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Kloss novabeam 100 - Help

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I recently obtained a very old Kloss novabeam 100 and I'm having problems setting it up. First, I want to know how to focus it for a given distance. Also, what can you do with a remote that you can't do from the rear panel. I don't have the remote or a manual so I'm kinda lost. Thanks to any one who helps. I really want to get this projector to work.
post #2 of 17
You can't focus those lenses. They are fixed for a certain distance that I can't remember. If I remember right, the remote will only change channels and turn the set on. I take it that you have the curved screen with it. If not, you are in a lot of trouble.
post #3 of 17
I had one of these.. along with an older 1A...

If it doesn't have black dots in the center of the lenses, then it is for a 100" diagonal flat screen. You'll have to find the focus distance by trial and error... If it has black dots in the middle of the lenses, then you are in trouble if you don't have the 72" curved screen those work with. The remote has the centering controls on it(simple crosshatch in the center), but this can be done from inside.. The convergence pots are all there, and should be marked. Without the proper screeen, though, you'll never get it converged right and your focus will be WAAAY off in the corners.

The 100 doesn't have a TV tuner.. Video and possibly stereo audio only. Also be careful, the phosphor in these tubes(on the back of the black keystone shaped plate inside the tubes) is very easily burned by static images.
post #4 of 17
This is ancient, but so is your projector, so you may find it of use:

Novabeam FAQ
post #5 of 17
Hi, a have one too but is broken, and looking for support, find this in ebay. I think that is a good answer to your problem jeje. Regards from Mexico City.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZafierX View Post

I recently obtained a very old Kloss novabeam 100 and I'm having problems setting it up. First, I want to know how to focus it for a given distance. Also, what can you do with a remote that you can't do from the rear panel. I don't have the remote or a manual so I'm kinda lost. Thanks to any one who helps. I really want to get this projector to work.


As I recall the remote has nothing the panel doesn't. There was a string provided which allowed one to set up the correct fixed distance (trial and error without. The lenses can't be focused.

Art
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonynut View Post

I had one of these.. along with an older 1A...

If it doesn't have black dots in the center of the lenses, then it is for a 100" diagonal flat screen. You'll have to find the focus distance by trial and error... If it has black dots in the middle of the lenses, then you are in trouble if you don't have the 72" curved screen those work with. The remote has the centering controls on it(simple crosshatch in the center), but this can be done from inside.. The convergence pots are all there, and should be marked. Without the proper screeen, though, you'll never get it converged right and your focus will be WAAAY off in the corners.

The 100 doesn't have a TV tuner.. Video and possibly stereo audio only. Also be careful, the phosphor in these tubes(on the back of the black keystone shaped plate inside the tubes) is very easily burned by static images.

I have the 78 inch screen but can I use it with a 60 inch screen(torus) I have
by changinging the distance to the screen and still maintain proper focus?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZafierX View Post

I recently obtained a very old Kloss novabeam 100 and I'm having problems setting it up. First, I want to know how to focus it for a given distance. Also, what can you do with a remote that you can't do from the rear panel. I don't have the remote or a manual so I'm kinda lost. Thanks to any one who helps. I really want to get this projector to work.

I owned one! I believe it was the Model 1-A. It came with an alignment cord that hooked onto a tab on the floor projector and hooks to either side of the screen. Everything had to be equally taut.
post #9 of 17
If this pursuit is purely out of curiosity, have fun and best of luck - otherwise, throw that PJ in the dumpster. I don't think even the trash men or goodwill will pick it up (the city will probably fine you if you leave it on the curb due to 900 lbs. of mercury and radioactive asbestos isotopes in that thang).

There's probably some Usenet masochist or some old ham operator on Fidonet that will buy the tubes. Check this first.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNelson View Post

You can't focus those lenses. They are fixed for a certain distance that I can't remember. If I remember right, the remote will only change channels and turn the set on. I take it that you have the curved screen with it. If not, you are in a lot of trouble.

Mine was a monitor only and used a Jensen TV tuner (mono upgradeable to stereo when stereo broadcasting would be available).
post #11 of 17
That was my first projector. The comments about the fixed focal distance and a nylon cord used to set up the distance are correct (the "focus lanyard"). However, there was a "large venue" model with pincushion correction built into the lenses for a flat screen, which was set up for a 10' diagonal 4:3 screen (6x8 feet). This model also had a fixed lens shift such that the top of the walnut "credenza" cabinet was even with the bottom of the screen (or the credenza could be suspended from four chains and heavy eyebolts in the ceiling above the screen). The lenses are liquid filled with glass surface in that model, whereas the cheaper set for the curved screen used molded plastic lenses.

Sorry, but I have no memory of model numbers, although I remember that the model name changed from "NovaBeam" to "VideoBeam" at some point, when Henry Kloss spun off Advent Video Corporation from KLH and patented the "Novabeam" liquid filled tube. The resolution could be set either at 640x350@60Hz (aka EGA) progressive or 640x480@60Hz progressive (in the days before "VGA" was named, using seperate external NTSC tuner and "line doubler" boxes). The monitor itself had a built-in test pattern with a rectangular array of dots. You stretched one vertical black string and one horizontal string, and tweeked 20-odd little screwdriver-adjustable potentiometers for linearity by trying to get the dots exactly on the strings.

It was an awe-inspiring setup in the early 1980's. I had mine attached to a C-Band BUD (Big Ugly Dish) in the glory days before HBO and Cinemax (the two original movie channels) implemented scrambled signals. I'm approaching my 30-year anniversary with that original "Home Theater".

Interestingly, I still have a pair of KLH Model 6 speakers from that original Home Theater, and they still work, they are attached to an old audio setup with a turntable. I believe Henry Kloss founded KLH after selling his original Acoustic Research company, where he invented the "acoustic suspension" closed box design for extending the bass frequency downwards. He founded Advent when he began experiments with video equipment.
post #12 of 17
The Advent projector was the Videobeam, the Kloss Video projector was the Novabeam. Henry won an Emmy for the development of the video projector. At the time, these were by far the best projectors available. As a side note, the dealer that I bought my Model One from had a NEC monitor. It had Novabeam tubes in it.
post #13 of 17
i have one - if you want me to dig up the manual
post #14 of 17
Review of the Kloss Novabeam here. Perhaps you could find other stuff about it on the website too.

http://www.walvisions.com/ArchivePag...0_VMreview.htm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNelson View Post

The Advent projector was the Videobeam, the Kloss Video projector was the Novabeam. Henry won an Emmy for the development of the video projector. At the time, these were by far the best projectors available. As a side note, the dealer that I bought my Model One from had a NEC monitor. It had Novabeam tubes in it.

thank you!!
post #16 of 17
As you can see from the linked article, it might be the ten feet diagonal flat screen configuration. Anyway even the curved screen units can throw a picture on a flat wall, it will just look a bit warped, but good enough to see if it works. The review lists the throw distance 96 inches from lens to screen for the 6.5 foot screen model reviewed.
post #17 of 17
I've had several Novabeam 100's and setting up and convergence takes patience and time. You'd best get hold of a shop manual. The original service center was (maybe still is) in Mass. contact info follows:

Elite Video
One Presidential Way, Suite 104A
Woburn, MA 01801
Tel: 781-938-6606
Fax: 781-938-6610

For Projector and Part Sales, General inquiries, and Competitive price quotes:
Eric Geller
e-mail: egeller@elitevision.com

For Technical Support and Service
Walter Allen
e-mail: wallen@elitevision.com

Walter was my main contact and he may ask where you got this info and best not to say. He has said I was 'nuts' to still keep fooling around with this 'antique' and now that flat panels are keeping cheaper than ever, he's probably right. See if they still have a 'spare' shop manual as it would certainly help


Good luck, AIkeeper
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