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What I'd do differently next time. - Page 23

post #661 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

Pay someone to do the drywall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

I just can't justify paying someone $800 to do the drywall.

Do you typically disagree with yourself like this?
post #662 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq View Post

You can if you've ever done it yourself. If you haven't done it yourself I'd get someone to mud it for you at least. But that's just me.

No but my dad has done it many times.
post #663 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Do you typically disagree with yourself like this?

The topic is "What I would do different Next Time" not "What I wish I would have done different this time."

NEXT time I will justify the cost.
post #664 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

No but my dad has done it many times.

Cool! I'd take advantage of that! Nice father/son thing too... and as I'm sure he reminds you, "you might learn something from your old man..."
post #665 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepyourgameup View Post

Very true, however, when the lights go down nobody will see the drywall.

While this "may" be true good luck trying to sell that house with that shady drywall job. May I suggest showing the house in the dark with the lights off??
post #666 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

While this "may" be true good luck trying to sell that house with that shady drywall job. May I suggest showing the house in the dark with the lights off??

They would probably be more concerned with the fact that the basement windows are covered by drywall and there is a permanent riser in the room.
post #667 of 814
My first of i am sure many...I was very excited to have the my new hd250 installed however,, after the wife saw the "big black box" sticking down from her pretty clean ceiling, we are now having to move it! I will try to post pictures later. The black extension pole drops the pj down 10" (from 8'6" ceiling ) below the soffit. It does stick out a bunch. So I am moving the unit forward a foot so it will be right on the soffit.

For those new to projection systems, I would be sure during design phase that the bigness of the pj is considered. It is killing me to have to wait another week before we can fire it up!
post #668 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsony View Post

My first of i am sure many...I was very excited to have the my new hd250 installed however,, after the wife saw the "big black box" sticking down from her pretty clean ceiling, we are now having to move it! I will try to post pictures later. The black extension pole drops the pj down 10" (from 8'6" ceiling ) below the soffit. It does stick out a bunch. So I am moving the unit forward a foot so it will be right on the soffit.

For those new to projection systems, I would be sure during design phase that the bigness of the pj is considered. It is killing me to have to wait another week before we can fire it up!

So, then, I gather that under the heading of "What I'd do differently next time", your short version would be "Don't get married."?

I kid, I kid. Wives are great.
post #669 of 814
I built my theater 7 or 8 years ago and was all set to go LCD. Had everything measured out for that little box. Towards the end of construction a Barco CRT fell in my lap and is still on the ceiling today. More than 3 ft long and weighs about 170 pounds. But I'm ready when I finally upgrade my projector!
post #670 of 814
I got this idea after talking to my flooring installer and deciding to put new speaker wire for an 11.2 system AFTER the walls were up:
Use 12 gauge speaker wire as spacers to lift the baseboards up by about a 1/4" from the floor when you install the baseboards. This is best done before the carpet is in. This space will allow you to stuff speaker wire in the gap and run it all around the perimeter of your theater without unsightly wires running on walls/ceilings.
post #671 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by 0o0o0 View Post

But the inside is plastic soft crappy cheap plastic and when that plastic starts to crack.. your done. How does it crack? well HDMI plugs lifespan is only on the amount of times you plug in and unplug.. my opinion from experience a pathetic 7 times. After that youve worn your HDMI cable down, bent a pin inside, or just merely weakened its strength.

While I will agree HDMI has its share of stupid bad issues which could have easily been resolved when it was designed, I have to wonder what you are doing to your cables to make them fail so quickly.

I have been using HDMI in my HTPC since it first appeared a few years back. Since a HTPC is simply a PC built for a specific task, I have moved, opened, upgraded, etc, the HTPC at least two dozen times in the last few years. This means I have removed the HDMI cable at least two dozen times. I have never had one fail.

There are two tricks with HDMI connectors. The first is to go on and off in an easy, level, straight path. If you twist or angle the connector it will surely fail quickly. Just be slow and careful and level...and you will have no problems. The second is to recognize that approaching it with dread and disgust will cause you to greatly increase your odds of damaging the connector. Think of it like doing any work while angry...your odds of failure greatly increase.

Conduit is a great idea, though. Future proof the path!
post #672 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by tony123 View Post

I just made one such change in my room. Getting the equipment rack out of the theater! It's been said many, many times on this thread, and I'll repeat it. I've now had the equipment in an adjacent room for only a week, but it has immediately changed the space in several ways. Mainly, it changed the character of the room. It lost some of that "home entertainment" feel. You know, a room with a big screen and a stack of lit up boxes.

Keep this one high on your priority list.

I am going to put my gear under the front of the stage. Air will be piped in and out of there for cooling, and the front of the stage will be dark frosted plexiglass lift up doors. This allows for easy access to the BR player, line of sight for the IR remote, etc. Also, I have no place to put an external equipment rack...unless I want to lose the space for the popcorn maker and minifridge!
post #673 of 814
? -for the best sound result, how high can the front speakers be? And if you put speakers inset next to the screeen how far should they be from the screens edge.
We are just planning now.
post #674 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belcherwm View Post

... Towards the end of construction a Barco CRT fell in my lap ...

Ouch!! That must've really hurt!

Next time make sure to secure it to the studs, and not just use drywall anchors!

Mike
post #675 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq View Post

So, then, I gather that under the heading of "What I'd do differently next time", your short version would be "Don't get married."?
I kid, I kid. Wives are great.

It took a while but you can see what happened here and in this case The Wife was right...the post sticking down from the ceiling did not give me much more distance to the screen than mounting onto the cove ceiling...We have enjoyed this set up.
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post #676 of 814
MUCH better location. Since it was almost at the point anyway, I concur with your wife's demand. You married a smart woman...keep her!
post #677 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsony View Post

It took a while but you can see what happened here and in this case The Wife was right...the post sticking down from the ceiling did not give me much more distance to the screen than mounting onto the cove ceiling...We have enjoyed this set up.

Good deal. My fiance' is a good HT instigator too. My pj has been gone for calibration and she really misses it. She's ready to write the vendor herself to get it back!
post #678 of 814
What I would do different. Sounds pretty obvious, but leave wires longer than you need. A couple times I have ended up with not as much cable as I would like, even though I thought I had enough run.
post #679 of 814
+1 ^

I will second that. When I was pulling wires, I thought I was being careful and not wasting wire. But later I realized that I was making things much tougher by not leaving extra "play" in my wire lengths. Professional electricians do generate a lot of waste, but they're a whole lot faster in getting the job done because they're not fighting short wire runs.
post #680 of 814
Still finishing up my theater but already found a few things. When you are ready to paint don't go to Lowes and ask for the blackest paint they can mix without checking a sample. They said "Very Black" was the blackest so I happily grabbed two gallons of flat and painted the ceiling and screen wall. The next day I went to get a gallon of satin to do the trim and asked for the blackest black again and the guy said "dark Kettle Black" was the blackest. At this point I knew I was going to have an issue. I called home and checked the can a told him to mix "very black" as I already had it painted. I pulled the two samples and sure enough "very black" had a strong blue base. I used the satin "very black" on the trim and finished up but the blue was becoming more pronounced especially after I added the DMD black sound panels. It bothered me enough that I went to home depot and picked up two more gallons a "mouse ears" in flat and another gallon in satin for the trim. 6 gallons of paint and 300 feet of tape later and I am tired but happy. Lesson learned, always check the sample...

I am amazed at how much better the mouse ears absorb the camera flash compared to the "very black"
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post #681 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by tony123 View Post

There's no substitute for living with something. Well, having professional experience is, but we don't all have that.

I just made one such change in my room. Getting the equipment rack out of the theater! It's been said many, many times on this thread, and I'll repeat it. I've now had the equipment in an adjacent room for only a week, but it has immediately changed the space in several ways. Mainly, it changed the character of the room. It lost some of that "home entertainment" feel. You know, a room with a big screen and a stack of lit up boxes.

Keep this one high on your priority list.

I could not agree more. I build homes and have done 5 TR's so far, each being an improvement from the previous one. I use Logitech's RF remote and put the equipment in a separate room. A separate room makes it easier to control the heat and lighting.

Mistakes:
I forgot a conduit to the secondary "in room" projector location.
I should have built (2) 45 degree walls at rear corners of room for better sound deflection.
I should have installed the return air high rather than low on the wall or into the ceiling.

Note that I did not have the curtains up at this time, but I strongly suggest heavy dark curtains on side walls, especially if it is a retro, for an inexpensive way of improving sound quality and control.
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post #682 of 814
Finished product:
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post #683 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by roknrol View Post

+1 ^

I will second that. When I was pulling wires, I thought I was being careful and not wasting wire. But later I realized that I was making things much tougher by not leaving extra "play" in my wire lengths. Professional electricians do generate a lot of waste, but they're a whole lot faster in getting the job done because they're not fighting short wire runs.

+2 Fortunately it was only two outlets that I cut a bit short but it was a pain to get my outlets wired
post #684 of 814
I'd look at my riser height a lot more carefully. I used calculators etc and came up with a riser height. But when loading the room next thing I know I'm lifting my screen(higher then desirable for first row) in order to allow back row to have unobstructed view.

And possibly looking at a solution to side speakers sticking out of wall. They're just waiting for someone to walk into them.

Planned lighting for riser before hand. Dark room. Dark carpet. Stairs are hard too see. And retrofitting after the fact sucks when I could have implemented whatever I wanted.
post #685 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haps View Post

I'd look at my riser height a lot more carefully. I used calculators etc and came up with a riser height. But when loading the room next thing I know I'm lifting my screen(higher then desirable for first row) in order to allow back row to have unobstructed view.

And possibly looking at a solution to side speakers sticking out of wall. They're just waiting for someone to walk into them.

Planned lighting for riser before hand. Dark room. Dark carpet. Stairs are hard too see. And retrofitting after the fact sucks when I could have implemented whatever I wanted.

How high is your riser?
post #686 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haps View Post

Planned lighting for riser before hand. Dark room. Dark carpet. Stairs are hard too see. And retrofitting after the fact sucks when I could have implemented whatever I wanted.

I just tucked a rope ling under the lip all the way around. Simple. Looks cool. Effective. Do it on the stairs too. Keeps klutzes from braining themselves in the dark.
post #687 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haps
I'd look at my riser height a lot more carefully. I used calculators etc and came up with a riser height. But when loading the room next thing I know I'm lifting my screen(higher then desirable for first row) in order to allow back row to have unobstructed view.

And possibly looking at a solution to side speakers sticking out of wall. They're just waiting for someone to walk into them.

Planned lighting for riser before hand. Dark room. Dark carpet. Stairs are hard too see. And retrofitting after the fact sucks when I could have implemented whatever I wanted.
Similarly important is riser depth. I went with five feet and most chairs want six feet of space to fully recline.
post #688 of 814
My first mistake - not using larger jack studs (ie. 2x8's) for my door frame to accommodate a)the double drywall, and b)the 2" of extra width for my acoustic treatments. This is only important if you want a standard projection hinge to let you be able to open the door 180-degrees (ie. flat against the wall). Luckily I can still cut the drywall back and replace them without too much pain....
post #689 of 814
What would I do different when building my HT?

1. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
2. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
3. I would have wired my HT for transducers. Having to go back and pull these was a PITA. I think I wasted around 5 hours or more this weekend pulling them and another day itching at the insulation in my skin. Pulling these wires before the wallboard was up would have made life easier. Additionally, I would have been able to install the transducers six months ago when they arrived.
4. Bought a bigger house with a larger unfinished room to build me HT. Actually, since I wanted to be on the water, it wasn't an option, but a 9' x 17' room is as small as you can get for a HT, IMHO. It works, but barely.
5. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
post #690 of 814
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterB123 View Post
What would I do different when building my HT?

1. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
2. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
3. I would have wired my HT for transducers. Having to go back and pull these was a PITA. I think I wasted around 5 hours or more this weekend pulling them and another day itching at the insulation in my skin. Pulling these wires before the wallboard was up would have made life easier. Additionally, I would have been able to install the transducers six months ago when they arrived.
4. Bought a bigger house with a larger unfinished room to build me HT. Actually, since I wanted to be on the water, it wasn't an option, but a 9' x 17' room is as small as you can get for a HT, IMHO. It works, but barely.
5. I would have researched on the internet and found this site.
It's not small, it's intimate.
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