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What I'd do differently next time. - Page 26

post #751 of 816
The contractor has done it again! Here's some advice from our perspective.

In the Contractor's defense...yes, we are out there to make money. BUT, if the contractor is serious about building his business and not wanting to spend a high percentage of his time selling himself to get a job, he WILL have the customer's best interest at heart. His jobs should be sold by his reputation. Very few people are happy when they get the bill. Usually, the sticker shock dissipates once the client moves back in and realizes that, "that widget is exactly where it should be and everything works. AND, their friends are impressed!" And with a little grim, they realize that they don't have horror stories to share at parties about what the they found after the contractor left or what they should have done. When you go to medical specialist, you go to the best one that you can afford. Wait. I'm in Canada, so the best one costs the same as the novice...nothing. My advice is to ask to see previous jobs done by the contractor and talk to the home owners about the good and the bad. And make sure the contractor has experience in the specific type of work you need done, or have experts who are. Talk to the building inspector about his experience with that contractor. They know who is good and who needs to be watched.

The market is full of wood butchers and scoundrels. I'm sure Toronto is no different from any other settlement, where anybody with a hammer and lack of other employment fancies them self a contractor.

If you are doing new construction it is much easier to establish a ballpark price than if you are building into an existing structure, especially if work has been done there before. Building booms are the worst time to have any work done because you often have to settle for an untried contractor without a pedigree. This is when the opportunists get work because you can't find any body else. The good guys are generally the ones still working when the market is slow.

I too work strictly on a T&M basis as the GC or project manager. But, "most" of my sub-trades will be on the job on a "fixed price" basis or a fee schedule. Prices will vary depending on actual site conditions. Fair is fair. How can a contractor be expected to cover the cost for repairs to structure compromised and hidden by previous contractors or "home handymen" (Do It to Your self-ers)! I've been in the business for 30 years and still I can't believe some of the things I find! Try, 5 joists in a row that don't make it to the other end because of multiple holes cut for pipes in the previous 2 or 3 bathroom renos!!!

Ask the GC or contractor how he selects the subs for your job. This is a trick question. If the Contractor has been around, he won't be putting jobs out to tender, he will have a group that he works with. Not necessarily trades in his employment, as this adds to overhead that you will be paying a premium for. Personally, I believe that an independent sub understands that his reputation is only as good as his last job and will want to build his business with the contractor. As a "sub" instead of an "employee" he knows that he is more easily replaced if he doesn't perform to the contractor's "expectations". Also, and very important, is that he must be a team player. Sometimes he has to take the second or third best/easiest route, for example running wire, when he knows that a pipe has to go in a specific area. He knows that he won't be on the next job if he complicates things for others. But it is the contractor that sets the tone (ie. if corner cutting is tolerated). Three-way communication is imperative. The subs need to know expectations and critical details before they proceed with work in each area, they need to tell the contractor immediately if they encounter a problem and possibly most importantly, the client should be comfortable discussing even the most minute detail that they are not completely happy with, with the contractor whether in the drawings or finished work. Never mind the hair dresser, only the contractor actually knows for sure! A fresh set of eyes and an open discussion usually comes up with solutions for what had been compromises. Experienced trades are always happy to get some of the lime light when they can propose a fix that they may have seen before or come up with in your specific situation. Never underestimate a trade that takes pride in his work!!! You will be pleasantly surprised. I take pride in finding them, keeping them and having them on site.

Conversely, ask the contractor how long his trades have been with him. Subs won't work for a contractor that is constantly having problem, doesn't treat them with the respect that a quality trade deserves and has issues with money.

Understand that the GC should be working for YOU, but he must also protect his sub trades. If changes are made, the trade must still get paid for the work done. If the change was made by the homeowner...

Ask how the contractor deals with change orders. I don't bill for changes, only for work done and restocking fees, if charged by the supplier, which is rare, since they want my business. Obviously my time is covered discussing the change, but I don't see the logic in charging for an item if it was changed before any work was done on it. I do custom work and therefore expect things to change as the job progresses. Very few homeowners have the insight or "mental imaging" capability to understand or "see" what is on the drawings. Sadly, this includes too many architects, engineers and designers. In their defense, (aren't I diplomatic?) they are not on the renovation site on a daily basis, if at all, after the project starts, and have made many assumptions in preparing their drawings. The contractor should be there and can address problems as they are exposed. He is often in the best position to propose solutions, present them to the homeowner and or designer given his knowledge of existing site conditions. This is what you are paying for.

As far as the fear of T&M becoming, "Take your time and material". The work site should be a happy place. As the homeowner, find things to compliment workers on. It will put a smile on their face and let them know that you are appreciating what they are doing. If they are not doing something right, take it up with the contractor to deal with. Discuss concerns and problems before they become big and expensive. "Expensive" translates into stress on everybody and causes voices to get raised and other bad stuff. If you have made a mistake, own up to it! We already know who's mistake it is. The difference will be how everybody eagerly contributes to fix it. For you! Honesty is a two way street. Work on a happy site will not slow down, because every body wants to work for someone that acknowledges and appreciates them. If work appears to be slowing, step back and make sure that there isn't some issue being dealt with or that your impatience to get your place back isn't clouding your perception. Having renovation/construction work done on your home is ranked as one of the most stressful events in your life. Right up there with having a baby, moving and not having money. Breath!
post #752 of 816
I've also decided I don't have a third DIY build in me, so at my age I will be hiring out most of the construction work. Now that I'm retired, I can spend as much time as it takes to supervise the contractors to make sure it gets done right. I'll still do the signal wiring and electronic installation myself. Also, this time I will go to a higher level of professional planning help -- Erskine Group's "Signature" level design package.
post #753 of 816
I am hoping I have one more build in me (I'm old enough to remember things like the Mercury & Gemini space programs).
Hopefully I will still "FEEL" young enough to carry out a DIY 2nd theater build, when we go with an empty-nester home in a few years.
(although I must concede - I hired out he drywall work for HT #1)
post #754 of 816
I should have signed up for a credit card that did flight miles, or some other rewards program, and made all purchases for the theater (and the home remodel) with that card. It didn't occur to me until very late in the project, and I could basically fly to Saturn on any major airline at this point if I had done that... ;-)
post #755 of 816
More room behind the screen wall. Not much else as I really planned it out for months and months. And that was about 7 years ago!
post #756 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebland View Post

More room behind the screen wall. Not much else as I really planned it out for months and months. And that was about 7 years ago!

How much did you leave and how much do you recommend?
post #757 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustMike View Post

I should have signed up for a credit card that did flight miles, or some other rewards program, and made all purchases for the theater (and the home remodel) with that card. It didn't occur to me until very late in the project, and I could basically fly to Saturn on any major airline at this point if I had done that... ;-)


.....yeah, but think about the baggage fees, they would have killed you.
post #758 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustMike View Post

I should have signed up for a credit card that did flight miles, or some other rewards program, and made all purchases for the theater (and the home remodel) with that card. It didn't occur to me until very late in the project, and I could basically fly to Saturn on any major airline at this point if I had done that... ;-)
I have a Sony card and basically am getting the new HW50ES for free!
post #759 of 816
Well theater is not quite done, but wife scheduled a basement/theater open house/Christmas party for the neighborhood.

Rushing to get everything done. Went to mount speakers with just hours to party time.
Speaker wires shrunk???!!!????

I swear I pulled the wires for the mains to above my head, but now they barely reached the mains 2' from the floor.
Worse yet, I had very little to spare for the surrounds. One surround was short 2 inches and I had to move it over to get the wire to reach. No time to find wire and splice in an extension.


Lesson learned Leave way more speaker wire at each end of the install than you think you need. I was cheap and trying to run it all 7 channels off of one 250' roll.


On the plus side: The un-calibrated, untreated (fabric walls up) sounded great at first listen as the first track was Master and Commander from the Blu-ray demo disks on this forum. I think I got hit by splintering wood as the cannon balls ripped through the ship.


P.S. The water heater sprung a leak that morning too. Setting back all of the setup activities 3 hours.
post #760 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbgonzomd View Post

I would buy a second tape measure. One for within the theater, the other for where the saws are. I could of cut a month off my project if I didn 't have to walk back and forth between locations looking for the tape measure.


(And, yes, I know they have a handy clip to attach it to your pants/belt, but this requires forethought prior to moving between rooms...and I have none.)

This made me laugh because I am having the exact same problem!tongue.gif
post #761 of 816
Im in the middle, well beginning, of a build now. But I cant stress enough buying good lumber. My 2x4s are crap from the box stores! I right now have all of my truck tie down synched tight to hold everything in place. Im hoping a few days help untwist the lumber before I put in the final screws.
post #762 of 816
Sorry, it will only get worse. If it is too much work to rebuild, you can try planing off any "twist" bumps with an electric planer - Be careful with the spinning blades!!! Bowed 2 x 4's can be cut about 2/3 through from the front, in the middle of a "bow" and pushed in (will close saw kurf) and put a screw/nail "toe nailed" to hold or pulled out (will open the saw kurf), put a shim into the saw kurf and toe nailed depending on whether stud is bowed out or in. Yes, this is as much work as it sounds. Use a straight edge; a 4"strip of 3/4 plywood, not one of your studs. smile.gif

TIP: If your studs are not absolutely perfect, make sure all the bows go the same way. If you are building a room within a room or ONE side is more critical, make the bow "bend" away from you. A hollow is always easier to fill or ignore, than plane off.

Using 5/8" drywall will also help smooth out a twisted wall. The heavier DW can support itself over some of the dips.

This is why I like supporting the "professional" Lumber yards. One that is busy. They are busy for a reason, they will probably have better quality material. At not much more, if anything. I have bought plywood at home cheapo that wasn't even square!!! They are strictly price driven.
post #763 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

Sorry, it will only get worse. If it is too much work to rebuild, you can try planing off any "twist" bumps with an electric planer - Be careful with the spinning blades!!! Bowed 2 x 4's can be cut about 2/3 through from the front, in the middle of a "bow" and pushed in (will close saw kurf) and put a screw/nail "toe nailed" to hold or pulled out (will open the saw kurf), put a shim into the saw kurf and toe nailed depending on whether stud is bowed out or in. Yes, this is as much work as it sounds. Use a straight edge; a 4"strip of 3/4 plywood, not one of your studs. smile.gif
TIP: If your studs are not absolutely perfect, make sure all the bows go the same way. If you are building a room within a room or ONE side is more critical, make the bow "bend" away from you. A hollow is always easier to fill or ignore, than plane off.
Using 5/8" drywall will also help smooth out a twisted wall. The heavier DW can support itself over some of the dips.
This is why I like supporting the "professional" Lumber yards. One that is busy. They are busy for a reason, they will probably have better quality material. At not much more, if anything. I have bought plywood at home cheapo that wasn't even square!!! They are strictly price driven.

heres two pics of the straps. Amazingly, the pulled them perfectly square. I had a straight board on top and this worked. Right now I just have these sitting here. I dont want to close the bottom of the soffit yet because of other work. Im hoping this helps twist it into place and ill leave these up until after I put up the bottom cross braces and screw them in.

LL

LL
post #764 of 816
Catching up on this thread made me think of something that I did do, and should pass along... Especially since it's that time of the year:

Keep copies of all your receipts during construction. Not just for the obvious reason. Sales tax is deductible (NOTE: This is mostly helpful only for those of us in the states without a state income tax), and any big project like a theater (or for me this year, a big backyard project), the sales tax adds up, and can easily surpass the 'estimated amount' you can itemize without receipts - and I suppose could pass even the state income taxes. Which also means you should then squirrel away every receipt during that year, as it will actually mean something!

(blah blah - consult your tax professional - IANAL blah blah blah biggrin.gif)
Edited by jautor - 1/7/13 at 6:19pm
post #765 of 816
Hi SnC
So it is just the bottom plate (horizontal) of the bulk head ("ladder") that is warped? If you get some steel studs cut to length (measure front of bulkhead to back side of beam less 1" - the 1" is 1/2" at each end so that the metal doesn't stick out and interfere with the Drywall.) cut the ends so that only a 3" length of the web is left (1 1/2" front and back faces are snipped off) and screw this "tab" to the underside of the plate and the underside of the beam. Do this at 4' intervals, given the short span. Not only will it keep the bulk head straight, but it will give you something to attach the drywall to. The 1 1/2 dimension is up out of the way and will give a bent edge to support all the wire without damage. Take your straps off and you don't have to wait.

I am assuming that the plate is level with the bottom of the beam. If it isn't, chalk a line on the stud wall, level with the bulkhead and use the 1 1/2 dimension to fasten to the side of the stud (snip off the web and one of the 1 1/2 faces. The steel stud stays oriented the same way. Obviously the length of the metal stud would be from the front of the bulkhead to the far side of the wall stud, less 1".

In either method put a "metal corner" (not a corner bead - it is a 7/8" x 1 3/8" 24 gauge bent piece of flat metal) attached to the wall, long side down, to catch the edge of the drywall from the underside of the bulkhead and the top of the wall to reinforce that joint.

I generally don't like framing with steel, but it can't be beat for strapping and reinforcing wood!

I see in the next picture that there are two air ducts. If the DW is spanning from the wall over the ducts to another "ladder". Was the first ladder really necessary? Or could you have attached a 2 x 2 to the wall?

Have a beer.
post #766 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

Hi SnC
So it is just the bottom plate (horizontal) of the bulk head ("ladder") that is warped? If you get some steel studs cut to length (measure front of bulkhead to back side of beam less 1" - the 1" is 1/2" at each end so that the metal doesn't stick out and interfere with the Drywall.) cut the ends so that only a 3" length of the web is left (1 1/2" front and back faces are snipped off) and screw this "tab" to the underside of the plate and the underside of the beam. Do this at 4' intervals, given the short span. Not only will it keep the bulk head straight, but it will give you something to attach the drywall to. The 1 1/2 dimension is up out of the way and will give a bent edge to support all the wire without damage. Take your straps off and you don't have to wait.

I am assuming that the plate is level with the bottom of the beam. If it isn't, chalk a line on the stud wall, level with the bulkhead and use the 1 1/2 dimension to fasten to the side of the stud (snip off the web and one of the 1 1/2 faces. The steel stud stays oriented the same way. Obviously the length of the metal stud would be from the front of the bulkhead to the far side of the wall stud, less 1".

In either method put a "metal corner" (not a corner bead - it is a 7/8" x 1 3/8" 24 gauge bent piece of flat metal) attached to the wall, long side down, to catch the edge of the drywall from the underside of the bulkhead and the top of the wall to reinforce that joint.

I generally don't like framing with steel, but it can't be beat for strapping and reinforcing wood!

I see in the next picture that there are two air ducts. If the DW is spanning from the wall over the ducts to another "ladder". Was the first ladder really necessary? Or could you have attached a 2 x 2 to the wall?

Have a beer.

The pictures doesn't really explain what my build is. I am removing all of the duct work in my house in exchange for mini splits. So where the straps are will be the only soffit soon. I just dont want to remove the old ducts until the new system is fulling operational.
post #767 of 816
If you have recessed cans or sconces along your side walls, consider putting the ones closest to the screen on their own zone so they can be controlled separately from the ones towards the middle and back of the room. For movies, I like all of them off, but for tv/sports, I would have liked to have my side soffit lights on at a low-moderate level, but the front-most cans cast too much light on the screen. I need to keep the sides off and compensate by having the rear soffit cans brighter than I would like.
post #768 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustMike View Post

I should have signed up for a credit card that did flight miles, or some other rewards program, and made all purchases for the theater (and the home remodel) with that card. It didn't occur to me until very late in the project, and I could basically fly to Saturn on any major airline at this point if I had done that... ;-)

Yup, I signed up for an Amazon Prime card, which my wife and use for everything, even other renovations around the house. Over the last two years we've racked up enough amazon points to buy an XPA-3 and a Pioneer SC-67 from Amazon. Plus we stream movies on Amazon anyway and as prime members, some of the movies are free!
post #769 of 816
I'm sure this might be somewhere in the last 26 pages...

But....

MAKE SURE YOU TEST ALL YOUR CABLES BEFORE YOU PUT THEM THROUGH THE WALL!!!!! Also run CAT6 everywhere, and try to have a pull string everywhere as well mad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

I completed my home theater yesterday, I mean COMPLETE, except for the carpeting... and then after massive amounts of troubleshooting, realized that the brand new aurum cable from amazon was defective!

Anyone else experience this?
post #770 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockmastr8 View Post

I'm sure this might be somewhere in the last 26 pages...

But....

MAKE SURE YOU TEST ALL YOUR CABLES BEFORE YOU PUT THEM THROUGH THE WALL!!!!! Also run CAT6 everywhere, and try to have a pull string everywhere as well mad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

I completed my home theater yesterday, I mean COMPLETE, except for the carpeting... and then after massive amounts of troubleshooting, realized that the brand new aurum cable from amazon was defective!

Anyone else experience this?

That's a bummer! Can you use the old in-wall cable to pull new cable through?
post #771 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockmastr8 View Post

I'm sure this might be somewhere in the last 26 pages...

But....

MAKE SURE YOU TEST ALL YOUR CABLES BEFORE YOU PUT THEM THROUGH THE WALL!!!!! Also run CAT6 everywhere, and try to have a pull string everywhere as well mad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

I completed my home theater yesterday, I mean COMPLETE, except for the carpeting... and then after massive amounts of troubleshooting, realized that the brand new aurum cable from amazon was defective!

Anyone else experience this?
I had an HDMI cable fail on me about 1 year into my theater being complete. Then, when I tried to use my pull-string, it must have gotten caught up in other cables and snapped. The best thing I had ever bought was some cable lubricant. I was able to squirt some into the conduit, work it to the trouble spot and free up the old hdmi cable. Using a standard wire fish tape, I was able to get a new HDMI cable to the projector. There was a lot of yelling and cussing involved, but it worked out in the end. smile.gif

What I learned from this was to run as many cables as possible OUTSIDE of the conduit while the walls/ceiling are open so that there is plenty of room in the conduit for new wires, if needed.
post #772 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq View Post

That's a bummer! Can you use the old in-wall cable to pull new cable through?

Negative... I have a custom star ceiling... and really high end wallpapered walls as well...
post #773 of 816
I've tested none of the cabling in my build and this is something that is on my mind. I'm hoping I can use any dead cable as a pull cable if one of them is bad. If not I'm going to be really really unhappy.
post #774 of 816
Another tip on pulling cable - pull about 6'-10' extra, even if you don't think you'll need it. I had some left over cat6 cable that I decided to run from my PJ location to the front of the room. I had just enough left to make it front to back and it seemed like there was plenty hanging down. After channel, double drywall and finish panels, there's only about 1.5' hanging now and it'll probably be too short if I actually need it. Thankfully it was an extra pull and my first pull has plenty of leeway, but for others that may be doing only one pull, make sure you have enough!
post #775 of 816
One thing I’d do differently is putty my woodwork before staining. I thought I’d match the stain afterwards but I didn’t get all the putty off (I had some gaps on the corner columns) and it really showed up after the poly was put on. In hindsight I would have color matched the putty, sanded, stained and then finished in that order.
post #776 of 816
This.
And take your time. If the budget allows, hire it out. If the budget really allows, do skim coat plaster & blue board. If done by a decent pro, it can give you buttery smooth walls and almost no visible imperfections.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsprance View Post

Here's some more after finishing my first tape/spackle job:


* use the paper tape, not the mesh. The paper tape takes a little longer to get the hang of but its a little easier to cover smoothly in the 2nd and third coats.


* do the least conspicuous wall first. you will get better as you go along. I was dumb enough to do the most prominent wall first.


* for the first coat of mud, water down the compound a little bit. It makes life so much easier. A pro taper suggested that to me.


* Wet the tape in water just before you put it up and try to get all the mud out from under it in one long smooth swipe. dont keep trying to make it better with more mud, you will make it worse. its good if you can still see the tape. 2nd and 3rd coats will take care of it.


* lightly sand (dont scrape) between coats.


* use the sponge sanders. Those pro sand blocks and screens dont give you a good feel.


*its the most boring and disgusting phase of the process. if you take your time you will be very happy when its all over.
post #777 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by design1stcode2nd View Post

One thing I’d do differently is putty my woodwork before staining. I thought I’d match the stain afterwards but I didn’t get all the putty off (I had some gaps on the corner columns) and it really showed up after the poly was put on. In hindsight I would have color matched the putty, sanded, stained and then finished in that order.
If you are filling defects in the joints? Yes fill them before sanding and staining with a material that will take the stain the same way as the wood, so that it doesn't stand out. You can add lines with a pen or pencil (test that won't get dissolved by the stain or other finishes) to extend grain patterns over patch to help it blend in. Some wood fillers are colour matched to a wood colour as a base colour and can be further stained with the "over-all" stain.
If you are just filling nail holes from installation of trim for example, this is usually done after the wood has been stained and varnished. The wood putty is matched to the final trim colour. Sometimes this means using 2 or 3 different putties, each coloured to match the specific grain being filled. The varnish finish will prevent the putty from getting into the grain of the surrounding wood as it can be cleaned away with your finger or cloth.
post #778 of 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelkilt View Post

This.
And take your time. If the budget allows, hire it out. If the budget really allows, do skim coat plaster & blue board. If done by a decent pro, it can give you buttery smooth walls and almost no visible imperfections.

If you have never done taping before and this is a room you will want to show off, hiring it out is hands down the best advice and worth the money...and you'll probably save time and definitely aggravation.

The reason you are adding a little water to the mud is that if the humidity is low and/or you aren't moving fast enough, the mud that you are trying to embed the tape into is surface drying. Any spots where the mud is drying will not stick to the tape, resulting in a bubble that will appear after the 2nd coat (before the 2nd coat dries, cut the tape on 3 sides of the bubble and apply a thin layer of mud and scrape with your knife to flatten. I have never seen a professional taper wet the tape with just water. I would imagine the air would have to be extremely dry! You need to be careful not to the make the tape so wet that it starts stretching. You are only adding water to the amount of mud used for embedding the tape (Yes, you may add a lesser amount of water to regular mud for the 3rd coat if you aren't using light mud to get a smoother edge). When taping, do not scrape all of the mud out from under the tape! The mud is what is gluing the tape to the board. Again you will get a bubble! Do not apply a coat of mud over the wet tape to try and speed things along. Scrap the tape with a 4" knife, using the profile of the tapered DW joint as a guide. The tape and underlying mud will dry and shrink tight to the Drywall surface. The 2nd coat goes on with a 6" knife which should ride on the face of the DW. With a little pressure and the proper flexible knife, you will leave this coat flat with the face of the DW and dry just below the plane of the face. The tape should be completely covered and protected from the sanding. Mud on wet tape will keep the tape from shrinking tight, leaving it close to the surface where it can be roughed-up with sanding and will always show through the paint as a rough spot. 3rd coat with a 10" trowel should bring the joint smooth with the plane of the DW face. Over troweling will start pulling the surface of the mud. If things start going wrong; stop and let it dry and put on another coat. When dry Feather the edges with a 6" knife or trowel with a tight (thin) coat and touch up any imperfections.

Too much sanding can damage the smooth paper surface of the DW. By not putting too much mud on in each coat, I get away without sanding at all between coats, hence minimizing the dusty mess. I will scrape with the next size knife/trowel in localized areas to get rid of a blob or ridge (let them dry!!! Trying to get rid of all of them when wet will make more mess). If you've made a bit of a mess, the sanding screen won't plug up like paper. Use 150 or 180 grit on your final sand. Carefully! wipe down or vacuum the surface (it is fragile and easily scratched) to minimize the loose dust and prime with DW primer. The primer will harden the mud coating and help protect it from scratches. It will also make any imperfections jump out. With a strong light shining obliquely across the wall fill and sand all the imperfections. Touching the dried patches with a fine sponge (an almost worn out sponge is best). I like the "low dust" mud for small jobs and repairs. I get a good surface out of it and very little dust in the air to fill the rest of the house.

Don't skimp on the dust mast; use an N-95 with TWO elastic straps, or a respirator if you are sensitive to dust; the one-elastic masks are a joke. Getting one with a valve will make it easier to breath and less tiring. My painter ended up with a rash from the Home Cheapo made-in-China masks. I buy 3M. So does he, now.wink.gif

The professional DW suppliers should have a "latex" coating that can be sprayed or rolled on to give a very tough scratch resistant surface close to plaster in feel. "Tough Hide" is the name of the product from CGC (now part of US Gypsum). Other manufacturers have similar products. Again the application of this product is best left to an experienced professional to get an even coating.
post #779 of 816
I always run low voltage pipes throughout my homes as standard now, rather than running cat 6, hdmi, etc.. That way you are safe, no matter what the industry does, or if you change your mind later. Smurf piping can be purchased at Home Boy Depot. Use at least 3/4" pipe. The half inch is too small to get much more than speaker wires through it. PVC piping and landscape pipes can also be used. And I wouldn't be so quick to condeme HD for their quality. HD sells Simpson Mills solid dimensional Doug Fir lumber, which is the best lumber available in North America. All the osb plywood is crap, and everybody has to buy it from the same lumber mills anyway. If you need plywood, use Laminated veneer plywood instead of osb. It will cost more, but will hold up better and is stronger, IMHO. Plywood is not out of square, they have cut down the size so as to force carpenters from butting the edges too tight, which causes it to expand and pop when it gets wet. Now, if you want to talk service, there is none at the box stores, so it would be a short conversation. biggrin.gif
post #780 of 816
I see you are from Canada and when you said "have a beer", for some reason that made me think of Rich Moranis in "Strange Brew", "take off eh, you hoser". You pull his tale, eh, no way, he looks hungry. biggrin.gif
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