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RG6 Cable?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Are some of these cables better than others? Has anyone purchased the Terk RG6 cable Bestbuy? Is it any good?
post #2 of 10
Yes, there can be a great variation in RG6 cable. I have not used Terk cable before. For what are you using it?

CJ
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
In this case I'm using it to extend a run (with a connector) from my outside cable line into my bedroom as well as from the cable box to the TV.

I have HD service w/DVR and from time to time I have problems with video and audio in my den. With video I often see white spaces on the screen. With audio, I sometimes experience a break-up and a weird noise when this occurs. I just recently got a DVR for the bedroom and I replaced both runs of RG6 cable, the extention from outside and from the cable box to the TV. I experienced the problem the other day in my bedroom so I touch the RG6 connection to the cable box and the video froze and I heard the same sound that I heard in the den. This gave me the thought that my problem could be related to the RG6 cable. What are the differences in cables? Thx
post #4 of 10
The difference between which cables? RG6 is a specification (having to do with the construction and size of the cable). In general, it is optimal for transmitting high bandwidth video feeds (like HD services). If you are using a cheap cable (or one with a thinner gauge) you could be losing information. The 2nd issue is the terminations on the end of the cable. Cheap terminations will loosen and create a poor connection on each end (another source of drop out). I would suggest 2 possible courses of action:

- Go to Home Depot and look for quad shield RG6. Buy the appropriate length with terminations or buy and crimp on your own terminations.
- Go to an online store that sells Belden or Canare cable and buy one (it will probably be cheaper than Best Buy's offerings). This is the stuff that they use in pro A/V applications. I like to order from Bluejeanscable.com but there are a lot of other options out there. You'll want a cable with F-type connectors.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg_R View Post

The difference between which cables? RG6 is a specification (having to do with the construction and size of the cable). In general, it is optimal for transmitting high bandwidth video feeds (like HD services). If you are using a cheap cable (or one with a thinner gauge) you could be losing information. The 2nd issue is the terminations on the end of the cable. Cheap terminations will loosen and create a poor connection on each end (another source of drop out). I would suggest 2 possible courses of action:

- Go to Home Depot and look for quad shield RG6. Buy the appropriate length with terminations or buy and crimp on your own terminations.
- Go to an online store that sells Belden or Canare cable and buy one (it will probably be cheaper than Best Buy's offerings). This is the stuff that they use in pro A/V applications. I like to order from Bluejeanscable.com but there are a lot of other options out there. You'll want a cable with F-type connectors.

Thanks Greg. There's so much to learn. When I asked for differences, I was responding to CJO when he said, "Yes, there can be a great variation in RG6 cable."
post #6 of 10
Quad shielded coax is normally used for CATV signals which is just what you are going to do; extend the cable service to a new outlet. However Q-S cable is not the best coax in terms of shielding. It is also more difficult to terminate because aluminized mylar foil is fragile.

The cable company may use a water proof, foil shielded, copper plated steel center conductor w/ weather proof connectors. It is good enough cable, not the best cable, and you won't bury yours.

RG6 is not even inherently superior to RG59 in all applications, but it is becoming the defacto cable industry standard.

The most usual cause of problems is not the cable itself but the connections. Make sure that all are tight or even replace them. Do not use twist on F connectors. Use crimp style with or without gold coloring.

Spend a little time in the info sections of the cable makers' and vendors' web sites. I think that you will find that hight coverage copper or copper and foil shielding is better for your application. Do not overlook just buying a length of pre-terminated RG6. If it is a little long a you can coil up the excess.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekguy View Post

Use crimp style with or without gold coloring.

Good information here.

If i may though, stay away from Crimp connectors. If you over crimp them you will damage the cable. Compression fittings are better in my opinion. This is all i use.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by phantsam View Post

Good information here.

If i may though, stay away from Crimp connectors. If you over crimp them you will damage the cable. Compression fittings are better in my opinion. This is all i use.

Compression is better agreed, and some of the lighter weight crimping tools do a poor job. But crimpers are are easy to find (and cheaper) and the heavier hex crimp tools have worked well for me, at least for connections that are exposed to the weather.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekguy View Post

Compression is better agreed, and some of the lighter weight crimping tools do a poor job. But crimpers are are easy to find (and cheaper) and the heavier hex crimp tools have worked well for me, at least for connections that are exposed to the weather.


I'm not so sure compression is actually a better termination. Compression is a friction type termination where crimp is permanent. I've pulled some compression connectors off of the cable before at trade shows. I can't do that with a crimp connection. However, if either crimp or compression connectors are terminated correctly on the cable they are both a sound termination. I use both and have equal success.


What I like about compression is I can use the same tool for multiple terminations. I use Liberty stuff and can use the same tool and stripper for both RG59 and RG6. I also use Canare and have to have 2 different strippers for 3c and 5c. I am partial to crimp connectors because I like to finish them of with some shrink tubing. I think it looks nicer. You can't beat the quickness and ease of a compression connector though.

Also, if you use the proper crimp connector for the cable you are terminating it doesn't "damage" the cable.
post #10 of 10
Sorry it has taken so long to get back to this thread- I've been out of town. It actually sounds like you might just have a loose connection. If wiggling the connection makes the picture drop, that's where your problem is at. Try screwing it in tighter.

If that doesn't work, you might be able to crimp or use a compression tip on the end of your existing wire and save yourself some time and money. Make sure that you get the correct type of end for the cable that is in your wall (RG-59, RG-6, or RG-6 quad shield).

CJ

PS- IMHO, Canare makes the best ends available and they are crimped. Compression are good and definitely quick, just not as good as the Canare.
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