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How fast does your network have to be to stream 1080p videos smoothly? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by smino View Post

What is the best software for streaming to the xbox x360 (linux/windows)?
I have .ISO, .xvid, .mkv, .wmv .mp4 .avi and .m4a files, and which ones stream the best surround sound?

Maybe you should ask this question in the XBox forum. You're likely to get less smartassery in the responses.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by smino View Post

What is the best software for streaming to the xbox x360 (linux/windows)?
I have .ISO, .xvid, .mkv, .wmv .mp4 .avi and .m4a files, and which ones stream the best surround sound?

Not sure what is best for sound, but TVersity hasn't failed me in any capacity in the software department. I recommend trying that.
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmonkeee View Post

Maybe you should ask this question in the XBox forum. You're likely to get less smartassery in the responses.

Oh hell, was that a green light on smartassery? I missed my chance
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by smino View Post

What is the best software for streaming to the xbox x360 (linux/windows)?
I have .ISO, .xvid, .mkv, .wmv .mp4 .avi and .m4a files, and which ones stream the best surround sound?

TVersity is a good choice if you have a variety of files, since it can be set up to transcode stuff to something the 360 can accept. I personally use either the Zune Player or Windows Media 11, but I rarely want to play anything other than .mov, mp4 and .wmv files.

You cannot play surround sound from anything other than VC-1 files (WMV). MPEG-4 and H.264/AVC clips are limited to low-complexity 2 channel sound encodings. See the article here about support for various formats.
post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by brakel View Post

Wireless does not have enough bandwidth to stream 1080p. A Gig network should handle it.

I stream 1080p trailers/clips via wireless and it works just fine , have not tried an entire movie as of yet however . I am using an external ethernet to wireless converter from Buffalo (20g PS3 so no built in WiFi) .

* Obviously these are not raw blu ray streams but making a blanket statement that 1080p cannot be streamed via wireless is simply not accurate .

- Jason
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by diceburna View Post

DLink DGL-4300 (4 Gb ports/ 108 Mb wireless thru turbo mode)

I used the DGL4300 for over a year and now the DGL4500. They both work very well.

I've never had a problem streaming 1080P over regular wireless G(non turbo mode) and I certainly don't have any problems over Wireless N with my DGL4500.

But also the majority of my 40 network devices are on my wired gigabit network.
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emotep View Post

What's the point of wiring your PS3 and PC and using the PS3 as a media hub though?

If they are close enough to be wired, that would mean that your PC is close enough to your TV to hook it up to it anyways, so why bother?

You know that they do make rather long ethernet cables, right?

Every stationary networked device in my house gets wired ethernet. It is simply superior.
post #38 of 45
Its odd that 6 months ago I ran into this very topic. My 1080p movies would stutter like hell over the network but 72p would work fine. I got around this by using MK2VOB then copying over the large files to the PS3 HD. The largest file I copied to the PS3 was 35 gig and it took forever but most 10-15 gig movies aren't to bad.

After the recent FW update came out a few days ago, for shits n giggles I tried to stream a 1080p movie and it worked fine. I was shocked so i tested out other movies that previously failed and to my surprise they work! Not sure if this is due to the PS3 FW or newer version of TVersity.
post #39 of 45
Can i load the .mkv file on to a thumb drive and play them direct? If so, how do I browse to the Thumb drive from the XMB? THanks~
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JF7FSU View Post

Can i load the .mkv file on to a thumb drive and play them direct? If so, how do I browse to the Thumb drive from the XMB? THanks~

No. The PS3 doesn't understand the mkv container.
post #41 of 45
actualy, cat5 to my knowledge and personal experience that you can run up to 50 ft reliably before droppage. Problem is when you run a cable that long it is possible for the cable to drop network packets which lessens the connection quality. Which is what happened to my buddy when he has a 50ft network cable and could not get the xbox to connect on live whereas wireless worked to perfection.

Now if you run a gigabit switch over cat 5 your still using 10/100. CAT5 has a bandwidth threshold so if you use CAT5 on a gigabit switch or router that cable may not able to transfer HD movies as easily whereas CAT6 could. Cat6 cables are rated for 10/100/1000 which is the standard for a gigabit network. Obviously still backward compatible with 10/100. This is why Sony ships with the PS3 a CAT6 cable because the PS3 has a gigabit network card.
post #42 of 45
I have D-link and get Nat 2 on my PS3. I tried streaming some 1080p .mkv files and they stutter badly over my wireless. I have the DSl Extreme 6mbps D/L speed.

Regular DivX, Xvid and WMV work fine. My router is about 25 feet from the PS3. ANy suggestions short of a wired network?
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by amb7247 View Post

actualy, cat5 to my knowledge and personal experience that you can run up to 50 ft reliably before droppage. Problem is when you run a cable that long it is possible for the cable to drop network packets which lessens the connection quality. Which is what happened to my buddy when he has a 50ft network cable and could not get the xbox to connect on live whereas wireless worked to perfection.

Now if you run a gigabit switch over cat 5 your still using 10/100. CAT5 has a bandwidth threshold so if you use CAT5 on a gigabit switch or router that cable may not able to transfer HD movies as easily whereas CAT6 could. Cat6 cables are rated for 10/100/1000 which is the standard for a gigabit network. Obviously still backward compatible with 10/100. This is why Sony ships with the PS3 a CAT6 cable because the PS3 has a gigabit network card.

Cat5(it's not even made anymore) can have problems but Cat5e has no problems running gigabit at 100 meters in length. We've never had any problems running a gigabit connection over cat5E at close to 330 feet(100 meters) at work. And i've been running a gigabit network over cat5e at home since 2001 with no problems.
And also some of the cat5 cable that was made to higher specs, before cat5e came out, also will have no problems with gigabit speeds at up to 100 meters.
We use a Fluke tester at work to test the various cables(cat5 , cat5e and cat6) to make sure it can run at the gigabit speeds. If the cable passes the various tests, then they always have no problem running at gigabit speeds.
Cat5e and cat6 cables will always pass(since the gigabit spec was designed for that cable) it's the cat5 cables that will be questionable until we test it to make sure it's OK.
post #44 of 45
....Most HD runs @ 1.5Mbps on download....LMAO! If your internet connection is reliable (throw out your crappy 0.5Mbps upload at&t DSL modem), then, you should be fine. However, if you are having WiFi issues, you should try and troubleshoot this by placing the computer closer to the access point or running a continuous ping to your gateway to verify if it's the computer's wireless card, WiFi access point, the router or something wrong with your internet connection. If it's the access point, try changing the encryption and the SSID. You want to be running WPA-PSKv1 or WPA-PSKv2. These encryption methods are way more secure and have a higher, more reliable throughput than WEP. To test your internet connection directly connect your computer to your modem/router (make sure to disable the WiFi on the modem before starting the test) and try streaming. If you are connected directly to your modem and you are still having issues and if you are running any service that is supposed to be faster than DSL, then, call your ISP and find out why they suck. biggrin.gif:D:D
post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB01138 View Post

....Most HD runs @ 1.5Mbps on download....LMAO!
Wow! Reviving a thread that's been dead for four years!

And providing misinformation in it. I don't know of any service providing 1.5 Mbps video at HD resolutions and certainly it's not "most". Amazon HD is 2.5 Mbps, Netflix has 720p video at 2.35 and 3.6 Mbps and 1080p at 4.8 Mbps (both minus 192 Kbps stereo or 384 Kbps 5.1 sound); I forget the bitrate range of VUDU's 720p encodes, but their 1080p encodes run 4.5 to 9 Mbps. Microsoft's Xbox Video run 10 Mbps at 1080p.
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