or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 3082

post #92431 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

For me, that's the frustrating part. We're paying $70/mo more for cable TV than we were paying in Colorado Springs in the early 90's, $30 vs $100. And truth be told, the only "real" difference is that the channels we watched then are now in HD and we have  a DVR vice a VCR. Believe it or not, but I think the only new channels we're watching are Fox, FNC and CW (I still miss the old UPN). Oh, and FOOD/HGTV which started around the time we moved to Phoenix, as well as Velocity of late. Now, maybe a 300%+ increase over 20 years is reasonable for less than 20 channels, but I doubt it. The price of a car comparable to my 1988 Grand Prix has only doubled in a slightly longer time and the price of a better 65" TV has actually gone down since we bought ours in 2003. Heck, even the price of gas in Phoenix is holding fairly steady relative to the average hourly US wage (10% in 1970, 13% now).

The difference between you and me though is that half of my favorites are on cablenets. Since that is gradually changing again, I feel the time is coming when what I watch will once again be on network TV and I'll dump cable. And don't get me started on my cellphone bill. smile.gif
If there is something that comes on the cablenets I just wait until it comes out on Blu-ray or DVD. There is so much I've been watching on the free channels I haven't had much time for Home Video thanks to MeTV and Cozi TV. I get Fox and the CW in HD OTA. There is also plenty of news on the broadcast networks and I get a news talk radio station. The only thing that cable has going for it are the sports channels. But since I'm only a football fan there is 8 months out of the year I don't even think about them.

I really miss cable TV from the 90s. The price was only $30 a month, there were no reality shows, and had a lot of great programming. But cable TV has gone downhill since then. It has been ruined by corporate greed.
post #92432 of 93648
The real need for cable seems to be live sports. I live in a condo, cannot have a dish and an indoor antenna does not work. I am a sports junkie so if we want live sports and other stuff, cable is the way to go. You can get most live sports over the internet but it is illegal and the sites keep moving around. We use our DVR for time shifting and not to save things. The bill does go up but most everything else has also. Don't get me started on the TWC/Comcast merger -- I am a TWC subscriber and have no other choice that makes any real sense.
post #92433 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Proof that there is a God. And He has a sense of humor.

I'm not one who typically watches the Saturday night Syfy schlock-fests, but I caught 'Sharknado!' on one of it's many rebroadcasts (NBC Universal was determined to milk every last drop of seawater out of it). And it was hysterical! Looking forward to this one, which I'm sure will be hyped to the moon. Which will probably be the setting for 'Sharknado 3'. You know its coming. tongue.gif

If you enjoyed this one, give Jersey Shore Shark Attack a try. I love the cheese on SyFy smile.gif.
post #92434 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

If there is something that comes on the cablenets I just wait until it comes out on Blu-ray or DVD. There is so much I've been watching on the free channels I haven't had much time for Home Video thanks to MeTV and Cozi TV. I get Fox and the CW in HD OTA. There is also plenty of news on the broadcast networks and I get a news talk radio station. The only thing that cable has going for it are the sports channels. But since I'm only a football fan there is 8 months out of the year I don't even think about them.

I really miss cable TV from the 90s. The price was only $30 a month, there were no reality shows, and had a lot of great programming. But cable TV has gone downhill since then. It has been ruined by corporate greed.

But the difference is is that you watch the old stuff. I don't want to watch old programs that are not broadcast in HD and I didn't spend ungodly amounts of money on my system to watch reruns of M*A*S*H. There is some great programming available on cable and to many of us it's worth the expense.
post #92435 of 93648
Bickering removed. Take the cord-cutting conversation to the cord cutting thread. Thanks.
post #92436 of 93648
Critic's Notes
Have it your way at NBC's Olympics
Broadcast, cable or Internet, viewers get a buffet of choices.
By Robert Bianco, USA Today - Feb. 17, 2014

Finally, NBC has figured out a way to give Olympics fans more to see and more ways to see it.

As always, you have the option of watching NBC's highlight package in prime time. But for Sochi's 2014 Winter Olympics, that staple has been augmented by extensive live coverage through NBC Universal's cable outlets and its "Live Extra" Internet feed. In fact, as long as you subscribe to a cable or satellite provider and you have a strong Internet connection, you can often end up with three viewing choices for the same event, complete with three sets of commentators.

Consider figure skating, one of the Olympics' biggest ratings draws. On Live Extra, which uses the Olympic Broadcasting Services feed, you hear from British skater Chris Howarth and Australian coach Belinda Noonan (though you might never know that, because OBS tends not to identify who's speaking). On NBC, you get Tom Hammond, Scott Hamilton and Sandra Bezic. And on NBCSN, you have Terry Gannon and the talk of the Olympic town, Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir.

The Olympics make stars of analysts as well as athletes — and this year, the TV breakouts are clearly Lipinski and Weir, who Gannon calls "The Glitter Twins." Lipinski holds her own on the clothing front, but when it comes to glitter, Weir is the draw: Friday's silver sparkles were followed Sunday by an emerald-green jacket paired with a bejeweled headband. But for both, the fashion choices are more than entertaining. They represent a sense of showmanship combined with a willingness to be out there and honest that extends to their commentary.

Relaxed and amusing together, Weir and Lipinski are a joy to hear, in part because they don't continually make us listen. They're willing to let long stretches of performances go by without comment, and when they do chime in, their remarks are technical enough to be explanatory without being obtuse. Best of all, while they understand the pressure the competitors face, they still expect them to perform and are not afraid to be critical when they don't.

It's easier to speak freely, of course, when you're talking to the relatively small audience that NBCSN's daytime skating broadcasts draw. Commentators on prime-time's big stage instead tend to fall back on enthusiasm and mushiness — none more so than Hamilton and Bezic.

You won't find a pair with more knowledge or experience, but they behave less like analysts than camp counselors, offering comfort, encouragement and, whenever even remotely possible, praise. Every moment seems to be greeted by either elation or despair, delivered in all caps by Hamilton and with a perpetual catch in her throat by Bezic, who has a particularly annoying tendency to state the emotionally obvious. Let's just assume from here on out, please, that every skater who does badly wanted to do better.

If it all leaves you pining for the days when Dick Button and Peggy Fleming would flat-out tell you that a routine was terrible or an outfit was ugly, try Noonan and Howarth. Noonan, in particular, is the most willing to say a position is unattractive, the choreography is insufficient, and the judges are crazy.

Unfortunately, they're hampered by the live Internet format, which allows you to pause, but not to rewind or fast-forward. While the Internet replays offer more flexibility than the live feed, they still can't match the image you get from a good TV or the total control you can exert by combining NBCSN with a DVR. Both, however, are of most interest to completists. For many viewers, prime-time highlights are more than enough.

It's your choice — which is what Olympics fans have wanted all along.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2014/02/16/winter-olympics-review-feb-17/5533871/
post #92437 of 93648
TV Review
‘Star-Crossed,’ for the young only
CW high school drama hits on the themes of 'Romeo and Juliet'
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine

Many stories about young lovers let us know, in a boastful sort of way, that they’re based on “Romeo and Juliet.” This is odd because it would be more difficult to make a story about young lovers that has no echoes whatsoever of “Romeo and Juliet.”

If the CW’s new sci-fi drama “Star-Crossed” had a different title, the nods to Shakespeare in its premise and plot might go unnoticed. Revolving around the romance between a human teenager and her extraterrestrial high school classmate, the series is much more strongly reminiscent of other dramas about sensitive outsider girls and their vampire boyfriends.

The familiarity is deadening but not deadly. Young viewers with a taste for star-crossed lovers could get wound up in the main characters’ romantic two-step. Older viewers will likely find the combination of high school drama and interspecies warfare a bit too awkward.

The premiere episode, which airs next Monday, Feb. 17, at 8 p.m., opens with a scene set in May 2014. A spacecraft full of aliens called Atrians crash-lands in suburban Louisiana.

The survivors are immediately attacked by U.S. military forces. After responding in kind, they are rounded up and quarantined in a compound near Baton Rouge.

Ten years later, as an experiment in integration, seven Atrian teenagers are going to be enrolled in the local high school. In the first day of classes, Emery (Aimee Teegarden) realizes that one of the aliens, Roman (Matt Lanter), is the boy she briefly sheltered after the crash. She had thought he was dead.

Although we know that Emery and Roman are going to get together, the show takes its time. In fact, they haven’t even kissed by the end of the two episodes made available for review. (A near kiss is interrupted by a relatively modern cliché: the inopportune cell-phone ring.)

Inconveniently, Emery’s father, Ray (Jay Huguley), is the head of security at the alien compound. Roman’s father, Nox (Jason Douglas), is an Atrian tribal leader who favors accommodation and assimilation with the humans.

The inevitable pretty queen bee of the high school, Taylor (Natalie Hall), wants to exclude the new kids. Her handsome friend Grayson (Gray Damon) is more friendly to them, but he may be putting up a front in order to win over Emery.

As in the HBO vampire series “True Blood,” there are doves and hawks on both sides. An alien underground called the Trags is planning an armed rebellion. A human group called the Redhawks wants to oppress the aliens.

Also as in “True Blood,” the minority group may have some mojo that the majority group wants. Julia, a chronically ill friend of Emery’s, has heard a rumor that the Atrians possess an herb that could cure her cancer.

Breaking somewhat with Shakespeare, when the plot gets around to the equivalent of Tybalt’s death, it’s Roman’s side, not Emery’s, that is the aggrieved party. Roman adjusts a little too quickly to the loss, coming across as wimpy more than magnanimous.

Perhaps because of that, Emery and Roman’s chemistry is less volatile than it should be. At least in the early episodes, Roman is more preoccupied with intra-Atrian politics than with his love life.

Unlike such shows as “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “The Vampire Diaries,” “Star-Crossed” fails to exploit the high romanticism of high-school-age kids. A possible confrontation at the homecoming carnival should strike a chord with everyone who is or has been an adolescent; in this show it is bathetic.

The premise raises questions about the country’s treatment of Indians and African-Americans that “Star-Crossed” is far too light to even consider, much less answer.

The show also speculates weakly about how the world will be different in 10 years. It seems that Lenin worshipers will be a recognizable clique in high schools in 2024, and lockers will have video screens.

But it’s too soon the count the show out. The principals are attractive, and the first two episodes set up some plot threads that could twist together well.

If the writers and actors can turn up the heat on the romance, “Star-Crossed” won’t leave viewers asking, “What’s in a name?”

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/star-crossed-for-the-young-only/
post #92438 of 93648
TV Review
'Breath of Freedom'
Smithsonian report, including interview with Colin Powell, shows how WWII helped boost civil rights in America when troops returned home
By David Hinckley, New York Daily News - Feb. 17, 2014

The seeds of freedom can take root in the strangest places, as this meticulous and fascinating documentary about black soldiers in World War II again demonstrates.

On a mission to defeat Adolf Hitler and derail his vision of a world ruled by a master race, America ended up confronting and eventually starting to eliminate some of its own ugly and indefensible racial discrimination.

Smithsonian isn’t the first place to note that black soldiers who fought in World War II were less inclined to accept an inferior position in American life when they returned home.

What lifts this documentary above others is the way it traces specific moments and situations.

In occupied Germany, for instance, black soldiers could enter clubs, restaurants and other public facilities alongside white soldiers. Back home, south of the Mason-Dixon line, that was illegal.

Black soldiers could mingle freely with all civilians. That was also a dangerous move in Alabama.

And of course, as Colin Powell and others note here, black soldiers were risking their lives for their country, just the same as every white soldier. That alone should have punched everyone’s ticket for the “all men are created equal” line.

Small details are fascinating as well. Civil rights demonstrations were often organized by World War II veterans on military principles, with commanders, battalions and regiments.

“Breath of Freedom” notes several times that in the early stages of the war, the U.S. military tried hard to keep blacks separate and unequal — arguing, in the segregationist party line of the day, that blacks were not capable of doing what white soldiers did.

Since the premise was a lie, the policy failed.

And soon other dominoes began to fall.

'BREATH OF FREEDOM'
Network/Time: Monday at 8 p.m., Smithsonian
Rating: ★★★★ (out of five)


http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/breath-freedom-tv-review-article-1.1614940
post #92439 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Critic's Notes
Have it your way at NBC's Olympics
Broadcast, cable or Internet, viewers get a buffet of choices.
By Robert Bianco, USA Today - Feb. 17, 2014

Finally, NBC has figured out a way to give Olympics fans more to see and more ways to see it.

As always, you have the option of watching NBC's highlight package in prime time. But for Sochi's 2014 Winter Olympics, that staple has been augmented by extensive live coverage through NBC Universal's cable outlets and its "Live Extra" Internet feed. In fact, as long as you subscribe to a cable or satellite provider and you have a strong Internet connection, you can often end up with three viewing choices for the same event, complete with three sets of commentators.

Consider figure skating, one of the Olympics' biggest ratings draws. On Live Extra, which uses the Olympic Broadcasting Services feed, you hear from British skater Chris Howarth and Australian coach Belinda Noonan (though you might never know that, because OBS tends not to identify who's speaking). On NBC, you get Tom Hammond, Scott Hamilton and Sandra Bezic. And on NBCSN, you have Terry Gannon and the talk of the Olympic town, Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir.

The Olympics make stars of analysts as well as athletes — and this year, the TV breakouts are clearly Lipinski and Weir, who Gannon calls "The Glitter Twins." Lipinski holds her own on the clothing front, but when it comes to glitter, Weir is the draw: Friday's silver sparkles were followed Sunday by an emerald-green jacket paired with a bejeweled headband. But for both, the fashion choices are more than entertaining. They represent a sense of showmanship combined with a willingness to be out there and honest that extends to their commentary.

Relaxed and amusing together, Weir and Lipinski are a joy to hear, in part because they don't continually make us listen. They're willing to let long stretches of performances go by without comment, and when they do chime in, their remarks are technical enough to be explanatory without being obtuse. Best of all, while they understand the pressure the competitors face, they still expect them to perform and are not afraid to be critical when they don't.

It's easier to speak freely, of course, when you're talking to the relatively small audience that NBCSN's daytime skating broadcasts draw. Commentators on prime-time's big stage instead tend to fall back on enthusiasm and mushiness — none more so than Hamilton and Bezic.

You won't find a pair with more knowledge or experience, but they behave less like analysts than camp counselors, offering comfort, encouragement and, whenever even remotely possible, praise. Every moment seems to be greeted by either elation or despair, delivered in all caps by Hamilton and with a perpetual catch in her throat by Bezic, who has a particularly annoying tendency to state the emotionally obvious. Let's just assume from here on out, please, that every skater who does badly wanted to do better.

If it all leaves you pining for the days when Dick Button and Peggy Fleming would flat-out tell you that a routine was terrible or an outfit was ugly, try Noonan and Howarth. Noonan, in particular, is the most willing to say a position is unattractive, the choreography is insufficient, and the judges are crazy.

Unfortunately, they're hampered by the live Internet format, which allows you to pause, but not to rewind or fast-forward. While the Internet replays offer more flexibility than the live feed, they still can't match the image you get from a good TV or the total control you can exert by combining NBCSN with a DVR. Both, however, are of most interest to completists. For many viewers, prime-time highlights are more than enough.

It's your choice — which is what Olympics fans have wanted all along.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2014/02/16/winter-olympics-review-feb-17/5533871/



do viewers get to choose hockey matches that don't have "fixed" clocks?

LOL
post #92440 of 93648
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Bachelor (120 min.)
10PM - Castle
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Will Arnett; models Chrissy Teigen, Nina Agdal and Lily Aldridge; Silversun Pickups perform)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - How I Met Your Mother
(R - Nov. 4)
8:30PM - 2 Broke Girls
(R - Nov. 4)
9PM - Mike & Molly
(R - Nov. 11)
9:30PM - Mom
(R - Nov. 11)
10PM - Intelligence
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Kevin Spacey; the cast of "How I Met Your Mother'' presents the Top Ten List; Amber Heard; Gary Clark Jr. performs)
12:37AM - The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Gary Oldman; Ellie Kemper; Roddy Hart & The Lonesome Fire perform)

NBC:
8PM - XXII Winter Olympics: Figure Skating, Snowboarding, Freestyle Skiing, Bobsled (3 1/2 hrs.)
* * * *
Midnight - The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Series Premiere: Will Smith; U2 performs)
1:01AM - XXII Winter Olympics: Ski Jumping (60 min.)

FOX:
8PM - Almost Human
9PM - The Following

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Baton Rouge
9PM - Antiques Roadshow: Pittsburgh
(R - Feb. 13, 2012)
10PM - Independent Lens: Las Marthas

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Siempre Mi Amor
9PM - Lo Que la Vida Me Robó
10PM - Qué Pobres Tan Ricos

THE CW:
8PM - Star Crossed (Series Premiere)
9PM - Beauty and the Beast

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - La Impostora
9PM - La Reina del Sur (Series Finale)
10PM - Santa Diabla

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Joel Kinnaman)
(R - Feb. 12)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Director Godfrey Reggio)
(R - Feb. 12)
12:01AM - @ Midnight (Dan Soder; Nate Bargatze; Nikki Glaser)
(R - Feb. 11)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (James Franco; Neal McDonough; Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers)
(R - Nov. 21)
Midnight - The Pete Holmes Show (Marc Maron; Rob Bell)
(R - Dec. 3)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Jackie Collins; guest host Ross Mathews; comic Jeff Wild; comic Arden Myrin; comic Josh Wolf)

SYNDICATION:
Check Local Listings - Arsenio (Tom Arnold; Antoinette Tuff; Ron G.)
post #92441 of 93648
TV Sports
NBC Pushes Too Far in Bringing Bode Miller to Tears
By Richard Sandomir, The New York Times - Feb. 17, 2014

Bode Miller had just tied for a bronze medal in the men’s super-G at the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, on Sunday and it was time to be interviewed. NBC had already established Miller’s quest as an emotional story line, putting a microphone on his wife, Morgan, to hear her reactions to his races, and having the couple sit for an interview with Tom Brokaw. He was being humanized — as the changed man, the family man, the mature 36-year-old whose brother had died last year.

This is the type of storytelling that lubricates NBC’s prime-time Olympic engine.

This time, the engine backfired.

It was not out of bounds for NBC’s Christin Cooper to ask a medal winner questions about his brother’s death. (The snowboarder Chelone Miller died last year at 29.) It was a relevant area to pursue, part of his Olympic biography. And Miller brought it up in response to her first question, saying that he had “a lot of emotion riding” on the race.

She picked up on that quickly and asked, “Bode, you’re showing so much emotion down here, what’s going through your mind?” That probably should have been the last question about his brother. This was, after all, an interview with a great skier who had just won a bronze medal, the sixth Olympic medal of his career. He had done no wrong to be milked for more emotion than he wanted to reveal.

Cooper needed to strike a far better balance in her questions so that the takeaway for viewers would not be that she was badgering him.

Maybe the absence of detail in his answer — he said only that it had been “a long struggle coming in here. And, uh, just a tough year” — compelled her to go forward.

“I know you wanted to be here with Chelly experiencing these games; how much does it mean to you to come up with a great performance for him? And was it for him?” she said. Now she was sounding intrusive, and maybe doubting his fraternal inspiration. It was one question too many, at least the way it was phrased. But it pushed Miller into a thoughtful answer — that he did not know if he had won a medal for his brother or to “make myself proud.”

He was holding up, but tears had started to trickle down Miller’s face.

He was being a stand-up guy, even if he was being pulled through a wringer.

Now was truly the time to stop. If you’ve made a medal winner cry, it is time to simply say “thank you” and move on. It was on tape, so NBC could have cut it off and gone to Matt Lauer in the studio. Instead, Cooper forged on, wondering whom he seemed to be talking to when he looked up in the sky before he started his run down the mountain.

It was not a bad question, but by this point, it was overkill.

“What’s going on there?” she said.

Miller’s helmeted head was bowed and he was unable to answer. The clock kept ticking, and I expected NBC to turn its camera elsewhere or for Cooper to say, “Thanks, Bode, you had a great race.” That did not happen. And there was no interview with the gold medalist, Kjetil Jansrud, to plug in and change the tempo.

Instead, Cooper tried to comfort him, putting a hand on his shoulder. In all, NBC lingered over this scene for 75 seconds — as Miller continued to weep, as he walked away, as he was comforted and as his wife embraced him. He might have cried on his own, for his brother, for joy, for the way his life had changed. But had the tears not been provoked by Cooper’s questions, we probably would not have seen that emotion.

Dan Hicks, who called the super-G race for NBC, talked over some of this tearful imagery — unnecessarily — mentioning how Miller had seemed like a different skier than in the past and how his emotions “continued to flow out.” Yep, we saw that.

Emotion is a real and honest element of athletic triumph and defeat. And you don’t want a network to tell its journalists to stick to soft questions when interviewing the winners. But in this instance, Cooper and NBC lacked the sensitivity to know when enough was enough.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/17/sports/olympics/nbc-pushes-too-far-in-bringing-bode-miller-to-tears.html?ref=television
post #92442 of 93648
TV Sports
Bob Costas to return to NBC's Olympic telecast on Monday night
By Chris Chase, USA Today - Feb. 16, 2014

Bob Costas’s Olympic quarantine is almost at an end.

NBC has confirmed reports that Costas will be back in the chair for Monday night’s primetime broadcast after a six-day absence because of an eye infection that left him unable to see in bright light. Costas first revealed his eye troubles during the opening night of Olympic coverage on Thurs., Feb. 6. He hosted five nights for NBC before the infection spread to both eyes and rendered him unable to perform his hosting duties.

When Matt Lauer took over on Tuesday night, it was the first time anyone but Costas had helmed an Olympic primetime telecast on any American network since 1998. Costas had been at the NBC chair for every night of Olympic coverage since 1988.

With Lauer running double duty on Today – he was on NBC for 30 of 61 hours at one point – the host took a well-deserved break after three nights “out of the bullpen,” as Costas had put it.

Lauer’s former Today co-host, Meredith Vieira, helmed the Friday and Saturday broadcasts, making her the first woman to ever serve as the solo host for primetime Olympic coverage. (As noted by Deadline.com, Vieira also has an NBC-owned syndicated talk show debuting in the fall. “The Sochi exposure is a gift,” Lisa De Moraes wrote.)

Lauer and Vieira were fine in fill-in duty, most notably with their interviewing skills honed from years at the chat-heavy Today. Still, it was hard not to miss Costas, who is as much an Olympic fixture as medals and anthems.

For Costas to match his old hosting streak, he’d have to work every night of the Olympics until the 2032 Summer Games.

http://ftw.usatoday.com/2014/02/bob-costas-olympics-return-monday-nbc/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UsatodaycomSports-TopStories+%28USATODAY+-+Sports+Top+Stories%29
post #92443 of 93648
Critic's Notes
As Jimmy Fallon Starts His Next Late-Night Job, A Look Back At How He Got His First One
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Feb. 18, 2014

Jimmy Fallon was born Sept. 19, 1974 – 20 years after the premiere of NBC’s Tonight Show, and one year before the premiere of NBC’s Saturday Night Live. Fifteen years ago, he joined the cast of SNL. Monday night, he takes over The Tonight Show…

There are direct connections between those two shows, and between those fifteen years, including, consistently and significantly, executive producer Lorne Michaels.

Michaels hired Fallon for SNL in 1998, tapped him to co-host “Weekend Update” with Tina Fey in 2000, and persuaded him to succeed Conan O’Brien and host what became NBC’s Late Night with Jimmy Fallon in 2009. Now, starting Monday, Michaels and Fallon team for yet another late-night show – the granddaddy of them all, now known as The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

This means that Michaels, by betting on and continuing to benefit from Fallon’s talents and popularity, has added to his SNL flagship by taking control of 10 additional weekly hours of late-night NBC programming: five with Late Night, about to be inherited by SNL veteran Seth Meyers, and five more with Fallon’s incarnation of The Tonight Show.

This also means Fallon has spent his entire NBC career at 30 Rock, working out of neighboring studios: Studio 8-H for his six years with SNL, Studio 6-A and 6-B for his five years with Late Night, and, starting Feb. 17, 2014, what most likely is a multi-decade run back in Studio 6-B – the same studio that housed five years of Jack Paar and the first 10 of Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show.

Back in 1999, when Jimmy Fallon was finishing up his freshman season on Saturday Night Live, I interviewed him, having seen something in his enthusiasm, his musical talent and his comic instincts that made him seem especially interesting. He turned out to be a keen student of TV comedy history as well, which makes his ascendancy in late-night TV seem even more inevitable and appropriate.

My original, edited interview with Jimmy Fallon, conducted when he was 24 years old, ran in the New York Daily News – but on the eve of his inheritance of NBC’s The Tonight Show at age 39, I thought it was worth running more lengthy chunks from that interview, to capture his enthusiasm, his commitment – and his soon-to-be-tapped potential.

Jimmy Fallon interview, May 16, 1999:

ON HIS ENTHUSIASM FOR ‘SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE’:


BIANCULLI: The reason I was so eager to talk to you is because every time you are on the show, you shine with what really looks like enjoyment at what you’re doing.

(FALLON chuckles)

BIANCULLI: And that’s very rare. I –

FALLON: (chuckles) That’s – God – That’s so nice. Thanks for saying that.

BIANCULLI: Well, it’s okay.

FALLON: It’s because I do. I love what I’m doing. It’s, like, this is, like, the greatest job on Earth. And I’m so, you know, I’m so happy that I’m doing it. (chuckles)

BIANCULLI: Well, how much did you know about the show growing up?

FALLON: I am like the hugest fan, I swear to God. Like, I am the biggest fan there is. I used to tape it – I used to watch it and tape it every Saturday night since, like – religiously since, like, ’86. I mean, like – I mean, I have them all on tape. In college I used to just, like, hang out in my dorm, get a six-pack, you know and just watch the show, by myself. And just watch the whole show, and then, you know, even tape it and then go out at one o’clock.

BIANCULLI: And then go out! Oh that’s funny.

FALLON: Yeah, like, my friends would have parties and they’d be like, “Hey! What’s up, man! How come you can’t – you know, I’ll set up a room so you can watch in the room.” And I’m like, “No, I gotta watch it at home. Then I’ll come out,” you know? They’re like, “You’re a lunatic.”

BIANCULLI: Who introduced you to it?

FALLON: My parents. My mom and dad. They loved the show and I remember, like, it was so big, you know. They used to imitate them and laugh, you know, and whatever and – We had one of those old VCRs, you know, back in, like, I think it was ’79 maybe or something?

BIANCULLI: Yeah? That’s one of the real old ones.

FALLON: Yeah. It was the two pieces and it was huge?

BIANCULLI: Yeah.

FALLON: Yeah. So they had that and they used to tape it and then, like, show me and my sister, you know, the sketches that weren’t as risqué as the other ones. (chuckles) Like Wild and Crazy Guys or something. Or King Tut.

BIANCULLI: Oh that’s great! So you were literally raised on these things.

FALLON: Yeah, you know, like, I used to watch all them and then imitate them and, you know, and – Like, I loved it because, you know, it was just – made everyone laugh, you know. Everyone thought it was great…

ON HIS ‘SNL’ AUDITION:

BIANCULLI: So what did you do for your audition?

FALLON: What I did was, I had this stand-up act and they were, like, “You know what? We’ve seen the stand-up act. Do something different with that. We want three characters and three impressions.” And I do a lot of impressions. I said, “You know what? I’m just gonna do my own thing.” And I did, like, a celebrity walk-a-thon. So I did, like, you know, just different celebrities. Like maybe ten celebrities? I started off, like, Jerry Seinfeld, you know, like, (imitates Seinfeld) “You know, we’re all going to the same place. Why don’t we just take a bus!,” you know? And, like, so then – and I did, like – I did three original characters after that. I did the, like, twelve celebrities, and then I finished off with three guitar impressions. Three musical impressions.

BIANCULLI: So you did do the music the first time there?

FALLON: Yeah, I said – I just did, like, three – I’m trying to think – can’t remember who I did even. I think I did The Cure and Alanis Morissette.

BIANCULLI: Now, when you do The Cure, tell me who’s in the room judging you at this point. Because you have to know whether or not they even know The Cure.

FALLON: (laughs) You know what? I don’t know why I did The Cure even because I’m not – something just told me I should do it and, like – what happens is, this audition is the most pressure – the craziest, tensest thing ever. You know, you’re going up against eight people in wigs, you know?... I mean, they’re totally nervous. I didn’t have any wigs. I didn’t have nothin’, man. I just – I didn’t have my guitar, you know? What they did was – they carry like – Lorne’s in the audience and you could see Lorne and he’s like an idol to me, you know? And the more I get to know him the more I want to be like him, you know? And he’s in the audience and Marci Klein, you know, you could see her and – I think there was, like, six writers. But they wire you up – the audio guy comes in and he’s nervous. He’s, like, “Good luck, you know, way to go.” It’s like, “Aw man, he gets me nervous.” Then everyone keeps coming and telling me, “Look, Lorne’s not gonna laugh. He’s seen it all, you know? It’s 24 years he’s been doing this and, you know, so don’t get discouraged if he’s not laughing at you ‘cause he’s seen it all.” And then you get onstage and I said – you know what I said? I said, “I’m not gonna…” Well, here’s what happened. I was gonna go onstage and they said, “Jimmy, can you wait? We promised this guy he can go on ahead of you. I’m sorry to do this to you.” I said, “No problem.” This guy walks by with a keyboard and, like, a box of wigs and I said, “That’s it. How can I follow this?” So I said, “It’s all over. Just enjoy it while you’re up there.” (laughing) So I said, What I’m gonna do is, I’m not gonna waste anymore time. I’m not gonna say hello, how are you? You know, I’m just gonna go in and do it. I walked up onstage, I said, “Alright. Let’s do this.” And he said, “Well, wait! Wait! We gotta – we’re, you know, taping it on camera here, so, give us a five count or something.” So I said, “Well, no one told me about a five count!” (chuckles) So then I just went into it. I said, “Five, four, three…” and it turns out it was a live feed to Burbank. So Warren Littlefield was watching and all these other, you know, NBC execs and I didn’t know that. Thank God they didn’t tell me that. So I just did it –

BIANCULLI: Oh, because that would have made it a pressure situation?!

FALLON: It would have made me more nervous, sure. I thought it was just, like, a videotape I’d sit at home and watch. You know, auditions. I’ve done those before. But yeah –

BIANCULLI: Was it done on the stage at 8H?

FALLON: On the actual stage. Studio 8H, you walk through the big doors, the classic ones you’ve seen. I was almost, like, crying, I’m like, “Wow, I was on the stage where Steve Martin did, like, you know, classic monologues that I could, you know, recite word for word.” And I was out of control. It was the most greatest, emotional moment of my life. I was, like, it was nuts! It was, like, you’re onstage with the lights and, you know? I couldn’t even describe it to you… I actually was there and I was, like, “I can’t wait to tell my friends. Even if I don’t get this, I’m actually on the stage, in front of Lorne Michaels.”

BIANCULLI: Now how old were you when this happened?

FALLON: Twenty-three.

BIANCULLI: Ok. So you get on there, and you’ve gotta be juiced as hell.

FALLON: Yeah.

BIANCULLI: Was there a moment -- was there an early joke where you got a response from somebody or something where you relaxed or you suddenly realized “This is going well!”

FALLON: Yeah. I did Seinfeld first and I got some reaction and I think I did Travolta next [actually, it was the other way around], and it was just kind of – it was decent. It was pretty, you know, solid. But then I did Adam Sandler. And I remember because –

BIANCULLI: (laughing) Kinda ballsy.

FALLON: Yeah. Exactly. My manager was like, “Well, you know what? If you think you can do Sandler, do it.” My manager was very good with me. I went over the audition with her many times. She said, “You know what? If you think you should do it, you do a great impression, do it. I don’t think anyone else, you know, would think to do it.” And I remember I did Adam Sandler and Lorne started laughing. And it was, like (makes a sort of gasping sound) – It was so amazing. Like, he put his head in his hands, you know, or one hand, like, covered his face, you know? And then he turned to one of the writers and he was laughing. And I was like, “Oh my God”

BIANCULLI: You got a laugh.

FALLON: Like, I could – Yeah, I made Lorne Michaels laugh. In the building where – doing Adam Sandler. In the building where he made Adam Sandler famous, you know? And it was, like, “God!” It was too perfect for me, like. Just those little things that, like, I will remember, like, forever. (laughs) You know? Like I will keep talking about them. I remember that happening and, he was just – it was just, like, that right there was – I said to myself, “You know what? No matter what happens, I got a great story to tell people.”

BIANCULLI: Yeah. When I talk to older comedians and they talk about their first time on The Tonight Show and what Carson did if they got a wave, if they got a wink, if they got a call over –

FALLON: Yeah!

BIANCULLI: That moment is frozen for them, forever. It’s this huge deal. So it’s got to be that same thing for a next generation.

FALLON: Yeah, you’re right. I mean, that’s a great example. I mean, that’s the one thing that, like – for them it’s Carson. They love this guy. They idolize this guy. This is like – Lorne Michaels who I’ve – I just get nervous just seeing him, you know?

BIANCULLI: So let’s finish the audition. You do The Cure, you do all the music stuff –

FALLON: Yeah. I think I finished Alanis Morissette and then I said, “Thank you very much” and I just left. And as soon as I walked out, [SNL producer] Marci Klein followed me and said, “I just want to tell you, that was, like, one of the best auditions I’ve seen. You did a great job. You should be very proud of yourself.” And I was, like, that was just awesome.

ON GETTING THE 'SNL' JOB:

BIANCULLI: So how long before you found out?

FALLON: Of course they let you wait, like, a week. So I, like, grew a beard and I was like 400 pounds. I Brian Wilson’ed it up. And I was hangin’ out and I was, like, you know, What’s gonna happen?

BIANCULLI: And every time the phone rings you die?

FALLON: Yeah. (laughing) I kept calling my manager. I said, “Anybody call yet? Should you call them?” She’s like, “Alright. Leave me alone. You gotta stop.”

BIANCULLI: So how did you find out?

FALLON: So they called and said, “You know what? Lorne is flying out to L.A., he wants to meet with you.” I was like, “This is outta control!” I couldn’t even believe it. I called my parents, I’m like, “Lorne wants to meet with me.” And then I’m at the Paramount lot and I walked on the lot and I saw Molly Shannon – she was there for some other reason and she said, “Hey. I heard about your audition, you know. Don’t be nervous. This is all routine. Just good luck. Just go in there and just be yourself…” And he let me wait for, like, two hours, which is legendary. I think Chris Farley waited eight hours. Like, I feel honored that I only waited two. (laughs) But I knew I was gonna wait two hours –

BIANCULLI: Do you pack a lunch? What do you do?

FALLON: You know what? For some odd reason, even though I’ve read every book, I didn’t bring anything. So I just kinda drank, like, eighty Cokes and got really nervous, you know, in the lobby. And then finally they said, “Lorne’s – You can go on in.” And I walk in, the whole room’s white, to me was, like, perfect, you know? It was like heaven. (laughs) Everything’s white, and it was, like, weird and I was like, “Wow. This is so cool.” And he was, like, “How are ya?” And I think the first thing he said to me, like, I think he said something like, “Have you ever worn wigs?” or something like that. Or “Have you ever tried…wigs with characters?” I was, like, “I haven’t but…,” and my hair was pretty spiked, “You know I do this to my hair. I can do something different.” He was like, “Oh I know that!” He goes, “Well, we want you for the show.” Yeah. Everything was silent and I could, like, hear the lights buzzing, you know? (laughs) And it was just – I was just flabbergasted. I didn’t know what to say. I was totally speechless.

BIANCULLI: What did you say?

FALLON: I think –

BIANCULLI: Eventually you’ve got to say thanks, or yes, or something.

FALLON: Yeah. I mean, I remember – Right there is, like, when I kinda blacked out. I remember on my way out I said, you know, “I’m gonna make you…I wanna make you proud… that you hired me. I’ll do a good job.”

ON TELLING HIS PARENTS ABOUT THE ‘SNL’ JOB:

FALLON: As soon as I got home I called – I waited, you know, until they were both home. I got them both on the phone and I told them. I said, “I just got…Saturday Night Live” and, like, they just went nuts. They were screaming on the phone, like, they blew my speaker on my phone (laughing), you know? My mom went nuts. (imitates Mom screaming) “Oh My God!” And my dad would go – they were clapping and – They’re great parents. Very supportive all the way through. My dad used to drive me to do my comedy gigs, you know, when I couldn’t drive, you know.

BIANCULLI: That’s not easy driving, either.

FALLON: Yeah. I mean, like – He was – They were very supportive, you know, through all of it and it was just, like, a really emotional thing, seeing that they’re fans of the show, too, and they know how much I loved it.

ON HIS FIRST SHOW:

BIANCULLI: So you got to get them in as guests for the season opener, I'm sure.

FALLON: (laughs) Yeah. Yeah.

BIANCULLI: Because if you don’t do that for your parents, you’re disowned.

FALLON: Yeah.

BIANCULLI: Opening night. What was that week like and what was that night like?

FALLON: You know what? It was Cameron Diaz and Smashing Pumpkins [Sept. 26, 1998]. I’ll never forget. And what I was doing was – Gilbert Gottfried was my big impression and that was my big thing on the show. That was all I had. And I told my parents – I told my sister and everyone to watch – If my name came up as a featured player then I was guaranteed to be in. So I said, “If my name’s not in the credits, I’m probably not in the show.” And for some odd reason, they didn’t run my name in the credits.

BIANCULLI: So they were relaxed…

FALLON: Yeah but they were sad. They were like, (sigh) “He didn’t do it.” It was almost like Mighty Casey at the Bat. So there was no joy in Mudville. Everyone was like, (sigh) “Boy, that’s a sad one.” So they’re watching the show so, you know, my big part comes on with the Hollywood Squares, and it collapses and they’re still playing the game. (laughs) So, you know, my parents were in the audience and my sister was there, too, actually –

BIANCULLI: Older or younger?

FALLON: One year older. She’s 25.

BIANCULLI: That’s great. What’s your sister’s name?

FALLON: Gloria Fallon… You know, I called her actually before the audition from the hotel. I’m gonna go into the audition, you know, in an hour. She was there for me. And after my first show, afterwards they came to my dressing room and just, like, hugged me and I was just hugging my mom and crying, you know. My dad was, like, “It was great…” They’re very supportive. I have very supportive parents and my sister was – we were, like, best friends. We’re really close.

BIANCULLI: So was it fun?

FALLON: It was out of control. And then, of all people, [L.A. Improv owner] Budd Friedman came to the show who was, like – he helped me out. So it’s crazy, like, you know – when I was, like, hungry he used to, like, give me meals at The Improv. Like, if you do a slot at The Improv, you get paid eight dollars and twenty-five cents but you also get a free meal. So if I was gonna work there, my parents loved it because, like, He’s eating! You know? They loved Budd Friedman. He was like my foster dad when I was in L.A. So I saw him there. I was, like, Wow! He was, like, “Congratulations. Way to go.” He was like, “I always knew it.” So it was kind of – it was really cool that he was there. And we all went out and, like, it was packed, I remember that – like, packed with people and celebrities and Seinfeld was walking around and, you know, my parents got to talk to Seinfeld. And he was very cool with them. And Cameron Diaz was great with my parents. And it was just – it felt really good, like, wow. Like, you know, it’s all happening.

ON HIS MUSICAL PARODIES:

BIANCULLI: The other thing I really remember about you in terms of your early stuff, is the first time you were on “Update” with the guitar.

FALLON: That was crazy.

BIANCULLI: And you could – as a viewer – I don’t know what it was like in the studio, it had to be even neater, but coming through the TV screen, you could tell the audience just amping it up almost exponentially in terms of how much they were loving what you were doing.

FALLON: The story behind that is, no one really – like, they had writers and stuff, they kind of – no one really thought it would work. They kind of dismissed it, like, “All right. We’ll give it a shot. Go ahead and do this.” You know, that’s why I was, like…middle in the list of – there was someone following me after that in “Update.” So they kind of said, “Ah, give it a shot.” And in dress rehearsal we did it and it went over really well. Like, it was insane. And I was, like, and Colin [Quinn, then the host of ‘Update”] was like, “Wow. That was pretty good.” The first, you know, a minute to live show – it was only my fourth show [Oct. 24, 1998] – And I’m, like, just do it. You gotta have guts and confidence. Just do this, you know, and I did and they went doubly crazy. And it was, like – I remember, like, I was so nervous and Colin was looking at me like “Can you believe this?” I looked at him like, “I can’t believe…” and he’s like, “Just enjoy it, man, do it up, you know.” I remember I just couldn’t stop smiling (laughing) because it was, like, amazing. I was like – I wrote all that – I can’t believe this is happening! I love this show so much but I was thinking, like, if I was at home laughing – this guy doing these songs – I would love this guy. I would be, like, “Yeah! This guy is totally cool and, like, …it’s cool. The guy’s brand new, he’s got no – nobody knows who he is, you know?” He doesn’t want to force himself on anybody. He comes in and he does this thing and it’s, like, it gets a good reaction. That’s one of my favorite – that’s my favorite moment.

BIANCULLI: Do you remember which songs you parodied?

FALLON: Yeah. Yeah. It was Halloween songs. I did matchbox 20, and then it was Marcy Playground, the song was “Sex and Candy,” and then I closed with Alanis Morissette and she was on the show. Which was –

BIANCULLI: What did she say to you?

FALLON: She was the best! She came up to me and she was, like, “I loved it!” She goes, “That was so funny!” She goes, “My whole band was laughing and everyone loved it.” She goes, “It was really sweet.” I was, like, “Good for Alanis Morissette! I love her now!” Now she’s my favorite.

BIANCULLI: Now, Colin – it really did seem like you guys had eye contact during that first one where you both were realizing something was really going on there. What did the head writers that didn’t believe in it beforehand say to you afterwards?

FALLON: I mean, everyone just, like, “Way to go, man…” What can you say? It’s, like, it was fun. It was fun for anyone who was in the studio and then, you know, everyone was just like kind of – I remember everyone was just smiling, like, “Great job, man. You did it”… And I remember Ben Stiller was – he shook my hand, too. And he was the host. And he loved it. He was like, “That was awesome.” That was, like, my best show, I think.

ON DREAMING OF STARRING ON ‘SNL,' THEN DOING IT:

BIANCULLI: Now tell me about the impact of Saturday Night Live from your perspective. After you do what you consider your best show ever, after that show, who do you hear from in terms of old friends or strangers or what’s the reaction. How do you know where this show is reaching?

FALLON: It’s great. I get fan mail – which is a weird, cool thing – so fan mail started coming, like, from Canada. I was just like, “Dude, look at this, man.”

BIANCULLI: International fan mail.

FALLON: (laughing) You know the red, white and blue envelopes? I remember that. I’m like, “God! They can hear me in Canada!” This is crazy.

BIANCULLI: As long as you’re not getting a lot of prison mail, you’re okay.

FALLON: I did get that! Letters from prison, they said, “Hey, I’m writing to people I like on TV. Please draw a picture of yourself and send it to me. I was tempted to draw a picture of myself behind bars" and, like, “This is how you see me,” you know? “There you go. Here’s your drawing.” But I didn’t write him back but I hung up all the letters on my wall, because that’s what I would do. I mean, I would write the show a year ago. So I was kind of psyched that I was getting fan mail. Then I would get the old messages from people from home. A lot of times, like, ‘You’re a jerk! I can’t believe…” You know, being nice. They’re like, “You should pay them to be on the show! You’re the guy that wouldn’t leave the dorm room to watch the show. You’re the idiot that made me watch everything," you know, whatever – because I’d show stuff in my room.

BIANCULLI: You would host retrospectives?

FALLON: Oh totally. I’d be, like, all right here’s the best of the season, according to me. And I’d show them all the sketches and they’d love it! But, like…my whole thing was – I think when I was watching, I was, like, if Dana Carvey ever gets sick, I’m gonna go in. Like Lorne’s gonna call me. He has no idea who I am –

BIANCULLI: I’m on standby, yeah.

FALLON: He’d call me out of nowhere, in Saugerties, NY, and say, “Hey Jimmy. Dana’s sick. Can you come in and do the church lady?” (laughs) So after that, I’d get calls from that, my manager calls me. It’s like – that was the show that really opened it all up. And for the audition, I really said, “You know what? I’m going to give 100%, you know? I’m just gonna go in, just do what I think is funny and see if people like it. And it was great."

BIANCULLI: You really do seem like a real student of this. Who’s the best example of what SNL tries to be, in terms of all-time host or performer? Who do you think of first?

FALLON: Steve Martin.

BIANCULLI: Yeah?

FALLON: I think he, like – I think Saturday Night Live is, like, a mix between, like, rock-n-roll and comedy. It’s cool like rock-n-roll, you know, it’s loud and it’s funny. It’s…entertaining. …It’s something you can watch again and again like a song or something. And Steve Martin is like rock-n-roll kind of… He used to play the banjo and he used to, you know – He used to, like, get screams from the crowd, you know? I love that. I love that type of humor and that type of fun. It’s, like, live, it’s so raw and it’s, like, it’s just, like, sweat, you know? You get out there and just go nuts. …That’s what I love. That’s when I love comedy. When people are, like, sweating and into it, and they’re in the groove and they know they’re doing well…

BIANCULLI: It’s so much fun. I really have enjoyed talking to you because you – I’m glad that the enthusiasm that you show on TV actually is genuine.

FALLON: I’m just – I’m so thankful – I don’t think people even, like, understand when the show’s live. I think they assume it’s taped and so – That’s why I think, like, it’s not as much of a novelty, you know, because everyone in the world is watching it now… I think people have forgotten that it’s actually live. It’s like the old Milton Berle days. …This is the only live TV around now!

BIANCULLI: And it juices up through the set so it’s got to be so much fun in that studio.

FALLON: (excitedly) It’s, like, the greatest adrenaline rush in the whole world.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=6900
post #92444 of 93648
Obituary
John Henson, Muppets Puppeteer and Son of Creator Jim Henson, Dead at 48
By Tony Maglio, TheWrap.com - Feb. 15, 2014

John Henson, the son of Muppets creator Jim Henson, died on Friday. He was 48.

According to a statement on the Jim Henson Company’s Facebook page, Henson died of a sudden heart attack.

Henson was a puppeteer and performer for the Muppets, playing ogre Sweetums from the late 1980′s until 2005, including in the Muppets movies. He was also a company shareholder and board member.

Henson is survived by his two daughters, Katrina, 15, and Sydney, 10, and his wife Gyongyi. A private service is being planned. Henson’s father Jim, the famous man behind the Muppets, died in May 1990 at age 53 from an abscesses in his lungs.

The new Muppets film, “Muppets Most Wanted,” opens on March 21. The puppets appeared recently in a series of Super Bowl commercials – co-starring with “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” star Terry Crews — for the Toyota Highlander.

http://www.thewrap.com/john-henson-dead-muppets-puppeteer-jim-henson-48-sweetums
post #92445 of 93648
Quote:
Bob Costas’s Olympic quarantine is almost at an end.

Has anyone really missed Costas' pontifications?
post #92446 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon J View Post

Has anyone really missed Costas' pontifications?

Putin. biggrin.gif
post #92447 of 93648
Must be a slow weekend on news to have Costas in them about his eyes status..
post #92448 of 93648
I wonder how many NBC viewers would prefer Al Michaels to be the primetime anchor over Costas.
post #92449 of 93648
I'll take Al any day over Costas.
post #92450 of 93648
Al's not saying anything because -- with the time difference -- he's the lone anchor with a somewhat normal day.

Feel sorry for Brian Williams. Having to anchor the news at 2:30 in the morning local time can't be fun.

We're a little spoiled in Detroit as we can watch CBC's coverage, as well. Between NBCSN and CBC, I've pretty much seen everything by 3pm. No need for primetime highlights package.
post #92451 of 93648
I've always liked Bob Costas. He seems to understand the underlying frivolousness of sports, and is willing to poke fun at his profession in kind of a "meta", breaking-the-fourth-wall kind of way. It's sort of refreshing. And he's undeniably smart and quick witted which I appreciate too. He's also very good when he ventures into other subjects outside of sport, as he's occasionally done with other types of shows.

But I can see where others might find him insufferable. tongue.gif I like Keith Olbermann too and he's cut from the same bolt of cloth, albeit a bit more abrasive.
post #92452 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Al's not saying anything because -- with the time difference -- he's the lone anchor with a somewhat normal day.

Feel sorry for Brian Williams. Having to anchor the news at 2:30 in the morning local time can't be fun.

We're a little spoiled in Detroit as we can watch CBC's coverage, as well. Between NBCSN and CBC, I've pretty much seen everything by 3pm. No need for primetime highlights package.
He makes over $13 million per year to do that broadcast, I don't feel sorry for him at all. wink.gif
post #92453 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSUL 
I'll take Al any day over Costas.
This. I haven't forgotten what he did to my home team when they squared-off against the Chi-Bulls in the 1998 NBA Eastern Finals.
post #92454 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezzy View Post

This. I haven't forgotten what he did to my home team when they squared-off against the Chi-Bulls in the 1998 NBA Eastern Finals.

What, invoked bullet-time? Forced them to eat the blue pill? biggrin.gif
post #92455 of 93648
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Feb. 17, 2014

THE XXII OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES
Various Networks, Check local listings

One of the biggest stories at the Olympics today is the gold medal final in ice dancing, where U.S. favorites Meryl Davis and Charlie White have a significant lead going into the free dance final event. Viewers can watch them live on NBCSN beginning at 10 a.m. ET, or watch for the way NBC repackages the event for prime time, beginning at 8 p.m. ET. The prime-time features on Davis and White have been very effective, showing them skating together almost since birth, and going on an endlessly repeated home-video tape loop from grade school to puberty to Olympic medals, skating together all the way. Also tonight, on NBC in prime time, host Bob Costas is expected back, after missing his first stretch of Olympics coverage since 1988, because of an eye infection. For live coverage of all events, go to NBCOlympics.com.

VERONICA GUERIN
The Movie Channel, 8:00 p.m. ET

This 2003 movie tells an intense and interesting true story, about a persistent newspaper crime reporter in Dublin whose efforts to cover the expanding drug trade in her country made her the target of vengeful drug lords. An additional reason to see the movie at this point in time, though, is because the title role, in this seldom televised movie, is played by Cate Blanchett, up for another Oscar this year for her brilliant work in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine.

THE MUSIC MAN
TCM, 10:00 p.m. ET

Can’t help it. I love this movie, and I love whenever TCM televises it, because it’s at the proper screen ratio, and presented uninterrupted. Robert Preston and Shirley Jones star, with ample support from a totally charming barbershop quartet. "Lida Rose, I’m home again, Rose…"

INSIDE COMEDY
Showtime, 11:00 p.m. ET

Tonight, David Steinberg focuses on two comedians who have established themselves as dramatic actors as well: Bette Midler, who’s as strong a singer as she is an actor and joke-teller, and Richard Belzer, a standup comic who made the transition to dramatic acting in general, and decades of playing Det. John Munch in particular.

THE TONIGHT SHOW STARRING JIMMY FALLON
NBC, 12:00 a.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
Watch and record this, because it’s a little piece of instant TV history. It’s the first time The Tonight Show has emanated from New York since Johnny Carson departed for California in 1972, and the first Tonight Show hosted by Jimmy Fallon – performing in the same 30 Rock studio that once housed Carson and, before him, Jack Paar. Tonight, Tonight starts another chapter in its long, impressive history, which began nationally on NBC in 1954. Opening-night scheduled guests: Will Smith and U2.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #92456 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Sports
Bob Costas to return to NBC's Olympic telecast on Monday night
By Chris Chase, USA Today - Feb. 16, 2014

Boo!
post #92457 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy 
What, invoked bullet-time? Forced them to eat the blue pill?
Yes. How did you know?
post #92458 of 93648
SUNDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #92459 of 93648
Nielsen Overnights
Olympics Slide During Repeat-Heavy Night
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Feb. 17, 2014

Despite facing a lack of competition in the way of original programming on rival networks, the Olympics on NBC slid on Sunday night versus the comparable night for the 2010 Winter Olympics, according to preliminary numbers.

NBC’s Olympics coverage on Sunday night drew a 4.8 rating/13 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic, down 19 percent from Feb. 21, 2010. In total viewers, the Olympics grabbed 21.1 million, down 9 percent from the comparable night of the 2010 games.

Overall, the 2014 Olympics in Sochi are off 15 percent in the demo from the 2010 games and 12 percent in total viewers.

That said, NBC easily dominated the ratings on Sunday night, beating out ABC, CBS, Fox and the CW combined in both the demo and total viewers.

Fox, which aired repeats throughout the night, was a distant second in ratings and fourth in total viewers with a 1.0/3 and 2 million.

ABC was third in ratings and total viewers with a 0.9/3 and 3.7 million. The network aired an “America’s Funniest Home Videos” repeat at 7 p.m., followed by the movie “Up” from 8 to 10. A “Castle” repeat closed the night.

CBS took fourth place in ratings and second in total viewers with a 0.6/2 and 4.2 million. Aside from “60 Minutes” at 7, which had a 1.0/3 and 8 million total viewers, the network aired repeats.

The CW averaged a 0.3/1 and 1.2 million total viewers for the night.

http://www.thewrap.com/ratings-olympics-slide-repeat-heavy-night/
post #92460 of 93648
TV Notes
‘Act Of Valor’ Series Not Going Forward At National Geographic Channel
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Feb. 17, 2014

Act Of Valor, inspired by Relativity’s successful 2012 Navy SEAL feature, was announced in October as the network’s first scripted series. That is no longer the case. “NGC is unfortunately not moving forward with Act Of Valor in favor of other scripted projects we have under consideration that will be announced soon,” the network said in a statement.

I hear that at the time of the series green light, Nat Geo had a formal deal with Relativity and well as Studiocanal’s Tandem Communications, which was to act as the studio and handle international distribution. The Bandito Brothers, the creative team behind the feature who had partnered with Relativity in 2012 to develop a TV series inspired by the film, had a preliminary, handshake agreement but no deal in place. In the months following Nat Geo’s announcement, I hear it became clear the Bandito Brothers, Nat Geo and Relativity had different visions for what the series should be. Because of that, a deal with the Bandito Brothers could not be reached and the project was ultimately scrapped.

Nat Geo made a successful entrance into scripted television with the feature SEAL Team Six, which became the network’s highest-rated program of 2012. It was followed by the highly rated Killing movie franchise.

http://www.deadline.com/2014/02/act-of-valor-series-not-going-forward-at-national-geographic-channel/
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information