or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 3018

post #90511 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Washington Notes
TV Sports Blackouts to End? FCC Wants to Eliminate Rule
By Ted Johnson, Variety.com - Nov. 1, 2013

FCC Acting Chairwoman Mignon Clyburn has introduced a proposal to end the agency’s nearly 40-year-old sports blackout rule, saying that changes in the marketplace have “raised questions” about whether they are still in the public interest.

I fail to understand why the FCC would have anything to do with any league's blackout agreements

It doesn’t. Most of the popular press about this issue, including the Variety article, is just plain wrong.

The FCC sports blackout rule is simply a variation on its syndex and network non-dup rules, and it applies only to games made available to cable/satellite viewers via out-of-market, aka “distant” broadcast stations, when such games are not carried by a local broadcaster. This rule fills a hole in the syndex/non-dup rules whereby a local broadcaster that would normally have local broadcast rights to a game and thus be able to have the distant broadcast deleted pursuant to its syndex/non-dup rights, cannot invoke such rights because the local broadcast is blacked out pursuant to league rules.

In other words, all the FCC blackout rule does is allow a locally blacked out game to also be blacked out from cable and satellite subscribers who might otherwise receive that game via a superstation or distant network service.

But today, very few subscribers receive out of market broadcast stations at all, and very rarely do such stations carry games to which the rule would apply, so all the hubbub about this rule is really much ado about nothing, and most folks expecting to see more sports if/when the rule is ended will be sorely disappointed.
post #90512 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post


SPORTS STREAMING SERVICES

The trouble with online streaming services for sports — the ones that let you watch games on your computer, television or mobile device — is that most of them are subject to media blackouts, meaning broadcasters have exclusive rights to live games. So the home team, which you'd see broadcast on a local station, won't be available to watch on any online streaming service. So it's pretty tough — but not impossible — to watch live sports online, legally.

This is the one thing I don't understand. I can stream and watch every game outside of my area but if I want to watch my local team, even with a subscription to cable or satellite, I can't. You would think the local teams would want you watching their games instead of ones outside of their area. This needs to change soon. I should be able to watch my local teams while on the go.
post #90513 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

No problem with Sundays, as the premium network shows are repeated ad nauseum later that night/morning and throughout the week. Even the cablenet shows are repeated several times. If you miss one, that's on you. Wednesday has become the big bottleneck for me since the 5 shows I watch then are all on broadcast networks, and thus not repeated. Fortunately, a dual-tuner DVR is all that's required to get me safely through the evening.

Go with Dish and get a Hopper. It records the 4 networks on one tuner and saves them for 8 days....
post #90514 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

This is the one thing I don't understand. I can stream and watch every game outside of my area but if I want to watch my local team, even with a subscription to cable or satellite, I can't. You would think the local teams would want you watching their games instead of ones outside of their area. This needs to change soon. I should be able to watch my local teams while on the go.

The blackouts are kinda weird, I'm 400 miles from Memphis Grizzlies, blacked out here, nothing on local Comcast to access blackouts. Atlanta blacked out 150 miles away, they are available most of the time on local regional sports nets. Cincinnati 300 miles away, nothing locally available, and blacked out.
post #90515 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

The blackouts are kinda weird, I'm 400 miles from Memphis Grizzlies, blacked out here, nothing on local Comcast to access blackouts. Atlanta blacked out 150 miles away, they are available most of the time on local regional sports nets. Cincinnati 300 miles away, nothing locally available, and blacked out.

And you're blackout using NBALP as well?
post #90516 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

And you're blackout using NBALP as well?

Yep, just checked the archive of games, last night's MEM/DAL game is blacked out, all the others are availabe except Atlanta, if they played, I can't remember, but they are definitely blacked out. I do have Directv and I get all the Memphis games on some channel, but I can't get them on my local Comcast. I can't swear to the LP on Comcast, they could conceivable be available, I think there is still a free trial, I'll try to check it out and see if possible the Memphis games are available on it.
post #90517 of 93684
Nielsen/Business Notes
Seeking More Pay for Delayed Play
By Bill Carter, The New York Times - Nov. 4, 2013

In 2007, faced with the growing popularity of digital video recorders, advertisers agreed to pay television networks for commercials viewed within three days of a show’s first broadcast.

But with the pace of delayed viewing increasing ever more rapidly, a chorus of network executives is pushing for a new change — payment for seven days of commercial viewing on everything from computer screens and tablets to TV sets.

David F. Poltrack, who has headed CBS’s research for more than 30 years, said it would be hard to understate the influence of the digital video recorder on the economic model of commercial television. “The difference between this season and two seasons ago is more dramatic than the difference between two seasons ago and 20 seasons ago,” he said.

The single biggest factor in that upheaval: delayed — and sometimes never counted — viewing of television shows. Under the agreement negotiated five years ago, known in the industry as C3, networks do not get paid for any viewing that takes place starting on the fourth day after a show’s first run, even though more and more viewing is falling into that category.

Viewing in the period four to seven days after the first run is up about 17 percent this season, Mr. Poltrack said. That can mean millions of viewers. The new Fox and NBC hits “Sleepy Hollow” and “The Blacklist” have both been adding more than a million viewers in those extra days, and about half a rating point in the category many advertisers pay a premium for — viewers between the ages of 18 and 49.

“These are our viewers,” said Kevin Reilly, chairman of entertainment for the Fox Broadcasting Company. “It’s not as though they are lesser viewers or negligible viewers.”

Indeed, they are valuable viewers. Brad Adgate, the senior vice president for research at Horizon Media, said the 18-49 rating for programs in playback mode is better than first-run numbers for almost every network program this season. The median age for viewers watching recorded shows is 45.1 — younger than any of the four big networks (CBS, 58.3; ABC, 54.2; Fox, 51.1; NBC, 50.7).

Leslie Moonves, the CBS president, noted that viewers who play back shows demonstrated “a definite desire to watch those shows,” which goes to the increasingly important advertising area called engagement.

The counterargument, of course, to the building desire to receive seven days’ pay from ad buyers is that delayed viewers are often commercial-skippers. But Nielsen has steadily shown — in the face of consistent skepticism from those who skip ads — that about half the commercials are viewed days later.

Pat McDonough, the senior vice president for analysis at Nielsen, said, “You just watch them; you forget you’re watching a commercial.” She said that no matter what the program or time frame, “it never gets below 40 percent” viewing for commercials.

Mr. Moonves, who in his long tenure at CBS has been aggressive in pursuing value for every aspect of network television, said confidently that by next May, when networks make ad deals for the next season, “The new currency will be live plus seven days” — or C7.

Linda Yaccarino, the top sales executive for NBC Universal, said she had already seen more flexibility among advertisers. “It’s top of mind in meetings with customers,” she said.

Paul Lee, ABC’s top entertainment executive, said, “We’ve done some C7 deals already.” He said ABC might be in a special position because of all the serialized shows it broadcasts. “We’re getting more value for shows like ‘Scandal,’ ” he said.

Still, the collective view of the ad community remains: we’ll see.

“Clients are already getting this audience,” said Rino Scanzoni, the chief investment officer for the media buying giant GroupM, who was at the center of the creation of C3 in 2007. “It’s very difficult for an agency to go to a client and say: why don’t you just be benevolent and pay for it?”

Even with added viewing, going past three days will remain an issue for advertisers who need timely exposure, Mr. Scanzoni said, especially movie companies that need to open a film on a specific date. But he said the issue would come down to a negotiation, with advertisers expecting networks to concede something — perhaps a lower initial rate. “There has to be some incentive,” he said.

Whatever happens to the C3 system, the television business is rethinking across the board to cope with the changes wrought by delayed viewing. Mr. Adgate suggested that some advertisers might decide to start ad promotions earlier to capture the millions waiting longer to see shows.

Mr. Poltrack of CBS noted that playback was heavy on weekends, which is fine for CBS shows that play on Thursdays because that falls inside the C3 window; Monday shows are hurt, however, because CBS gets no money if they are played back the following Saturday. “It’s becoming a marketing challenge,” he said.

Robert Greenblatt, the chairman of NBC Entertainment, said, “It seems overly self-serving to say to viewers: watch it within three days. The better message is: watch it soon.”

That has already led to a push to develop shows with excitement and urgency, he said. But urgency is what programmers also say they must now avoid in judging shows, because the viewership numbers that arrive in three or seven days (or 30 — networks are also putting out month-after ratings) may revive shows that struggle in early ratings.

Mr. Moonves pointed to how patient CBS was being with the new drama “Hostages,” which has attracted weak audiences for its first broadcasts. The aggregated numbers are somewhat more promising, so CBS has so far stuck with the show.

Fox has done the same with its comedy “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” going so far as to slot a special episode after the Super Bowl. Mr. Reilly noted that “comedy is a slow-growth business” that demands special patience to see if an audience finds it over time.

As they do all this recalculating, the networks are keeping eyes trained on two other developments. One is the rapid growth of video-on-demand, which the networks embrace. The VOD system does not allow fast-forwarding, so commercials cannot be skipped.

The future gold mine in VOD, as the networks see it, is in the added business that can be done after initial three-day commercial exposure ends. At the moment, the networks simply remove the ads. But they expect to be able to switch to new commercials after three days, which would mean separate sales to new advertisers.

And there is one more looming avenue of revenue, based on the addition by Nielsen — next fall by most estimates — of a system that will measure streaming shows on tablets and computers. At the moment, that viewing is going completely unmeasured — and unpaid for.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/04/business/media/networks-want-advertisers-to-pay-for-delayed-viewing.html?hp&_r=0
post #90518 of 93684
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Dancing With the Stars (120 min., LIVE)
10:01PM - Castle
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Chris Hemsworth; comic Artie Lange; Jane's Addiction performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - How I Met Your Mother
8:30PM - 2 Broke Girls
9PM - Mike & Molly (Season Premiere)
9:30PM - Mom
10PM - Hostages
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (2013 World Series MVP David Ortiz; Woody Harrelson; The Wanted performs)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Lauren Graham; Eugenio Derbez)

NBC:
8PM - The Voice (120 min.)
10:01PM - The Blacklist
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Anthony Hopkins; Sting performs)
12:36AM - Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (Simon Baker; Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.); Dismemberment Plan performs)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Strfkr performs; singer Caitlin Crosby)

FOX:
8PM - Bones
9PM - Sleepy Hollow

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Junk in the Trunk 3
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Dallas
(R - Feb. 9, 2011)
10PM - Independent Lens: The Graduates

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque el Amor Manda
9PM - La Tempestad
10PM - Mentir Para Vivir

THE CW:
8PM - Hart of Dixie
9PM - Beauty and the Beast

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Marido en Alquiler (120 min.)
10PM - Santa Diabla

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Journalist Bob Woodruff)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author David Folkenflik)
12:01AM - At Midnight (Jonah Ray; Howard Kremer; Ali Wong)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Kevin Kline; Brie Larson; King Krule)
Midnight - Pete Holmes Show (Ike Barinholtz)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Tom Hiddleston; comic Brad Wollack; comic Arden Myrin; comic Ryan Stout)

SYNDICATION:
Check Local Listings - Arsenio (Michael Weatherly; Barkhad Abdi; Janelle Monae)
post #90519 of 93684
TV Notes
John Noble, this is your 'Sleepy Hollow' wake-up call
By Gary Levin, USA Today - Nov. 4, 2013

Sleepy Hollow is a sleeper hit.

After just four episodes, the new drama is Fox's highest-rated series, and one of network TV's top newcomers among young-adult viewers. And its 13-episode first season has already been extended for a second.

Tonight (9 ET/PT), it returns from a break with "The Sin Eater," a pivotal episode that introduces John Noble as Henry Parrish, a recluse who fills that life-saving title role. "He's like the sage, the elder statesman who gets brought in rather reluctantly and agrees to help," says Noble, a fan favorite who starred in the Sleepy producers' previous Fox series, Fringe.

Who's he helping? Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison), the long-dormant hero, who's gone missing again? Abbie Mills (Nicole Beharie), his detective partner, who has her own haunted past?

The episode also begins a series of extended flashbacks that fill in the details of Crane's past: How he switched sides from British to colonial soldier; how he met his future wife Katrina, whose spell revived him more than two centuries after he was killed by a Headless Horseman; and how his past ties into the show's mythology — and his ability to solve crimes in the present.

"It's nice to explore a different side of Ichabod. He was responsible for some bad things when he was fighting for the wrong side," says British actor Mison (Parade's End), who plays him, quickly adding, "Don't tell my mother I called the British the wrong side."

Future episodes this season, ending Jan. 20, will rely more heavily on flashbacks and the show's core characters. And Noble, who starred as Fringe's breakout character, addled scientist Walter Bishop, returns twice more — including the Jan. 20 season finale — and is on board for next season.

"I have to sense there's a connection with Ichabod that will play out," Noble says. Are there similarities (apart from looks) between Parrish and his Fringe character? "Both are complex men with big secrets, and both have a certain charm about them."

Mison calls Noble "perfect for this type of show: You can throw the most absurd line of dialogue at him and he'll sell it instantly."

That isn't what was expected of Sleepy itself: "I thought this show was meant to be a hard sell, that we were meant to spend ages convincing people to watch," Mison says of the concept, which blends the sturdy procedural format with a fanciful, and original, historical drama. "There's not very much like it on telly. We went straight in with as many outlandish things as we could."

Adds executive producer Alex Kurtzman: "We kind of knew how insane it was up top, and that's why we loved it so much."

But Sleepy quickly proved an unlikely hit: Original episodes are averaging 12.3 million viewers, including big gains from DVR-delayed viewing, a feat that sparked "shock and surprise and delight," Kurtzman says. (The Sept. 30 episode drew 21 million when DVR viewing, video on demand, streaming and a repeat are factored in, Fox said Friday, citing new Nielsen data.)

The show combines elements of two Washington Irving stories —The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle – published around 1820 and set near the time of the Revolutionary War. In this version, Crane awakens in present-day Sleepy Hollow, and is threatened by his tie to "Headless," one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, who also finds his way into the future. (Wilmington, N.C., where the series is filmed, is a stand-in for the Upstate New York town).

In teaming Crane with Abbie, Kurtzman and co-creator Roberto Orci took inspiration from The X-Files' pairing of investigator opposites Mulder and Scully. But they wanted to avoid casting them as believer and skeptic, as that earlier Fox show did.

"Abbie's past and backstory is as fraught and complicated as Crane's," Kurtzman says. As viewers learned in the first four episodes, "she's trying to function as a normal person, knowing she's been touched by something abnormal." Crane's "emergence into her world forces her to confront a past she's been running from. And it takes her a while to get her head around the idea of being chosen to thwart the apocalypse."

One thing fans haven't gotten their heads around is when Crane will shed his colonial garb, a rather obvious contrast with the Sleepy locals that was joked about in an early episode.

"That will be addressed very soon," teases Mison. "We quite like that there is an iconic look to our Ichabod, that we don't want to deviate from too much," he says. But "seeing him wash clothes in the sink isn't quite enough."

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/11/03/sleepy-hollow-fox-tom-mison-john-noble/3326347/
post #90520 of 93684
TV Review
The return of 'Mike & Molly'
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

That didn't take long: Earlier in October, after just two episodes, CBS canceled the terrible comedy "We Are Men," and this week "Mike & Molly" (9 p.m. Monday, KDKA-TV) returns to the air starring Swissvale native Billy Gardell as Mike and comic actress Melissa McCarthy ("Bridesmaids") as Molly.

In an interview this summer, executive producer Chuck Lorre said he and his colleagues are "rebirthing" the series for the new season. This explains promos that have been airing that refer to the show as "the new 'Mike & Molly.'"

"It's just changing the tone of the show," Mr. Lorre said. "There's a tonal quality of the show we want to address, and clearly I think the show needs to take more advantage of the enormous talent of Melissa McCarthy. That's an obvious thing that has to be addressed going forward. She's the biggest comedy star in the world right now and the series has to reflect that."

That's evident in the title of Monday's season premiere, "Molly Unleashed."

The episode begins with Molly in her classroom handing out a test that she says will determine her students' futures while ruminating on her own lot in life -- living in her mom's basement "suffocating under a mountain of debt" -- despite scoring well on such a test when she was a child.

"Some mornings I wake up and think, why are you even getting out of bed?" Molly says. "A bed I'm still making payments on, by the way."

Then, after telling her students to "follow their dreams," she falls out the classroom window. The reset begins with a more active Molly who more closely resembles the characters Ms. McCarthy has played in her hit movies "Bridesmaids" and "The Heat."

Before the end of the episode, Molly gets referred to as having "lost her marbles," "loony" and "the Nutty Professor." Mike's mom, Peggy (Rondi Reed), even weighs in on Molly's issues and how they might impact her marriage to Mike.

"Marriage is not for the faint of heart," she says. "I never understood why the gays want it so bad. But who knows, maybe they'll fix it up like they do a sketchy neighborhood."

After getting herself pulled together, Molly meets with a union rep (Brian Baumgartner, "The Office") who represents her in front of her employer.

"You don't need a good excuse," he advises Molly for her crackup. "You're in a union."

And later he tells her all she needs to do when she returns to the classroom: "Just show up, play 'em a movie and cash a check. You're in a union."

Molly goes out drinking with her mom (Swoosie Kurtz) and sister (2003 Carnegie Mellon University grad Katy Mixon) and says she became a teacher because it was not her passion; it was the easy path.

At the end of the half-hour, Molly is still in search of herself and what she wants to do with her life vocationally. This will be a theme for the season: Molly trying to find herself and make a go of it in the new profession she chooses.

In next week's episode she goes on a ride-along with Mike in his police car to do research for the book she decides to write.

Putting the show's focus squarely on Molly and her career aspirations -- episode three follows Molly to the funeral home where her sister works for more book research -- gives "Mike & Molly" a story engine beyond the relationship between the two title characters. Whether this is a path viewers will want to journey along with Mike and Molly remains to be seen.

http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/tv-radio/2013/11/03/The-return-of-Mike-amp-Molly-The-return-of-Mike-amp-Molly/stories/201311030001
post #90521 of 93684
TV/Technology Notes
Your iPad Is Now Your Kid's TV
By Sam Thielman, AdWeek.com - Nov. 3, 2013

Just call them the very early adopters. By now, everyone’s got a story about a kid who swipes at magazines, televisions and even windows because they’ve assimilated the iPad technique. Nielsen estimates put potential kids’ tablet viewership at 16.5 million, and while television deliveries via smartphones and tablets won’t be added to its national TV ratings until September 2014, networks are diving headfirst into this emerging market.

The Walt Disney Co. last week unveiled perhaps the most radical tablet-related development, saying that its new Disney Junior series, Sheriff Callie’s Wild West, will stream to tablets before it ever hits the linear feed. Beginning Nov. 24, verified subscribers can access the new program via the Watch Disney Junior app; the first Western for the footy-pajamas set won’t run on the network until early 2014.

By and large, the kids-targeted cable nets are developing apps with the tacit understanding that distribution and measurement will eventually catch up with them. Steve Youngwood, Nickelodeon’s evp and gm of digital, said advertisers have been “incredibly understanding” about having to accept guarantees made against internal data.

Thus far, the initial viewer-pattern data has been encouraging. “In the past year and a half, we’ve seen video viewing just skyrocket across mobile,” said Beau Teague, Cartoon Network’s senior director of user experience. “Our mobile viewing has surpassed even viewing on the desktop site.”

Some of that has to do with the weirdly obsessive way in which younger children (say, ages 2-8) tend to sample on-demand content.

“We definitely see a lot of repeat viewing,” Teague said. “Kids will return to favorite episodes and favorite clips. They’ll seek out whatever the catchphrase was from last night’s episode of Adventure Time.”

It’s also worth noting that mobile-access content can gently nudge operators who have dragged their feet over the adoption of authenticated streaming services. If subscribers are clamoring for cool tablet-only content that a Disney or a Nick or a Cartoon Net creates, MSOs may be more likely to acquiesce when those same programmers begin to agitate for a much more platform-agnostic approach.

Of course, targeting kids brings with it a host of specific regulatory issues, regardless of the device, said Albert Lai, chief technology officer of Brightcove.

“Any provider of content for kids needs to be wary of legal and federal regulation,” Lai said. “There’s opportunity, but everyone has to be very careful about the monetization.”

Lai also offered a personal anecdote: “I spent the weekend with my niece and nephew, and my sister was trying to understand how to provide appropriate content for kids who were 8 and 11, and how she could maintain control over the monetization piece.”

Why was that a priority at the moment? “They’d gotten an iTunes bill and it was $300,” Lai said. “She and her husband said, ‘I don’t think those are all app purchases.’”

http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/your-ipad-now-your-kids-tv-153575
post #90522 of 93684
TV Notes
NBC Midseason Drama Series ‘Crisis’ Stops Production For “Course Correction”
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Nov. 4, 2013

EXCLUSIVE: Upcoming NBC drama series Crisis has gone on an unplanned hiatus. The eight-day (one episode cycle) break started on Friday night after production was wrapped on the fifth episode after the pilot. Insiders describe the reasons for the stoppage as “course correction,” with writers using the time to tweak storylines and work on scripts. There also will be some reshoots done on completed episodes. Along with the pilot for The Blacklist, Crisis, a hostage/political thriller drama starring Gillian Anderson and Dermot Mulroney, tested through the roof in the spring, with the two considered NBC’s strongest drama pilots of last season. There has been concern recently that subsequent episodes were veering from the direction (and promise) of the pilot, which led to the decision to take a break and try to fix that.

Additionally, I hear Crisis producer 20th TV is in the process of bringing in senior level writers to support creator Rand Ravich who tends to work with smaller writing staffs, something that proved hard for a complex, serialized drama with multiple storylines like Crisis. Unlike fall series, midseason ones are not on a tight delivery schedule, which has allowed a number of elaborate drama productions to take a temporary shutdown for extra work on storylines and scripts. 20th TV previously did it with Fox’s 24 in the fall of 2008 and on NBC’s Awake two years ago.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/11/nbc-midseason-drama-crisis-stops-production/
post #90523 of 93684
Note: This article was published before Game 6 of the World Series was played.

TV Sports
Why Kids Aren't Watching Baseball
Thrills in October, But Kids Don't Watch Like They Have in the Past; The 'Opera of Sports'
By Matthew Futterman, Wall Street Journal

The 2013 World Series has given baseball nearly everything it could have dreamed of. A long series. Tight games. Storied teams. Controversial, game-changing calls. The irrepressible David Ortiz. And those outrageous beards!

Through the first five games, Fox averaged over 14 million viewers, 12% more than last year. This was about more than just Boston and St. Louis, the two cities involved.

There's one problem, though: Too many kids have found something else to do.

It isn't hard to figure out why. So many games dragging deep into their fourth hour. All those AARP-eligible folks lining the lower levels of the stands. Baseball has morphed into sports' version of the opera—long productions filled with pomp, color and crazy facial hair that younger audiences just don't get.

The average World Series viewer this year is 54.4 years old, according to Nielsen, the media research firm. The trend line is heading north: The average age was 49.9 in 2009. Kids age 6 to 17 represented just 4.3% of the average audience for the American and National League Championship Series this year, compared with 7.4% a decade ago.

Comparisons with the NFL are pointless. That behemoth of North American sports dominates nearly every demographic. But kids make up a larger segment of the television audiences for the NBA, NHL and even soccer's English Premier League than they do for baseball.

Kids accounted for 9.4% of the NBA conference finals audience this year, compared with 10.6% a decade ago. They represented 9% of the NHL conference-finals audience in the spring. For Premier League soccer on the NBC Sports Network, kids are accounting for 11% of the audience.

And this isn't about how late in the day the games are being played. Baseball's two league championship series had more pre-prime time starts this year than in 2003, yet the average youth audience for the two series added up to 542,000 this year. In 2003, it was nearly 2.5 million. That drop can't be explained completely by the epic Red Sox-Yankees and Marlins-Cubs series that year, or by the pre-Hulu/Netflix TV landscape. Through the first five World Series games this year, kids accounted for 4.6% of the audience.

Baseball officials argue that their audience tracks closely to that of prime-time network TV in general, where kids now make up about 5% of the audience, and the median age of viewers is in the early-to-mid 50s. They attribute their declines in part to the fragmenting TV audience, especially among kids.

Also, they point out, TV is far more competitive in October, with pro and college football and a new TV season in full swing, than it is in May and June for the NHL and NBA playoffs.

Bob Bowman, chief executive of MLB Advanced Media, baseball's tech company, said that while TV remains king, it isn't the only measure of fan engagement in the mobile era. Fans, presumably many of them kids, downloaded 10 million copies of MLB.com's mobile app this season, up from 6.7 million in 2012. "We know that with kids today, that is the best way to reach them, and in some cases that's the only way to reach them," Bowman said.

Yet participation rates also continue to decline, too, especially among casual players. Little League Baseball, which represents about two-thirds of the world's youth baseball, had 2.1 million players last year, compared with 2.6 million in 1997.

This isn't good. Executives know that if kids attend games, stay up late to catch the last out of the World Series and play baseball, they are far more likely to follow the game as adults and pass the habit on to their children.

With commissioner Bud Selig set to retire after next year, when he will turn 80, it's time baseball became less like "La Bohème" and more like "Rent." This isn't about a generation's shortening attention span. These are the same kids who devour 800-page Harry Potter tomes. It's about the game's waning ability to capture a worthy generation's attention.

As riveting as the sport can be at its most intense moments, baseball's primary activities are the pitcher staring at the catcher to decide what to throw and the batter stepping in and out of the batter's box. It doesn't have to be that way.

May we suggest two simple rule changes: Once batters step into the box, they shouldn't be allowed to step out. Otherwise it's a strike. If no one is on base, pitchers get seven seconds to throw the next pitch. Otherwise it's a ball.

Playoff baseball games aren't much longer than those in other sports. They just feel like they are because the game often lacks flow. Only rarely does baseball feel like you can't leave your seat because something big is about to happen. If the game doesn't feel that way, a lot of kids will find something that does.

Something has to give here. If baseball were a stock, analysts would applaud its earnings growth—roughly double the past 10 years to nearly $8 billion—but they would warn about the long-term prospects, especially since so much of its business relies on TV revenue.

For the love of beards and Big Papi, someone please fix this great game. This many kids can't be wrong.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303843104579167812218839786
post #90524 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

The blackouts are kinda weird, I'm 400 miles from Memphis Grizzlies, blacked out here, nothing on local Comcast to access blackouts. Atlanta blacked out 150 miles away, they are available most of the time on local regional sports nets. Cincinnati 300 miles away, nothing locally available, and blacked out.

Interesting. I get many of those on DirecTV. Must be a Comcast thing.
post #90525 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen/Business Notes
Seeking More Pay for Delayed Play
By Bill Carter, The New York Times - Nov. 4, 2013

But Nielsen has steadily shown — in the face of consistent skepticism from those who skip ads — that about half the commercials are viewed days later.

Pat McDonough, the senior vice president for analysis at Nielsen, said, “You just watch them; you forget you’re watching a commercial.”
She said that no matter what the program or time frame, “it never gets below 40 percent” viewing for commercials.

Just cant buy 40% that seems waaaaay too high.
post #90526 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Just cant buy 40% that seems waaaaay too high.
To me, too. But you gotta figure perhaps the kind of people most likely to BE a Nielsen family tends to either watch commercials or let the thing run while they grab a snack or check their phones. I dunno about TV, but I do know the people they seek for radio ratings are not typical, average people.
post #90527 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Just cant buy 40% that seems waaaaay too high.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

To me, too. But you gotta figure perhaps the kind of people most likely to BE a Nielsen family tends to either watch commercials or let the thing run while they grab a snack or check their phones. I dunno about TV, but I do know the people they seek for radio ratings are not typical, average people.
Commercials don't bother me that much. In fact, I enjoy some of them like the new Jeep Cherokee commercial with Bob Dylan's "Motherless Children" playing in the background, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LWoC9J3qzM ,or any commercial with Sam Elliott or the "Haverty's" girl (Emily Tarver). On the flip side, two of my best friends record EVERYTHING (including sporting events) and NEVER watch commercials. Even when my brother-in-law visits, he grabs MY remote and mutes the TV when commercials are on even if we're not talking. Drives me nuts...
post #90528 of 93684
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 4, 2013

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER
CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

Cristin Milioti, the titular mother finally introduced at the end of last season, makes her third appearance tonight, briefly. But watch, too, for another appearance by Anna Camp, who was so funny last week as the disastrous wedding-weekend date of Josh Radnor’s Ted. I spent a long time trying to place where I’d seen her before, then it finally clicked: She stole lots of scenes on HBO’s True Blood as Sarah, the anti-vampire, oversexed religious zealot.

MIKE & MOLLY
CBS, 9:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
CBS has yet to fully cash in on the movie stardom of Melissa McCarthy, who starred in this sitcom before breaking out on the big screen, and has stayed with it ever since. This is the premiere episode of Season 4 – that’s how long this show has been around – and starts, this season, with a plot that breaks McCarthy’s Molly away from her school blackboard, and sends her out as a loose cannon into the wider world.

SLEEPY HOLLOW
Fox, 9:00 p.m. ET

This series returns with a guest-star appearance worthy enough to note. John Noble, the standout star from Fringe, returns to a Fox genre show, this time playing a character called the Sin Eater. (Next week: Gordon Ramsay as the Sin Cooker?)

MOM
CBS, 9:30 p.m. ET

Allison Janney really gets to go for some broad comedy in tonight’s new episode. Her character hits menopause, and reacts with a series of crazy mood swings, from heated-angry to aging-denial– the latter which has her going even blonder and dressing more trendily than her daughter, played by Anna Faris.

THE STORY OF FILM: AN ODYSSEY
TCM, 12:15 a.m. ET

Depending upon the content of each week’s documentary, this imported film history series either gets a prime-time slot, or is pushed to later at night. Tonight’s episode, Part 9, is the latest push yet, so if you’re following and enjoying this series, set your recorders, because it shows up at 12:15 a.m. ET, and has the clunkiest title yet: 1969-1979 – Radical Directors in the 70s Make State of the Nation Movies. And its focus includes movies from Australia, two of which are given the prime-time treatment by TCM: 1979’s My Brilliant Career (starring Judy Davis, pat 8 p.m. ET), and 1975’s Picnic at Hanging Rock at 10:15 p.m. ET.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/

* * * *

Critic's Notes
Japan Imports a Democratic Pop-Culture Twist: Random Musical Stardom
By Rich Greenhalg, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 3, 2013

Sometimes pop music is a beautiful snapshot of a generation brimming with joy and youth. Other times, it’s a sad view of a former teen star tongue-jutting and twerking in front of an equally jaded audience. It’s a curious question: who defines what sells – the fans, the artists, or the industry? But what if you left it all up to chance?

What if you gambled your future on something as arbitrary as the game “Rock, Paper, Scissors”? Could you sell over a million singles and launch a career that way? In Japan, most definitely.

The Japanese case in point here is AKB48, and they're not your average pop girl group. AKB48 actually is a rotating roster of four teams of girls, created in 2005 by Yasushi Akimoto under the experimental concept of “Idols you can meet” – pop stars performing live everyday instead of showing up on sparse tour dates. (AKB is short for Akihabara, the city where the show is staged.) Fans can vote for their favorite girls, to see who gets to be the lead singer on records and concerts.

The concept grew so popular in Japan it now has three other competing sister groups - SKE48, NMB48, HKT48 (with expansion teams in Indonesia and Hong Kong). It was Akimoto’s desire to create Japanese pop stars out of ordinary girls, and let the fans interact and participate in the group’s evolution.

The producers of AKB48 also build on the reality concept by leaving a few of those spots up to chance. The televised Janken Taikai tournament, held every fall, has girls against each other in games in to be part of the lineup for the group’s next single. (Seen in top photo, and below left.)

The TV journey these girls take, with its simultaneous fan involvement, is the main event here. And it has made AKB48, surprisingly, one of the highest-earning musical acts in the world. There are plenty of lucrative offshoots, including ’s a late-night variety show called AKBingo, where the girls are featured playing game-show stunts such as "Punishment DodgeBall” or “Honesty Chess,” so the fans can see more of their personalities. The show also serves as a half-hour informercial for AKB’s new music and performers.

The group holds a popularity ranking election every June to see who the new media face of AKB48 will be. The top members are called “Senbatsu” (the top 16 faces). The Janken tournament is used as a “Wild Card” position to introduce new faces and give all the struggling AKB hopefuls a chance at being the “Center” (or “Ace”, 1st position) of an official AKB48 single release. The winner is an instant celebrity in Japan, known as the “Janken Queen.”

That’s exactly what happened last year to Haruka Shimazaki, nicknamed “Paruru."

Paruru had been in AKB48 since 2009, juggling school and Idol duties. She quickly gained a cult following from fans, but was not a typical Idol in that her personality is quiet, and she's a bit eccentric in dealing with fans. Her personality became the story after her Janken win, and management played up her “Tsundere” (hot and cold) style. Her Janken single was even about her social awkwardness: It was called “Eien Pressure” (Forever Pressure).

With the help of B-side extras, that release eventually sold over a million singles, and made her one the most recognized Idol personalities in Japan.

While most people haven't been watching, AKB48 has started to make inroads in the United States, clocking almost 1000 videos on YouTube. One of the group's singles, “Sugar Rush,” was included in Disney’s popular 2012 animated film Wreck-It Ralph, and one video performance has the girls dancing to their pop confection, thematically dressed up as cupcake desserts. Take that, Katy Perry.

And here’s a fan tribute of their very catchy “Koisu Fortune Cookie,” with Americans (of all ages, surprisingly) getting all the steps from the video. It has almost two million Youtube hits itself. (A clip from the AKB48 version is below that.) [CLICK LINK BELOW TO SEE VIDEOS)

On the surface, the happy beat and simple joy of AKB48 might be a breath of fresh air, given the recent lows of MTV’s antics. And it’s also worth noting that Robin Thicke, Miley Cyrus’s twerking partner, recently released his “Blurred Lines” single through Universal Music Japan. For the Japanese version of the video, he used AKB48 Idols Yuko Oshima and Haruna Kojima and skipped the usual over-sexed raunchiness.

And there’s not a jutting tongue anywhere to be seen.

(Visit the official AKB48 YouTube page here.)

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=6191
post #90529 of 93684
SUNDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #90530 of 93684
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Ratings gains for ABC and CBS Sunday
Scripted veterans hit highest ratings in weeks
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Nov. 4, 2013

It was a night of gains for drama series on broadcast last night.

All three of ABC’s dramas and CBS’s “The Good Wife” hit their best numbers in weeks.

“Wife” matched a season high with a 1.6 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights. The show was pushed back by NFL overrun, which lasted until 7:59 p.m. and bumped CBS’s entire lineup back an hour.

“Wife” was up 14 percent from last week.

Earlier in the night, ABC’s “Once Upon a Time” posted a 2.3, its best rating in two weeks and up 5 percent over last week in the 8 p.m. slot. Lead-out “Revenge” drew a 1.7 at 9 p.m., up 21 percent over last week to its best rating since Oct. 6.

And new drama “Betrayal,” while still only mustering a 1.0 in the 10 p.m. slot, also posted its best rating in a month and was up 11 percent over last week.

CBS’s entire Wednesday lineup clearly benefitted from the NFL lead-in, which averaged a 6.6 at 7 p.m. “60 Minutes” (3.2 at 8 p.m.) and “The Amazing Race” (2.0 at 9 p.m.) also posted their best numbers since Oct. 6.

It undoubtedly helped not to have to air against the now-ended playoff baseball, which pulled away some viewers to Fox the past few weeks.

Fox’s Sunday lineup was largely down or flat to its most recent outing four weeks ago. “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy” tied as the night’s top non-sports show with a 2.5 apiece, but “Simpsons” slid 17 percent from its most recent episode (the very popular “Treehouse of Terror”) and “Guy” was even.

“Bob’s Burgers” (1.8, down 5 percent) and “American Dad” (1.9, down 10 percent) also suffered declines from their last originals.

As usual, NBC dominated the night with “Sunday Night Football.”

NBC finished first for the night among 18-49s with a 4.6 average overnight rating and a 12 share. CBS was second at 3.3/8, Fox third at 1.9/5, ABC fourth at 1.6/4, Univision fifth at 1.2/3 and Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-eight percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for NBC’s NFL coverage and CBS’s NFL overrun are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data.

CBS started the night in the lead with a 6.6 at 7 p.m. for NFL overrun, followed by NBC with a 2.0 for “Football Night in America.” Fox was third with a 1.5 for reruns of “Bob’s Burgers” and “The Simpsons,” ABC fourth with a 1.4 for “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” Univision fifth with a 1.2 for “Aqui y Ahora” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for the movie “Toy Story 3.”

NBC took the lead at 8 p.m. with a 5.1 for NFL pregame and the start of “Sunday Night Football,” while CBS slipped to second with a 3.2 for “Minutes.” ABC was third with a 2.3 for “Time,” Fox fourth with a 2.1 for “Simpsons” (2.5) and “Burgers” (1.8), Univision fifth with a 1.3 for “Mira Quien Baila” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for its movie.

At 9 p.m. NBC led with a 5.7 for football, with Fox second with a 2.2 for “Guy” (2.5) and “Dad” (1.9). CBS was third with a 2.0 for “The Amazing Race,” ABC fourth with a 1.7 for “Revenge,” Univision fifth with a 1.3 for more “Baila” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for the movie “Fast & Furious 4.”

NBC was first again at 10 p.m. with a 5.6 for more football, followed by CBS with a 1.6 for “The Good Wife.” ABC was third with a 1.0 for “Betrayal,” Univision fourth with a 0.9 for “Sal y Pimienta” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.4 for its movie.

CBS was first for the night among households with an 8.9 average overnight rating and a 14 share. NBC was second at 7.7/12, ABC third at 3.8/6, Fox fourth at 2.5/4, Univision fifth at 1.9/3 and Telemundo sixth at 0.6/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/ratings-gains-abc-cbs-sunday/

* * * *

TV Notes
For sweeps, a Monday night makeover
After a disastrous start, CBS is revamping its schedule
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Oct. 29, 2013

Sometimes playing it safe is better than taking a gamble.

That’s the lesson CBS has clearly learned after experimenting with its Monday night lineup, to disastrous result.

The network scheduled three new shows on the night this fall, and its ratings took a hit. It’s hoping to reverse that with the fourth-season return of “Mike & Molly” tonight at 9 p.m., the final piece in its revamped schedule.

Last May CBS decided to slate “Molly” as a midseason replacement. The show has always posted solid ratings in the 9:30 p.m. timeslot, but CBS thought it could find something better.

The network already had an open slot for a new sitcom at 8:30 p.m., where last fall’s new entry, “Partners,” flopped. Leaving “Molly” off the fall schedule freed up space for CBS to launch a second new comedy on the night.

The network slated new comedies “We Are Men” at 8:30 and “Mom” at 9:30. “Men” bombed. Not only did it pull low ratings, but it also hurt its lead-out, “2 Broke Girls,” which sank to series-low ratings in the 9 p.m. slot.

So last month CBS admitted defeat. It canceled “Men,” moved “Girls” to 8:30 in hopes of reviving its ratings in an easier timeslot, and readied “Molly” to return to the schedule.

“Molly,” about a couple who met at Overeaters Anonymous, returns on the first Monday of the November sweeps with CBS hoping for improved ratings.

Last season “Molly” averaged a 2.9 adults 18-49 Nielsen rating, ranking among the top 20 shows on broadcast. If it can equal that this season, it will easily be CBS’s No. 2 show on the night, behind “How I Met Your Mother.”

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/for-sweeps-a-monday-night-makeover/
post #90531 of 93684
TV/Business Notes
NBC’s Bob Greenblatt On Being Provocative – And Trying To Bring The Network Back
By Nancy Tartaglione, Deadline.com - Nov. 4, 2013

Reporting from Jerusalem

NBC entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt took a trip around the dial of his previous posts, and his current one, this morning at the Innovative TV conference that’s organized here by Israel’s Keshet Media Group. The former Fox and Showtime exec was praised for the success of NBC’s hot freshman The Blacklist, and noted that the network “used to be one of the most innovative, acclaimed networks in America. We’re trying to bring that back.” In September, Greenblatt’s NBC contract was renewed through 2017, a vote of confidence for the exec just days before the start of the new broadcast season. He tossed kudos to NBC parent Comcast today, quipping that NBC “used to be owned by GE, a company that made airplane parts.”

But moving from cable to broadcast came with its own set of trials, he said, after a series of clips was played from Six Feet Under, the HBO show he exec produced, and Dexter, Showtime’s recently ended serial killer hit. “We’re in the process of trying to figure out what is the next stage of broadcast TV. We compete with cable every day. Network shows have kind of gotten safe and predictable and a little old-fashioned… We have to be provocative and do things to surprise people.” NBC “is a great network” thanks to its history with shows like Seinfeld, ER, Friends, St Elsewhere and Hill Street Blues, which were “innovative. But, there’s certain things we can’t do,” Greenblatt said before adding, “I don’t look at is as handcuffs; those limitations can ultimately be a good thing.”

Greenblatt called James Spader series The Blacklist a “hybrid” of the kind of serialized shows that work on cable and the closed-ended franchises that are more familiar to network TV. It “could be the next wave,” he suggested. “NBC had to make noise… We were number four… If you’re not provocative you’re going to be passed over these days.” In a nod to some of NBC’s woes (there’s been a lack of breakout comedies for the second straight season), Greenblatt commented, “Unfortunately, yes, we read the critics. I think in cable TV, critics are important because they raise the profile of a show. But in broadcast TV, the critics are just savage to us.”

Talk also turned to M.I.C.E., the show that NBC set as a put pilot in September 2012 with Peter Berg and Sarah Aubrey’s Film 44 and which is based on Keshet’s The Gordin Cell format. Keshet CEO Avi Nir, who ran the chat with Greenblatt, noted that the first trial “wasn’t so good” and a mutual decision was made to go in a different direction, he said without elaborating.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/11/nbcs-bob-greenblatt-on-being-provocative-and-trying-to-bring-the-network-back/
post #90532 of 93684
Quote:
“Wife” matched a season high with a 1.6 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights. The show was pushed back by NFL overrun, which lasted until 7:59 p.m. and bumped CBS’s entire lineup back an hour.

In the central zone the lineup was already adjusted thirty minutes so the actual pushback was only thirty additional minutes.
post #90533 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

Quote:
“Wife” matched a season high with a 1.6 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights. The show was pushed back by NFL overrun, which lasted until 7:59 p.m. and bumped CBS’s entire lineup back an hour.

In the central zone the lineup was already adjusted thirty minutes so the actual pushback was only thirty additional minutes.

Yet they gave us a repeat of The Mentalist instead of the episode that was supposed to be shown.
post #90534 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

Quote:
“Wife” matched a season high with a 1.6 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights. The show was pushed back by NFL overrun, which lasted until 7:59 p.m. and bumped CBS’s entire lineup back an hour.

In the central zone the lineup was already adjusted thirty minutes so the actual pushback was only thirty additional minutes.

Yet they gave us a repeat of The Mentalist instead of the episode that was supposed to be shown.

With "The Mentalist" pushed out of Prime Time in the East, and because the networks show the same episode in all areas, the Central and the West got a repeat as well.
post #90535 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

Quote:
“Wife” matched a season high with a 1.6 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights. The show was pushed back by NFL overrun, which lasted until 7:59 p.m. and bumped CBS’s entire lineup back an hour.

In the central zone the lineup was already adjusted thirty minutes so the actual pushback was only thirty additional minutes.

Yet they gave us a repeat of The Mentalist instead of the episode that was supposed to be shown.

With "The Mentalist" pushed out of Prime Time in the East, and because the networks show the same episode in all areas, the Central and the West got a repeat as well.

I wonder if they will replay it so we can see it or are we out of luck? Considering they are in the stretch run of the Red John storyline you'd think they wouldn't let us just not see it.
post #90536 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

In the central zone the lineup was already adjusted thirty minutes so the actual pushback was only thirty additional minutes.

Thats always an argument on tvbythenumbers.

Some say its only a half hour cause their usual primetime shows are resched to start 7:30et on cbs doubleheader sundays.
Others say its an hour cause the generally sched sunday primetime start is 7:00.

& if its the mentalist shouldnt they have known theyd be pushed back & thus scheduled a rerun from the getgo ?
post #90537 of 93684
They are now saying this episode will be shown next Sunday Nov 10 with the previously scheduled Nov 17 episode now bumped to Nov 24. There is a link in The Mentalist thread.
post #90538 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

Yep, just checked the archive of games, last night's MEM/DAL game is blacked out, all the others are availabe except Atlanta, if they played, I can't remember, but they are definitely blacked out. I do have Directv and I get all the Memphis games on some channel, but I can't get them on my local Comcast. I can't swear to the LP on Comcast, they could conceivable be available, I think there is still a free trial, I'll try to check it out and see if possible the Memphis games are available on it.

As a follow up on the blackout of Memphis Grizzlies, it is blacked out on League Pass and I don't see anywhere else it is available in the guide. I have no problems with Directv, all the Grizzlies games are available on 650(650-1) on Sports South + and normally they are availabe on 651(-1) the guide just lists the station as DTV. I wouldn't use my local comcast for League Pass at all anyway, I'm not finding any of the games in HD.

The point is that I appear to be shut out of all the Memphis Grizzlies games on my local comcast, with the exception of TNT, ESPN and probably NBATV(but I'm not sure of that one)...
post #90539 of 93684
TV Notes
CW’s Fall Season So Far: What’s Working, What’s Not and Why
By Jethro Nedeog, TheWrap.com - Nov. 4, 2013

Once the home of high school dramas like “90210″ and “Gossip Girl,” The CW has strategically moved in the direction of genre dramas with carryovers like “Beauty and the Beast,” “Arrow” and “Supernatural” joined by freshman series “The Originals,” “The Tomorrow People” and “Reign.”

“One of the things that I’ve said, and it’s had an impact from the beginning, is that I wanted to broaden out the programming,” CW president Mark Pedowitz told TheWrap.

As a result, the network has been seeing an odd rise in the advertiser-coveted adults 18-49 demographic. As of late October, this season has seen an increase of 10 percent with 18-49 audiences and only 1 percent with its key 18-34 demo, year-over-year. That could be problematic for the network, which sells its advertising against the younger-skewing 18-34 lot.

The CW, owned by CBS and Warner Bros., earns much lower ratings than the other English-language broadcast networks, which it attributes to its youthful focus and its own youth — it premiered in 2006.

Pedowitz admitted to TheWrap that he was “a little puzzled with the 18-34 numbers.” But, he said the network is pleased by its gains with adults 18-49.

“I want to reach the upper end of the 18-34,” he continued. “And when you do that, it automatically causes your 18-49 to go up … We’re a much healthier network because of that.”

It should also be noted that millennials have overwhelmingly adopted online and DVR viewing versus live viewing, so The CW led the charge on championing time-shifted numbers years before the other guys. This season, its primetime schedule is seeing a 34 percent rise in total viewers, and a 42 percent increase in both 18-34 and 18-49 demos with Live+3 DVR viewing.

We’ve already weighed in on the other broadcast networks’ fall seasons, but held CW for now since its season started later.

Here’s TheWrap’s take on The CW’s fall season so far:

Ratings: Clearly, CW’s new shows consistently rank the lowest among the networks among the 18-49. But that isn’t really a fair comparison, since its advertising revenue is made against adults 18-34 and online viewing, as Pedowitz made sure to point out. Comparing the series’ 18-49 ratings against each other is more apples-to-apples.

“The Originals,” though it hasn’t quite captured the same audience numbers of its progenitor, “The Vampire Diaries,” is doing solidly by CW standards on Tuesdays with an average 1.0/3 in adults 18-49 and 2.1 million total viewers. Pedowitz feels confident that the network made the right decision in not scheduling it with a “TVD” lead-in on Thursdays. It had hoped for the series to find its own audience.

“‘Originals’ has performed quite well in comparison to how ‘The Vampire Diaries’ was,” he said. “I believe over time it’ll be a stellar performer.”

Meanwhile, “The Tomorrow People,” averaging a .8/2 rating among adults 18-49 and 2 million viewers in its post-”Arrow” spot on Wednesdays, is doing slightly better than “Reign,” which has a .6/2 and 1.8 million viewers on Thursdays after “The Vampire Diaries.” But they’ll both need to put a cork in their sliding week-over-week viewers and galvanize their core audiences.

Chatter: None of The CW’s new shows have broken into the Top 10 on the Nielsen Twitter TV ratings. And if you’re thinking Nielsen may not be capturing The CW’s younger-skewing audience for some reason, it should be noted that ABC Family’s “Pretty Little Liars” Halloween special, which caters to the same demo, placed first during the week it aired. Also, “The Vampire Diaries” Season 5 premiere placed sixth during that week. So, it’s possible for The CW to break in.

On GetGlue, though, “The Originals” consistently places on the social company’s weekly Top 10 ranking of scripted broadcast shows. Notably, its series premiere on Oct. 3 took the No. 1 spot that week.

As for review buzz, TV critics have notoriously looked down their noses at CW fare. This season was different. As Pedowitz summarized: “Some critics perceived [our new fall programming] very well, others do what they do best and savaged it.”

The critics were mixed on “The Originals,” but leaned more to the positive side for its emphasis on family dynamics. The reviews were similarly mixed for “The Tomorrow People”; critics felt that its writing made up for what they felt was a silly premise.

“Reign,” on the other hand, was welcomed more positively than the other two. TheWrap’s Tim Molloy even summed up its intrigue over placing Mary Queen of Scots on the French throne as “a girlier ‘Game of Thrones’” in his review and complimented its production value and star Adelaide Kane.

Wrap forecast: “The Originals” is a shoo-in for not only a full season order, but also a second season renewal. It isn’t as clear-cut for “The Tomorrow People” and “Reign.” They’ll probably both get full season orders, but a second season isn’t a sure thing.

Those shows have a couple things working in their favor: First, both fit the direction that The CW is moving in – more genre drama, less of the high school teen kind. Also, struggling returning series may take the heat off of them.

“The Carrie Diaries,” for one, is languishing on Friday nights and seems marked for expulsion. And “Tomorrow People” and “Reign” are also both performing better than “Beauty and the Beast,” which despite its rabid social media fandom, is barely able to break a .3/2 and 800,000 total viewers — The CW numbers of yesteryear.

http://www.thewrap.com/cws-fall-season-far-whats-working-whats/
post #90540 of 93684
Critic's Notes
Changing channels: Robert Bianco revisits fall picks
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

In every TV season, shows and minds change.

A pilot is a template for what lies ahead, not a guarantee — which is why top-10 lists should be carved in wax, not stone. Inevitably, some shows on the list of fall's best new network series get a little better, such as Fox's Brooklyn Nine-Nine, which has built on the promise of its pilot by strengthening the links among its cops; and Sleepy Hollow, which has overcome the over-complicated nature of its own pilot to become one of the year's giddier pleasures.

Some get a little worse, including The Blacklist, a still-intriguing series that has too often succumbed to the pull of gratuitous gore and a Criminal Minds-style freak-of-the-week villain, and Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., an enjoyable throwback adventure that has yet to develop — or create much interest in — its supporting characters. Some seem poised to move up, such as Mom, as soon as it proves it can build a story that doesn't revolve around Anna Faris — and as soon as it brings Faris' performance, appealing as it often may be, down just a notch.

Sometimes, shows remain on the cusp as we wait to see which way they'll break. The Millers has some very funny moments and a fabulous trio of stars in Will Arnett, Margo Martindale and Beau Bridges, but it has yet to combine those assets into a completely satisfying episode. Trophy Wife and The Goldbergs are well-cast shows that ooze charm, though both have a hard time moving past "mildly amusing." But they all hold their ground, if only because none of the shows ranked below them are good enough to pose a challenge.

The news comes in the bigger shifts that cause shows to shuffle in and out of that list. (The best new fall show anywhere? Showtime's Masters of Sex). Remember, TV is fluid and minds could change again — but for now, these four shows are on the move.

MOVING IN:

The Crazy Ones
CBS, Thursday, 9 ET/PT


If you're looking for the season's most pleasant surprise, look no further than this comedy from David E. Kelley (his first half-hour series) starring Robin Williams as a brilliant but eccentric ad man. For all his enormous talent, Williams can be a hard actor to contain, but Crazy Ones has done so admirably, giving him a character to play who seems real rather than a skit cartoon or an actor's showcase, and keeping his manic bursts short enough to amuse rather than exhaust.

Nor is Williams in it alone. With Sarah Michelle Gellar, James Wolk, Hamish Linklater and Amanda Setton The Crazy Ones has one of the best ensembles on TV, and each week it's allowed one of them to shine. The product placements can still be jarring but even so, The Crazy Ones has evolved into a heady blend of sophistication and silliness, and a good fit for a generally strong line-up. And what could be more pleasant than that?

Back in the Game
ABC, Wednesday, 8:30 ET/PT


Looks can be deceiving.

At first glance, this sitcom about a divorced mother (an instantly likable Maggie Lawson) coaching a team of little-league losers with the help of her tough-guy father (the great James Caan) seemed like little more than a Bad News Bears update. But like the wonderful ABC shows surrounding it — The Middle and Modern Family — Game is really far more interested in what constitutes a family these days. In this case, that means following the struggle of Lawson's Terry Gannon to support her son (Griffin Gluck, the newest member of ABC's stable of terrific child actors) and repair her relationship with her father while tentatively re-entering the dating world.

In truth, the baseball team remains a stumbling block: They're one-note stereotypes, not people. But the family dynamic is well-written and extremely well-played, the blue-collar atmosphere rings true, and the show has a knack for the kind of throwaway jokes that make you laugh a split second afterward. So naturally, it's the comedy ABC chose to cancel when its initial 13-episode run is completed, probably in January. Sometimes now matter how well you play the game, you still lose.

MOVING OUT:

Hostages
CBS, Monday, 10 ET/PT


You know that initial impression you probably had that Hostages was a bad idea? You should have gone with that.

To be fair, it was a very good pilot, one that effectively set up a cat-and-mouse game between a doctor (Toni Collette) and the rogue agent (Dylan McDermott) who took her family hostage to force her to kill the president. Unfortunately, as many of us feared and as each ever-worsening episode has proven, that's a movie idea.

McDermott's character is trapped in one grim expression and Collette's is essentially passive: She's trying not to do something. Her only bursts of activity come in her increasingly inept attempts to escape, which would only work if the show were actually attempting to be comic.

Sadly, rather than helping, the condensed time frame — each episode marks a day — makes things worse. One night she's operating on her gut-shot husband; the next morning, she and the family are all at the breakfast table, washed and coiffed and looking little the worse for wear.

The same, unfortunately, cannot be said for the show. Weepy and wearisome, Hostages fails both as drama and as entertainment. Reward its remaining viewers by letting it complete its 15-episode season, and then set the family, and us, free.

The Michael J. Fox Show
NBC, Thursday, 9:30 ET/PT


Some shows you want so badly to work.

Michael J. Fox is a true TV star: One who proved, in his Good Wife role, that Parkinson's disease has not robbed him of his ability to act. And he's working here with some equally talented actors, including Betsy Brandt and Katie Finneran (whose talent TV, alas, continues to waste).

Unfortunately, none of them have been given anything much to work with. Fox is less a series than a collection of styles and attitude borrowed from other, better shows: A little Modern Family in the monologues and the messages, a little Mary Tyler Moore Show in the workplace. Sometimes the show makes jokes about Fox's condition; more often, it attempts to ignore it, even when you'd expect it to come up. Traits come out of the blue; behavior changes on a whim; situations are strained; and practically nothing is funny.

Here's hoping The Good Wife has kept the door open. As much as we may love Fox, it's better to see him rarely on a great show than weekly on a bad one.

Old Top 10

1. Blacklist, NBC
2. Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Fox
3. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., ABC
4. Mom, CBS
5. The Michael J. Fox Show, NBC
6. Hostages, CBS
7. Sleepy Hollow, Fox
8. The Millers, CBS
9. Trophy Wife, ABC
10. The Goldbergs, ABC

New Top 10

1. Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Fox
2. The Crazy Ones, CBS
3. Sleepy Hollow, Fox
4. Blacklist, NBC
5. Mom, CBS
6. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., ABC
7. Back in the Game, ABC
8. The Millers, CBS
9. The Goldbergs, ABC
10. Trophy Wife, ABC


http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2013/11/04/bianco-fall-top-tv-picks/3289453/
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information