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Legacy Audio Speakers - Page 12

post #331 of 469
Any one in the Seattle area have any Focus SE's I can come listen to?
post #332 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kris Deering View Post

Any one in the Seattle area have any Focus SE's I can come listen to?

Kris, I am checking around for you... I'll let you know what I find out shortly...

Dennis
post #333 of 469
Hi Kris,

Victoria Dudleston at Legacy got back to me this morning, so they are aware of your interest in the Focus SEs. Legacy will be contacting you directly to make arrangements for an audition shortly....
post #334 of 469
I wonder if this means we can expect to see a full review of the Focus SE in Home Theater magazine in the coming months. Darryl Wilkinson sure liked the Classic HD-based system. My apologies to DMark1 for not seeing his post requesting a link. I did check on their website, and the review is not up yet. It can be found in the July/August issue.

It sure is nice to see Legacy Audio getting a little more mainstream press attention lately.
post #335 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkeeler10 View Post

It sure is nice to see Legacy Audio getting a little more mainstream press attention lately.

Couldn't agree more. What a remarkable set of products.
post #336 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkeeler10 View Post

I wonder if this means we can expect to see a full review of the Focus SE in Home Theater magazine in the coming months. Darryl Wilkinson sure liked the Classic HD-based system. My apologies to DMark1 for not seeing his post requesting a link. I did check on their website, and the review is not up yet. It can be found in the July/August issue.

It sure is nice to see Legacy Audio getting a little more mainstream press attention lately.

Bkeeler: A review is a possibilty, but they just did the Classic HD review, so it might be a while until they want to do another Legacy review in Home Theater magazine. ... Although, I think Kris is interested in auditioning a full Legacy 5.1 system, which would be a very different kind of review than a 2 channel review.

We'll see... anything could happen biggrin.gif
post #337 of 469
I'm lucky to be close enough to Dennis's that I could drive over and listen to a few of the Legacy speakers he has on hand. I've been gathering my thoughts since then so I could do them justice and give a sense of their sound to the voyeurs/lurkers out there. smile.gif

Since I'm on a budget I only listened to the Signatures and the Studios. I definitely did not want to fall for the Focus.

We started with the Studio with a few Jazz pieces I brought with me. The sound was crystal clear and the soundstage was enormous! Where I was sitting it seemed to extend several feet to the left and right of the Studios and maybe 4 feet above them.

The percussion instruments really popped and had that nice visceral impact they should. Wind and string instruments had a presence that's hard to explain.

Going in I thought that the bass would be overwhelming, since everyone raves about the bass that Legacys put out. But it wasn't. The bass was definitely palpable but it didn't crowd out the other instruments. Every instrument was audible and had its own place in the soundstage.

Then we put on a live recording of Chrissy Hynde. As I said to Dennis, that's my wife's music so I didn't really know what to expect with it. But, for me, it ended up being the defining song for the speakers. You could hear the audience in the background, you could sense where Ms. Hynde was on the stage, and again the instruments sounded gorgeous. The bass guitar was really something.

All of that was with the Studios. So, I'm thinking to myself, I can get out of this fairly cheaply. smile.gif Wrong. Next up were the Signatures.

OMG! Now, while the Studios were great and put everything I've auditioned so far to shame, the Signatures were a cut above.

The interesting thing to me is that the Signatures did not sound different than the Studios. I could finally understand what it means when they say that Bill Duddleston voices them to keep the tonal qualities he wants across the line. You got the same clarity, the same presence of instruments, the same soundstage, in a way. But everything was done better.

Boy! did those Signatures sound better than the Studio. Not only could you tell where Ms. Hynde was standing but you got the sense that could tell how she was holding the mic. The plosive sounds you could hear when someone is singing really close to a mic were very audible with the Signatures while, if you listened and knew they were there, you could make them out on the Studios. And the bass guitar! You could pinpoint exactly where it was and what the guitarist was doing.

The Signatures really extracted a ton more detail from the song than I'd ever heard before but not in a cold, analytical way. I've been lucky enough to sit a few feet from performers in pubs. The Signatures gave me that feeling. With the Studios I was listening to a recording, albeit a really well reproduced recording.

Then we put on this huge orchestral/choral piece (Berlioz's Requiem) I brought to really challenge the Legacys. The wikipedia page for it says that some of the movements don't need all 800 voices, 400 should suffice. Of course, I brought the movement that needs the entire chorus, Dies Irae. On my current system, it all turns into a big blur of sound and you can't really tell what's making all the noise in terms of instrumentation.

The Signatures kept the chorus distinct while playing all the horns and drums. It was amazing and, frankly, a bit of a stunner.

I really enjoyed listening to both sets of speakers. My space cannot really accommodate the Signatures so I think it'll be the Classics for me. Because of the voicing I mentioned above I know they'll sound great.

Oh! one more thing. The last song we played (not counting the insane War of the Worlds thing) was a piece that Dennis had. I had mentioned to him one of the things I listen for is the shimmer of cymbals. The piece Dennis put on had the musician tapping with the mallet(?). It was so realistic I still don't know what to think.
Edited by artur9 - 7/3/13 at 8:34pm
post #338 of 469
DMark1,

With my current speakers the tweeter and midrange drivers are at the height of the middle of my screen, which means sound and dialogue comes from the screen (okay, the illusion is that, but the speakers image well). I would be interested to know what you think of the Signature's image height. Not being as tall as the Focus, I wonder if the image is smaller or shorter. That could affect the relationship with a display or screen in an HT setup, perhaps, especially in a 2-channel multi-purpose setup like mine.
post #339 of 469
Hi Prepress,

I have used a trio of Signature SEs behind an acoustically transparent screen with great success. The Sigs stand 48" tall, and they image at about that height too, which placed the audio imaging right about halfway up my screen.

The Focus SEs stand 56" tall, and they can throw an image that is as high or higher than the speaker. I prefer the Focus SEs, because they have a larger overall presentation and than the Sigs (as excellent as they are). In addition to a pair of Focus SEs for L & R channels, I am using a Signature SE for my center channel at the moment, so my center image is still firmly anchored at mid-screen height. I haven't noticed any problem with using the Focus SEs as my L & R speakers in a home theater system. In fact, they sound fabulous in both music and movie roles.

Both speakers come on adjustable spikes, so you can add some tilt to them to adjust their imaging up or down if needed. If that is still not enough, you could consider adding a horizontal center channel like the Silverscreen or Marquis. That would also open up the wonderful world of multichannel music to you as well, which is very worthwhile and enjoyable.
post #340 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark1 View Post

Hi Prepress,

I have used a trio of Signature SEs behind an acoustically transparent screen with great success. The Sigs stand 48" tall, and they image at about that height too, which placed the audio imaging right about halfway up my screen.

The Focus SEs stand 56" tall, and they can throw an image that is as high or higher than the speaker. I prefer the Focus SEs, because they have a larger overall presentation and than the Sigs (as excellent as they are). In addition to a pair of Focus SEs for L & R channels, I am using a Signature SE for my center channel at the moment, so my center image is still firmly anchored at mid-screen height. I haven't noticed any problem with using the Focus SEs as my L & R speakers in a home theater system. In fact, they sound fabulous in both music and movie roles.

Both speakers come on adjustable spikes, so you can add some tilt to them to adjust their imaging up or down if needed. If that is still not enough, you could consider adding a horizontal center channel like the Silverscreen or Marquis. That would also open up the wonderful world of multichannel music to you as well, which is very worthwhile and enjoyable.

That would put the tweeters roughly at the bottom quarter of my plasma's screen. That may not be good. The Focus (SE and HD) is a good height, but they're very heavy and from a practical standpoint that is problematic in a 1BR apartment (200 and 195 pounds respectively!). I'd have no issues with the sound to be sure, but the image height might be a concern. Something to think about. Thanks.
post #341 of 469
When you are seated, the Signatures image higher slightly higher than the tweeters (and higher than your ear height). So they image slightly higher than their 48" height.

If your TV is mounted higher than 48", then your TV is probably mounted too high to begin with, causing you to crane your neck to look up at it....

This is why I love my acoustically transparent screen and projector - you can put the speakers where they belong, and your screen drops down in front of them to the perfect height.

Any chance you could install a motorized AT screen and lose the TV? When you're not watching something, you can put the screen up and have a nice clean looking room while you listen to your awesome Legacy speakers.... ;-)
post #342 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark1 View Post

When you are seated, the Signatures image higher slightly higher than the tweeters (and higher than your ear height). So they image slightly higher than their 48" height.

If your TV is mounted higher than 48", then your TV is probably mounted too high to begin with, causing you to crane your neck to look up at it....

This is why I love my acoustically transparent screen and projector - you can put the speakers where they belong, and your screen drops down in front of them to the perfect height.

Any chance you could install a motorized AT screen and lose the TV? When you're not watching something, you can put the screen up and have a nice clean looking room while you listen to your awesome Legacy speakers.... ;-)

Good to know that the image is higher than the speaker. That would be helpful.

This is a one-bedroom apartment (I rent) so I can't do any installations like the one you describe. The TV, a Pioneer Elite Kuro, sits on a 32" stand, where previously it was on a 28" stand. The change was due to reconfiguration of the system to accommodate new equipment. I am 10' away. Any higher than 32" would be a problem in my view.
post #343 of 469
My journey for new speakers has brought me to Legacy Audio. I live only 7 miles south of Springfield IL, their home. I have even toured their facility several years ago. My friend worked there 25 years ago helping make and assemble their various speaker lines. He own's an old pair of Studio Monitors that I have always been quite impressed with how they sound.

I currently own quite an eclectic mix of mainstream consumer speakers. My main's are Boston Acoustic VR30 towers with the Lynnfield tweeter (purchased in 1997). Center channel is Monitor Audio with my surrounds being Polk. I also own an RSP910 Eosone sub. Powering all of these is a Pioneer Elite SC-05 Class D Amplified AVR. With the exception of the AVR it is time I do something about this mess that I just described to you. I am wanting to move to a compact monitor for my front channels as I do not have a lot of space available. I have listened to the entire monitor line of B&W with the PM-1 being my favorite. Then I ran across this forum and some reviews for the Legacy Audio Studio HD. The Ribbon tweeter really intrigues me and I feel the build quality is better than the PM-1 (and the build quality of the PM-1 is excellent). I plan on making an appointment for an audition this week to hear them and their AMT tweeter. I also plan on replacing my center with the Legacy Cinema HD and rounding out with an HSU sub (VTF-2 MK4). My question is, how do you feel this configuration will be for 50/50 split between music and home theater? How will the Pioneer Elite AVR be in driving these speakers? Do you think they would be better paired with the Legacy Audio Metro subwoofer? I do plan on adding a dedicated Emotiva amp down the road. Any information would be greatly appreciated....
post #344 of 469
Ill be looking forward to your audition impressions... I am also intrigued by the studio hds.
post #345 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliwankenobi View Post

Ill be looking forward to your audition impressions... I am also intrigued by the studio hds.

I have an audition scheduled for next Monday to hear the Studio HD monitors and Metro sub combination. Will keep you posted!
post #346 of 469
Can't wait to hear your impressions...particularly on the Metro sub.
post #347 of 469
And I can't wait to hear your impressions -- particularly on the Studio HDs wink.gif. That may be my next speaker . . .
post #348 of 469
Can anyone who listened to the Studio HD comment if this speaker is very sensitive to placement near walls?

Also, is the sweet spot very narrow or is it wide enough for other people who are not in the money seat?
post #349 of 469
Last night I auditioned the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro sub together. I arrived at Legacy Audio's office here in Springfield Illinois around 4:30 PM. Waiting for me was Bill Dudleston, the founder of Legacy Audio. He took me to a room where he had setup my request of auditioning the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro HD subwoofer. My usual listening consists of both lossy and lossless music. It was important that I hear both. We started the audition with the lossy music I had brought with me. I must say I was not ready for what I heard. The first song, Drifting Wood by Lincoln Durham came alive. The kick drum, guitar and tambourine sounded as if they were in the room with us. The Metro sub hit low and deep and blended perfectly with the Studio's. The detail and expanse of the soundstage was amazing. Each recording we listened to sounded as if I had never heard them before. I moved around the room wanting to get a handle on sweet spot dynamics. Everywhere I moved to the sound was perfect. Dispersion and off axis listening was incredible. We moved on to my lossless music and the sound was even better and more detailed. I am completely sold on the Studio and Metro combination and will be purchasing soon.
post #350 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by captjmo View Post

Last night I auditioned the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro sub together. I arrived at Legacy Audio's office here in Springfield Illinois around 4:30 PM. Waiting for me was Bill Dudleston, the founder of Legacy Audio. He took me to a room where he had setup my request of auditioning the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro HD subwoofer. My usual listening consists of both lossy and lossless music. It was important that I hear both. We started the audition with the lossy music I had brought with me. I must say I was not ready for what I heard. The first song, Drifting Wood by Lincoln Durham came alive. The kick drum, guitar and tambourine sounded as if they were in the room with us. The Metro sub hit low and deep and blended perfectly with the Studio's. The detail and expanse of the soundstage was amazing. Each recording we listened to sounded as if I had never heard them before. I moved around the room wanting to get a handle on sweet spot dynamics. Everywhere I moved to the sound was perfect. Dispersion and off axis listening was incredible. We moved on to my lossless music and the sound was even better and more detailed. I am completely sold on the Studio and Metro combination and will be purchasing soon.

 

Awesome!  Sounds like that combination is a winner.  That's one of the hugest benefits of buying a subwoofer from the same manufacturer as the mains--you know they are made to work well with each other. 

post #351 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by captjmo View Post

Last night I auditioned the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro sub together. I arrived at Legacy Audio's office here in Springfield Illinois around 4:30 PM. Waiting for me was Bill Dudleston, the founder of Legacy Audio. He took me to a room where he had setup my request of auditioning the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro HD subwoofer. My usual listening consists of both lossy and lossless music. It was important that I hear both. We started the audition with the lossy music I had brought with me. I must say I was not ready for what I heard. The first song, Drifting Wood by Lincoln Durham came alive. The kick drum, guitar and tambourine sounded as if they were in the room with us. The Metro sub hit low and deep and blended perfectly with the Studio's. The detail and expanse of the soundstage was amazing. Each recording we listened to sounded as if I had never heard them before. I moved around the room wanting to get a handle on sweet spot dynamics. Everywhere I moved to the sound was perfect. Dispersion and off axis listening was incredible. We moved on to my lossless music and the sound was even better and more detailed. I am completely sold on the Studio and Metro combination and will be purchasing soon.

Glad to hear the demo was like that... That is exactly what I was wondering about. How wide is the soundstage and imaging.

Did you try some regular (not audiophile) music? Some pop or rock?
post #352 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliwankenobi View Post


Did you try some regular (not audiophile) music? Some pop or rock?

I did. I also listened to the following Rock/Pop Music:

Nickelback - Gotta Be Somebody
Volbeat - Heaven Nor Hell
Taylor Swift Featuring Gary Lightbody of Snow Patrol - The Last Time
Ponderosa - Old Gin Road

I was a little nervous to see how they would handle these tracks. However, once I started listening I was again impressed how the Studio's sounded coupled with the Metro subwoofer. All of the tracks above resonated with the same detail and soundstage of the other "audiophile" music I had brought with me. Really they were quite amazing and I have found I absolutely love the sound of the ribbon tweeter. Great experience overall!
post #353 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by captjmo View Post

I did. I also listened to the following Rock/Pop Music:

Nickelback - Gotta Be Somebody
Volbeat - Heaven Nor Hell
Taylor Swift Featuring Gary Lightbody of Snow Patrol - The Last Time
Ponderosa - Old Gin Road

I was a little nervous to see how they would handle these tracks. However, once I started listening I was again impressed how the Studio's sounded coupled with the Metro subwoofer. All of the tracks above resonated with the same detail and soundstage of the other "audiophile" music I had brought with me. Really they were quite amazing and I have found I absolutely love the sound of the ribbon tweeter. Great experience overall!

Thank you!

Just what I wanted to know. I like to know that one's low quality mp3s of CDs we may thrown or given away years ago are still enjoyable through these speakers.
post #354 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by captjmo View Post

Last night I auditioned the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro sub together. I arrived at Legacy Audio's office here in Springfield Illinois around 4:30 PM. Waiting for me was Bill Dudleston, the founder of Legacy Audio. He took me to a room where he had setup my request of auditioning the Studio HD Monitors and the Metro HD subwoofer. My usual listening consists of both lossy and lossless music. It was important that I hear both. We started the audition with the lossy music I had brought with me. I must say I was not ready for what I heard. The first song, Drifting Wood by Lincoln Durham came alive. The kick drum, guitar and tambourine sounded as if they were in the room with us. The Metro sub hit low and deep and blended perfectly with the Studio's. The detail and expanse of the soundstage was amazing. Each recording we listened to sounded as if I had never heard them before. I moved around the room wanting to get a handle on sweet spot dynamics. Everywhere I moved to the sound was perfect. Dispersion and off axis listening was incredible. We moved on to my lossless music and the sound was even better and more detailed. I am completely sold on the Studio and Metro combination and will be purchasing soon.

Thanks for sharing your impressions. Sounds like the speakers sold themselves. How big was the room you were in, and did you get a chance to listen very loudly for testing purposes? That's about my only reservation about the Studio -- can it sound big and clean (with the help of a sub of course), even when played at overkill volume levels. If it can go beyond what I normally listen at and still sound clean, uncompressed and full, I'm very interested. Perhaps it's a moot point for me -- I rarely exceed 10 dB below reference when watching movies and music is no louder than perhaps low 90s dB at the peaks. I know that Bill Dudleston is a big fan of increasing piston area as frequency decreases to avoid distortion -- I guess I'm a bit curious as to how far that concept could be taken in a two-way monitor. Any idea what the crossover frequency was between the Studios and the Metro?

Man, I wish I were close enough to visit the factory. Did you get a chance to listen to other models, or did you intentionally (and wisely!) avoid anything outside your budget? If I were there, I would simply have to listen to the Whispers. That would be safe for me because they're out of budget several times over. Now, listening to the Classics might be dangerous . . .
post #355 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkeeler10 View Post

How big was the room you were in, and did you get a chance to listen very loudly for testing purposes?

I would say the room was around 20x25. I had Bill adjusting the volume up and down as I listened to get a feel for clarity at low and high volume levels. No matter how much he adjusted the volume up I didn't notice any degradation or muddling in the sound quality. What I heard was very clean and detailed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkeeler10 View Post

Any idea what the crossover frequency was between the Studios and the Metro?

Yes, the crossover frequency was set at 50Hz.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkeeler10 View Post

Man, I wish I were close enough to visit the factory. Did you get a chance to listen to other models, or did you intentionally (and wisely!) avoid anything outside your budget? If I were there, I would simply have to listen to the Whispers. That would be safe for me because they're out of budget several times over. Now, listening to the Classics might be dangerous . . .

Haha I stayed away from doing that even though several of the Legacy Line was present in the listening room. I don't have the budget yet for something higher up the chain and I spoke with Bill on this to see if they accepted trade-ins down the road. He pointed to a speaker in the corner and said that one had come in last week and was 12 years old on trade. Bill said the building block approach was an excellent way to go. Get what you can afford now and then down the road trade them in on something new. I have my eyes set on a pair of Focus SE's. I plan on making a return trip to hear them all.
post #356 of 469
Nice review Captjmo, thanks for sharing!

Yes, the Studios are amazing speakers for their size. I think pairing them up with a Metro sub is a perfect combination that gives you full range sound. As far as volume levels are concerned, the Studios CAN play very loudly without strain. After all, they were designed for use in recording studios, which play back tracks at high levels every day. biggrin.gif The 8" woofer in the Studios has a very long excursion and strong motor for it's size - in fact Bill D. refers to it fondly as a "Super Woofer". The extra excursion ability allows the speaker to have a higher dB output than ordinary woofers.

Also, if you pair the Studios with a Metro subwoofer, and crossover at say, 60 Hz or so, the sub will take the bass strain off of the Studio, allowing it to output higher dBs with lower distortion - which translates into better sound overall. 60 Hz is a good crossover point for the Studios, especially because the Studios have a switch on the back that helps integrate the sound with the sub with a -2dB cut at 60 Hz. There is also a second switch that reduces treble output by -2dB above 10 kHz, if you have a need to tame overly bright recordings in your room. So along with experimenting with positioning and toe-in, you can "fine-tune" the speakers to your room to a certain extent with the switches.
post #357 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark1 View Post

Nice review Captjmo, thanks for sharing!

Yes, the Studios are amazing speakers for their size. I think pairing them up with a Metro sub is a perfect combination that gives you full range sound. As far as volume levels are concerned, the Studios CAN play very loudly without strain. After all, they were designed for use in recording studios, which play back tracks at high levels every day. biggrin.gif The 8" woofer in the Studios has a very long excursion and strong motor for it's size - in fact Bill D. refers to it fondly as a "Super Woofer". The extra excursion ability allows the speaker to have a higher dB output than ordinary woofers.

Also, if you pair the Studios with a Metro subwoofer, and crossover at say, 60 Hz or so, the sub will take the bass strain off of the Studio, allowing it to output higher dBs with lower distortion - which translates into better sound overall. 60 Hz is a good crossover point for the Studios, especially because the Studios have a switch on the back that helps integrate the sound with the sub with a -2dB cut at 60 Hz. There is also a second switch that reduces treble output by -2dB above 10 kHz, if you have a need to tame overly bright recordings in your room. So along with experimenting with positioning and toe-in, you can "fine-tune" the speakers to your room to a certain extent with the switches.

Thank you!!

I had a question. What speaker stands would you recommend for the Studio's?
post #358 of 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by captjmo View Post

Thank you!!

I had a question. What speaker stands would you recommend for the Studio's?

Something like this should suffice...

http://www.amazon.com/Sanus-SF22-Foundations-Bookshelf-Speakers/dp/B004STEH08/ref=sr_1_21?ie=UTF8&qid=1374858759&sr=8-21&keywords=sanus+speaker+stand


The question is what height is recommended. Other legacy speakers image a little higher and speaker position. Dennis can clarify here.
post #359 of 469
You should shoot for a stand height that will put the tweeters at your seated ear height, whatever that measures.

Of course, the larger, floorstanding models do image higher than the Studios, mostly in line with the tops of their cabinets. However, the Focus SE can image about a foot above it's cabinet height (like the height of a real life singer's mouth when they're standing). Not sure the technical reasons how that works, but it probably has something to do with the second 7" mid-woofer used above the tweeters in the Focus SE, raising the image height...

Interestingly, the Whispers image higher than their tweeter height too, when called for by the source material. Indeed, the Whispers' soundstage is expanded in ALL directions vs. the "smaller" models... :-)
Edited by DMark1 - 7/26/13 at 2:24pm
post #360 of 469
OK, I've been waiting to post this for a while. Now I can, since Anthony Cordesman's Aeris review in The Absolute Sound (TAS) has officially been released. The review is brilliant, and about as much of a rave review as I can ever imagine Tony writing.

I delivered the review pair of Aeris to Tony, and helped Bill Dudleston set them up with the Wavelaunch DSP processor. Tony ended up liking the Aeris system so much, that he sold his long-time reference speakers (Vandersteen 5As) and bought the Aeris review pair. So, good news, I didn't have to make another trip to pick up a 300 lb pair of Aeris speakers! :-)

The full TAS review can be found here: http://legacyaudio.com/images/uploads/reviews/Legacy_Aeris_Speaker__TAS_Review_Golden_Ear_Award.pdf

Here are some quotes from the review:

Legacy Aeris Review- “The Avatar of What the Next Generation of Speakers Should Be”
Review Date: August 2013
Publication: The Absolute Sound
Reviewer: Anthony H. Cordesman

"The Legacy Aeris is the avatar of what the next generation of speakers should be."

“It is a truly full-range speaker, with bass deep into the subwoofer region, outstanding performance at every frequency to the limits of hearing and beyond, excellent definition, outstanding dynamics, and a visual image that might win it an entry to the Museum of Modern Art in New York.”

"The Legacy Aeris is not a speaker as much as a system for ensuring the speaker can be adjusted to solve room-speaker interaction problems in a musically realistic way. This is the single most important area for advances in high-end audio, and Bill Dudleston (Legacy president) has pushed further into this area than any designer I’m aware of to date."

"I’ve had some great speakers in my listening rooms over the years, but I have never been able to get around so many room-interaction problems. The difference is striking."

“The Aeris reproduced the midrange of my best piano and violin recordings seamlessly and with the kind of accuracy that is sometime missing in even the most expensive competition.”

“…I have not heard better top-octave sound at any price.”

"…the Aeris will reproduce all of the bass detail that is actually on even the most demanding bass spectaculars. Saint-Saens, the deepest organ music, Kodo drums, Telarc bass spectaculars, bass guitar, synthesizer- take your pick. The Aeris not only provides great bass detail, it does so more evenly throughout the room."

“Working with the dealer to tailor the setup while you are actually listening to music makes a critical difference.”

“…you may well hear even more detail than you thought was on the recording."

"The Legacy Aeris is a speaker that helps redefine the state of the art.”

In the end, TAS awarded the Legacy Aeris the coveted Golden Ear Award!!!

The Golden Ear Award is awarded to "references that have withstood the test of time" & "newfound favorites destined to become classics."

Needless to say, orders for the Aeris are VERY strong at the Legacy factory these days. :-)
Edited by DMark1 - 8/27/13 at 1:18pm
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