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Official 2007-2008 Mitsubishi WD-**733 DLP - Page 4

post #91 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGRSBSKIER View Post

I just saw the 65733 in my Best Buy's weekly ad insert. You would think that if Mitsubishi is selling the TV it would be on their website.

Does anyone know if they can output at 24fps? I know they can accept it.

I believe only the "Diamond" versions or series 833 models have a chance of doing 1080p/24 in/out as they are the only ones that will have 120hz refresh rates. There is some information on all models here (large file so wait for it to load). http://www.cepro.com/asset/7985.pdf
post #92 of 486
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert D View Post

I believe only the "Diamond" versions or series 833 models have a chance of doing 1080p/24 in/out as they are the only ones that will have 120hz refresh rates. There is some information on all models here (large file so wait for it to load). http://www.cepro.com/asset/7985.pdf


They OUTPUT (show) 1080P @ 60 frames or 120 frames depending on the set but all will ACCEPT 24, 30 and 60 1080P frame rates

Steve
post #93 of 486
oh man thanks for the link...... to the pdf Rob

crap I just checked the pdf.... and there isno more DVI video input !!!!!!

man I was planning on plugging in my pc with it....

any suggestions?
post #94 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by azote View Post

oh man thanks for the link...... to the pdf Rob

crap I just checked the pdf.... and there isno more DVI video input !!!!!!

man I was planning on plugging in my pc with it....

any suggestions?

There are no cheap VGA to HDMI solutions, if your PC has DVI a conversion cable is cheap.
post #95 of 486
I'm seriously considering getting a Mits DLP, especially since they are available at costco.
I'd like opinions as to whether or not the Diamond series gets a significantly better picture
than the Medallion.
Thanks.
post #96 of 486
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roller11 View Post

I'm seriously considering getting a Mits DLP, especially since they are available at costco.
I'd like opinions as to whether or not the Diamond series gets a significantly better picture
than the Medallion.
Thanks.


which one 732 or 734?
post #97 of 486
Diamond is the xx833 series. It is not available yet, so I doubt anyone can comment.
post #98 of 486
My above question is regarding which ever Diamond/Medallion models are
currently available, even if they are last years models.
From what I can tell by looking at the specs, the only difference is the bulb,
150W vs 180w. Does this mean that the diamond is only brighter, not necessary better in
terms of PQ, or, is the diamond better PQ even at the same brightness.
If it's just a brightness difference, then the diamond holds no advantage cause I
do all my viewing in near total darkness, almost no ambient light.
post #99 of 486
I'm looking forward to these Diamond sets. Any latest word on exact ship dates?
post #100 of 486
Anyone know exactly how it works and/or what happens with the input signal on this Smooth120Hz feature?
post #101 of 486
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SupraLB View Post

I'm looking forward to these Diamond sets. Any latest word on exact ship dates?

August
post #102 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe221 View Post

There are no cheap VGA to HDMI solutions, if your PC has DVI a conversion cable is cheap.

thanks i think that solution going to work good..
....
has anyone been able to view a side by side comparison on the Mits 2007 models and the 2008s ?? (picture wise) we know that size changed too but i'm more concern on quality of picture
post #103 of 486
I bought and picked up a WD-65734 and matching stand from Walt's TV on Memorial Day (5/28/2007). The folks there were very helpful and patient while my wife decided which stand was best for the TV.

This TV replaces an older 34" Toshiba CRT (34HF81) which was way too small for my room (14 ft viewing distance), and lacked any sort of digital input - HDMI or otherwise. I'm keeping that TV though - moving it to another room to become a video game and "secondary" kids TV.

My initial impressions of the WD-65734 are pretty good, though out of the box, the settings favored a very cool, but bright picture. I immediately turned the lamp brightness down (to increase bulb life) and changed the image presets to the "Natural" setting which helped quite a bit. There's still a slight yellow cast with some material that I'll have to tweak later on. I also enabled the lower standby power setting within the menu, but startup time takes a good 20-30 seconds as a result.

Menu functions seem fairly straight forward, and relatively easy to use. I had the basics tweaked to my liking within 10 minutes of setup.

I've only tested 480P (DVD and a Nintendo Gamecube) and 1080i (Cox 8300HD and my PC w/ component adapter) via component inputs so far. Viewing pillar or letter boxed material is revealing a bit of pincushion distortion at all edges, and a slight upward bowing of the image in the center. I confirmed this w/ some patters from my Avia DVD. Overscan appears to be 2-3% left and bottom and 3-4% top and right, which was first apparent when attempting to view a full 1920x1080 desktop from my PC, which had to be reduced to a slightly lower resolution to view all menus and icons. I guess coming from a CRT to a fixed pixel display, I was a bit disappointed that I didn't get a geometrically perfect image with zero overscan. I'm curious if the geometry will improve w/ an HDMI connection or if it's an optical issue. Perhaps just a bad expectation on my part for any RPTV.

When I plugged in my PC to the front component inputs, I was very impressed that the TV's ClearThought feature detected the connection and asked me to "label" the device. By selecting "game", the TV automatically reverted to game mode which supposedly removes most image processing to eliminate video lag. I was also impressed when I discovered that after turning off the PC, the TV warned that it would automatically power down due to lack of source signal. This should help those who tend to power off the cable box, DVD player, etc., but not the TV, and then only get 1 year out of their bulbs.

Standard definition (Cox digital cable) content doesn't look too bad, though the size and detail of the screen do bring out the compression artifacts. The DVR sends all content upscaled to 1080i. I might try to see if it'll send 480i content as 480i to compare the TV's scaler with the 8300HD's. 1080i material, however, looks spectacular. Even 720p content, scaled to 1080i by the DVR, then to 1080p by the TV looks pretty good. I'll have to figure out how to get the DVR to output content w/o scaling. Anyway, watching Titanic on TNT-HD yesterday was an amazing experience, though at that resolution and size, the 10+ year old CGI technology used in the movie was more obvious.

Although the video games will ultimately stay on the 34" Toshiba moved to another room, my kids were very impressed w/ the games on the Mitsu set (F-Zero GX in Progressive/Wide-screen mode).

DVD's from my older Panasonic RP81 player in 480p mode look great - for DVD's. Some content, like National Treasure, the DVD color compression becomes more obvious as face tones tended to look a bit washed out. SuperBit discs like Starship Troopers, however, look "almost HD" even at 480p. The TV's internal scaler tends to do a great job, making me leery of even trying an HDMI connected 1080p scaling DVD player.

I don't own any HD content players yet (waiting for the format war to end or a reasonably priced combo player), so I'll have to leave those impressions to someone else.

I also plugged a USB fob into the front USB port and images which were not modified (i.e. stock from my 5 megapixel camera) were displayed. Image access did seem rather slow though (i.e. USB 1.1 vs 2.0). 5 megapixel images are the most the TV can handle, which for now, is fine by me as I own a 5 megapixel camera. Given that most people with this size set might own a camera w/ larger resolution, this limitation might limit the usefulness of this "feature" for many buyers.

I just got around to experimenting with the NetCommand feature this last weekend. For the most part, it works pretty well. I've got the TV controlling the COX DVR and my Onkyo receiver with the 2 provided emitters. Programming functions into the TV for my DVR and receiver was a simple process and just about every feature you'd need to pass on is doable. Having 4 "specialized function" keys is useful for the DVR's "A, B, and C" buttons. There is a very slight (< 1/2 second) lag between the TV remote press and the reaction from the expected device when compared to controlling directly.

At this point, I'm most interested in having the receiver volume controlled when the TV receives volume commands. Ironcially, volume control is where I'm having a bit of a problem. Each time I configure the appropriate setting to associate the receiver with my component input (video only) for the TV to send volume info to the receiver, the menu "reverts" to its default of "Audio Out" upon exiting the menu. I'm going to call it in as a bug and see if Mitsu releases any future firmware fixes to resolve that. The TV does, however, power off the receiver when I turn off the TV - but ironically doesn't turn it on. Again, either I've mis-configured, or it's a bug w/ the same association setting. I guess I'll call NetCommand a nice feature "when it works".

Other things I plan on trying out include switching the cable box to HDMI (bypassing my component only Onkyo), and seeing just how well the TV's "clear QAM" reception works on Cox Cable in the Phoenix metro area by connecting the coax straight into the TV. I have a Cox DVR, so don't really have the desire to bypass it, but it may be worth my while to connect an over the air antenna to the other input at some point for broadcast HD should Cox not carry all channels or sub-channels available in my area.

As for DLP "rainbows", I am sensitive to them, and with this set, while reduced over some thanks to the 6 color wheel, I can still see them. They're most apparent when small bright objects are surrounded by black or dark areas. The screen is large enough, even at 14 ft away, where with HD content, you may need to dart your eyes to change focus from scene to scene. Moving my eyes from left to right when the rainbows are most apparent to me. For now I can tolerate it given that I otherwise love the size and features of the set.

Overall, I'm happy with the purchase. Other contenders were a Sony 60" SXRD (no rainbows, but lacked HDMI 1.3 and 1080p24, smaller) and a Sammy LED DLP (slightly smaller, could still see rainbows, more expensive). Feature wise alone, I think the Mitsu was a better choice. Image (color) quality thanks to the 6 color wheel was what helped push my decision though - and that was when demoing last year's Y series and a clearance priced 65731. I chose the 65734 though because of the improvements and the desire to not buy last year's model.
post #104 of 486
What's the contrast ratio?
post #105 of 486
Where has anyone else found the xx734 in the wild? I won't ask Best Buy about these sets any more -- even Magnolia -- just so that I might secure some of my remaining sanity for those later years. But some AVS member sightings might actually help me track one down to witness with my own eyes.
post #106 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wind-Up Bird View Post

Where has anyone else found the xx734 in the wild? I won't ask Best Buy about these sets any more -- even Magnolia -- just so that I might secure some of my remaining sanity for those later years. But some AVS member sightings might actually help me track one down to witness with my own eyes.

I bought mine from Steve at Walts TV (65734) and his service was fantastic. I plan to do a first impressions post soon but so far I'm too busy enjoying my new purchase
post #107 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by HTMLSpinnr View Post

I bought and picked up a WD-65734 and matching stand from Walt's TV on Memorial Day (5/28/2007). The folks there were very helpful and patient while my wife decided which stand was best for the TV.

This TV replaces an older 34" Toshiba CRT (34HF81) which was way too small for my room (14" viewing distance), and lacked any sort of digital input - HDMI or otherwise. I'm keeping that TV though - moving it to another room to become a video game and "secondary" kids TV.

My initial impressions of the WD-65734 are pretty good, though out of the box, the settings favored a very cool, but bright picture. I immediately turned the lamp brightness down (to increase bulb life) and changed the image presets to the "Natural" setting which helped quite a bit. There's still a slight yellow cast with some material that I'll have to tweak later on. I also enabled the lower standby power setting within the menu, but startup time takes a good 20-30 seconds as a result.

Menu functions seem fairly straight forward, and relatively easy to use. I had the basics tweaked to my liking within 10 minutes of setup.

I've only tested 480P (DVD and a Nintendo Gamecube) and 1080i (Cox 8300HD and my PC w/ component adapter) via component inputs so far. Viewing pillar or letter boxed material is revealing a bit of pincushion distortion at all edges, and a slight upward bowing of the image in the center. I confirmed this w/ some patters from my Avia DVD. Overscan appears to be 2-3% left and bottom and 3-4% top and right, which was first apparent when attempting to view a full 1920x1080 desktop from my PC, which had to be reduced to a slightly lower resolution to view all menus and icons. I guess coming from a CRT to a fixed pixel display, I was a bit disappointed that I didn't get a geometrically perfect image with zero overscan. I'm curious if the geometry will improve w/ an HDMI connection or if it's an optical issue. Perhaps just a bad expectation on my part for any RPTV.

When I plugged in my PC to the front component inputs, I was very impressed that the TV's ClearThought feature detected the connection and asked me to "label" the device. By selecting "game", the TV automatically reverted to game mode which supposedly removes most image processing to eliminate video lag. I was also impressed when I discovered that after turning off the PC, the TV warned that it would automatically power down due to lack of source signal. This should help those who tend to power off the cable box, DVD player, etc., but not the TV, and then only get 1 year out of their bulbs.

Standard definition (Cox digital cable) content doesn't look too bad, though the size and detail of the screen do bring out the compression artifacts. The DVR sends all content upscaled to 1080i. I might try to see if it'll send 480i content as 480i to compare the TV's scaler with the 8300HD's. 1080i material, however, looks spectacular. Even 720p content, scaled to 1080i by the DVR, then to 1080p by the TV looks pretty good. I'll have to figure out how to get the DVR to output content w/o scaling. Anyway, watching Titanic on TNT-HD yesterday was an amazing experience, though at that resolution and size, the 10+ year old CGI technology used in the movie was more obvious.

Although the video games will ultimately stay on the 34" Toshiba moved to another room, my kids were very impressed w/ the games on the Mitsu set (F-Zero GX in Progressive/Wide-screen mode).

DVD's from my older Panasonic RP81 player in 480p mode look great - for DVD's. Some content, like National Treasure, the DVD color compression becomes more obvious as face tones tended to look a bit washed out. SuperBit discs like Starship Troopers, however, look "almost HD" even at 480p. The TV's internal scaler tends to do a great job, making me leery of even trying an HDMI connected 1080p scaling DVD player.

I don't own any HD content players yet (waiting for the format war to end or a reasonably priced combo player), so I'll have to leave those impressions to someone else.

I also plugged a USB fob into the front USB port and images which were not modified (i.e. stock from my 5 megapixel camera) were displayed. Image access did seem rather slow though (i.e. USB 1.1 vs 2.0). 5 megapixel images are the most the TV can handle, which for now, is fine by me as I own a 5 megapixel camera. Given that most people with this size set might own a camera w/ larger resolution, this limitation might limit the usefulness of this "feature" for many buyers.

I just got around to experimenting with the NetCommand feature this last weekend. For the most part, it works pretty well. I've got the TV controlling the COX DVR and my Onkyo receiver with the 2 provided emitters. Programming functions into the TV for my DVR and receiver was a simple process and just about every feature you'd need to pass on is doable. Having 4 "specialized function" keys is useful for the DVR's "A, B, and C" buttons. There is a very slight (< 1/2 second) lag between the TV remote press and the reaction from the expected device when compared to controlling directly.

At this point, I'm most interested in having the receiver volume controlled when the TV receives volume commands. Ironcially, volume control is where I'm having a bit of a problem. Each time I configure the appropriate setting to associate the receiver with my component input (video only) for the TV to send volume info to the receiver, the menu "reverts" to its default of "Audio Out" upon exiting the menu. I'm going to call it in as a bug and see if Mitsu releases any future firmware fixes to resolve that. The TV does, however, power off the receiver when I turn off the TV - but ironically doesn't turn it on. Again, either I've mis-configured, or it's a bug w/ the same association setting. I guess I'll call NetCommand a nice feature "when it works".

Other things I plan on trying out include switching the cable box to HDMI (bypassing my component only Onkyo), and seeing just how well the TV's "clear QAM" reception works on Cox Cable in the Phoenix metro area by connecting the coax straight into the TV. I have a Cox DVR, so don't really have the desire to bypass it, but it may be worth my while to connect an over the air antenna to the other input at some point for broadcast HD should Cox not carry all channels or sub-channels available in my area.

As for DLP "rainbows", I am sensitive to them, and with this set, while reduced over some thanks to the 6 color wheel, I can still see them. They're most apparent when small bright objects are surrounded by black or dark areas. The screen is large enough, even at 14" away, where with HD content, you may need to dart your eyes to change focus from scene to scene. Moving my eyes from left to right when the rainbows are most apparent to me. For now I can tolerate it given that I otherwise love the size and features of the set.

Overall, I'm happy with the purchase. Other contenders were a Sony 60" SXRD (no rainbows, but lacked HDMI 1.3 and 1080p24, smaller) and a Sammy LED DLP (slightly smaller, could still see rainbows, more expensive). Feature wise alone, I think the Mitsu was a better choice. Image (color) quality thanks to the 6 color wheel was what helped push my decision though - and that was when demoing last year's Y series and a clearance priced 65731. I chose the 65734 though because of the improvements and the desire to not buy last year's model.

Aren't you sitting a little to close??

Thanks for the review!! Good job! Enjoy your set!
post #108 of 486
Yea, that should be 14 ft.

Seems that those of us who are posting sightings are because we've bought @ Walts... LOL
post #109 of 486
Update to first impressions post:

Tested clear QAM tonight on Cox cable in phoenix - only digital channels that correspond to channels that are otherwise available via broadcast (as well as a few cable channels like TBS and BET) were available. If it's broadcast in HD, you can grab it from cable. Premium and most cable only channels were not available, presumably due to encryption.

This allowed me the opportunity to compare tuning w/ the cable box (8300HD connected via component cables, passed thru the Onkyo receiver) which presently scales everything to 1080i and comparing the internal scaler for SD digital content. I'd have to say I prefer the cable box's job for SD content as it looks a bit less blocky and the interlacing is less obvious. HD content looked slightly better via the internal tuner as you're pulling the analog component connections out of the loop.

Interestingly enough, (though obvious afterward) the digital cable channels in no way corresponded to their mappings on the cable box (i.e. 103-1 might be 712).

Analog scanning was fairly quick when learning channels, though digital scanning took a bit longer. I was a bit disappointed that the TV "included" all QAM channels, even those that were encrypted (pulled up blank when tuned). I would have hoped that the channels that weren't visible to the viewer w/o cable card (an option that was pulled this year) would have been excluded. It took me a good 20+ minutes to remove what seemed liked 100-200 unusable channels as it took the TV 2-3 seconds per channel to lock on or "give up".

Also, I attempted to use the built-in guide, ChannelView (or was it CableView), however it didn't seem to have any info - probably because I needed to leave the TV off w/o low power mode to allow it to download any data that might have been available. I didn't wait long enough to see if it'd download something later on. It did make viewing available channels a bit easier - and had I taken the time to label each one, it'd make choosing specific channels much quicker than using channel up/down if I had forgotten a particular assignment.

And finally, I discovered that if I connected an RCA (coax) cable from the TV's digital output to an extra (presently unused) COAX input on my receiver, I could finally control the receiver. Powering the TV on powers on the receiver, volume control works, and the receiver turns off w/ the TV. If you switch from internal speakers to the receiver, the receiver will turn on, and off if you switch back to TV speakers. On the downside, I wasn't getting a usable digital signal from the TV under any circumstances from the built-in tuner on the digital out. I'm not sure if it was the receiver or the TV. It doesn't matter for now, since I use the optical connection from my cable box directly to my receiver anyway, but it's nice that I can remove one remote from the mix for day-to-day use.
post #110 of 486
Your mention of ChannelView prompted me to check the PDF again as I could have sworn TVGOS was mentioned. Apparently only the Diamond models have TVGOS, as well as ChannelView.
post #111 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by HTMLSpinnr View Post

Yea, that should be 14 ft.

Seems that those of us who are posting sightings are because we've bought @ Walts... LOL


He is The King! Oh wait...???
post #112 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by HTMLSpinnr View Post

Update to first impressions post:

Tested clear QAM tonight on Cox cable in phoenix - only digital channels that correspond to channels that are otherwise available via broadcast (as well as a few cable channels like TBS and BET) were available. If it's broadcast in HD, you can grab it from cable. Premium and most cable only channels were not available, presumably due to encryption.

This allowed me the opportunity to compare tuning w/ the cable box (8300HD connected via component cables, passed thru the Onkyo receiver) which presently scales everything to 1080i and comparing the internal scaler for SD digital content. I'd have to say I prefer the cable box's job for SD content as it looks a bit less blocky and the interlacing is less obvious. HD content looked slightly better via the internal tuner as you're pulling the analog component connections out of the loop.

Interestingly enough, (though obvious afterward) the digital cable channels in no way corresponded to their mappings on the cable box (i.e. 103-1 might be 712).

Analog scanning was fairly quick when learning channels, though digital scanning took a bit longer. I was a bit disappointed that the TV "included" all QAM channels, even those that were encrypted (pulled up blank when tuned). I would have hoped that the channels that weren't visible to the viewer w/o cable card (an option that was pulled this year) would have been excluded. It took me a good 20+ minutes to remove what seemed liked 100-200 unusable channels as it took the TV 2-3 seconds per channel to lock on or "give up".

Also, I attempted to use the built-in guide, ChannelView (or was it CableView), however it didn't seem to have any info - probably because I needed to leave the TV off w/o low power mode to allow it to download any data that might have been available. I didn't wait long enough to see if it'd download something later on. It did make viewing available channels a bit easier - and had I taken the time to label each one, it'd make choosing specific channels much quicker than using channel up/down if I had forgotten a particular assignment.

And finally, I discovered that if I connected an RCA (coax) cable from the TV's digital output to an extra (presently unused) COAX input on my receiver, I could finally control the receiver. Powering the TV on powers on the receiver, volume control works, and the receiver turns off w/ the TV. If you switch from internal speakers to the receiver, the receiver will turn on, and off if you switch back to TV speakers. On the downside, I wasn't getting a usable digital signal from the TV under any circumstances from the built-in tuner on the digital out. I'm not sure if it was the receiver or the TV. It doesn't matter for now, since I use the optical connection from my cable box directly to my receiver anyway, but it's nice that I can remove one remote from the mix for day-to-day use.

Thank you for your elementery view of how cable television operates.
post #113 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by trapperjohnMD View Post

Thank you for your elementery view of how cable television operates.

Yikes, leave the poor guy alone. He is correct on every point.
post #114 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hipnotiq View Post

Yikes, leave the poor guy alone. He is correct on every point.

Thanks, but no worries. I viewed most of his other recent posts, and absolutely none of them were very useful, so I'll take his comment with a grain of salt.

On a different note - I've been reading in some threads about dust issues. My viewing area is in a particularly dusty location (can't change that much - near my back door where 3 dogs bring in dust from the yard). Is there anything I can do to be proactive on keeping as much of it out of the light engine as possible?
post #115 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by HTMLSpinnr View Post

On a different note - I've been reading in some threads about dust issues. My viewing area is in a particularly dusty location

first of all thanks for your review ... I have the same issue with the dust ... that's why I went ahead and got the warranty from Walts too ... because I know sooner or later it will break it....

as far is I can suggest would be to get one of those air purifiers (which I did too just in case)
post #116 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by azote View Post

first of all thanks for your review ... I have the same issue with the dust ... that's why I went ahead and got the warranty from Walts too ... because I know sooner or later it will break it....

as far is I can suggest would be to get one of those air purifiers (which I did too just in case)

Regarding the air purifier, I would suggest you place it a good 10 feet *away* from your tv, as based on my experience they actually attract dust. Sure, they 'clean' the air and drop particles to the ground but you might want to "attract" those dust particles to a different part of your TV viewing room (away from tv).
post #117 of 486
Bought a wd 65733. Great Picture, hook ups etc.
However the a major issue seems to be the projection grit/pincushion.

In standard mode the vertical borderlines on either side of the picture as well as the borderline on top are curved/warped/sagging. Only the bottom lines are straight.

The floor model in the store as well as both my sets ( had one exchange already )
have this problem which apparently cannot be remedied by a field technician.

Contacted Mitsubishi and they advised being aware of this however they consider this
condition "normal". In other words it cannot be remedied.

Is there anyone out there with a similar experience ? Does this also apply to the 65734
model ??



I was offered another exchange but not very hopeful another set will not
have the same problem. It is disappointing because the picture and other features
of this model are quite impressive.
post #118 of 486
My 65734 exhibits the same gemoetric flaws.
post #119 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdammers View Post

Bought a wd 65733. Great Picture, hook ups etc.
However the a major issue seems to be the projection grit/pincushion.

In standard mode the vertical borderlines on either side of the picture as well as the borderline on top are curved/warped/sagging. Only the bottom lines are straight.

The floor model in the store as well as both my sets ( had one exchange already )
have this problem which apparently cannot be remedied by a field technician.

Contacted Mitsubishi and they advised being aware of this however they consider this
condition "normal". In other words it cannot be remedied.

Is there anyone out there with a similar experience ? Does this also apply to the 65734
model ??

I was offered another exchange but not very hopeful another set will not
have the same problem. It is disappointing because the picture and other features
of this model are quite impressive.

I have an older (2004) 52725 and it also exhibits pincushion on the sides. From what I gather over the last few years, reading the Mitsubishi DLP threads here, it is inherent in ALL models to some degree.
post #120 of 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Thomas View Post

I have an older (2004) 52725 and it also exhibits pincushion on the sides. From what I gather over the last few years, reading the Mitsubishi DLP threads here, it is inherent in ALL models to some degree.


I've been looking into Sony, Samsung and Mits' newest models and all are getting thinner and seem to have more of this issue. My guess is because the cabs are getting thinner there is less room in which the image has to be projected resulting in the geometry issues. I have a 56" today with no issues but it's a deeper cab.
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