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NVIDIA 8xxx series overscan fix for XP

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
NVIDIA has released new drivers for the 8xxx series cards under XP and has also a fix for enabling overscan compensation now available.

Overscan Fix: http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/n...p?p_faqid=2064

158.22 Drivers: http://www.nvidia.com/object/winxp_2k_158.22.html

I haven't tried it yet so I don't know how well it works.

The fix also disables HDCP but using AnyDVD HD should get around that issue.

When I get home I may try this under Vista as well since NVIDIA also released some new Vista drivers today (v158.24).
post #2 of 21
Great. Now they need to get to work on the 7 series. The fact that their "fix" disables HDCP is troubling.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by glide2flip View Post

Great. Now they need to get to work on the 7 series. The fact that their "fix" disables HDCP is troubling.

Overscan works on the 6 series under XP. It doesn't for the 7 series? I thought they used the same basic drivers.

The HDCP issue is troubling. I had the same problem using an 8800GTS and the modded 96.89 drivers too though so if these drivers also run games properly and fix overscan it's still better than using the modded drivers.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micromain View Post

Overscan works on the 6 series under XP. It doesn't for the 7 series? I thought they used the same basic drivers.

The HDCP issue is troubling. I had the same problem using an 8800GTS and the modded 96.89 drivers too though so if these drivers also run games properly and fix overscan it's still better than using the modded drivers.

I'm actually running vista. I just assumed there was no overscan support for the 7 series in XP either. If there is, that makes me even more upset that they haven't been able to get their act together with the vista drivers.
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micromain View Post


When I get home I may try this under Vista as well since NVIDIA also released some new Vista drivers today (v158.24).

If you don't mind, please post if this worked or not. I really want to fix overscan in Vista and would love it if this worked.
post #6 of 21
Is it just me, or is it mind boggling that overscan compensation used to work just fine in XP for 88xx cards using the 96.xx drivers without screwing up HDCP support. Of course, those drivers were too unstable to use for anything other than looking at your desktop.

Why is it so damn hard for Nvidia to fix something that used to work just fine?
post #7 of 21
I believe it has to do with a rather complete rewrite of their unified driver architecture. Unfortunately, if you want everything to work, stick with the old drivers, if you want it all to work in the new ones you'll just have to give it some tiem.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by John DeLuca View Post

If you don't mind, please post if this worked or not. I really want to fix overscan in Vista and would love it if this worked.

I just tried it under Vista with the beta 158.24 drivers. Didn't work.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skepticon View Post

Is it just me, or is it mind boggling that overscan compensation used to work just fine in XP for 88xx cards using the 96.xx drivers without screwing up HDCP support. Of course, those drivers were too unstable to use for anything other than looking at your desktop.

Why is it so damn hard for Nvidia to fix something that used to work just fine?

They've probably prioritized fixes and the gamers are screaming the loudest so their complaints are being addressed first.

On another note, even using 96.xx drivers borked HDCP for me with PowerDVD Ultra. I had to use AnyDVD to get around the problem.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micromain View Post

I just tried it under Vista with the beta 158.24 drivers. Didn't work.

Ah well. Thanks for the info.
post #11 of 21
Well, I tried the fix w/ the new drivers and XP.
It sucks...
Instead of doing it the right way, and creating a new (smaller) deskstop resolution wrapped in the correct timings for the display, it is keeping the same same resolution and the adapter is scaling it down. End result...you eliminate overscan but you lose 1:1 pixel mapping. It looks like garbage.
Thanks again Nvidia for another outstanding let down...
post #12 of 21
The last 158 in XP sucked... They took away purevideo HD support, and everything was stuck on TV levels, no matter what renderer, hack or tweak I did, I couldn't view my video at PC levels. I'll skip these for a while.
post #13 of 21
Just a thought but maybe this isn't so much an nvidia issue as it is an issue with DRM. It seems to me they are having trouble finding work arounds that won't open them up for lawsuits with the entertainment industry. The industry wanted Vista and HDMI/DVI (digital video outputs) locked down to the point they couldn't be changed. Now nvidia is caught between the industry who doesn't want any flexibility and the end user who wants complete flexibility.

If you are going to blame anyone, blame the entertainment industry. Be patient with nvidia, they are, at the very least, trying to find work arounds without violating agreements and getting sued.

Again, just a thought.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joewagner501 View Post

Just a thought but maybe this isn't so much an nvidia issue as it is an issue with DRM. It seems to me they are having trouble finding work arounds that won't open them up for lawsuits with the entertainment industry. The industry wanted Vista and HDMI/DVI (digital video outputs) locked down to the point they couldn't be changed. Now nvidia is caught between the industry who doesn't want any flexibility and the end user who wants complete flexibility.

If you are going to blame anyone, blame the entertainment industry. Be patient with nvidia, they are, at the very least, trying to find work arounds without violating agreements and getting sued.

Again, just a thought.

I still blame the pirates and thieves myself. The entertainment industry hasn't spent tubs of money to implement DRM purely to hose their paying customers.

Anyway, I agree with you that it's likely DRM, specifically HDCP, that is creating the issue with implementing overscan correction. Maybe the only valid solution is to have manufacturers begin making all HDTVs with a setting for 1:1 pixel mapping with no overscan? Then, eventually, overscan correction becomes a complete non-issue.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micromain View Post

I still blame the pirates and thieves myself. The entertainment industry hasn't spent tubs of money to implement DRM purely to hose their paying customers.

No. But they spent it when even a retarded monkey would have known that it was money spent for close to nothing.
By the time HD-DVD and/or Bluray will have reached mass market adoption rates, we will witness the total failure of those protections.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorman42 View Post

No. But they spent it when even a retarded monkey would have known that it was money spent for close to nothing.
By the time HD-DVD and/or Bluray will have reached mass market adoption rates, we will witness the total failure of those protections.

So I assume that, due to the fact that crime/criminals cannot be eliminated, that you have removed the locks from the doors on your house? After all, locks can be a hinderance to those you actually wish to enter your home (even yourself if you lose your keys) and they really aren't a deterent to determined criminals anyway.

Regardless of the lousy analogy above, any unretarded monkey should know that the entertainment industry must, by law, make a concerted effort to protect their property or potentially lose the rights to it. So claiming that failure of the protection, or that it will be cracked eventually, is a valid reason to drop it really doesn't pan out or even make sense.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
By the time HD-DVD and/or Bluray will have reached mass market adoption rates, we will witness the total failure of those protections.

Too late, it's already happened. AACS protection on both HD-DVDs and BD disks has been cracked. Several commercial ripping programs have already exploited this to allow you to rip HD-DVDs and BD discs to your hard drive and play them back with several different codecs. AnyDVD HD and DVDFab HD Decryptor are two such programs. There are also several freeware solutions posted at doom9.org that tell you how to decrypt these discs.
post #18 of 21
Micromain, you are correct with your argument. I don't think anybody has argued against that point unless they are a pirate themselves. The fact is, the money, time and effort the entertainment industry is devoting to DRM isn't stopping pirates. It is becoming a major inconvenience for people who buy the content legally. They are the ones getting penalized. If the industry were intent on stopping copying there are other ways of handling it.

The reality of today is that the old way for them to do business is dying and they need to find a different way to make money on their content. There will always be movie theaters unless they are priced out of the ability for people to pay for it. Interestingly enough, I read recently that hollywood has started releasing DVDs in China for a couple of bucks in order to compete with illegal copies. Warner Bros. has inked a deal with ********** to distribute movies, and there are other examples where companies are beginning to realize that the industry must change.

When the dust has settled from this era we are living in we will still have quality movies and people will get to enjoy them when and where they want. It will just take time and we will have to deal with bumps in the road like the nvidia driver debacle.

In the meantime, lets enjoy what we have and hope that nvidia is able to find a workaround that allows us to have a great picture with no overscan. Or, as you said in an earlier post, the TV industry comes to the table with a TV that doesn't have overscan. In this day and age there really is no reason to have it. Especially on inputs designed with computers in mind.
post #19 of 21
DRM has never really been about stopping pirates anyway (they know in the long run that it will never really work), but it is more about controlling the way you use the media that you own a license to play. Their holy grail is to reach a point where DRM allows them to charge the end user a fee every time the content is accessed.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joewagner501 View Post

Micromain, you are correct with your argument. I don't think anybody has argued against that point unless they are a pirate themselves. The fact is, the money, time and effort the entertainment industry is devoting to DRM isn't stopping pirates. It is becoming a major inconvenience for people who buy the content legally. They are the ones getting penalized. If the industry were intent on stopping copying there are other ways of handling it.

The reality of today is that the old way for them to do business is dying and they need to find a different way to make money on their content. There will always be movie theaters unless they are priced out of the ability for people to pay for it. Interestingly enough, I read recently that hollywood has started releasing DVDs in China for a couple of bucks in order to compete with illegal copies. Warner Bros. has inked a deal with ********** to distribute movies, and there are other examples where companies are beginning to realize that the industry must change.

When the dust has settled from this era we are living in we will still have quality movies and people will get to enjoy them when and where they want. It will just take time and we will have to deal with bumps in the road like the nvidia driver debacle.

In the meantime, lets enjoy what we have and hope that nvidia is able to find a workaround that allows us to have a great picture with no overscan. Or, as you said in an earlier post, the TV industry comes to the table with a TV that doesn't have overscan. In this day and age there really is no reason to have it. Especially on inputs designed with computers in mind.

I'm not happy with DRM either. As we've seen in here, just getting HD movies and DRM to play nicely together can be a chore, not to mention permitting a user to legally use DRM'd material in the variety of devices they own.

However, I don't believe DRM has anything to do with controlling the way we legally use our media either, as others have suggested. The problem boils down to reproduction. The question is how to allow legal reproduction and fair use while preventing piracy? imo, doing so is going to result in having an impact and will impede on legal users and fair use. There's no way around it. I can live with that though since we deal with inconveniences regularly because of those who can't follow the letter of the law, and that problem extends far beyond the digital domain. Such is life that the ***hole minority has to cause problems for the majority.

In the meantime, I'm already enjoying what we now have and, as an early adopter of HD (since 1999) have enjoyed it for years even though there's still a ways to go yet. I've been patient this long. I can wait some more.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Micromain View Post

I just tried it under Vista with the beta 158.24 drivers. Didn't work.


Doesnt work in XP either. No matter what drivers I use with it.

8800 GTS
Toshiba 32HLC56

Tried DVI -> HDMI and VGA

Both dislpay a picture but the desktop image is too large for the screen.
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