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What I'd do differently next time. - Page 10

post #271 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyd4r View Post

2 words.

drop ceiling.

Are you saying you wish you would have done a drop ceiling?
post #272 of 814


Not listen to my mom complain about me having too many wires in my room.

That's not MY setup but that's similar to what it looks like.
post #273 of 814
Rockem Sockem Robots!!
post #274 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Factor V View Post

Are you saying you wish you would have done a drop ceiling?


Yes.. =)
post #275 of 814
still reading through this thread, so I don't know if this has been mentioned before:

I'd buy a nail gun

I'd watch a drywall pro do a ceiling before I attempted it

I'd read drywallschool.com sooner

I'd not be intimidated by HVAC (it's pretty easy)

I'd spend more time planning

I'd get more active on AVS earlier

One thing I'd do over again is to buy a miter (drop) saw at the beginning of the project
post #276 of 814
this just shows how new i was to all of this, but absolutely make sure all your framing is 16" apart. when you find a water problem and have to rip everything out, don't put it back "close enough", make sure it's exactly on 16's. when you have an irregular wall where you can do it all 16.5" apart and make it even, do it on 16's and use the extra studs.

basically, i knew sheet rock and everything else would be easier if it was all on 16's, but i had no idea how much trouble it saved all the way through trim work when it all fits together as it's supposed to. by far the worst short cut/rookie mistake i made.

also, get yourself a combo pack with a pancake compressor, framing gun, and finish nail gun, and a miter saw.

and don't be afraid to spend a few extra bucks to upgrade from, say, B&D or skill to dewalt. definitely worth it in the long run when you're trying to finish up the project with a tool that's barely still working.

and like others are saying, don't be intimidated...anyone can do this stuff. i started my complete basement finishing project with dedicated theater with only a hammer and a $15 b&d corded drill (and that's all i knew how to use...never even used a power saw before). the info in this forum is pretty amazing. you probably won't mistake my work for a professional's, but i never would have had the 10's of thousands of dollars to hire this out. instead, i took my time studying this site and designing exactly what i wanted, bought materials as i needed them, and learned as i went. finishing the sheet rock was probably the worst. definitely hire someone for that if you can.
post #277 of 814
So far, so good with a dedicated 16' wide by 22' deep theater withsn equipment room. I put LOTS of power in the equipment room. Even if you're not a gamer, put power inside the theater too. I though I was being so smart not to have plugs in the theater. What the heck do I need with plugs when I'm watching a movie? Well, the first time you have to run an extension cord to power you callibration computer you'll feel like a dolt!
post #278 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by agnathra View Post

also, get yourself a combo pack with a pancake compressor, framing gun, and finish nail gun, and a miter saw.

and don't be afraid to spend a few extra bucks to upgrade from, say, B&D or skill to dewalt. definitely worth it in the long run when you're trying to finish up the project with a tool that's barely still working.

AMEN TO BOTH.

I personally love dewalt tools and have never had one fail on me.
post #279 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forseti View Post

AMEN TO BOTH.

I personally love dewalt tools and have never had one fail on me.

+1 to both. Same. Lots of yellow in my workshop.
post #280 of 814
We bought new furniture for the house before the theater was constructed. I bought the Quest sectional from lazyboy and did not realize it was 15' long. Room was 13.5' wide. So I had to position the room the wrong way for accoustics so I could fit the couch.

Moral: Plan the room then buy the furniture!
post #281 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by helmsman View Post

Nathan - why don't you zoom it in a little to lose the small black bars on the top and bottom? Your screen frame or border will mask out the added spill on the sides but the picture loss in inconsequential (IMHO) and that way you still get a clean picture all the way to your frame edges. I agree with you on the 2.40:1 vs 2.35:1 screen size though.

I'm about to order my screen but am confused about 2.35 or 2.40. Scouring the forum I learned that the correct ratio is 2.36. Here's the basis:

16:9 is 1.78 (16/9 = 1.7777777)

Expanding the image by a third gives 2.36 (1.76 + 33%).

Not to split hairs but should I get a 2.35 or a 2.40 screen? I really don't want to deal with bars at the top/bottom and don't want to zoom unnecessarily to avoid the bars.

Thanks,
~hemster
post #282 of 814
Pretty sure you want 2.4, as all BD is 2.4, but ask in something like the Stewart thread.
post #283 of 814
Definitely 2.40. I have a 2.35:1 screen and almost always end up with a small black bar on DVDs and Blu-ray discs of widescreen movies since most are really 2.40:1.
post #284 of 814
To do differently ... I would have framed my front "wall" to accomodate the center channel better. I have a "fake" wall for the screen, with LCR behind the GOM cloth. I framed the wall w/ 2x2's ... but I used a 2x2 right in the middle of the wall where the center channel should be. So I had to put the center channel off center and angled

Next time I would frame the wall to accomodate placement of the hidden center channel.
post #285 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by imarkup View Post

To do differently ... I would have framed my front "wall" to accomodate the center channel better. I have a "fake" wall for the screen, with LCR behind the GOM cloth. I framed the wall w/ 2x2's ... but I used a 2x2 right in the middle of the wall where the center channel should be. So I had to put the center channel off center and angled

Wouldn't that be something you could fix moderately easily? Maybe just move 2 supports to either side of where the center would sit?
post #286 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papajin View Post

Wouldn't that be something you could fix moderately easily? Maybe just move 2 supports to either side of where the center would sit?

I am considering that. But I got a little over-zealous with the staple gun when I stapled the GOM fabric to the 2x2's. I am just a little concerned about ripping the fabric if I try to take our the staples. And since I have a "seam" in the middle of the wall (this is where the 2 pieces of GOM come together), I am not really sure what to do with the seam.

I think the verticle "seam" in the dead-center of the front wall is the basis of my whole mistake. What do others do about the seams? Do you use 2 seams, with 3 verticle GOM strips?
post #287 of 814
build from scratch ...
post #288 of 814
Here are some of the lost posts...
Quote:


from bmwracer3:
Wish i would have put in isolation clips, at least in the ceiling and made sure the walls were decoupled from the ceiling too.
Wish i would have built my basement with 9' walls (that's a huge one)
wish i would have understood/thought through how to put the outlets & speakers in pillars instead of cutting holes in my aquarium

that all being said, sound isolation in my theater is pretty dang good, so the only real regret is the 9' wall option.
__________________
~chris


Quote:


from damnsam77
Quote:


originally posted by bmwracer3
wish i would have built my basement with 9' walls (that's a huge one)..............so the only real regret is the 9' wall option.

well thats a really big "wish i would have done" item.....many people move into existing preowned homes and the ones that move into a new construction home never think about the 9 foot ceilings unless its brought up by the home builder sales person. And it costs a ton of money, on a 1500 sqft basement, it will cost you more than 15,000 to add that as an option prior to construction. And even then, then end up really screwing you by running waste pipes and hvac ductwork across your joists taking another foot off your ceiling clearance, so you really end up with 8 foot ceilings with soffits....unless the designated home theater room does not have any ceiling obstructions (no pipes, air ducts..etc) or if the builders are nice enough to run their waste pipes and ducts on the sides and corners rather than in the middle of your friggin room!!

Can you tell i am angry and bitter about this whole thing? Yes because i had to build a giant soffit in the center of my ome theater that dropped by ceiling height to 7ft, the giant 8ft by 15ft soffit covers all my immovable hvac and waste pipes!!! So if i ever were to move into a brand new home, i will be sure to shadow these contractors on a regular basis to make sure they dont take any "shortcuts" when building out the basement,

Quote:


bmwracer3 wrote:
Quote:


originally posted by damnsam77
well that's a really big "wish i would have done" item.....many people move into existing preowned homes and the ones that move into a new construction home never think about the 9 foot ceilings unless its brought up by the home builder sales person. And it costs a ton of money, on a 1500 sq ft basement, it will cost you more than 15,000 to add that as an option prior to construction. And even then, then end up really screwing you by running waste pipes and hvac duct work across your joists taking another foot off your ceiling clearance, so you really end up with 8 foot ceilings with soffits....unless the designated home theater room does not have any ceiling obstructions (no pipes, air ducts..etc) or if the builders are nice enough to run their waste pipes and ducts on the sides and corners rather than in the middle of your friggin room!!

Can you tell i am angry and bitter about this whole thing? Yes because i had to build a giant soffit in the center of my home theater that dropped by ceiling height to 7ft, the giant 8ft by 15ft soffit covers all my immovable hvac and waste pipes!!! So if i ever were to move into a brand new home, i will be sure to shadow these contractors on a regular basis to make sure they don't take any "shortcuts" when building out the basement,

oi! I guess you are a little upset. When i built my house (10/04-04/05) they only wanted $4300 for the 9' option, and that's on a 1500 sq ft basement too. There are two steel beams that run lengthwise in my house, and they put all the hvac between those (about 12'). I have a truss system for the joists, so all the gas/electrical/plumbing is run up in the joist space so finishing the ceiling was pretty easy. I'm very thankful for that hearing how much some of the people on here have to fight things.


Quote:


dennis erskine wrote:
If you're going to have 9' basement (or do have) and have a space you want allocated for a home theater, you must tell them that you want 9' clear. Worst case, you want 9' clear but will allow 8' clear within 12" of a wall or partition. Make that a condition of your contract.

Ending up with 7' is unacceptable ... What was it going to be...6' normally? That's nuts.

Quote:


damnsam77 wrote:
Quote:


originally posted by dennis erskine
if you're going to have 9' basement (or do have) and have a space you want allocated for a home theater, you must tell them that you want 9' clear. Worst case, you want 9' clear but will allow 8' clear within 12" of a wall or partition. Make that a condition of your contract.

Ending up with 7' is unacceptable ... What was it going to be...6' normally? That's nuts.

well i didnt have a choice with my basement, the house was built in 2003 and we bought it when we moved to denver last summer. At the time, i had zero knowledge about room construction, and wasnt remotely thinking about doing a theater anytime soon. But i do agree, contractors and home builders try their best to screw you out of finishing your basement by doing everything possible to make their job easier and faster and your life miserable. They go through building these houses so quickly that you seldome get a perfectly clear basement ceiling. It would be half decent if they atleast go the extra mile to ensure all duct and pipe runs go along side the walls within a 12" clearance where you can simply soffit around. Soffits always looks good in a home theater anyways.

But trust me, next brand new home i buy, or preowned home, i will make sure to take my tape measure and atleast guarantee an 8ft ceiling height all around the basement perimeter.
post #289 of 814
I must have lucked out. In my 2,100 sqft basement the builder only charged me $1,200 to make it 9ft deep. How they did it was dig a regular depth basement then build up around the sill about 12" with wood framing. So my house looks a little taller since the basement starts about 2ft above ground. Saved me a TON of money.
post #290 of 814
My 9' ceilings in the 1200 sqft basement cost me $4k - worth every penny. There seems to be a huge variance in the cost of a higher ceiling on lower levels. If I were building again I would look into open web joist systems for the floors - no bulkheads and easy to run mechanicals and fish wires through later.
post #291 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by yaj123 View Post

I must have lucked out. In my 2,100 sqft basement the builder only charged me $1,200 to make it 9ft deep. How they did it was dig a regular depth basement then build up around the sill about 12" with wood framing. So my house looks a little taller since the basement starts about 2ft above ground. Saved me a TON of money.

Definitely money well spent, even at twice the price.
post #292 of 814
Seating... I went with the Berkline 45004 quad in a curve configuration. I love the curve for the front row, but if I were to do it all again, I'd go with a straight quad in the rear.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...1#post14575760
post #293 of 814
Hi. I learned a lot on AVS and want to offer my tidbit back on what I'd do differently next time: Make sure that a rear-mounted projector is high enough so that players standing in the room playing a Nintendo Wii will not be in the path of the projector's image! A rear shelf-mounted PJ that assumes all members of the audience is sitting down may not work. I was lucky in that the projector is high enough and close enough that Wii players don't interfere with the projector. I only realized this near the end of construction. Hope this helps, Peter
post #294 of 814
1. Put in my own A/C returns. After seeing what the contractor did for $200, I could have done in the same time for $30. I did get a really nice vent cover though.
2. Don't bother running 5-RCA component cable to the projector. What would I use the 2 audio RCAs for anyways? My A/V buddy had a good laugh at my expense after pointing that out. He's right, of course. Cheaper and smaller in the smurf tube to boot.
post #295 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpts View Post

Hi. I learned a lot on AVS and want to offer my tidbit back on what I'd do differently next time: Make sure that a rear-mounted projector is high enough so that players standing in the room playing a Nintendo Wii will not be in the path of the projector's image! A rear shelf-mounted PJ that assumes all members of the audience is sitting down may not work. I was lucky in that the projector is high enough and close enough that Wii players don't interfere with the projector. I only realized this near the end of construction. Hope this helps, Peter

Good point! When I play High Velocity Bowling on the PS3, I ahve to stand a bit off to the side. Since bowling is less than 1% of the use of my HT, it's not a big deal to me, but if you are an avid Wii'er, it could be.
post #296 of 814
Another thing I would do differently next time, is use "Adjustable" boxes for all my loutlet boxes including dual outlets, sconces, low voltage boxes (speakers). If you are planning to do more than one single layer of 1/2" drywall (whether its 5/8" DD with GG and/or acoustic treatment with 1" or 2" furring strips), I would highly recommend planning ahead of time by installing adjustable boxes that can normally come out up to 1.75" after Drywall is up.

If you are like me, and its too late for you and you already have the standard boxes installed, just get 1" or 1.5" mudrings to extend the box out. Its just extra work you wouldnt need to do if you plan things right from the get go.
post #297 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpts View Post

Hi. I learned a lot on AVS and want to offer my tidbit back on what I'd do differently next time: Make sure that a rear-mounted projector is high enough so that players standing in the room playing a Nintendo Wii will not be in the path of the projector's image! A rear shelf-mounted PJ that assumes all members of the audience is sitting down may not work. I was lucky in that the projector is high enough and close enough that Wii players don't interfere with the projector. I only realized this near the end of construction. Hope this helps, Peter

I would have the same problem with my celing mounted projector even though its 15' back along with the front chairs that are 13'. Anyone standing in front of the front chairs would be in the path of the image.
post #298 of 814
There are a number of little things I'd do differently (extra money to turn off HT lights from the universal remote), but the biggest mistake I made was wasting my time and money by engaging Rives Audio. I ended up not using anything from their plan -- Bryan Pape gave me much more useful and more accurate information when I bought materials from him at sensiblesoundsolutions.com

More info on Rives at: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1054758
post #299 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by zmisst View Post

(extra money to turn off HT lights from the universal remote)

It's not that much money to do this with Insteon. Their IR-Linc has an IR receiver that a universal remote can send commands to. So... roughly $100 for the IR-Linc and $50 for each set of lights you want to control.
post #300 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq View Post

It's not that much money to do this with Insteon. Their IR-Linc has an IR receiver that a universal remote can send commands to. So... roughly $100 for the IR-Linc and $50 for each set of lights you want to control.

Except Insteon is horribly unreliable (either in X10 mode or wireless mode, although X10 mode is more reliable, but not really the point).

You'd think someone would invent a retrofit-lighting system that actually worked!
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