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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 3067

post #91981 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by mscottc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

Sorry but Fallon is no Carson, nobody can replace Johnny Carson.

Nobody can replace Carson in your mind because most likely you grew up with him, as did I. Yes, Carson set some mighty high standards, but to say that no one can replace him is being a bit close minded. Every generation has their own sense of taste and every generation has their own geniuses. Only time will tell if Fallon or anyone else can have a great run like Johnny did.

I like Fallon, and I would not have placed him in the same league as Carson, yet a week or so ago, I saw his bit imitating Springsteen, and saw the light. He's good, maybe even GREAT! Don't count him out.


I really liked Jack Paar and his stable of great guests, so I dreaded the changeover to TV game show boy Carson. I became a big fan of him soon thereafter.

post #91982 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Adams View Post


I really liked Jack Paar and his stable of great guests, so I dreaded the changeover to TV game show boy Carson. I became a big fan of him soon thereafter.

I also remember that transition. Johnny moved on into stardom and became the benchmark......
post #91983 of 93852
I preferred Parr to Carson, but I kept on watching when Johnny took over. Well, until he had Rachael Carson, author of Silent Spring on, and spent the whole time ridiculing her. I never watched him again, after that.
post #91984 of 93852
I enjoyed Johnny, HATE Leno. Might watch Fallon. Dave seems to have shifted to grumpy old man mode and is stuck there. Kimmel has his moments and do watch occasionally, but generally reserve my late night watching for The Daily Show and stuff I missed earlier in the day/week.

I despise Leno and stopped watching the moment he took over, watched Dave for a few years but his bits got tiresome. There is no way for any latenight show to have the impact Carson had, audience is just too fragmented. I'll record Fallon for a while and see how it goes, but watch too much stuff as it is, not sure I want to add more.
post #91985 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by veedon View Post

I don't know who NBC could have gotten that would be any better than Fallon.
Obviously NBC wanted someone fairly young, but not too young. Fallon is a few years younger than Leno was when he took over after Carson's retirement.

They could have got Seth Meyers. He is way more funny and entertaining than the dull boring Fallon. Jay Leno might return to the Tonight show again when Letterman starts kicking Fallon's butt in the ratings. When Leno leaves The Tonight Show I will leave as a fan.
post #91986 of 93852
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Bachelor (120 min.)
10PM - Castle
(R - Oct. 14)
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Chris O'Donnell; NBA player Paul George)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - How I Met Your Mother
8:30PM - 2 Broke Girls
9PM - Mike & Molly
9:30PM - Mom
10PM - Intelligence
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Louis C.K.; Marine veteran B.J. Ganem; Arctic Monkeys performs)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Michael Sheen; The Lone Bellow performs)
(R - Dec. 13)

NBC:
8PM - Hollywood Game Night
9PM - Hollywood Game Night
10PM - The Blacklist
* * * *
11:34PM - The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Dana Carvey; Earvin "Magic'' Johnson; A Great Big World performs)
12:36AM - Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (Johnny Knoxville; Barry Gibb performs with The Roots)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly ("We Cause Scenes''; Capital Cities perform; musical group Kan Wakan)

FOX:
8PM - The Following
(R - Jan. 19)
9PM - The Following (Time Slot Premiere)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Boise
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Eugene
(R - Jan. 23, 2012)
10PM - Independent Lens: The State of Arizona (90 min.)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Siempre Mi Amor
9PM - Lo Que la Vida Me Robó
10PM - Qué Pobres Tan Ricos

THE CW:
8PM - Hart of Dixie
9PM - Beauty and the Beast

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - La Impostora
9PM - La Reina del Sur
10PM - Santa Diabla

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Jeff Garlin)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Journalist Nate Silver)
12:01AM - @ Midnight (Michael Ian Black; Kerri Kenney-Silver; Michael Showalter)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Bill Hader; Breckin Meyer; The Strypes perform)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Andy Samberg; comic Moshe Kasher; comedian Loni Love; actor Gary Valentine)

SYNDICATION:
Check Local Listings - Arsenio (Dana White; Gabby Douglas; Ty Dolla $ign and more)
post #91987 of 93852
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jan. 27, 2014

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER
CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

Tonight’s new episode is called How Your Mother Met Me, and shifts the focus to Cristin Millotti as the titular Mother-to-be. It’s a flashback episode, one that inserts “Mother” into all sorts of almost encounters, near-misses and fleeting contacts through the years with Ted (Josh Radnor). Think of it as part Rashomon, and part Zelig. Either way, once again, the final-season narrative refuses to move forward.

THE FOLLOWING
Fox, 9:00 p.m. ET

Season 2 of The Following has a new approach, but the tone is the same: Violent scenes are lingered over as though they’re supposed to be enjoyed a little too much, and the schemes, minor as well as major, seem wildly unbelievable. But now that we know for certain that Ryan’s old nemesis _______ ____ _______ ___, we’re back to basics. And I’m not sure, on this show, whether that’s a good thing.

HERBLOCK - THE BLACK & THE WHITE
HBO, 9:00 p.m. ET

This documentary celebrates the bold and surgically funny work of Washington Post political cartoonist Herbert L. Bock, who signed his work Herblock and may have drawn the most caustic, accurate Nixon caricatures ever. It may be a little late to celebrate anything having to do with daily newspapers, but one of the heartening things about this film, based on the many celebrities, newsmakers and newspaper people who weigh in, is just how many people were long-time “Herblock” fans. You hear from Jon Stewart, Lewis Black and Jules Feiffer – and also from famous Post employees Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

MONTY PYTHON'S THE MEANING OF LIFE
Sundance, 9:00 p.m. ET

Mr. Creosote is my favorite part of this 1982 collection of comedy vignettes (“Just one thin mint…”), but there’s a lot more here to enjoy, from start to finish. And, technically, even a bit after the finish.

THE BLACKLIST
NBC, 10:00 p.m. ET

Like The Following, this broadcast network series ups the ante so far as portrayals of violence by bad guys. Unlike The Following, this series is worth… following. James Spader stars.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
Edited by dad1153 - 1/27/14 at 6:31am
post #91988 of 93852
Critic's Notes
Feeling Squeamish? Maybe You Shouldn’t Read Any Further
‘The Following,’ on Fox, Returns With More Gore
By Mike Hale, The New York Times' - Jan. 27, 2013

The Fox series “The Following” (Monday at 9:00 p.m.) is essentially a cheap horror story tricked out with a laughable literary framework, and it likes to traffic in patterns and symbols, the more obvious the better.

Last season, when it was the highest-rated new show on the broadcast networks, it featured a lighthouse in its first episode and in its final episode. Both referred to the work of Edgar Allan Poe, whose books guide the actions of the show’s peevish professor, psychopath and serial killer, Joe Carroll (James Purefoy).

Not all patterns are so benign, though, and some reveal more of the true sensibility of the show and its creator, Kevin Williamson. (Stop reading here if you still plan to watch the first season.) The pilot episode featured two particularly grisly, degrading scenes of death, both involving women. An acolyte of Carroll’s, part of the improbably large and obedient cult that gives the series its name, stabbed herself in the eye with an ice pick; a subsequent shot focused on her bare legs twitching. Later, a highly sympathetic character whose safety had been guaranteed by the show’s tortured antihero, the former F.B.I. agent Ryan Hardy (Kevin Bacon), was discovered hanging upside down, both eyes gouged out.

In the Season 1 finale, Mr. Williamson killed off two more women, this time central characters whose likability had been cultivated across the season. The F.B.I. agent Debra Parker was kidnapped and buried alive. When her body was discovered, the fine actress Annie Parisse (or a stand-in) suffered the indignity of lying on the ground in the background of the scene, bound and smeared in dirt.

Then came the big finish: Carroll’s ex-wife and Hardy’s lover, Claire Matthews (Natalie Zea), whose safety had been one of the show’s central sources of suspense, was summarily dispatched, stabbed in the season’s final seconds. Last week, the show’s Season 2 premiere (stop reading here if you haven’t watched it) confirmed her death, though in a manner that seems to leave open the possibility that she’s in hiding somewhere.

Men die on “The Following” as well, in copious numbers, but their deaths tend to be more discreet and respectful, taking place quickly or off camera. Important male characters, like Hardy and his own acolyte, the young agent Mike Weston (Shawn Ashmore), have a habit of recovering, Christlike, from grievous wounds.

Violence against women doesn’t, of itself, make a television show unworthy. Quite a few lauded cable series make a habit of it. But the elaborate nature of the misogyny masterminded by Carroll (who had killed 14 of his female students before the action even started), and the callous, manipulative disposal of characters we’ve been led to care about, are indicative of the slasher-film mentality that informs “The Following” more thoroughly than any other show on TV. (And probably explains its popularity.)

There are other things to keep you from engaging with the show, including its extreme implausibility. The size and efficiency of Carroll’s following would put many small armies to shame, and never have so many law-enforcement officers been so easily duped. There’s also the lazy B-movie predictability, the kind of thing Mr. Williamson once satirized in the “Scream” movies. The cop who doesn’t answer is dead. There’s someone behind you. You’re going to get hit by that cab.

It should be a pleasure to watch Mr. Bacon in his first starring TV role, but his character is no more three-dimensional than any of the others. (Another hallmark of the first season: There turned out to be no more compelling reason for all the mayhem than Carroll’s jealousy over Claire.) He’s wasting his skills on Ryan Hardy, and every so often, there’s a painful moment when he’s reduced to huffing and popping his eyes over the latest death.

Will any of this change in Season 2? The opening minutes of last week’s episode weren’t promising. After repeating the ending of Season 1, so that we could rewatch Hardy and Claire being stabbed, the show went right to its first killing: Hardy snapping a woman’s neck. Later, a newly introduced psycho killer danced with the corpse of his latest victim, another woman reduced to a piece of inanimate set dressing.

The new season of “The Following” does have at least one selling point. With several new female characters already — Hardy’s cop niece, a member of his addiction support group, a survivor of a subway massacre and yet another hard-bitten F.B.I. agent — you can start a pool on which will be the next to succumb to the show’s appetite for brutality.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/27/arts/television/the-following-on-fox-returns-with-more-gore.html?ref=television
post #91989 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jan. 27, 2014

MONTY PYTHON'S THE MEANING OF LIFE
Sundance, 9:00 p.m. ET

Mr. Creosote is my favorite part of this 1982 collection of comedy vignettes (“Just one thin mint…”), but there’s a lot more here to enjoy, from start to finish. And, technically, even a bit after the finish.

Show anything Monty Python and I am so in biggrin.gif.
post #91990 of 93852
Technology Notes
Samsung's curved 4K TV is fit to rule
By Lee Neikirk, USA Today/Reviewed.com - Jan. 25, 2014

Curved 4K TV technology is the talk of the town this year, and it was on display everywhere at this year's CES in early January. One TV that caught our eye during the show was the Samsung UN65HU9000: a sleek, silver entity displaying a very impressive 4K (also called UHD) image. Here are our first thoughts.

Picture Quality: High-tech ingredients make for one delicious picture.

The 65-inch HU9000 is fitted with a bevy of hardware-level features meant to vastly improve its picture quality within the scope of a traditional LCD — but we'll address those in a moment. Let's just start by saying that from a purely subjective point of view, the HU9000 looks really good. Last year, we reviewed more than a few 4K televisions from both Samsung and LG, and none of them looked quite this stunning.

One of this TV's major advantages over a traditional HD TV is Samsung's PurColor engine, which gives viewers greater color saturation and a wider range of colors. This allows for colors truer to the originally captured images, and gives viewers picture quality closer to what they would see in a movie theater.

Since 4K TVs have four times the resolution of normal HD TVs, content that wasn't originally created in that higher 4K resolution needs to be upscaled to fit 4K screens. The technology on the HU9000 makes these upscaled images look smoother, sharper, and more natural.

The most important new feature contributing to the the HU9000's awesome picture quality is the local-dimming, which turns off pixels in certain areas of the screen to achieve the deep blacks users would get in plasma TVs. Now that plasma TVs are on the decline, this technology is coming in to fill the void to bring viewers bold contrast to complement improved colors.

While a native 4K image is almost always stunning compared to 720p and 1080p resolutions, the HU9000 could be a very valuable series for early adopters looking to get both the best possible image and future-proof for the onset of readily-available 4K content.

We can't say anything for certain about picture quality until we get one of these TVs into the lab for testing. On the other hand, Samsung's track record of success in manufacturing high-quality televisions is plenty of reason for cautious optimism. Price is, of course, always important, and we don't have an MSRP on this TV just yet, though it is expected to hit stores this year.

It may just be a case of over-saturation, but curved TVs are starting to grow on me. A real-time demonstration of the difference in picture quality and atmospheric intuition between a curved and flat TV has me believing. Quite honestly, the curved UN65HU9000 is straight-up sexy.

Samsung calls this design "Aero Arena." The silver, minimal stand follows the same degree of curvature as the screen, which is also wrapped in metallic-gray trim and features bezels that are only seven millimeters thick. The 1.2-inch panel, though curved, still allows for wall-mounting if that's what you want.

Like last year's awe-inducing curved OLED TV, all of the HU9000 TVs port and connectivity options will live on an outboard box that Samsung calls "One Connect."

The box connects to the TV via a single cable, and all source and video connections connect to the box directly. We can probably expect four HDMI inputs, three USB inputs, and backwards-compatible jacks like component/composite, but that's still conjecture at this point.

Final Thoughts

The only thing standing between the HU9000 series and UHDomination is its pricing: Early adopters may have deeper pockets than the rest of us, but no one wants to shell out an exorbitant amount of money for a product that's still, by many accounts, from the future.

That said, Samsung's edge-lit HU9000 series promises to be marginally more affordable than the company's own S9 series, Sony's X950B flagship, and Vizio's Reference series. Assuming a high degree of picture quality, we're very excited to see how these TVs test once we get them into the lab later this year.

For more product reviews and news, visit Reviewed.com, a division of USA TODAY, and follow @ReviewedDotCom on Twitter.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/personal/2014/01/25/reviewed-samsung-un65hu9000/4819839/
post #91991 of 93852
TV/Critic's Notes
Have we become emotionally obsessed with the weather?
By Mackenzie Carpenter, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Jan. 26, 2014

Lois Rutherford is a hardy 74-year-old who has seen some rough weather in her day: "Charlie, David, Hugo," she said while standing on a frigid Mount Washington viewing deck last week, ticking off the names of hurricanes that have raked her hometown of Charleston, S.C.

But Hercules? Janus? Those studly "named" winter blizzards -- introduced by The Weather Channel in 2012 -- didn't ring a bell with Mrs. Rutherford, who nonetheless describes herself as happily obsessed with weather coverage, especially these days.

"I love the weather. It may be 7 degrees, but it doesn't bother me one little bit, and I am not going to let it stop me from coming up here before I go back to Charleston tomorrow," she said.

"Where it's 60 degrees," noted her son Ron, of Bethel Park, as he nudged her to get back in the car.

With the so-called polar vortex paying a second visit to Pittsburgh last week, and a third one expected later this week, people seem to be reacting to the frigid temperatures in three different ways:

• They hibernate (even though humans are not hibernating animals).

• They recreate (take that any way you want, but we're referring to those who like to ski, skate or ice fish).

• Or they fixate, like Mrs. Rutherford, on the weather.

The wind chill factor. Record lows, record highs. Snow drift patterns. In the summer, dew points and Derechos (straight line winds). In the winter, Alberta Clippers, polar vortexes and now, snowstorms named for Greek gods.

"We Americans love our weather," said Justin Roberti, a spokesman for AccuWeather, the for-profit service based in State College, Pa. "Weather is very personal to us. We use it to run our lives, and we're very emotional about it."

As compared to what other country? France?

"Europe isn't as into weather as we are," he said -- although, he hastily added that AccuWeather actually provides weather for every longitude and latitude in 27 languages, "and we are seen by a billion people per day."

Have people always been this way? Or are we in the grip of yet another unhealthy modern-day addiction fed by media, whether in the guise of local TV weather forecasts, Internet sites, blogs, mobile apps, or 24/7 cable weather channels?

It appears the latter is true, even as the weather business is being buffeted by the winds of change. A two-week standoff between The Weather Channel and DirecTV has roiled the viewing habits of hundreds of thousands, even as that other big for-profit weather player, AccuWeather, seeks to leverage the dispute to attract publicity for its own planned 24/7 weather channel.

All of this is happening in an era when weather junkies can check radar on their smartphone and the idea of a 24/7 weather channel is looking more and more like a relic of the 1980s, when cable television was in its infancy and the need for content was acute. Today, 67 percent of people age 40 or older still rely on television weather -- whether local or cable -- first and foremost, according to the Pew Research Center, compared to 21 percent who rely on the Internet. Under age 40, though, it's more of a tie, with 44 percent relying on television and 41 percent relying on the Internet.

In such a climate, the economics of round-the-clock coverage, at least when skies are clear, appear increasingly murky, and in recent years, more than 40 percent of The Weather Channel's programming has been dedicated to reality shows, not weather -- an approach that actually brings in higher ratings during quiet spells, Weather Channel spokeswoman Shirley Powell said.

Broad scientific expertise was in fact once a staple of The Weather Channel's lineup, which boasted some of the nation's top severe weather and hurricane experts: John Hope, who, as a government meteorologist in 1969, used his daughter Camille's name for one of the most destructive hurricanes in history; Steve Lyons; and Greg Forbes. Mr. Hope died in 2002 and Mr. Lyons left in 2012, although Mr. Forbes, a Latrobe native, remains. Last fall, the channel hired a popular New York anchorman who doesn't have a college meteorology degree. Sam Champion appeared on WABC in New York and on "Good Morning America" before jumping to the "Today" show.

DirectTV plays hardball

On Jan. 14, DirecTV stopped carrying The Weather Channel after negotiations broke down, claiming in a statement that the channel had strayed too far from its mission -- "Consumers understand there are now a variety of other ways to get weather coverage, free of reality show clutter."

But there are reports that the satellite broadcaster wants to cut fees it pays The Weather Channel, co-owned by NBCUniversal, by 20 percent -- which might lead to other cable carriers following suit. It also added a no-frills, all-weather-all-the-time Colorado newcomer called WeatherNation instead, which uses a three-hour taped loop instead of broadcasting live.

The Weather Channel cried foul, calling WeatherNation a cheaper version of itself without the kind of experience and deep bench strength it possesses -- 220 meteorologists are on staff there. It also took out full-page ads in major newspapers Wednesday urging DirecTV subscribers to contact Congress and switch providers and demanding the cable carrier pay viewers' cancellation fees once they do switch. More than 4 million customers have complained about DirecTV's move on keeptheweatherchannel.com, the company claims, more than 400,000 have called and emailed DirecTV, and more than 90,000 have pledged to switch providers.

Jim Cantore, whose reports while knee-deep in storm surges and hurricane winds have made him a star on The Weather Channel, also appeared on CNN last Sunday, painting DirecTV's action as a possible threat to public safety.

"Whether you're an emergency manager's office, whether you're even at the National Weather Service or a local TV station, your first hint at what's to come is from The Weather Channel," he said.

Really? National Weather Service meteorologists were furious, noting that the government agency happens to provide The Weather Channel with most of its observational and predictive weather data from satellites, radars, computerized weather models and current conditions.

Mr. Cantore later said he misspoke and was back on duty this past week covering "Winter Storm Janus" as it bore down on Washington, D.C. Weather Channel spokeswoman Shirley Powell noted that "Jim loves the National Weather Service and they love him."

45-day forecast?

Amid all of this, AccuWeather, apparently sensing an opportunity, decided to move up its announcement of its own 24/7 weather channel, scheduled to debut later this year.

That news was met with some head-scratching by meteorologists, who are still deriding AccuWeather's decision last summer to introduce a 45-day "forecast" in defiance of commonly accepted scientific norms, which state that any prediction beyond seven days is mostly guesswork based on long-term climatological averages.

"There cannot be skill at those ranges -- it goes back to chaos theory," meteorologist Steve Tracton told the Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang.

AccuWeather's founder, Joel Myers, was something of a wunderkind when he studied meteorology at Penn State University, but today, many academics consider him more of a showman, in pursuit of profit, sometimes at the expense of accuracy.

One Penn State meteorology instructor, Jon Nece, had his class compare AccuWeather's 45-day forecasts with standardized climatological averages and found AccuWeather's record ended up being worse.

AccuWeather spokesman Justin Robert was unrepentant.

"That was essentially one study by one group over a couple of different locations over a discrete period of time," he said. "Is the 45-day forecast going to be as accurate as the next day forecast? Certainly not, but we are providing much more detail in a forecast form, a greater level of detail, than you can find anywhere else. We're responding to this hunger out there for information, delivered on a detailed basis."

While people sometimes accuse Accuweather of gimmickry, competitors usually end up copying it, he added. AccuWeather took the basic windchill factor taught in meteorological schools, he said, and, using a proprietary algorhythm, introduced "RealFeel," and then The Weather Channel came up with "FeelsLike."

"We're the ones who introduced the five-day, the seven-day, the 10-day, the 25-day and the 30-day forecast and people scoffed at every one of them. Now -- at least up to the 10-day -- they're the industry standard."

Perhaps, but do people really need two weather cable channels or any?

Sure they do, especially this winter, where a certain sense of community seems to have evolved as we remain trapped together under a iron dome of cold that dulls the sky, bleaches dark asphalt streets a chalky white and makes metal railings burn to the touch.

Have a nice week.

http://www.post-gazette.com/local/city/2014/01/26/Have-we-become-emotionally-obsessed-with-the-weather/stories/201401260079
post #91992 of 93852
TV Notes
Holocaust play-TV drama ‘The Soap Myth’ asks: Who gets to write history?
By Howard Cohen, Miami Herald

Who gets to write history?

Should it be those who lived it or scholars who study and catalog it? What about those whose aim is to cast doubt on its very existence to keep the truth at bay?

Playwright Jeff Cohen and director Arnold Mittelman faced that quandary in their collaboration on The Soap Myth, a Holocaust play turned TV drama that premieres at 9 p.m. Monday on PBS affiliates including WPBT-2 (check local listings) and as a stream on the Internet at DigitalTheatre.com.

“This is the first time a Holocaust-related play will have a simultaneous launch via the Internet worldwide and on many national broadcasts on PBS affiliates,” said Mittelman, producing artistic director of the National Jewish Theater Foundation.

In the spring, Mittelman plans to launch the Holocaust Theater Archive to make archival material and plays about the Holocaust available for research and production. The project received a $100,000 matching grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

The Soap Myth is a significant addition to that archive. The challenge: to tell a story of German atrocities during World War II, and in particular to deal with the long-held notion that the Nazis used fat from the corpses of their Jewish victims to manufacture soap.

“That’s one big question that looms over the entirety of that play — and it’s not about soap,” Cohen said from his New York home.

“Who gets to write history and what is the criteria for writing history? The survivor said it happened. It’s his memory. How can you disrespect him? But the scholars say there is no evidence and they have to worry if they put something out there that they can’t back up with evidence. You’ll have these deniers over here who will say: ‘They say they made soap. Do you have evidence of that? What else are they lying about?’

“History is a very malleable thing that you have to take seriously.”

THE DILEMMA

Cohen’s story, The Soap Myth, centers on the desperate desire of Holocaust survivor Milton Saltzman to have his personal account of the horror heard and validated by historians and reintroduced into Holocaust museums’ exhibits. His hopes hinge on Annie, a young, naive investigative reporter who is assigned to write a piece on Saltzman. She’s caught between her compassion for the man — his passion is palpable — and historians’ need for documentation.

Another character, the disturbingly charismatic Brenda Goosen (Dee Pelletier), stops short of discounting the Holocaust completely but expresses one of Soap Myth’s troubling thoughts: What is it about the Jews throughout history that has led to such persecution? She suggests the victims somehow share the blame.

“It’s very easy sometimes to draw evil as a cartoon character and then you don’t learn anything,” Cohen said of the charm sewn into Goosen’s persona. “Why would anybody be persuaded by that cartoon? Evil is more insidious than that, and that helps people learn about how human beings can be taken in.”

Above all, Cohen says, “ The Soap Myth is about the survival of surviving. How you survive surviving.”

ORIGIN

That responsibility, as the last generation of Holocaust survivors passes away, felt overwhelming at times not only for the actors but for the writer, who sat on the idea for years before committing The Soap Myth to a script.

Cohen had been approached outside a small theater in Tribeca he ran by an elderly gentleman, a Holocaust survivor, who was clutching a manila envelope. The man pressed the package into Cohen’s hands. Inside was a magazine containing an article about the Nazi’s crimes and the creation of soap from the victims’ remains.

“I read this article, and it took me a number of years to figure out whether I should write something about it,” Cohen said. “It was a big responsibility because you’re dealing with such extraordinary issues and such enormous pain and you’re dealing with a topic where the No. 1 criteria is to make sure you get it right.”

The Soap Myth supplies no easy answers.

RESPONSIBILITY

“I seem to be drawn to really interesting stories that have a lot of gray area to them,” Cohen said. “There’s not a lot of right and wrong. It’s about how and when you pose the question. That alone provokes a lot of discussion. A lot of humanity is an enigma. We have a history of doing the most obscene things and a history of being optimistic and doing the most noble things and I think this story, the larger story of the Holocaust, encapsulates the riddle that are human beings.”

Greg Mullavey, 74, has enjoyed playing a wide range of characters over his 50-year acting career. He was Grandpa on Nickelodeon’s iCarly, hapless husband Tom on Norman Lear’s soap opera spoof, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, and the Meathead’s intellectual buddy, Stewart, on a memorable 1974 episode of All in the Family.

But Mullavey felt compelled to take on the role of Saltzman.

“That era of human history has always fascinated me,” Mullavey said from his New York home. “It’s appalling that man allowed a madman like Hitler to take power. I felt so much for it [ The Soap Myth] and can identify with it, and when an actor can do that that’s not acting anymore. That’s just being. That identification won the day for me.”

It was instantly apparent that he was right for the role, said Mittelman, former producing artistic director of the Coconut Grove Playhouse. “I could see a certain connection to the material, and he didn’t want to dissipate that. He basically sat down and did the Milton Saltzman sections of the play, and Jeff and I turned to each other with tears in our eyes. We knew we found our Milton.”

Mullavey’s experience working in front of cameras was crucial to help transport the stark setting of the play to film. The TV version was pieced together from two performances of the play at the end of its 2012 run at The Black Box Theater at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center on 46th Street in New York City. An audience was not present for the filming.

ACTING MAGIC

One scene resonated with particular power for Mullavey. “When I got to the final speech of this guy’s journey and his time at Auschwitz I got transported every night. I was no longer on stage. Those moments are rare for an actor and only a few times has that happened in my journey as an actor and when it happens it’s magical,” he said.

Andi Potamkin, 24, a New York stage actress, plays the young journalist Annie Blumberg. As the only character to remain onstage through the play — Mittelman’s decision — she is the audience’s eyes and ears in The Soap Myth.

“It was kind of everything you would ever want to get to do as an actor,” Potamkin said. “When I was studying theater what I really wanted to do was tell stories. And I want them to be important stories.

“Arnold came to me with this one and I read the script and it was an important story that needed to be told. Timeless. These are the last decades where there are actual, living survivors where we can interact with them and theater is such an interactive thing to do.

“I felt a connection to my character, the want to be able to give people that caring, that recognition, to reassure them you are seen and you are heard,” she said. “What a powerful thing that is — to look somebody in the eyes and give them recognition.”

http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/01/24/3890657/holocaust-play-tv-drama-the-soap.html
post #91993 of 93852
TV Notes
Ballet Drama ‘Flesh And Bone’ Gets Series Order At Starz, Casts Lead
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com

Starz has picked its next original series, giving a series order to drama Flesh and Bone, created/executive produced by Moira Walley-Beckett (Breaking Bad) and executive produced by Lawrence Bender, Kevin Brown and John Melfi. The green light comes after an extensive nationwide search involving thousands of hopefuls resulted in the casting of dancer Sarah Hay (Black Swan) in the lead role. Flesh And Bone follows a young ballet dancer, Claire (Hay), who has a distinctly troubled past, as she joins a prestigious ballet company in New York. The dark and gritty series will unflinchingly explore the dysfunction and glamour of the ballet world. “From the beginning, we all agreed this project could not go forward unless we found a world class dancer who had the ability to convey the widest range of emotions that Moira has written,” sais Starz CEO Chris Albrecht. “This is one of the most challenging and dynamic characters I have even seen and am thrilled to say we found our Claire in Ms. Hay.” Added Moira Walley-Beckett, “Sarah Hay embodies the role of Claire just as I dreamt her.”

Flesh and Bone had been on the fast track, picking up speed in November when the project locked in four accomplished dancers for supporting roles, former American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Irina Dvorovenko, current American Ballet Theatre soloist Sascha Radetsky (Center Stage), Ballet Arizona company dancer Raychel Diane Weiner, and Emily Tyra (Boardwalk Empire). Additionally, Ethan Stiefel, star of the movies Center Stage and Center Stage: Turn It Up, joined the project as consultant and choreographer. Then in December, Starz pulled out of its commitment to Sky Atlantic’s upcoming drama series Fortitude when its production schedule no longer guaranteed a delivery for Q4 of 2014. Starz indicated it would fill the spot with internally developed projects, with Flesh and Bone among the frontrunner. The slot is still up for grabs as Flesh and Bone will need more time and is slated for 2015, with production scheduled to begin in New York City in early 2014. Among the other candidates, Survivor’s Remorse, exec produced by LeBron James, has been picking up heat, with some preliminary casting already underway. Walley-Beckett, Bender and Brown all have strong connections to the ballet world. Bender and UTA-repped Walley-Beckett are former ballet dancers, and Brown’s family is made up entirely of former ballet dancers and was the basis for the 1977 feature The Turning Point.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/01/ballet-drama-flesh-and-bone-gets-series-order-at-starz-casts-lead/
post #91994 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Technology Notes
Samsung's curved 4K TV is fit to rule
By Lee Neikirk, USA Today/Reviewed.com - Jan. 25, 2014

Curved 4K TV technology is the talk of the town this year, and it was on display everywhere at this year's CES in early January. One TV that caught our eye during the show was the Samsung UN65HU9000: a sleek, silver entity displaying a very impressive 4K (also called UHD) image. Here are our first thoughts.

Picture quality and pricing aside, what is the side viewing angle like on these curved screens? Are we back to the rear projection days of not being able to see decent if sitting off to the one side at an angle?

post #91995 of 93852
TV Notes
'How I Met Your Mother' Turns 200: Showrunners Talk Time Travel, Penning the Series Finale
By Michael O'Connell, The Hollywood Reporter - Jan. 27, 2014

How I Met Your Mother (Mondays at 8:00 p.m. on CBS) has bucked TV convention from the start. Ordered to series in 2005, the telling of one romantic's odyssey to find the woman of his dreams premiered on a schedule that had all but given up on the multicamera setup and canned laughter of traditional sitcoms. But the format allowed the CBS comedy, a modest ratings performer to start, to embrace a distinctive narrative flow of flashbacks, flash-forwards, blink-and-you-miss-them scenes and a carefully maintained canon -- more similar to a serial drama than any half-hour comedy.

"I think we just wrote the rhythm of the show that we wanted to see," says executive producer Craig Thomas, HIMYM's co-creator and co-showrunner alongside longtime friend Carter Bays. "We were never really the kind of writers who wrote big 15-page scenes. We think very cinematically and have been really influenced by guys like Quentin Tarantino. We wanted to see if we could take that aesthetic and put it on the multicam format."

Nearly a decade later, HIMYM's March curtain call comes at the end of a ninth and final season that's been even more aggressively unorthodox, telling the story of a three-day wedding weekend over the course of 24 episodes -- complete with a new castmember (Cristin Milioti) coming onboard as a regular after her 2013 introduction as the titular "Mother" who's been teased by the title and the story since day one. That whimsy comes to a head with the 200th episode on Jan. 28, told entirely from the perspective of the actress' unnamed character, who's only now meeting leads played by Neil Patrick Harris, Alyson Hannigan, Josh Radnor, Jason Segel and Cobie Smulders.

"We'll call it half creative and half born of necessity," Thomas explains. "In the middle of season eight, we didn't know that we would even have a season nine -- so we were writing like it was the end. Sometimes you get more creative when you paint yourself into a corner. I think a lot of the playfulness of season nine has come out of that constraint of the three-day weekend."
CBS, studio 20th Century Fox, the producers and the cast ultimately settled on the ninth season being the series' final one after months-long negotiations ended last January with the decision that it was time to wrap up the story. Adds Bays: "It just grew in our heads to the tipping point where we had to do this [ninth] season. I think we would have cheated ourselves out of an amazing year if we had just ended it."

The ninth season, which will eventually culminate in Barney (Harris) and Robin (Smulders) tying the knot and Ted (Radnor) meeting the Mother, has still presented its share of structural obstacles. But Bays and Thomas are long accustomed to navigating the tricky chronology of the series' narrative that started simultaneously in 2005 and 2030. (Bob Saget, voicing the middle-aged iteration of Radnor's Ted, has narrated every episode to date.) "We always felt that if it got too claustrophobic, we had time travel as an escape hatch," says Thomas. "The 200th episode isn't confined to the three days. You see eight years of the Mother's life starting in 2005. We get to see her side of scenes that we've already shown the audience back in season three. There are a lot of callbacks to earlier in the series."

The Milioti-centric episode comes after a handful of glimpses of the character, whose path has been crossing that of other characters -- all while Bays and Thomas have sparingly doled out flash-forwards to her life after meeting Ted. Upping Milioti to a regular, the first-ever cast addition for a show that's remained focused on the central five players from the start, had many speculating how much she would be used during the final season. "We didn't know for sure how much we wanted to use her, but we knew we needed her 'on call,' as it were," says Bays. "So we made her a regular. In hindsight, it took making the first half of the season to realize we weren't using her enough, but I think these last nine episodes correct that error nicely."

None of these changes, major or minor, seem to have turned off the show's loyal following. Averaging a 4.4 rating among adults 18-to-49 and 10.4 million viewers in its final season, HIMYM has actually improved 5 percent from last year -- as many broadcast contemporaries suffer double-digit drops. It will end its run as the No. 3 comedy on television, only outranked by heavyweights The Big Bang Theory and Modern Family. It's also enjoying its a lucrative syndication, airing most nights on FXX.

"They know their series and their audience probably as well as any showrunners we've ever worked with. When they pitched the idea for season nine, it just seemed like another special form of storytelling," says 20th Century Fox TV's Gary Newman, who has overseen the series from the beginning alongside fellow chairman and CEO Dana Walden. She adds: "Ultimately, Gary and I both feel that Carter, Craig and [executive producer and director] Pam Fryman have earned the right to do almost anything they want to do with this show. They're very connected to their fans."

That kind of engagement is something that CBS brass is keen to keep going, even after the lights turn out on HIMYM. Entertainment chief Nina Tassler spoke about her affection for the show with reporters earlier in January. "It really broke the form in terms of having a comedy that had a mythology that ran the entire length of the series," says Tassler. "We feel that they've broken new ground, they introduced a new form, and that's why we're excited to talk about the spinoff."

Yes, a potential spinoff is indeed on the table. Bays and Thomas are working with Up All Night creator and former Saturday Night Live scribe Emily Spivey on a potential companion that adopts the premise with a new group of friends -- but it's not exactly the top priority for the guys, as they get ready to pen the one-hour series finale on the show that thus far has defined their careers.

"We're stalling writing it out of sheer nostalgia and fear that we'll be sobbing the whole time," Thomas says of the March 31 ender, "Last Forever." "In one episode, we're going to see 17 years in the lives of all our characters. We're going to catch the audience back up to the year 2030, when the story is being told by future Ted to his kids. It's a very big, ambitious hour. The big important things that will happen, a lot of those have remained true to our idea of how to finish the series that we've had basically since the pilot."

The long goodbye, bittersweet for some, has seemed to leave all on the show pleased with the year-and-a-half's notice they received in preparing for the end. It's a luxury afforded to a scant few TV series, particular comedies. "This really feels like a bonus season," says Harris, who will move back to New York shortly after the February wrap. "It's this wonderfully weird coda to our show."

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/how-i-met-your-mother-672716
post #91996 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc View Post

I preferred Parr to Carson, but I kept on watching when Johnny took over. Well, until he had Rachael Carson, author of Silent Spring on, and spent the whole time ridiculing her. I never watched him again, after that.
After looking at all of the facts now about DDT, Carson was right.
post #91997 of 93852
TV Review
HBO's 'Herblock'
Special profiles the influential Washington Post cartoonist, who skewered big shots and favored the little guy
By David Hinckley, New York Daily News - Jan. 27, 2014

Anything stuck a pin into the self-important balloon of politicians, Herbert Block felt, was a jab well taken.

Block, better known as Herblock, kept his own pin sharpened for more than half a century.

Over decades at the Washington Post he became the most famous editorial cartoonist of modern times, as skilled with a drawing as were his colleagues with words.

Politically he was the classic populist, a slightly less radical version of Woody Guthrie. He hated war, racism and corporate greed, loved America and anything that leveled the American playing field.

A heartland kid who drew pictures from the moment he could hold a crayon, he returned continuously to themes of economic and social justice.

Starting his career at the beginning of the Great Depression cemented those instincts and gave him material — he would have said too much material — to develop a distinctive style for portraying haves and have-nots.

His ordinary people were weary but proud. His Joe McCarthys and Richard Nixons were haunted figures with dark eyes and an air somewhere between desperation and sinister calculation.

While his drawings were not subtle, he knew the power of details, and over the years his pencils took on the power of a sword.

Director Michael Stevens anchors historical footage and commentary from people who knew or admired Herblock with long soliloquies in his own words.

These are delivered by actor Alan Mandell, sitting in a replica of Herblock’s cheerfully cluttered Post office.

While “Herblock” stresses the willingness of its subject to challenge powerful people and institutions, we rarely hear any return fire here. Herblock died in 2001, age 91, and if there are those who think his commentary unfair, their voices are only slight whispers here.

That his targets may have felt stung is treated as affirmation that the pin had done its job.

HERBLOCK
Network/Time: HBO, Monday at 9 p.m.
Rating: ★★★★ (out of five)


http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/herblock-television-review-article-1.1590691
post #91998 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc View Post

I preferred Parr to Carson, but I kept on watching when Johnny took over. Well, until he had Rachael Carson, author of Silent Spring on, and spent the whole time ridiculing her. I never watched him again, after that.
Hmmm. Turns out according many scientific experts and millions of malaria victims he was right.
post #91999 of 93852
TV Review
‘The Capones,’ Al would surely weep
Reelz reality series is as cooked at the lasagna that's served
By Mike Hale, The New York Times' - Jan. 27, 2013

They say that we should distrust something that’s too good to be true. But can something be too bad to be true?

Reelz’s new reality show “The Capones” has an air of falsity from beginning to end, but it’s still dull, predictable and derivative. Though the principals are remarkably telegenic and natural on camera, that’s because they nearly all look and sound like actors. The main character, in fact, is an actor.

Reality shows increasingly require a willing suspension of disbelief, but not usually for so small a payoff.

Premiering this Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 10 p.m., the show centers on Dominic Capone, who has a smattering of acting credits on imdb.com and runs a Chicago-area restaurant called Capone’s with his mother, Dawn. According to the opening sequence, narrated by someone called Uncle Lou, Dawn’s father was Ralph Capone. We don’t hear who Ralph Capone was, although it is strongly implied that he was related to Al.

Uncle Lou also says that Dom, who is identified in onscreen graphics as “the Boss,” is involved in “some other stuff,” and we see someone pass him an envelope. Lou implies that Dom runs a “crew” consisting of three guys — Carmine the business guy, Bert the ladies’ man and Jeff the dumb one — but what they do for him is left vague.

The main story line in the premiere concerns a party that Dom and his gorgeous longtime girlfriend, Staci, are throwing in the suburban mansion where they live. Whether they live there all the time or just for the filming of this series is unclear.

Earlier, Staci calls Dom on the way home from the gym and asks him to “rush home to give me another workout.”

“I think I can fit you in to my schedule,” Dom says.

“I was gonna see if I could fit you in,” she says, smirking.

But first, Dom has to pick up his friend Madeline, who is finishing a three-month jail sentence resulting from her shoplifting a pillow. Although Dom says they’ve always just been friends, Madeline says she and Dom dated. When they used to go pool-hopping, she says, “I could tell he was into me because he would always get boners.”

Meanwhile, Uncle Lou has Jeff drive him to Cicero so he can look at his childhood home. On the way, Jeff supposedly rear-ends a car driven by two suspiciously TV-ready tough guys. We don’t see the actual impact, and the other car appears to be undamaged, but one of the tough guys chases them with a baseball bat.

When they get to Lou’s old house, it’s occupied by a suspiciously TV-ready woman who only speaks Spanish.

The day of the party, we’re cued to expect fireworks at the party when Dawn and Staci argue over whether Dom prefers Dawn’s cheese lasagna or Staci’s meat lasagna.

Sure enough, the two women get into a shouting match at the party after Staci starts to suspect that the guests are avoiding her lasagna out of fear of Dawn. “When Italian women start arguing about lasanga,” says Dom, “watch the f— out.”

“I should grind some meatballs in her face,” says Dawn, and then follows up that image with an obscene joke.

“The Capones” is only one of many reality shows in which members of an ethnic group have done their best to confirm negative stereotypes about that group. If Al Capone were alive today, he’d ask to have his name taken off the show.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/the-capones-al-would-surely-weep/
post #92000 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

If there are two weeks between the conference championships and the Super Bowl, it's the logical time to play it. Which makes me wonder - are there always two weeks between championship weekend and the Super Bowl? Seems to me I remember them occasionally playing the SB the following week...confused.gif

The last time I recall there only be one week between the Conference Championships and the Super Bowl was when things were delayed a week by 9/11.
post #92001 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

If there are two weeks between the conference championships and the Super Bowl, it's the logical time to play it. Which makes me wonder - are there always two weeks between championship weekend and the Super Bowl? Seems to me I remember them occasionally playing the SB the following week...confused.gif

The NFL has been messing around with this off and on. They are now set on 2 weeks between the conference championship games and the Super Bowl.
post #92002 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV/Critic's Notes
Have we become emotionally obsessed with the weather?
By Mackenzie Carpenter, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Jan. 26, 2014

DirectTV plays hardball

On Jan. 14, DirecTV stopped carrying The Weather Channel after negotiations broke down, claiming in a statement that the channel had strayed too far from its mission -- "Consumers understand there are now a variety of other ways to get weather coverage, free of reality show clutter."

But there are reports that the satellite broadcaster wants to cut fees it pays The Weather Channel, co-owned by NBCUniversal, by 20 percent -- which might lead to other cable carriers following suit. It also added a no-frills, all-weather-all-the-time Colorado newcomer called WeatherNation instead, which uses a three-hour taped loop instead of broadcasting live.

The Weather Channel cried foul, calling WeatherNation a cheaper version of itself without the kind of experience and deep bench strength it possesses -- 220 meteorologists are on staff there. It also took out full-page ads in major newspapers Wednesday urging DirecTV subscribers to contact Congress and switch providers and demanding the cable carrier pay viewers' cancellation fees once they do switch. More than 4 million customers have complained about DirecTV's move on keeptheweatherchannel.com, the company claims, more than 400,000 have called and emailed DirecTV, and more than 90,000 have pledged to switch providers.

Jim Cantore, whose reports while knee-deep in storm surges and hurricane winds have made him a star on The Weather Channel, also appeared on CNN last Sunday, painting DirecTV's action as a possible threat to public safety.

"Whether you're an emergency manager's office, whether you're even at the National Weather Service or a local TV station, your first hint at what's to come is from The Weather Channel," he said.

Really? National Weather Service meteorologists were furious, noting that the government agency happens to provide The Weather Channel with most of its observational and predictive weather data from satellites, radars, computerized weather models and current conditions.

Mr. Cantore later said he misspoke and was back on duty this past week covering "Winter Storm Janus" as it bore down on Washington, D.C. Weather Channel spokeswoman Shirley Powell noted that "Jim loves the National Weather Service and they love him."

The Weather Channel is gone overboard over this squabble. A threat to public safety by not having The Weather Channel? Give me a break. I can't tell you how many times there has been severe weather in my area and turn to TWC only to see some reality show on. Besides, my local stations, my phone, and my computer can give me updated weather if I really need it in a bad storm.
post #92003 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
10PM - Castle
(R - Oct. 14)
* * * *

Is this correct? Both TitanTV and TVGuide have a new episode listed.
post #92004 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Picture quality and pricing aside, what is the side viewing angle like on these curved screens? Are we back to the rear projection days of not being able to see decent if sitting off to the one side at an angle?

I agree. I thought flat screens were the future.

I predict within the next 10 years Blu-ray will be an old technology because a new format will come out to support UHD. So if your wondering if you should upgrade your DVDs to Blu-ray, you maybe be having to upgrade your Blu-rays soon.
post #92005 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by BSTNFAN View Post

Is this correct? Both TitanTV and TVGuide have a new episode listed.

According to abc.com its a new episode Of Castle. #614 "Dresses to kill"

http://abc.go.com/shows/castle/photos/seasons/06/episode-614-dressed-to-kill/
post #92006 of 93852
Castle is delaying tonight's episode, and also the one on Feb 10th. So #614 is Feb 3, #615 is Feb 17.

http://thefutoncritic.com/showatch.aspx?id=Castle&view=listings
post #92007 of 93852
^^^ My TWC guide also lists tonight's "Castle" as an Oct. 14 rerun.
post #92008 of 93852
SUNDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #92009 of 93852
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
NBC’s Pro Bowl falls opposite CBS’s Grammys
Game draws a 6.7 metered-market household rating
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Jan. 27, 2013

The Pro Bowl got sacked by unfortunate scheduling last night.

The NFL all-star game aired against CBS’s Grammy Awards this year, a show it didn’t have to face last year.

As expected, considering the ratings power of the Grammys, Pro Bowl ratings were down though still solid.

The game posted a 6.6 household rating from 7:30 p.m.-10:45 p.m., according to Nielsen metered-market ratings, off 13 percent from a 7.7 metered-market rating last year.

NBC posted a 3.1 adults 18-49 rating in primetime, second to CBS.

Elsewhere last night, Fox was the only network to air its usual Sunday lineup.

Its highest-rated program was “Family Guy,” which averaged a 2.0 in the demo. As expected, against the heavy competition, Fox’s entire animated lineup was off double-digit percentages from its most recent slate of original episodes two weeks ago.

ABC’s first-ever “Bachelor” wedding averaged a 1.6 from 8 to 10 p.m. That was 60 percent better than a “Bachelorette” wedding that aired on ABC in late 2012 between Ashley and J.P.

Note: Because the Grammys ran well past primetime last night, overnight ratings are not accurate. More reliable ratings will be posted on Media Life as soon as they become available.

CBS finished first for the night among 18-49s with an 8.1 average overnight rating and a 20 share. NBC was second at 3.1/8, Fox and ABC tied for third at 1.3/3, Univision fifth at 0.6/2 and Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-nine percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for NBC’s NFL coverage are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data.

NBC was first at 7 p.m. with a 3.0 for a “Sunday Night Football” season recap and the start of the Pro Bowl. CBS was second with a 2.1 for “60 Minutes,” ABC third with a 1.5 for “America’s Funniest Home Videos,” Fox fourth with a 0.7 for reruns of “Bob’s Burgers” and “American Dad,” Univision fifth with a 0.6 for “Aqui y Ahora” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for the movie “Finding Nemo.”

CBS took the lead at 8 p.m. with a 9.5 for the Grammys, while NBC slipped to second with a 3.5 for football. ABC and Fox tied for third at 1.6, ABC for “Bachelor” and Fox for “The Simpsons” (1.7) and “Bob’s Burgers” (1.5). Univision was fifth with a 0.7 for “Mas Alla del Impacto” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for the end of “Finding Nemo” and start of “Captain America.”

At 9 p.m. CBS led with a 10.8 for the Grammys, with NBC second with a 3.0 for football. Fox was third with a 1.7 for “Guy” (2.0) and “American Dad” (1.5), ABC fourth with a 1.5 for “Bachelor,” Univision fifth with a 0.7 for more “Impacto” and Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for its movie.

CBS was first again at 10 p.m. with a 10.0 for the Grammys, followed by NBC with a 2.7 for football. Univision was third with a 0.6 for “Sal y Pimienta,” and ABC and Telemundo tied for fourth at 0.5, ABC for a repeat of “Castle” and Telemundo for the end of its movie.

CBS also led the night among households with a 14.8 average overnight rating and a 22 share. NBC was second at 5.4/8, ABC third at 3.7/6, Fox fourth at 1.8/3, Univision fifth at 1.1/2 and Telemundo sixth at 0.6/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/nbcs-pro-bowl-falls-opposite-cbss-grammys/

* * * *

Nielsen/TV Notes
A slightly bigger audience for Grammys
Averages 28.5 million total viewers, up 1 percent

The Grammy Awards remained hot despite facing bigger competition from NBC’s Pro Bowl this year.

Sunday night’s telecast drew 28.51 million total viewers, according to Nielsen, up 1 percent from the 28.38 million who watched last year’s program.

It marked the second-biggest audience for the show in the past 21 years, behind only the 2012 broadcast, which took place hours after Whitney Houston’s unexpected death. A Houston tribute lifted that ceremony to more than 39 million viewers.

Sunday’s show also posted a 9.9 adults 18-49 rating, off 2 percent from a 10.2 last year.

The steadiness of the ratings was impressive for two reasons.

First, the Grammys aired two weeks earlier than last year because of the Olympics. Whenever the Winter Games take place, the ceremony is moved back two weeks, so as not to interfere with the first Sunday of the Olympics or the Super Bowl, which takes place on the first Sunday in February.

The Grammys had 2.64 million viewers more than the last time they aired in January due to the Games, in 2010.

Second, the ceremony faced the Pro Bowl on NBC, which draws decent numbers. That’s a lot more competition than CBS is used to, and indeed initial ratings for the Pro Bowl are down.

There was also some controversy surrounding the show. Surprisingly, it wasn’t about the 33 couples, many of them same-sex, who were married near the end of the show, though certainly blowback over the political statement could build.

Instead, it was the way CBS aired the event that received criticism.

The network put the awards on a tape delay on the West Coast, which prompted some disgruntled tweets.

Because the ceremony was airing live on the East Coast, West Coast residents who wouldn’t get to see the show for hours nonetheless found their Twitter and Facebook feeds full of Grammy results and commentary.

And news outlets posted stories on who had won and what the night’s most surprising parts were, including that marriage ceremony during a performance of the Macklemore and Ryan Lewis hit “Same Love.”

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/slightly-bigger-audience-grammys/
post #92010 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

I agree. I thought flat screens were the future.

I predict within the next 10 years Blu-ray will be an old technology because a new format will come out to support UHD. So if your wondering if you should upgrade your DVDs to Blu-ray, you maybe be having to upgrade your Blu-rays soon.

No question, they will be remastering a whole buncha' stuff in UHD (as long as it was film-based to begin with), and many of us will be upgrading our library of favorites yet again. But the new format will still be blu-ray based and backward compatible.
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