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Does a Lexicon DC-2 for $2100 sound too good to be true? (long) - Page 2  

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Bryan, I am no happier about being ripped off now than I was a few weeks ago when it first happened, and I am continuing to pursue this matter to the end. Will the authorities catch him?...yes. Will I get any money back?...doubtful. Mark is under indictment by the grand jury for much more serious charges than the "petty" scams he has committed here. I'll post more information as soon as he is actually behind bars.
post #32 of 38
Buzz, I can understand your worry about setting a precedent, but I believe most of the folks here merely wanted to know who the generous benefactor was so that they can reward him by giving him new business. I for one am impressed by your dedication to the members of this forum. Too often people place emphasis on price and features, and hardly give customer service a second thought. If your kind actions toward Bob were indicative of the type of customer service Tag/McClaren provides, you have just won a life-long customer. Tag/McClaren has just moved to the top of my audition list, I was looking at B&K, perhaps Dennon 5800 but I think I will save a bit longer for a superior product with superior service

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TIMSAISTI
post #33 of 38
Well done, Buzz!!

I've followed Bob's awful story and it made me realize how vulnerable I've been on some past transactions. I'm thrilled you decided to help him. For now, I'm content with my Chiro gear and my ATI 1505. When I decide to upgrade, you can bet I'll be checking into the Tag McLaren line. And hey, if you're ever in Florida, stop by my house and we'll watch "Days of Thunder". http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Kent

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If I have seen farther than others it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Sir Isaac Newton
February 5, 1675
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Stacy Huff:
Bob,

That is great news! I suppose that if you had wanted to do so, you would have posted the name of this gracious benefactor already. I'm dying to know. Perhaps they have their reasons, but for me, grassroots goodwill goes a long way. I'm glad to hear that things have taken a good turn for you.

I guess I've made things a bit awkward for Bob here. I asked him not to publicize this as this is not a precedent I wish to set.
But Bob got screwed and I realized I could soothe some of the injury. So I made him an offer but asked him to keep mumm about it.
I confess.


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Buzz Goddard www.tagmclarenaudio.com

[This message has been edited by Buzz Goddard (edited 10-25-2000).]
post #35 of 38
Way to go Buzz!!

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mark
post #36 of 38
Sad story, Bob! I've given this advice before, but it bears repeating:

I've been working on and off for months collecting notes for a FAQ I eventually hope to write on "How to Buy & Sell Used Audio/Video Gear on the Net," but it's still in the process of being done. But I can give you some general purchasing tips:

1) unless you know and trust the person very well, DO NOT _EVER_ SEND THE SELLER CASH. Cash gives you no recourse in the event of fraud, theft, or even a disagreement (like when the merchandise arrives broken or damaged). (And when I say "Cash," that includes money orders, cashiers checks, or personal checks that they clear before shipping you merchandise.)

2) always try to use a charge-card for the purchase. That way, if there's a problem, you can make an appeal to the credit card company to have them refund your money.

3) consider using a third-party to act as an intermediary, like iEscrow, Tradesafe, or BuyersGuardian. They can inspect the merchandise, confirm that it is what the seller says it is, and also protect the seller from bad checks or stolen credit cards.

4) as a second resort, ask the seller to ship the merchandise to you via C.O.D. At least that way, you can see the package before paying for it. Of course, this will not protect you if somebody decides to send you a damaged product or a box full of bricks.

5) get a phone number from the seller so that you can talk to them and work out any problems by voice. Emails are often not enough in these situations.

6) if you do negotiate or communicate via Email, always answer Emails promptly.

7) the safest dealer to buy from is generally an established company with a brick-and-mortar store. At least this way, there's a physical building you could go to (or send an attorney to) to complain or, as a last resort, serve legal papers.

8) when dealing with an individual, ask for references. If they can provide the names and addresses of a half-dozen or more customers who have done business with him over the past few months, then that gives them a little credibility over someone who has zero references. Some may have "positive Ebay feedback," which in theory adds to their reputation. The only negative experiences I've ever had on Ebay were people with a rating of less than 10.

9) do a Deja News search on this person's name to see if there have been any negative reports on them over the past couple of years.

10) before making a big purchase (say, over $1000), ask on the various Usenet marketplace groups (rec.audio.marketplace, rec.video.marketplace, alt.home-theater.marketplace, rec.music.marketplace, etc.) if anyone has had any problems with this particular seller. Me personally, if it were my money and I was making a purchase this big, I'd take a cheap flight out to their town and pay for & pick up the thing in person.


In your case, if the person has totally ducked out of sight, about all you can do is file a small-claims lawsuit against them in their state; there's little remedy if you file the suit in your home town. (Because of the large number of similar disputes, some small-claims courts will now only take cases involving more than $2000.) You can pay a process server to serve the seller with court papers. The problem here is, even if you win, there's no easy way to collect, because a judgement is just a piece of paper. You could also consult your local post office and your state Attorney General's office and file complaints against the person. Most states have a Consumer Affairs Department, and you can call them to find out your specific rights. If the seller is a company, then you can file a complaint with their city's Better Business Bureau, in addition to the above remedies.

You could conceivably post a "Deadbeat Alert" message to rec.audio.pro and rec.audio.marketplace, warning other customers to avoid dealing with this person. However, make sure that you do so only after giving them every opportunity to communicate and solve the problem after a reasonable amount of time, and be careful to state the facts and avoid libeling them.

I've only had to do this once, in more than a decade of buying and selling gear on the Net (and on CompuServe during the 1980s). That bizarre experience was enought to inspire me to write the FAQ, and eventually when I have more time, I'll finish it and post it here.

If anybody has any tips you'd like me to include, let me know via E-mail and I'll add them to the list.


--Marc Wielage
mfw@musictrax.com
post #37 of 38
Well, I wish I'd listened to Mark and the others.

Check my thread in the DLP/LCD Projector Forum for the gory details.


Steve
post #38 of 38
sorry to hear about your misfortune Bob, but get this, a few days after you posted a reply regarding a dc-1 available on this site and warned me about a Mark Webber character, about a week later he e-mailed me about a dc-2 for $2700. Needless to say, i did not reply. Thanks and i hope this guy goes down hard. When you do catch him, give him or better yet save a few extra shots for me (i DESPISE thieves).Still looking for a dc1/ref. 30 in the $1500 range. Let me know if someone knows of one for sale. Thanks.

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power
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Does a Lexicon DC-2 for $2100 sound too good to be true? (long)