classify SNF as a "show." If you ask people what their favorite "show" is, they probably won't mention a sporting event. But that's just me.

Considering the NFL has become the MFL (Me Football League); technically, it could be called a show-off. wink.gif
post #90423 of 93656
I will give you that! wink.gif
post #90424 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post


In the demo that counts, 18 to 49, didn't it beat Sunday Night football the last couple of weeks?

No it didnt.
It beat SNF this week because SNF & world series went head to head alot of the same audience.
But last week 18-49 as really every week SNF 10.0 beat walking dead 7.1.

+ we are talking the avg rating for the entire season & SNF is ahead of walking dead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

I wouldn't necessarily classify SNF as a "show." If you ask people what their favorite "show" is, they probably won't mention a sporting event. But that's just me.

Here is the list from tvbythnumbers which says:

Complete List Of 2012-13 Season TV Show Ratings:
'Sunday Night Football' Tops, Followed By 'The Big Bang Theory,' 'The Voice' & 'Modern Family

http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2013/05/29/complete-list-of-2012-13-season-tv-show-ratings-sunday-night-football-tops-followed-by-the-big-bang-theory-the-voice-modern-family/184774/

How is it not a show its in the top 25 each week, it gets $$ for ads, its factored into the nbc season avg.

Just cause its sports why does that matter.
Thats like saying Zena:Princess Warrior is the #1 show of all time cause im only counting shows that:
- begin with the letter Z in the title
- have a : in the title
- had the words princess & warrior in the title biggrin.gif
post #90425 of 93656

Umm... aren't cable ratings based on a different size universe than broadcast ratings, or has that changed? And if so, absent 18-49 viewer totals – which I don't see in the linked articles – how can you tell that Dead beat SNF?
post #90426 of 93656
I think it is already adjusted for the size for example

This weeks 18-49 rating/viewers:
WD = 6.8 / 8,628,000
SNF = 6.3 / 8,009,000

Last week:
SNF = 10.0 / 12,678,000
WD = 7.1 / 9,070,000
post #90427 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

No it didnt.
It beat SNF this week because SNF & world series went head to head alot of the same audience.
But last week 18-49 as really every week SNF 10.0 beat walking dead 7.1.

+ we are talking the avg rating for the entire season & SNF is ahead of walking dead.
Here is the list from tvbythnumbers which says:

Complete List Of 2012-13 Season TV Show Ratings:
'Sunday Night Football' Tops, Followed By 'The Big Bang Theory,' 'The Voice' & 'Modern Family

http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2013/05/29/complete-list-of-2012-13-season-tv-show-ratings-sunday-night-football-tops-followed-by-the-big-bang-theory-the-voice-modern-family/184774/

How is it not a show its in the top 25 each week, it gets $$ for ads, its factored into the nbc season avg.

Just cause its sports why does that matter.
Thats like saying Zena:Princess Warrior is the #1 show of all time cause im only counting shows that:
- begin with the letter Z in the title
- have a : in the title
- had the words princess & warrior in the title biggrin.gif

I never saw Zena, was she as good as Xena?
post #90428 of 93656
Technology/Business Notes
Intel Is Said to Weigh Sale of Online Cable TV Venture
By Brian Stelter, The New York Times - Oct. 31, 2013

Intel may bow out of its ambitious cable-television-via-the-Internet venture, known as OnCue, by selling it to Verizon, according to people with direct knowledge of the talks between the two companies.

It is possible that Intel will forge ahead with OnCue through a partnership with Verizon, or a pact with some other company, but a purchase by Verizon is most likely, according to the people, who insisted on anonymity because the talks were supposed to be private. A deal will most likely be struck by the end of the year.

OnCue, as envisioned by Intel, would take the traditional cable television bundle and make it more consumer-friendly by transmitting it via the Internet. The company’s technology has impressed many, but channel owners have been reluctant to make the necessary licensing deals, stirring speculation that Intel might not move forward.

The other big roadblock has been an internal one. When a new chief executive, Brian M. Krzanich, took over the company earlier this year, he expressed skepticism about the television project because it was not a core part of Intel’s business, and directed the project leaders to seek partnerships for it.

Earlier this fall Intel executives privately acknowledged that they would fall short of their widely publicized goal of introducing OnCue to the public in time for the holiday season.

A takeover of OnCue could position Verizon to sell a cablelike television service across the United States through existing broadband pipes or through its Verizon Wireless business. Its current eight-year-old television subscription service, FiOS, has five million subscribers and is growing steadily, but it is available in only about 15 percent of American homes because it is delivered over a proprietary fiber-optic network. Verizon said last year that it did not plan to expand that fiber-optic network much more.

But a Verizon television service could potentially reach many more people if it were not linked to the fiber-optic network and were made available through any broadband connection. Alternatively, it could be sold as an optional mobile TV upgrade for the Verizon Wireless unit’s roughly 100 million monthly subscribers.

Verizon is in the process of gaining full ownership of the wireless unit, having announced last month a $130 billion acquisition of Vodafone’s 45 percent stake. “We don’t comment on speculation,” a Verizon spokeswoman said on Wednesday after the online technology site AllThingsD published an article on the talks with Intel. An Intel spokesman declined to comment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/31/business/media/intel-is-said-to-weigh-sale-of-online-cable-tv-venture.html?ref=technology
post #90429 of 93656
Critic's Notes
Hey Simon Cowell: With 'X Factor' ratings sliding, can you save it?
By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times' 'Show Tracker' Blog - Oct. 31, 2013

Attention, Simon Cowell: You need to rethink the ratings factor for "The X Factor."

Fox's singing contest reemerged Tuesday night with a serious baseball hangover, drooping to just 4.9 million total viewers with a two-hour special, according to Nielsen.

True, Cowell's extravaganza has had to contend with several weeks of postseason baseball and World Series interruptions -- its most recent telecast before Tuesday was way back on Oct. 10 -- and the Tuesday slot is not its customary time period.

But so what? Those are lousy numbers, no matter what sort of excuse is made for them. And given that "X Factor" is one of TV's most expensive shows, that doesn't bode well for its future on the struggling Fox lineup. (No such worries in Cowell's native Britain, apparently, where "X Factor" looks headed for a three-year renewal on ITV, according to reports.)

NBC's rival songfest "The Voice" delivered 11.6 million Tuesday, part of the time in head-to-head competition with "X Factor." That's not all: "X Factor" lost not only to "NCIS" and "The Biggest Loser" -- it barely beat "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." A repeat of "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." That hurts, people.

Among viewers ages 18 to 49, the demographic Fox is selling, "X Factor" lost a quarter of its audience compared with earlier this month.

Remember when Cowell bragged about how he was going to bag "American Idol"? Right.

But this isn't a one-episode problem. "X Factor" has been deflating for some time. So what's the problem?

After a rocky first season that ended with Cowell firing Paula Abdul and Nicole Scherzinger as judges and basically starting over, the producers tried to ramp up the show-biz glitz and brought on Britney Spears, who lasted all of one harshly-reviewed season.

This time around, there's a lot of contrived suspense centered on "four-chair challenges," in which contestants who think they're safe might be scooped away at any minute. It's a lame attempt to inject some drama into proceedings that are supposedly about finding the best singer, not seeing who can survive the weirdest parliamentary challenges.

"X Factor's" real problem is that it's the weakest link. TV has a singing-show glut, and "X Factor" just doesn't have its act together the way "The Voice" does. In fact, it's making "American Idol" -- which itself changes judges the way Lady Gaga changes costumes -- look like a model of stability and good taste.

So Cowell might want to take a break from his busy schedule of endorsements and product placements and give some attention to, say, actually producing the show. While he still can.

What do you think of "X Factor"?

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-simon-cowell-with-x-factor-ratings-sliding-shows-in-deep-trouble-20131030,0,2461855.story#axzz2jI5Vfqs4
Edited by dad1153 - 10/31/13 at 2:59am
post #90430 of 93656
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
THURSDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (Special)
(R - Oct. 27, 2006)
9PM - Grey's Anatomy
10PM - Scandal
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Mindy Kaling; Josh Malina; Rob Zombie performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - The Big Bang Theory
(R - Jan. 10)
8:31PM - The Millers
9:01PM - The Crazy Ones
9:31PM - The Big Bang Theory
(R - Apr. 4)
10:01PM - Elementary
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Harrison Ford; Halloween costumes; Holy Ghost! performs)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Ben Kingsley; author Anne Rice)

NBC:
8PM - Saturday Night Live: SNL Halloween (Special)
9:01PM - Sean Saves the World
9:30PM - The Michael J. Fox Show
10PM - Parenthood
* * * *
11:34AM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Matthew McConaughey; director Eli Roth; The Fray performs)
12:36AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Kerry Washington; Jason Schwartzman; chef Flynn McGarry; Amel Larrieux performs with The Roots)
1:36AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (Playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa; Pierce the Veil performs)

FOX:
8PM - The X-Factor: Meet the Top 12
8:30PM - Glee
(R - Oct. 10)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - The 'This Old House' Hour
9PM - Call the Midwife
(R - Feb. 12, 2012)
10PM - Lou Reed: Rock and Roll Heart (1998)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque El Amor Manda
9PM - La Tempestad
10PM - Mentir Para Vivir

THE CW:
8PM - The Vampire Diaries
9PM - Reign

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Marido en Alquiler (120 min.)
10PM - Santa Diabla

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Author Mark Fainaru-Wada)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author Bill Bryson)
12:01AM - @Midnight (Steve Agee; Natasha Leggero; Moshe Kasher)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Rachel McAdams; Norman Reedus)
Midnight - The Pete Holmes Show (Chelsea Peretti)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Kat Dennings; comic Dan Levy; comic Fortune Feimster; comic Loni Love)

SYNDICATION:
Check Local Listings - Arsenio (Joe Morton; Carrot Top; Preachers of LA)
post #90431 of 93656
Nielsen Notes (Cable)
TBS’ ‘Pete Holmes Show’ Off To Soft Start, Topped By Comedy Central’s ‘@midnight’
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Oct. 30, 2013

TBS’ new late-night entry, The Pete Holmes Show, opened to 407,000 viewers at midnight on Monday, 245,000 of them in the adults 18-49 demographic. That was below the debut of the other new late-night cable show, Comedy Central‘s @midnight, which premiered last Monday to 549,992 total viewers and 260,876 adults 18-49, and Pete Holmes‘ predecessor in the post-Conan slot, Lopez Tonight, which clocked in 425,000 viewers and 269,000 adults 18-49 in its final week.

Pete Holmes, which is produced by Conan O’Brien’s Conaco, only held half of its Conan lead-in, 782,000 total viewers, 482,000 adults 18-49. In the first midnight face-off last night, the Funny Or Die-produced @midnight topped Pete Holmes in every category, including adults 18-49 (393,000 vs. 245,000), helped by a stronger lead-in from The Colbert Report (628,000 adults 18-49).

@midnight’s dominance is strongest in the younger demos, as it beat all late-night cable shows, including lead-ins The Daily Show With Jon Stewart and Colbert Report, in persons 18-24 where it drew 127,000 viewers last night. Colbert was No. 2 with 106,000, while Pete Holmes had 51,000.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/10/tbs-peter-holmes-show-off-to-soft-start-topped-by-comedy-centrals-midnight/

* * * *

Nielsen Notes (Cable)
The Mystery Of ‘Totally Biased’s Vanishing Audience

It’s been a rough sledding for FX‘s late-night program Totally Biased With W. Kamau Bell in its new home on FXX. With only one night of originals on the fledgling network, Wednesdays, the nightly Totally Biased has been barely registering for most of the week. For instance, on Monday, the show drew only 12,000 total viewers at 11 PM. Its adults 18-49 delivery was 4,000. In FXX’s target demo of adults 18-34 it averaged 3,000 viewers, while its young adults aged 18-24 audience was so miniscule, it was listed as 0 on the Nielsen charts. To put it in perspective, the second lowest rated cable late-night show among adults 18-49 on Monday, The Pete Holmes Show, averaged 245,000 in the demo. That’s 61 times Totally Biased‘s tally. In 18-34, the second lowest rated program, Bravo’s Watch What Happens Live, scored 101,000 viewers, 34 times the viewership of Totally Biased. While a dropoff in moving to FXX, which is carried in 26 million fewer homes than flagship FX, was expected, those public access program-level numbers are puzzling as Totally Biased was a solid and pretty stable ratings performer on FX. Adding to the head-scratcher is the fact that Totally Biased‘s 1 AM repeat on Monday night did far better than the 11 PM premiere, logging 39,000 total viewers and 27,000 adults 18-49.

Totally Biased performs better on Wednesdays, following original series It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia and The League, drawing an average of 110,000 total viewers, 92,000 adults 18-49 and 64,000 adults 18-34. Still, that is less than a third of the show’s audience on FX in the final leg of its first season (372,000) and half or less of Totally Biased‘s 18-49 (236,000) and 18-34 (127,000) Season 1D averages. And while the auditorium-size viewership for Totally Biased on some nights is somewhat of a mystery, the show’s long-term prospects at these levels are pretty clear. Totally Biased is well received and liked by FX brass, but a cancellation is looming unless the show mounts a ratings turnaround.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/10/the-mystery-of-totally-biaseds-vanishing-audience/
post #90432 of 93656
TV Notes
‘Key & Peele,’ ‘Drunk History’ Renewed by Comedy Central
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - Oct. 30, 2013

Comedy Central has renewed “Key & Peele,” for a fourth season and “Drunk History for a second.

The pickups come hours after word that the network has renewed “Brickleberry” for a third season. All three new seasons will premiere in 2014.

“We are covering several genres with these pickups: one sketch; one animation; and whatever ‘Drunk History’ is,” joked Kent Alterman, president of content development and original programming for the network.

“Key & Peele” is executive produced by Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele (pictured) as well as Ian Roberts, Jay Martel and Joel Zadak.

“Drunk History” is executive produced by Derek Waters, Jeremy Konner, along with Gary Sanchez Productions’ Will Ferrell, Adam McKay, Chris Henchy and Owen Burke.

http://www.thewrap.com/key-peele-drunk-history-renewed-comedy-central/
post #90433 of 93656
TV Notes
Bill Moyers to End Television Show
By Elizabeth Jensen, The New York Times - Oct. 30, 2013

Bill Moyers told public television stations on Tuesday that his interview program “Moyers & Company” would end with the Jan. 3 show, keeping to the two-year timetable he and the program’s funders committed to when he came out of a 20-month retirement in January 2012. The news was first reported by the trade publication Current.

Mr. Moyers, who was not available for comment, said in a letter to stations that while the show would disappear from television, he and his staff were exploring the possibility of continuing to serve audience members through his Web site,billmoyers.com, “with the goal of engaging them in the renewal of democracy.” He noted that the show had more than 315,000 Facebook fans, a number that is growing by several hundred people daily. “They — like so many of our viewers — take their citizenship seriously,” he wrote.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/30/bill-moyers-to-end-television-show/?ref=television&_r=0
post #90434 of 93656
TV/Nielsen Notes
For ‘Vampire,’ sweet taste of Halloween
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Oct. 31, 2013

Some of the other broadcast networks are running Halloween specials tonight, such as “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” on ABC and “SNL Halloween” on NBC.

But the CW already has a spooky show, “The Vampire Diaries,” which has something unique planned for tonight’s Halloween episode, airing at 8 p.m.

The lead characters are all attending the Monsters Ball, a Halloween costume party, with Elena and Damon going as Anne Boleyn and Henry VIII. During the party they’re coping with the fallout from Bonnie’s death, which is still reverberating in Mystic Falls.

The show, now in season five, is coming off a season high last week among adults 18-34 (2.06 rating) and women 18-34 (3.01), according to Nielsen live-plus-three-day-DVR-playback ratings.

With NBC and ABC struggling mightily in the 8 p.m. Thursday timeslot this fall, “Diaries” is actually pulling better numbers in the hour in key demos like 18-49s and 18-34s than those two networks, a rarity for the CW.

Like all CW shows, “Diaries” is also seeing a huge uptick in DVR viewership. Last week’s episode grew by 49 percent in 18-34s, 53 percent in women 18-34 and 49 percent in 18-49s with three-day playback.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/for-vampire-sweet-taste-of-halloween/
post #90435 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Technology/Business Notes
Intel Is Said to Weigh Sale of Online Cable TV Venture
By Brian Stelter, The New York Times - Oct. 31, 2013

Intel may bow out of its ambitious cable-television-via-the-Internet venture, known as OnCue, by selling it to Verizon, according to people with direct knowledge of the talks between the two companies.

It is possible that Intel will forge ahead with OnCue through a partnership with Verizon, or a pact with some other company, but a purchase by Verizon is most likely, according to the people, who insisted on anonymity because the talks were supposed to be private. A deal will most likely be struck by the end of the year.

OnCue, as envisioned by Intel, would take the traditional cable television bundle and make it more consumer-friendly by transmitting it via the Internet. The company’s technology has impressed many, but channel owners have been reluctant to make the necessary licensing deals, stirring speculation that Intel might not move forward.

The other big roadblock has been an internal one. When a new chief executive, Brian M. Krzanich, took over the company earlier this year, he expressed skepticism about the television project because it was not a core part of Intel’s business, and directed the project leaders to seek partnerships for it.

Earlier this fall Intel executives privately acknowledged that they would fall short of their widely publicized goal of introducing OnCue to the public in time for the holiday season.

A takeover of OnCue could position Verizon to sell a cablelike television service across the United States through existing broadband pipes or through its Verizon Wireless business. Its current eight-year-old television subscription service, FiOS, has five million subscribers and is growing steadily, but it is available in only about 15 percent of American homes because it is delivered over a proprietary fiber-optic network. Verizon said last year that it did not plan to expand that fiber-optic network much more.

But a Verizon television service could potentially reach many more people if it were not linked to the fiber-optic network and were made available through any broadband connection. Alternatively, it could be sold as an optional mobile TV upgrade for the Verizon Wireless unit’s roughly 100 million monthly subscribers.

Verizon is in the process of gaining full ownership of the wireless unit, having announced last month a $130 billion acquisition of Vodafone’s 45 percent stake. “We don’t comment on speculation,” a Verizon spokeswoman said on Wednesday after the online technology site AllThingsD published an article on the talks with Intel. An Intel spokesman declined to comment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/31/business/media/intel-is-said-to-weigh-sale-of-online-cable-tv-venture.html?ref=technology

Verizon will get this into production right after it delivers the new DVR that can record more than 2 shows at a time. frown.gif
post #90436 of 93656
I'm still trying to remember when the TV suits decided the over 50 viewers are worthless.
post #90437 of 93656
It's the marketing idiots.  They think that unless it's something we've never bought before, like adult diapers or nursing home care insurance, we cling for dear life to our favorite brands to which we swore undying fealty in our twenties and can't be persuaded to change loyalties, even when those old favorites have gone out of business.  Therefore advertising is wasted on us and advertisers won't buy commercial time during programming that appeals to us.

You'd think that might not apply to commercial-free premium programming, but comprehending two models would overwhelm the sand-grain sized brain of a marketing executive.
post #90438 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post

Who cares? And why are you so adamant about SNF beating TWD?

idk why does Lesley Goldberg care ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

I never saw Zena, was she as good as Xena?

Better she was the real one on the simpsons ep (i think it was a treehouse of horror) with the comic book guy.
post #90439 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

I'm still trying to remember when the TV suits decided the over 50 viewers are worthless.

Isnt the reason something like 50+ are easy to reach cause they watch alot of shows but 18-34 & 18-49 are a lot harder to reach cause they watch less so that makes them way more valuable.
post #90440 of 93656
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Oct. 31, 2013

IT'S THE GREAT PUMPKIN, CHARLIE BROWN
ABC, 8:00 p.m. ET

Originally televised by CBS in 1966, this is one of the two perfect Charles M. Schulz Peanuts specials – the other, of course, being the first, A Charlie Brown Christmas. And like that one, this is, at bottom, a cartoon about the value and strength of faith. This time it’s epitomized in Linus’ belief that the Great Pumpkin will visit him on Halloween, a faith that puts him, for a while, in a rough patch.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
NBC, 8:00 p.m. ET

This prime-time special is a compilation of Halloween skits from past shows – and since there are nearly 40 years from which to draw, it ought to be filled with many more treats than tricks.

VINCENT PRICE MARATHON
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

All over the TV cable and satellite spectrum today, you can see marathons of spooky movie franchises: the Halloween movies on AMC (beginning at 10 a.m. ET), most of the Nightmare on Elm Street movies on Syfy (beginning at 9n a.m. ET), even the Saw movies on IFC (beginning at 3:45 p.m. ET). But for Halloween purists, one better place, especially if there are younger eyes still watching, is TCM’s lineup of classic horror films starring Vincent Price. The action starts at 8 p.m. ET with 1961’s The Pit and the Pendulum, a start that’s entire apro-Poe – and continues all night and even into Friday morning, when TCM concludes with two of the best: 1968’s creepy witch-hunting drama The Conquerer Worm (at 6:30 a.m. Friday) and the wittiest serial-killer movie ever made, 1973’s Theatre of Blood (8:15 a.m. ET Friday), co-starring Diana Rigg and using the works of Shakespeare as inspiration for vengeful, imaginative bloodshed.

GHOSTBUSTERS
Comedy Central, 8:30 p.m. ET

This 1984 supernatural movie comedy may be the ultimate post-Halloween TV treat. Enjoy it with kids, and have marshmallows or Smores ready to enjoy at the climax. Bill Murray stars, Dan Aykroyd is wonderful, and Sigourney Weaver is great – especially when she’s possessed.

THE RETURNED
Sundance, 9:00 p.m. ET
MINISERIES PREMIERE:
This eight-part miniseries from France is a lot of things even Sundance’s promos won’t tell you. First, it’s subtitled – but don’t let that deter you. Second, it unfolds so deliberately, revealing its surprises and shocks so meticulously and patiently, that to give even the most basic summary would rob The Returned of some of its fun, and wonder, and eerieness. The less you know about this eight-part psychological thriller going in, the better, so all I’ll say is this: Set in a remote small town in the French Alps, it starts with a disaster, introduces a pair of increasingly mysterious sisters (pictured), and eventually introduces a serial killer, a series of mysterious characters and events, and an overall creepiness that makes this a drama that lingers with you long after each episode is over. Truly, impressively creepy.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

TV Review
Sundance's 'The Returned' Is Must-See-TV - But I Won't Say Why
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Oct. 31, 2013

The Returned, which Sundance Channel launches in the U.S. on Halloween night, is a creepy, eerie, hauntingly memorable miniseries. But you’ll have to trust me on that…

You’ll have to trust me because I don’t think I’ve ever seen a TV drama more dependent on mood, and slowly exposed revelations. The less you know about The Departed, the more engrossing it is from the start. It’s a show that, because of the boldly different way it unfurls, rewards both the patient and the ignorant.

This puts me, as a TV critic, in a very tough spot. I’m of two minds about what people regard as “Spoilers,” and my two minds are these. One, when writing or broadcasting a preview in advance of a TV show’s premiere, I try to reveal as little as possible, at least about surprise or key plot information, so viewers will have the same enjoyment watching as I did. Two, once something has been broadcast or streamed or otherwise made available, then it’s my job to discuss it, in whatever detail I wish, whether other people have seen it or not.

But The Returned, that’s something else entirely.

I’ve read one or two reviews, by critics I respect greatly, to see how they handed this particular case. And, in my opinion, they handled it poorly. So as highly as I recommend you watch The Departed, which premieres Thursday night at 9 ET on Sundance, I just as emphatically recommend that you avoid reading other articles about this miniseries, except for this one, until you’ve seen it.

Then write me – in about two months, when the eight-part drama is over – and say whether I was right to be so cautious and protective.

Meanwhile, to prepare for tonight, here’s all you need to, and what you should, know.

In France, where it was produced and presented by Canal Plus, The Returned was known as Les Revenants. Shown here, it’s still in French, but is subtitled. That’s one secret Sundance has kept from you, at least in its on-air promos, but embrace that, don’t flee from it. Sundance has made a smart and brave move, scheduling a subtitled series in prime time, but it’s hoping for an intelligent audience – which is exactly what The Returned should attract, and delight.

So what can I say about this show, in advance, without diluting its impact? Very little, but this:

It takes place in a small mountain village in the French Alps, a gorgeous but remote place serviced by a giant dam, winding road and a local pub, all of which figure, quickly or eventually, into the plot. And the mood, like the Pacific Northwest of Twin Peaks, is quietly but constantly foreboding. As the bartender tells a new arrival in Episode 6, “If you like tragedy, you’re in the right place.”

And if you like spellbinding, unpredictable stories of life and death, you’re in the right place, too. I’m particularly impressed by Yara Pilartz and Jenna Thiam (seen in photo at top), who play sisters Camille and Lena, and by little Swann Nambotin (right), who plays young Victor – but all of the actors here, and all their characters, are bound to surprise you, whatever your expectations or predictions.

My predictions: Every episode’s pre-credits sequence will hook you in, just like every closing shot will freak you out. The Returned, most of which was written and directed by Fabrice Gobert and Frederic Mermoud, will haunt you long after it’s come and gone.

And if I say that’s entirely apt, given the subject matter, I’m already flirting with revealing too much…

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=6141
post #90441 of 93656
WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
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Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Other networks take a hit against World Series
ABC, CBS and NBC shows fall to series lows
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Oct. 31, 2013

The final game of the World Series, won by the Boston Red Sox, pulled big ratings on Fox last night, and that led to lower ratings for every other broadcaster.

Fox easily won the night with a 5.4 adults 18-49 rating and 15 share, according to Nielsen overnights, more than double the No. 2 network, CBS, with a 2.2/6.

The big ratings for the World Series probably mean people skipped watching scripted shows for sports and are planning to catch up on their DVRs, so it will be interesting to see what the three-day DVR playback levels are for last night.

Nearly every original show on the Big Three networks was down from last week. Only two, ABC’s “Back in the Game” (1.7) and NBC’s “Revolution” (1.4), were even to last week, and both of those programs still tied series lows.

ABC’s entire lineup fell to season or series lows. “The Middle” was off 5 percent from last week, to a 2.1, while the 10 p.m. drama “Nashville” slid 13 percent to a series-low 1.4.

New comedy “Super Fun Night” was also off 14 percent to a 1.8 at 9:30, though much of that drop can be blamed on the fact that lead-in “Modern Family” was a repeat. It drew a 2.2 at 9 p.m., down more than a third from last week.

CBS’s “Survivor” slid 4 percent from last week to a series-low 2.3 at 8 p.m., and lead-out “Criminal Minds” tied a series low with a 2.4. At 10 p.m. “CSI” dipped 14 percent from last week to a series-low 1.8.

With Fox winning primetime and CBS in second, ABC placed third for the night at 1.8/6. NBC was fourth at 1.2/3, Univision fifth at 1.1/3, CW sixth at 0.6/2 and Telemundo seventh at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-eight percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for Fox’s World Series coverage are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data. Final numbers for the game will be out later today, and Media Life will post an update.

Fox finished first during each hour of the night, beginning with a 4.6 at 8 p.m. for baseball. CBS was second with a 2.3 for “Survivor,” ABC third with a 1.9 for “Middle” (2.1) and “Game” (1.7). NBC and Univision tied for fourth at 1.4, NBC for “Revolution” and Univision for “Porque el Amor Manda.” The CW was sixth with a 0.7 for “Arrow” and Telemundo seventh with a 0.3 for “Marido en Alquiler.”

At 9 p.m. Fox led with a 5.7 for baseball, while CBS remained second with a 2.4 for “Minds.” ABC was third with a 2.0 for a repeat of “Family” (2.2) and a new “Fun” (1.8), Univision fourth with a 1.1 for “La Tempestad,” NBC fifth with a 0.9 for a rerun of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” CW sixth with a 0.6 for “The Tomorrow People” and Telemundo seventh with a 0.4 for more “Marido en Alquiler.”

Fox was first again at 10 p.m. with a 5.8 for more baseball, with CBS second with a 1.8 for “CSI.” ABC was third with a 1.4 for “Nashville,” NBC fourth with a 1.2 for another “Law & Order: SVU” rerun, Univision fifth with a 0.9 for “Mentir para Vivir” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for “Santa Diabla.”

Among households, Fox was first for the night with a 10.6 average overnight rating and a 17 share. CBS was second at 6.3/10, ABC third at 4.1/6, NBC fourth at 2.9/5, Univision fifth at 1.5/2, CW sixth at 1.3/2 and Telemundo seventh at 0.6/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/networks-take-hit-world-series/

* * * *

Cable Overnights (18-49)
Big opening night for the NBA on TNT
Bulls-Heat game draws second-biggest audience

NBA fans were pretty excited to see the Miami Heat open the defense of their second straight title against the Chicago Bulls on Tuesday night.

The opening game of the season averaged 5.4 million total viewers on TNT, according to Nielsen overnights, becoming the second-most-watched NBA opener ever.

It finished behind only the 2010 Heat opener, when LeBron James made his debut with Miami. That game drew 7.4 million viewers.

Tuesday’s 8 p.m. game also drew a 3.3 household rating.

TNT televised a second contest at 10:30 p.m. between the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers, which drew a 2.4 rating and 3.6 million viewers.

The telecast probably would have drawn higher ratings if star guard Kobe Bryant had played. He is injured.

The doubleheader averaged a 2.9 rating and 4.5 million viewers, boosting TNT to No. 1 in primetime among all cable networks.

It was also the second-highest-rated opening night in TNT history, behind only 2010.

The games spurred a lot of social media activity, with 2.7 million NBA-related tweets, the most for any broadcast or cable program last night.

The night’s top cable programs:

18-49s
:
1. TNT’s “NBA Basketball” (8:09 p.m.) 2.5; 2. FX’s “Sons of Anarchy” (10 p.m.) 2.2; 3. TNT’s “NBA Basketball” (10:46 p.m.) 1.8.

Total Viewers: 1. TNT’s “NBA Basketball” (8:09 p.m.) 5.37 million; 2. FX’s “Sons of Anarchy” (10 p.m.) 4.20 million; 3. TNT’s “NBA Basketball” (10:46 p.m.) 3.57 million.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/big-opening-night-nba-tnt/
Edited by dad1153 - 10/31/13 at 9:58am
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TV Notes
CBS Eyes ‘How I Met Your Mother’ Spinoff From Carter Bays, Craig Thomas & Emily Spivey
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Oct. 30, 2013

EXCLUSIVE: As fans are preparing to say goodbye to one of TV’s most popular comedies, How I Met Your Mother, CBS is looking to extend the franchise. I’ve learned that the network is in talks with HIMYM producer 20th Century Fox TV for a spinoff series, which takes a female spin on the original show. Referred to as How I Met Your Father, the spinoff hails from HIMYM creators/executive producers Carter Bays and Craig Thomas and Up All Night creator/exec producer Emily Spivey. It would feature a new group of New York friends and chronicle a female member of the group’s quest to meet her future husband. I hear the new characters could be introduced in the HIMYM series finale, and Ted, Barney, Marshall, Lily and Robin’s favorite hangout, MacLaren’s Pub, may be featured on the new show, serving as a link between the two gangs. The premise, which is not tied to any of the original HIMYM characters, gives Bays, Thomas and Spivey a clean slate to build new characters and relationships. The trio, who will co-write and executive produce the spinoff, share a background — they all started in late-night and worked on New York-based late-night shows (Late Show for Bays and Thomas, Saturday Night Live for Spivey) before transitioning to primetime comedy series.

CBS certainly could use more HIMYM — the veteran comedy is the key piece holding together the network’s Monday lineup, which has had a rough fall. HIMYM launched its final season with a 3.7 adults 18-49 rating and remains CBS’ highest-rated Monday series and the second-highest rated overall behind The Big Bang Theory. This is the second hit comedy series to be exploring a spinoff for next season, joining ABC’s Modern Family, also from 20th TV, which is mulling an offshoot built around the character played by guest star Rob Riggle. Spivey, who is under an overall deal at 20th, is repped by UTA, which also reps Bays and Thomas.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/10/cbs-how-i-met-your-mother-spinoff/
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Business Notes
Time Warner Cable Loses 306,000 TV Subscribers Amid CBS Dispute
By Hilary Lewis and Alex Ben Block, The Hollywood Reporter - Oct. 31, 2013

Time Warner Cable lost 306,000 TV subscribers over the past three months, in part due to a month-long blackout of CBS, the company revealed when it announced its third-quarter earnings Thursday.

The company also lost 24,000 high-speed data and 128,000 voice subscribers, as the company experienced greater-than-expected declines across all three services.

TWC's had 11.4 million residential video subscribers at the end of the quarter, down from more than 11.7 million subscribers at the end of its second quarter.

During this quarter, customers in New York, L.A., Dallas and other markets lost access to CBS-owned stations and Showtime during a fight over retransmission fees.

The company also had a dispute with Journal Communications and it acknowledged that this event and the CBS dispute "negatively impacted" subscriber activity.

Meanwhile, TWC experienced growth in its business services, adding 14,000 subscribers and seeing revenue in that division grow 20.5 percent to $594 million. Total revenue for the quarter was up 2.9 percent to $5.5 billion. Operating income was up 6.0 percent to $1.2 billion.

TWC also experienced a 14.2 percent gain in residential high-speed data revenue, despite its subscriber loss. The company also saw its average monthly revenue per residential customer relationship increase by 1.9 percent to $105.56.

“We are better off with CBS than we would have been if we had not had this fight,” outgoing TWC CEO Glenn Britt said on an earnings conference call on Thursday. COO Rob Marcus, who is Britt's successor, said though that sub losses were "much worse" than expected and would continue to have an effect into the fourth quarter. He also highlighted that customer losses also spilled over into the company's broadband and telephony business.

The blackout began Aug. 2 when retransmission consent negotiations over the price TWC pays for CBS channels in New York, Los Angeles and Dallas, as well as the Smithsonian channel, broke down. TWC also pulled pay TV service Showtime from its systems nationwide, as CBS quickly blocked TWC broadband subscribers from watching online on CBS.com.

It was the first time CBS content had been blocked out by a multiple cable system operator in company history. It meant popular shows like 60 Minutes, NCIS and The Big Bang Theory were not available in two of the largest American TV markets.

The early analysis was that this would likely cost CBS some $400,000 a day; but as the weeks wore on it’s was TWC that was being hurt most. CBS show ratings for the most part, even without the coverage in New York, L.A. and Dallas, remained quite strong; and the network insisted it was easily weathering the storm.

Under the guidance of CEO Leslie Moonves, CBS remained firm throughout. It was asking for an unusually large increase from a little over 50 cents per sub per month to around $2 by the end of the contract. Moonves said that it was a historic adjustment so CBS could catch up with what was being paid to cable TV networks; and that its content, including NFL football and the top rated primetime line up, was far more valuable and it was not right for them to be paid less than TNT, USA and other cable networks.

TWC shot back that CBS has over the air distribution as well so cable should not have to pay as much. TWC noted that CBS gets the right to broadcast over the air from the federal government without paying anything; so it is different than a cable channel.

About four days into the blackout, TWC CEO Glenn Britt wrote a letter to CBS that was immediately leaked to the media offering to settle if it could offer CBS stations on an ala carte basis. CBS called the proposal a “sham” and turned down any such deal.

There were reports coming out of the CBS side that one issue was TWC insisting on controlling digital rights that would hinder outside deals for the network’s content with Netflix, Amazon and other streaming services.

Pressure began to mount from all sides as Congressman issued statements, consumer groups griped and associations – some backed by the cable and satellite operators – began calling for retransmission “reform,” meaning an end to payments for carrying the local channels and network.

Acting FCC chairwoman Mignon Clyburn threatened some “appropriate” action if the sides did not reach an agreement, but it was correctly taken as an empty threat. The FCC has stayed on the sidelines in retrans negotiations in recent years, saying it was for the market to decide.

It might also take a law but despite some harping by Congress, there was no sign of serious action to pass legislation to regulate, control or end retrans negotiations.

About three weeks in, TWC began offering to rebate the cost to subscribers of buying an antenna so people could watch some shows, such as the NFL, over the air without having to depend on their cable subscription.

On Aug. 8, talks officially resumed but in reality nothing happened. Both sides simply wanted to say they were talking during that period, but neither was ready to compromise to the satisfaction of the other.

CBS announced in late August that it had closed a deal with Verizon FiOS to carry the same services at the same cost it was offering TWC, which gave it a PR victory.

On Aug. 14, some subscribers filed a lawsuit against TWC in Los Angeles, claiming their contract for service was being breached and raising other charges.

As the two sides approached Labor Day weekend, there were signs of progress. With football season about to officially start, and events like the U.S. Open taking place, talks finally got serious.

In the end it appears CBS was the winner, getting the price it wanted and retaining many of the digital rights, so it was still free to do other deals with Netflix, Amazon and others for the same programming.

“The final agreements…deliver to us all the value and terms that we sought in these discussions,” Moonves said in a memo to CBS employees that was leaked to the media. “We are receiving fair compensation for CBS content and we also have the ability to monetize our content going forward on all the new, developing platforms that are right now transforming the way people watch television.”

Britt was more subdued in his statement: “As in all of our negotiations, we wanted to hold down costs and retain our ability to deliver a great video experience for our customers.

While we certainly didn’t get everything we wanted, ultimately we ended up in a much better place than when we started.”

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/time-warner-cable-loses-306000-652131
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TV Review
Following the Grim Reaper, Equipped With a Camera
‘Time of Death’ Tracks Terminal Patients to the End
By Mike Hale, The New York Times - Oct. 31, 2013

If there was ever an argument against binge viewing, it’s “Time of Death,” a documentary series beginning on Friday night on Showtime. Over the course of six hours we watch eight people sicken and die, succumbing to cancers and other diseases at ages ranging from 19 to 77. For the viewer, some recovery time between episodes is probably a good idea.

Made to examine how people handle the last months or days of their lives, “Time of Death” has an odd structure. One story, that of Maria, a 48-year-old in Santa Cruz, Calif., with terminal breast cancer, runs through all six episodes. But each episode also tells at least one other self-contained story, cutting back and forth between Maria and a man with Lou Gehrig’s disease or Maria and a woman with lung cancer.

The weekly tales have a sameness to them: they’re about people meeting death in the best way they can manage, helped by supportive family members, friends, caregivers and hospice nurses. Everyone behaves well, and the dying speak frankly and lucidly about their lives and their concern for those they’re leaving behind. The unseen film crews are granted remarkable access, and in several cases the camera is in the room when the subject dies.

In their combination of intense sorrow with chipper uplift, these stories feel like what you might expect from the “Time of Death” production company, Magical Elves, which is better known for reality shows like “Project Runway” and “Top Chef.” The segments turn messiness and grief into something tidy and a bit superficial. The real emotions running through the scenes show up in faces at the edge of the frame, staring at the floor or going blank during a moment of forced cheer.

But the story of Maria and her three children, ages 25, 15 and 14, is something else entirely — a raw, agonizing look at a family that falls apart under the pressure of a parent’s impending death. Bad behavior and devastating reversals build to a pitch of despair in the fifth and sixth episodes, in scenes that may shake you in a way nonlive television rarely does.

Presumably the producers’ realization of what they had in Maria and her bright, gorgeous, unfettered children led to the bifurcated structure of the series, and it’s the ups but mostly downs of her last eight months on earth that make “Time of Death” worth watching.

When her youngest daughter runs away from home, Maria tells the camera, “Not everybody can watch somebody die.” It’s not an easy thing, and you wonder about the effect on the camera crews, embedded with a cast of characters who all passed away between August 2012 and July 2013, four of them in a six-day span in April. After that, another season of “Top Chef” might look pretty good.

TIME OF DEATH
Showtime, Friday nights at 9, Eastern and Pacific times; 8, Central time.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/31/arts/television/time-of-death-tracks-terminal-patients-to-the-end.html?ref=television&_r=0
post #90446 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Isnt the reason something like 50+ are easy to reach cause they watch alot of shows but 18-34 & 18-49 are a lot harder to reach cause they watch less so that makes them way more valuable.
That's an interesting approach. When an advertiser pays X dollars for 30 seconds if the over 50 normal audience makeup is a larger percentage than the coveted demo then their cost per thousand skyrockets while we old farts come in much more cheaply. wink.gif
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Walk into any New York ad agency or sit at a meeting with agency execs and everything becomes remarkably clear. The reality of the people who staff those agencies is projected onto the television landscape. One look at the people around the room and you have an "ah-ha" moment for everything trend you see on television.
post #90448 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Isnt the reason something like 50+ are easy to reach cause they watch alot of shows but 18-34 & 18-49 are a lot harder to reach cause they watch less so that makes them way more valuable.

18 to 49 yr olds are more eager to buy things they don't need, plain and simple.

Those over 50 have bought most of the things they don't need already.
post #90449 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by GqMagic View Post

18 to 49 yr olds are more eager to buy things they don't need, plain and simple.

Those over 50 have bought most of the things they don't need already.
Well put.
post #90450 of 93656
Critic's Notes
The Era of Awesome Kid Weirdos Is Here
By Magaret Lyons, Vulture.com (New York Magazine)

"Sitcom kid" is a term used derisively — a child who's phony-seeming, coached, a little too "on" in a way that makes you resent their parents and fear for their future abilities to adapt in the face of adversity. In their voices, you can hear the hundreds of hours of practicing "Tomorrow" from Annie, or "Where Is Love?" from Oliver. Eesh.

Mercifully, over the last few years, that's fallen out of fashion — partially because there were simply fewer family-set comedies on TV, partially just because character and actor styles come and go. Shows like Louie helped usher in the non-precocious kid style; sure, the two young actresses who play Louie's daughters are terrific, but they're not that saccharine weird-cute of an early eighties sitcom kid. And this new season pushes things a little further: We're in the era of awesome kid weirdos. They're quirky, they're themselves, they have talents and shortcomings, and they're all just a little bit offbeat.

The stand-out kids of the season are the two boys on Trophy Wife: Ryan Lee as middle child Warren and Albert Tsai as youngest son Bert. (You might also recognize Lee as the tween Leslie Mann screamed at in This Is 40.) Warren is the easily excitable doof, who's terrible with vocabulary words but hugely enthusiastic about just about everything else — including, say, organizing Legos with his half-brother Bert. Warren's mom is an intense type-A doctor (Marcia Gay Harden, as Bradley Whitford's first ex-wife), but Bert's mom is the loopy hippie (Michaela Watkins, Whitford's second ex), though everyone seems to get along pretty well. Trophy gets compared to Modern Family a lot, and in that sense, Warren and Bert are both Mannys. They're passionate oddballs, people to whom perhaps the outside world will be unkind. These characters — Warren and Bert, but Manny too — are themselves funny, but we also learn a lot about their respective family dynamics by how accepting and supportive everyone around them seems. Are their parents sometimes perplexed? Sure, but it's never cruel or dismissive. On Trophy Wife, the brothers' appeal eclipses that of older sister Hillary (Bailee Madison), who's written as a more textbook Salty, Organized, Brainy Teenage Girl. Maybe as the season goes on, we'll see more depth or intrigue from her.

On Mom, there's a similar dynamic: The older sister character feels more like a stock player, while the younger brother is a lot more engaging. Teenage Violet (Sadie Calvano) is newly pregnant — part of this fall's exhausting teen-mom trend — though it seems like she'd be just as acerbic in a non-gestational state. Her little brother Roscoe (Blake Garrett Rosenthal from Bridesmaids and New Girl), though, is more dimensional. Initially it seemed like he was going to be a tiny nerd kid, the sort of smartypants character shoehorned in to roll his eyes at his dumb-dumb parents. (Say…Alex on Modern Family.) Instead, Roscoe can be both a little nerdy and a little kid-silly, like when he tries to get out of brushing his teeth by vowing to brush twice as long tomorrow, or confesses to having worn the same underwear for several days in a row. Again, Roscoe serves as the focal point of his family's ability to feel and express tenderness: Both mom (Anna Faris) and grandma (Allison Janney) are recovering alcoholics, his dad Baxter (Matt Jones) is only sort of in the picture, and his sister resents the neglect she suffered owing to her mother's addiction. But everyone has a soft spot for Roscoe, and he brings out the gentleness on what can be a sort of harsh show.

And in the most striking example of rad but off-the-beaten-path kids bringing out gentleness from harshness, there's the just-finished MasterChef Junior. Kids between the ages of 9 and 13 competed for judges Gordon Ramsay, Joe Bastianich, and Graham Elliot; after years of watching Ramsay gleefully insult chefs (nothing will ever top "panini head," but he's tried), it's refreshing — and genuinely surprising — to watch him be so supportive of young chefs. He's not mean to them, though the young contestants seem very aware that he could be. And the children on MCJ are fantastic home chefs, with skills vastly eclipsing any sort of ordinary childhood interest in cooking. Honestly, their skills eclipse most adults' interests in cooking. They improvise snail soups and rely on their go-to toffee pudding recipes, and when the going gets really tough, the infamously sour Ramsay comes over and tenderly helps them. It's kinda great.

These shows didn't invent awesome weirdos, and current shows like The Middle have been exploring quirky kid characters for a solid five seasons. Maybe this repetition will get tiresome, and we'll yearn for the days of Stephanie Tanner. But I doubt it.

http://www.vulture.com/2013/10/era-of-awesome-kid-weirdos-is-here.html
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