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The New PQ Tier thread for Blu-Ray - Discussion - Page 699

post #20941 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by djoberg View Post

I expect to give them! smile.gif

Again, I *may* not be getting to them until AFTER the holidays, but I *may* be able to squeeze a couple in before then. I can't recall the last time I saw these 5 classics, though I seem to remember watching The Birds on one of the Movie Channels within the last few years.

Be sure to crank up the volume on the Bernard Hermann-scored movies. The soundtracks are divine-sounding.
post #20942 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by mweflen View Post

Be sure to crank up the volume on the Bernard Hermann-scored movies. The soundtracks are divine-sounding.

Would you believe Amazon Prime delivered the set in ONE DAY?! I'm looking at the set now and I can't tell which movies feature a musical score by Bernard Hermann. But that okay because I crank up the volume on EVERY MOVIE! cool.gif That's one of the advantages of having a dedicated "man-cave" in the basement (our house is also a long Rambler and it's on the other end of the house from the bedroom wing on the main level).
post #20943 of 21406
A Christmas Carol: 60th Anniversary Diamond Edition (1951)

recommendation: Tier 4.5*


VCI Entertainment has issued a couple of different iterations for this black-and-white Christmas classic starring Alastair Sim. This attempt sported a new film transfer from the 35mm negative and other various film elements. In that one regard the presentation was an unqualified success, displaying fine detail and improved clarity. The film source is in sound shape for the most part, though it certainly has not undergone the extensive restoration afforded to some other vintage movies.

What most hurts the picture quality is a thoroughly mediocre VC-1 video encode at sub-par bitrates. It struggles to faithfully capture the film's grain structure and often breaks into blatant banding. The scene in which Scrooge meets Jacob Marley's ghost is awash in macroblocking and other compression artifacts. This disc was first released at the tail-end of 2011 and VC-1 had already been passed at that point by better AVC encoders. Why strike a new, unfiltered film transfer, only to cripple it with a mediocre video encode?

A few scenes show traces of halos and black levels occasionally fluctuate. I think a newer video encode might actually land this film transfer in Tier Three. Its appreciable level of detail does bring out a quality image with some sharpness and depth.
post #20944 of 21406
Rebecca

Grain lovers will be in a state of rapture over this. Rebecca is a 1.33:1 black and white film from 1940, and was Hitchcock's first US film. There is a bit of print damage here and there and some contrast pulsing. Keeping in mind the age of the print, I can't imagine it looking a whole lot better without a serious years-long restoration to eliminate all signs of aging. But the overall impression is that you have threaded a piece of film through one end of your television and had it spool to the other. I have not seen a more filmic transfer on BD. Grain is lush and stable, and NEVER digital looking. The grain reveals good detail in facial closeups. Detail generally is good but not excellent. There is no edge enhancement or DNR. It's just rapturous to watch for a cinephile. Black levels in the best scenes are strong, but the age of the print does diminish these somewhat. There is a fair amount of dimensionality in the best scenes.

Tier Recommendation: 3.0
post #20945 of 21406
The Edge

On Black Friday I picked up this Blu from a "bargain bin" at Target (sadly, I used a credit card and found out this week about the hacking job at Target, which resulted in having to get a replacement credit card and all the hassles that go along with that eek.gif). I've always liked this "wilderness thriller" with Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin (and Bart the Bear) and having never owned the DVD I bought this Blu for $5, which was a steal.

PQ-wise it's really a mixed bag. It could be incredibly sharp and detailed one minute with appreciable depth, then, out of nowhere, it turned soft and flat. This would have been forgivable if not for the fact that it happened numerous times throughout the nearly 2-hour running time. Facial details were very good, bordering on low Tier 0 and high Tier 1 in nearly every scene. This Blu featured countless panoramic views of the gorgeous Alaskan wilderness/mountains/lakes, but half of them, sad to say, came across as soft and flat. Contrast could be really good but at times there was a washed out look. Again, this was one inconsistent flick!

I see this 2010 release is placed in Tier 3.75. I believe that's a bit harsh, given the excellent facial details and the many scenes that did offer amazing clarity, depth, and details. Even black levels were good at times. So, I'm inclined to bump this up a whole tier.....

Tier Recommendation: 2.75

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below...
Edited by djoberg - 12/21/13 at 9:04pm
post #20946 of 21406
Nim's Island

Here's another "bargain bin" Blu (a Black Friday special from Amazon). I did a Search after viewing this and I see that I rented this back in January of 2009. Surprisingly, I recommended a 1.25 placement at that time (it's currently ranked at 1.0), but I had a very different viewing experience this time around. Most reviewers, here and elsewhere, sang its praises for its vibrant colors, exquisite details, inky blacks, and exceptional sharpness/clarity. Admittedly, there were some of these virtues on display at times, but there were also several flaws that plagued this title, especially during the first half of the movie.

What bothered me the most was the HOT CONTRAST in most daytime scenes, resulting in a washed out look, over-saturated colors, and a lack of details. There were also sporadic shots with noise, some murky blacks (though in fairness I must say some scenes had deep blacks with very good shadow details), and inaccurate fleshtones (due to pervasive golden/orange hues). I can't account for the different viewing experience I had. I do have my Pioneer KURO now, back then I had a Samsung DLP, so that my be one factor involved. Another reason may simply be that Blu-rays that *appeared* to be "reference" or "demo" quality fours years ago do not hold up to that standard today. Whatever the reason(s), my recommendation today for this title is now just a tad better than average....

Tier Recommendation: 2.75

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
post #20947 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by djoberg View Post

Here's another "bargain bin" Blu (a Black Friday special from Amazon). I did a Search after viewing this and I see that I rented this back in January of 2009. Surprisingly, I recommended a 1.25 placement at that time (it's currently ranked at 1.0), but I had a very different viewing experience this time around. Most reviewers, here and elsewhere, sang its praises for its vibrant colors, exquisite details, inky blacks, and exceptional sharpness/clarity. Admittedly, there were some of these virtues on display at times, but there were also several flaws that plagued this title, especially during the first half of the movie.

What bothered me the most was the HOT CONTRAST in most daytime scenes, resulting in a washed out look, over-saturated colors, and a lack of details. There were also sporadic shots with noise, some murky blacks (though in fairness I must say some scenes had deep blacks with very good shadow details), and inaccurate fleshtones (due to pervasive golden/orange hues). I can't account for the different viewing experience I had. I do have my Pioneer KURO now, back then I had a Samsung DLP, so that my be one factor involved. Another reason may simply be that Blu-rays that *appeared* to be "reference" or "demo" quality fours years ago do not hold up to that standard today. Whatever the reason(s), my recommendation today for this title is now just a tad better than average....
That is a fair point. Some of the highly-ranked releases from four or five years ago do not always hold up that well. Posters should not be afraid to re-evaluate a disc, even if it has been in a top position for many years. Compression standards have improved by leaps and bounds from the major studios, while newer film scans are rendering older scans obsolete. Even dreaded software tools like DNR and EE have improved considerably, producing less obvious effects.

Desk Set

recommendation: Tier 3.75*


I really can't place this 1957 CinemaScope movie any higher in the Tiers, though Fox has done a credible job in transferring it to Blu-ray. It shows evidence of CinemaScope mumps, a film problem inherent to many early Fox movies using that technology. There appears to have been some correction to compensate for the problem, which normally produces widened faces with distortion. Focal issues and occasional softness can be attributed to the film source itself.

A solid film transfer that can't be characterized as eye candy.
post #20948 of 21406
Prometheus

It could be easily Tier 0,5, maybe even 0,25; it's sharp and consistent image, with some breathtaking details, especially the facial ones. But there's one huge problem - contrast, which is a reason why Prometheus looks like most of digitally shot movies: it's somewhat flat, lifeless and dull. Without inky blacks it looks worse that it might and should look.

Tier 1,5


Alien

Like most of the older movies, it has some out of focus, soft shots, and with so many optical effects, matte paintings and miniatures it's almost impossible for a movie to look consistent for the whole time. But apart from weaker parts, Alien restoration looks simply great, giving justice to its masterful cinematography, precise lighting and stunning production design. Blacks are as deep as the space itself, and facial details can be on par with the best modern titles.

Tier 1,25
post #20949 of 21406
Fast & Furious 6

Another good-looking Blu from the F&F franchise!!

This may not be *reference* quality (Tier 0), but it will easily be lauded as *demo* material (Tier 1). My greatest praise would have to be in its black levels, with some mesmerizing night scenes, including several aerial shots of major cities. Shadow details were crisp. Colors could be a bit over-saturated at times, but all in all, they were very pleasing to the eyes. Speaking of "colors," there was a plethora of various hues throughout due to color-grading, but this is one of those gems where it didn't hinder flesh tones or details. Facial close-ups featured good textures, revealing every pore, wrinkle, smear of dirt or grime, etc. (though in a few shots they were only mediocre). This also had the coveted look of film, thanks to a consistent layer of fine grain.

My biggest gripe would be that in some of the action scenes details were lost. And in some shots there seemed to be focus issues so a bit of softness crept in and it became flat. I'm going to take a rather conservative approach on this one and yet still award this with the following placement....

Tier Recommendation: 1.75*

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
post #20950 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by djoberg View Post

My biggest gripe would be that in some of the action scenes details were lost. And in some shots there seemed to be focus issues so a bit of softness crept in and it became flat.
I received my copy yesterday and I haven't seen the whole movie on Blu yet, but watching a few scenes I've noticed the flat image you're talking about, it looked almost like some parts of action scenes were shot digitally.
post #20951 of 21406
I thought some here would like to know that Amazon.co.uk is running the 8-disc Universal Classic Monsters box set for under $30 shipped to the United States:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B008H45YSO

It's an incredible bargain at this price and the transfers have been reviewed well, both in this thread and elsewhere. This set is practically identical in content to the more expensive American box and is region-free, meaning it will play on any American BD player. Ordering from Amazon.co.uk is a cinch, since you can re-use your normal Amazon account on the site. I wouldn't hesitate at this price, it likely won't last long. There is really little difference than ordering from any other Internet retailer.

I wish everyone a merry Christmas and happy holidays!smile.gif Enjoy the festivities.
post #20952 of 21406
Aliens

Just as Alien, there are some problems here, for example the whole conversation between Ripley and Burke on LV-426 (I thought you'd be smarter than this.) is completely out of focus, and of course some FX shots are also soft, but there's also one pretty big problem that wasn't on Alien - flat, closer to gray blacks. Apart from that Aliens looks better than I expected it would ever do, and when it comes to close ups it can be simply amazing.

Tier 2
post #20953 of 21406
The Family

Have you ever bathed in *amber*? I haven't either, but believe me this movie was bathed in an "amber glow" in nearly every scene!! I finally got used to it but it did wreak havoc on flesh tones, giving them...well, an "amber tone." (In fairness there were several scenes that were normal and flesh tones were amazingly accurate in them.)

Okay, I got that out of my system. Now I can get to the "good stuff." I simply LOVED the facial details in this title; they were some of the best I've seen in a very long time. You've heard me state before that Tommy Lee Jones has a face that was absolutely, positively "made for High Definition"....well, this was the most detailed and textured he's ever looked. Even shots of the young female actor (who plays the daughter of Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer) revealed texture and peach fuzz that you normally wouldn't see. Details in general were superb in most scenes. Colors were spectacular as well, along with some very strong contrast. Black levels were, for the most part, deep and inky with corresponding shadow details. Depth also abounded in MANY scenes.

I simply must penalize this for the horrendous amber bath given to the majority of this Blu, but being it didn't hinder the fantastic details on display I won't be too harsh. My eyes were very pleased in nearly every scene and if I were inclined to buy this movie (which I'm not, for the movie itself was quite lame), I would most definitely put it on my "demo shelf." Specifically, I believe it belongs right here....,

Tier Recommendation: 1.25*

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
post #20954 of 21406
Stay tuned for reviews on The Lone Ranger and Elysium. Reviews thus far on other sites have been stellar regarding the PQ of these titles, so I'm anticipating another "sugar rush" for my eyes! cool.gif
post #20955 of 21406
Spellbound

Another 1.33:1 B&W Hitchcock film from the early 40s. Like Rebecca in the same set, this has a marvelous filmic appearance with lush grain for the most part. Unfortunately, a few close-ups, particularly bright ones, show some digital looking grain. 80% of the run time looks really nice here, but wonky contrast, digital grain, and print damage weigh down the other 20%. It's a pleasing watch generally, but the inconsistency can't be avoided or forgiven.

Tier Recommendation: 3.5
post #20956 of 21406
Torn Curtain

Shot in 35mm by Hitchcock in 1966, this is a pleasing rendition. It is clear that soft filters were used for a majority of the film, and that hampers detail somewhat. Plenty of rear projection and optical shots also diminish detail. Nevertheless, stable grain is evident, no DNR or EE seems present, and fine detail can be very nice on close-up shots. Color is stable and realistic, and black levels are pretty good. I was consistently pleased by the visuals, and was never pulled out of them by anything that seemed a defect of the transfer. This reminds me a lot of Superman: The Movie (1978), but with a better rendition of film grain.

Tier Recommendation: 2.75
post #20957 of 21406
Happy Christmas to (almost) All PQ Tier Thread contributors

Having a great time here - decided to sell my projector until such time that I get a property with a room which I can dedicate one to

So, in its place, took delivery of a shiny new Samsung 55" LED TV yesterday - a lovely 'gift to self' between me and my GF

So far, blown away - popped Hugo BR on and was smiling from ear to ear - cemented my opinion that it's THE best BR I have yet to see

Looking forward to your Lone Ranger review, DJ.

cool.gifbiggrin.gif
post #20958 of 21406
Elysium

Well, I'm going to go against the "conventional wisdom" on this one, for everyone who chimed in on Cinema Squid's site were drooling over the PQ while I was underwhelmed!!

The GOOD:

1) Excellent black levels, especially of outer space near Elysium.

2) Very pleasing colors on Elysium.

3) Amazing sharpness/clarity on Elysium

The BAD:

1) A very DRAB color palette on earth.

2) Often quite gritty on earth

3) CGI scenes were soft at times, especially on earth

4) Terrible shaky cam during most of the first half of movie...again, mostly on earth.

You get the picture. This was NOT eye candy in most of the scenes on earth. Some will say, "But weren't there amazing details on earth?" Yes and no. In some scenes yes, but in all shots with the "shaky cam" they were limited. Even facial details were underwhelming to my eyes (after viewing the impeccable facial details in last night's viewing of The Family this was very disappointing). This is NOT a Blu that I would take off my shelf to show off my system and the virtues of HD, so I'm going against the grain and consigning this to....

Tier Recommendation: 2.0*

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
post #20959 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by rusky_g View Post

So, in its place, took delivery of a shiny new Samsung 55" LED TV yesterday - a lovely 'gift to self' between me and my GF

So far, blown away - popped Hugo BR on and was smiling from ear to ear - cemented my opinion that it's THE best BR I have yet to see

Looking forward to your Lone Ranger review, DJ.

cool.gifbiggrin.gif

Congrats on the new Sammy! I have a 4-year old Sammy LCD that was high-end back when I bought it and it still is quite impressive, especially with black levels (with Picture Mode set at Natural) and colors. Even the off-axis viewing isn't too bad. I can well imagine your new LED beats mine by a long shot.

My wife and I will be watching The Lone Ranger after supper. Methinks I'm going to be much more impressed with the PQ on this one compared to Elysium. I don't think I'll run into all the issues enumerated in my review of Elysium's scenes that took place on a post-apocalyptic earth.
Edited by djoberg - 12/25/13 at 3:32pm
post #20960 of 21406
Alien 3

Too bad David Fincher hates this movie so much (personally I LOVE the extended cut), so sadly we will never see it restored as beautiful as Alien and Aliens. Obviously this Blu-ray is based on the same master as 2003 DVD, and the result is underwhelming, especially for a movie with such an amazing cinematography. Clearly all the details are there, but they just can't find their way from under the overwhelming layer of softness. But there are moments when Alien 3 looks more than good; some close ups (almost every of Charles S. Dutton) are sharp and richly detailed and these are good examples of how it could look.

Tier 3.5

---

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift

Spot on contrast, great blacks, beautiful colors and sharpness. Gorgeous, pleasantly filmic image.

Tier 1.25*

---

Fast Five

Wow! Clarity, sharpness and contrast are just amazing, and with action set mostly in a full daylight results can be stunning at times.

Tier 1

---

Fast & Furious 6

This is a step back from the amazing quality of Fast Five; it's still sharp, very detailed image, but the wow factor present on the previous movie is missing. Also almost all of the close ups of actors in cars (set mostly at night, or "night") were clearly darkened in post, and they doesn't look as good as the rest of the movie; they're weirdly flat, less detailed, very digital in a bad way.

Tier 1.5*
post #20961 of 21406
The Lone Ranger

Ah, FINALLY, a true, REFERENCE-QUALITY live-action Blu-ray!!

I have three words to describe this marvel from Disney: SHARPNESS...DETAILS...DEPTH! From beginning to end we are treated to unbelievable SHARPNESS (perhaps there were a few fleeting instances of softness, but arguing this point would be, in the grand scheme of things, "straining at a gnat"). And along with the incredible sharpness we have DETAILS galore....details in clothing, details in gorgeous southwestern vistas, details in close-ups of mountains & deserts, details in buildings & furniture, and details in Johnny Depp's painted face (and in the face of every actor that the director chose to zoom in on). Without exception all details were high Tier 0 all the way!! DEPTH was so grand that my wife turned to me and said, "Is this in 3D?" Just so you know my wife is oblivious to the fact that my Pioneer KURO is NOT a 3D tv, or that my Pioneer Elite Blu-ray player is NOT 3D capable, but to her eyes the depth was so mesmerizing that she really thought it was in 3D!!

Though these 3 virtues were on display more than anything else, that's not to say they were the only things worthy of praise. Blacks levels were also to-die-for in several nighttime scenes and shadow details were equally praiseworthy. Add to that spot-on flesh tones, strong contrast, and beautiful primary colors that were manifested from time to time (against a background of mainly different shades of brown). These all join together to give you pure, unadulterated EYE CANDY!! I can't say this deserves a place at the top of the coveted Tier, or even close to that, but I'm convinced it shouldn't be near the bottom either. My vote goes for....

Tier Recommendation: Tier 0* (Right above Braveheart)

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
post #20962 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by djoberg View Post

The Lone Ranger

Ah, FINALLY, a true, REFERENCE-QUALITY live-action Blu-ray!!

I have three words to describe this marvel from Disney: SHARPNESS...DETAILS...DEPTH! From beginning to end we are treated to unbelievable SHARPNESS (perhaps there were a few fleeting instances of softness, but arguing this point would be, in the grand scheme of things, "straining at a gnat"). And along with the incredible sharpness we have DETAILS galore....details in clothing, details in gorgeous southwestern vistas, details in close-ups of mountains & deserts, details in buildings & furniture, and details in Johnny Depp's painted face (and in the face of every actor that the director chose to zoom in on). Without exception all details were high Tier 0 all the way!! DEPTH was so grand that my wife turned to me and said, "Is this in 3D?" Just so you know my wife is oblivious to the fact that my Pioneer KURO is NOT a 3D tv, or that my Pioneer Elite Blu-ray player is NOT 3D capable, but to her eyes the depth was so mesmerizing that she really thought it was in 3D!!

Though these 3 virtues were on display more than anything else, that's not to say they were the only things worthy of praise. Blacks levels were also to-die-for in several nighttime scenes and shadow details were equally praiseworthy. Add to that spot-on flesh tones, strong contrast, and beautiful primary colors that were manifested from time to time (against a background of mainly different shades of brown). These all join together to give you pure, unadulterated EYE CANDY!! I can't say this deserves a place at the top of the coveted Tier, or even close to that, but I'm convinced it shouldn't be near the bottom either. My vote goes for....

Tier Recommendation: Tier 0* (Right above Braveheart)

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
Intriguing! Appreciate the review. I've been trying to picture the 'look' of this film outlined by the production principals in The Masked Man , a trade-magazine article. "We didn't want all the clichéd bright blue skies and orange landscapes—the postcard look," the DP said. They touted the advantages of using the bleach-bypass technique for the mostly filmed production. This process did boost contrast--and apparently the sharpness you stress. They also liked the 'creamy tone' for the selected 30% bypass. Alexa digital cameras were also used. -- John

EDIT: Watched The Lone Ranger via FLEXview Dec.26 (free 1st use) to see how film bleaching diminished outdoor color saturation. Noticeable for sure but vista shots seem minimal. BR bit rate difference likely negates comparisons so I'll consider waiting for disc price drops.
Edited by John Mason - 12/27/13 at 7:43am
post #20963 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason View Post

Intriguing! Appreciate the review. I've been trying to picture the 'look' of this film outlined by the production principals in The Masked Man , a trade-magazine article. "We didn't want all the clichéd bright blue skies and orange landscapes—the postcard look," the DP said. They touted the advantages of using the bleach-bypass technique for the mostly filmed production. This process did boost contrast--and apparently the sharpness you stress. They also liked the 'creamy tone' for the selected 30% bypass. Alexa digital cameras were also used. -- John

Thanks John!

I read that article and found it very interesting. Regarding the color palette they wanted, there was indeed an emphasis on blacks/whites/grays, but many of the panoramic views of southwestern vistas featured different shades of browns. Primary colors were limited, but when they did appear they were striking (case in point: the red dress worn by the saloon owner).

Again, sharpness, details, and depth join together to give us a reference-quality film. I will look forward to your analysis after you view it.
post #20964 of 21406
Kick-Ass 2

recommendation: Tier 1.25*

Kick-Ass 2 has reference video and really should reside in Tier 0. Its pristine 1080P picture has beautiful clarity, marked by excellent depth and nigh-perfect colors. However, too much of it has been selectively filtered. Some close-ups exhibit very waxy facial features. The DNR is less obvious than usual, since apparently some scenes escaped the post-processing. In better news, it lacks any hint of sharpening or halos.

Universal's AVC video encode handles the crystal-clear film with ease. This could have been a real contender for the upper half of Tier 0, if they had eased up on the DNR in tighter shots.
post #20965 of 21406
Coraline

Sharpness! Details! Textures! Coraline looks PERFECT, and without doubt this is one of the best (if not THE best) Blu-rays I've seen. No matter how beautiful and detailed CGI-animated movies are, there are things computer simply cannot do and for me Coraline is the most visually and artistically impressive of them all.

Marvelous.

Tier 0 (above Avatar)
post #20966 of 21406
North By Northwest

Quote:
Originally Posted by mweflen View Post

North By Northwest

Quite pleasing overall, with no artifacts, EE, or DNR. Color is lush, detail is strong when photography allows - Hitchcock employs some soft filters on Grant and Saint's close-ups. This is not as good as Hitchcock's other VistaVision films on BD, but it is quite nice nonetheless. In scanning the tiers, this is better to my eyes than those discs around it. So I'll place it a bit higher at:

Tier Recommendation: 2.25

What he said! Though I would add that there was one bad case of "mosquito noise" in a shot of Martin Landau's face (I believe it was a scene in an airport). Facial details in general were good, considering the age of the movie, though Eva Marie Saint's lacked texture and almost looked like it had been smoothed over.

I was really impressed with nighttime scenes, with very good black levels accompanied by decent shadow details. This set is most definitely worth the price of under $33 and one that loves these Hitchcock classics would be a fool to pass this up.

I believe mweflen got the placement right....

Tier Recommendation: 2.25*

Viewed from 7.5' using the equipment listed below....
Edited by djoberg - 12/26/13 at 9:01pm
post #20967 of 21406
Colorful: The Motion Picture

recommendation: Tier 2.5*


Sentai Filmworks has been known in the anime community to release Blu-rays of varying quality. Colorful lies at the poorer end of that spectrum, as the 2010 movie consists of relatively simple, unpolished animation.

Technically, the Blu-ray has some problems. The transfer appears to have been improperly deinterlaced to 1080P, most noticeable on the horrible stuttering during an opening pan. Another problem is the deficient AVC video encode, which runs at DVD levels for extended periods and leads to rampant banding and chroma noise. This disc received some level of criticism upon release and I would have to say it was justified.

The animation itself is definitely true hi-definition but won't impress jaded Blu-ray users.
post #20968 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mason View Post


EDIT: Watched The Lone Ranger via FLEXview Dec.26 (free 1st use) to see how film bleaching diminished outdoor color saturation. Noticeable for sure but vista shots seem minimal. BR bit rate difference likely negates comparisons so I'll consider waiting for disc price drops.

Hey John,

I want to emphasize that I recommended a Tier Blu ranking for The Lone Ranger based mainly on SHARPNESS, DETAILS and DEPTH and NOT because of the color palette. Admittedly the colors are *desaturated* or *bleached* (which ever term you choose to use) throughout the majority of the movie. But the "bleaching" is "minimal" in many cases and when primaries are seen they are praiseworthy, so one can not fault this title for the color palette. I just looked over most of the titles that are currently residing in Tier Blu and there were several that have very little color at all. Tree of Life and Sin City are two good examples that illustrate this point. So, I firmly believe The Lone Ranger is deserving of the "reference Tier" and I trust others will feel the same after they view it.

I'm not, in any way, shape, matter, or form, implying that you would refuse to recommend Tier Blu for this title because of the "bleaching" employed, but I wanted to stress, for anyone reading our exchanges, that a title doesn't require a beautiful and explosive color palette to qualify for Tie Blu. Sometimes I complain, in my reviews, of a "drab" color palette, but that is *usually* associated with other negatives, like "softness" or "heavy grain." If a title has remarkable sharpness and is highly detailed, I can usually overlook the lack of colors.
post #20969 of 21406
Quote:
Originally Posted by djoberg View Post

Hey John,

I want to emphasize that I recommended a Tier Blu ranking for The Lone Ranger based mainly on SHARPNESS, DETAILS and DEPTH and NOT because of the color palette. Admittedly the colors are *desaturated* or *bleached* (which ever term you choose to use) throughout the majority of the movie. But the "bleaching" is "minimal" in many cases and when primaries are seen they are praiseworthy, so one can not fault this title for the color palette. I just looked over most of the titles that are currently residing in Tier Blu and there were several that have very little color at all. Tree of Life and Sin City are two good examples that illustrate this point. So, I firmly believe The Lone Ranger is deserving of the "reference Tier" and I trust others will feel the same after they view it.

I'm not, in any way, shape, matter, or form, implying that you would refuse to recommend Tier Blu for this title because of the "bleaching" employed, but I wanted to stress, for anyone reading our exchanges, that a title doesn't require a beautiful and explosive color palette to qualify for Tie Blu. Sometimes I complain, in my reviews, of a "drab" color palette, but that is *usually* associated with other negatives, like "softness" or "heavy grain." If a title has remarkable sharpness and is highly detailed, I can usually overlook the lack of colors.

Yes, agree. I just wanted to see for myself, after finding that linked article detailing production and your review, if I could better comprehend what the bleaching did. Didn't think it was valid here to suggest a tier ranking based on my FIOS viewing, not Blu-ray. Buy very few Blu-rays here, mainly because I'm on FIOS's highest-cost premium channel plan, and eventually films will appear there. (sans BR advantages). Did buy Tree of Life based on its tier ranking here and a similar production article I linked in the separate Tree of Life thread. Surprised about your color palette comment for TOL, though, since I thought it aimed for a normal balanced palette--and tried to maximize PQ throughout. -- John
post #20970 of 21406

For a Few Dollars More

 

Overall a very good transfer.  Facial details on close-up shots are exquisite and the actors' eyes really shine.  Vistas and long shots are equally as good.  The color palette is drab but when there is color such as vegetation, it pops.  Softness only creeps in on a few shots but what drags down PQ is print damage in a few scenes, most notably in vertical scratches but they are minor.

 

Recommendation: Tier 2.75*

 

Viewed on a 55" screen from 8'

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