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Wrapping Black Velvet on Trim...... with Mitered or Butt joined ends. - Page 3

post #61 of 136
Tried this tonight... unfortuantely it just didn't click... I get lost at picture #9 - #10 (reading them left-to right) folding and finishing the pointy part of the wrapped corner. My corners look horrible and bumpy. It's not clear what is happening in these pictures, to me.
post #62 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzakiel View Post

Tried this tonight... unfortuantely it just didn't click... I get lost at picture #9 - #10 (reading them left-to right) folding and finishing the pointy part of the wrapped corner. My corners look horrible and bumpy. It's not clear what is happening in these pictures, to me.

Well then...go back to the Front and do it the way I described.
post #63 of 136
I appreciate you posting the tutorial, that's for sure... I just ran into problems and didn't ever seem to get it right. My velvet is done, but I guess I will just have to smoosh the corners together as tight as I can and hope the velvet coming together will cover the swell on one end of each corner.
post #64 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzakiel View Post

I appreciate you posting the tutorial, that's for sure... I just ran into problems and didn't ever seem to get it right. My velvet is done, but I guess I will just have to smoosh the corners together as tight as I can and hope the velvet coming together will cover the swell on one end of each corner.

Usually the most common mistake is not tugging the velvet taunt and holding it into place while you staple it. "pinch and Fold...hold and Staple".

You cold trim off those "Ears", then using a drop of clear "Cloth Adhesive" stick the remaining Folds together before you "smoosh"

Or simply pull out the staples and redo the sucker. That's what I do.
post #65 of 136
I have a maybe a stupid question but I was wondering why did everybody go the trouble of wrapping velvet around the trim instead of just painting it black?

thanks
post #66 of 136
Black paint on a flat surface does not absorb light nearly as much as black cloth. And velvet absorbs the most light of all types of cloth.

It's not just for looks... it's so the overspill from the projector is absorbed and edges look crisp. If it spilled a little on to flat black paint, you'd still see the image there.
post #67 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzakiel View Post

Black paint on a flat surface does not absorb light nearly as much as black cloth. And velvet absorbs the most light of all types of cloth.

It's not just for looks... it's so the overspill from the projector is absorbed and edges look crisp. If it spilled a little on to flat black paint, you'd still see the image there.

+1

AND...guests are AMAZED that YOU built it YOURSELF. It really gives the screen that commercially finished look. All of the male guests at my place actually touch it and say "you did this? wow!" And the wife likes that finished look too!
post #68 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotelmania View Post

I have a maybe a stupid question but I was wondering why did everybody go the trouble of wrapping velvet around the trim instead of just painting it black?

thanks

Judging by the two responses you've gotten, I'm sure I speak with conviction and sincerity for most all who have done likewise when I attribute the use of Black Velvet to none other than;

"Intelligent Design"


'cause it is.
post #69 of 136
black velvet is 50% off at joann
post #70 of 136
Hoping to put my screen together tomorrow... one quick question.

Is there any bleed through on the velvet? Should I paint the wood frame with flat black before wrapping?
post #71 of 136
The only time I can notice that there is any bleeding on the trim is in a dark room with the projector lamp on high and this is on an epson 6500 with 1600 lumens. In low lamp mode I can't tell at all.
post #72 of 136
I don't ever see any bleed through. But, I think it would vary based on the actual velvet you end up with. Some may do it worse than others, and some not at all.

Because I pulled mine really tight, two of my outside edge corners poked through ever so slightly. Someone around here had previously recommended a sharpie to touch it up. Worked like a charm for me.

If you are one of those "measure twice, cut once" guys, then I would paint 'em black first so you're covered just in case. After all that stapling you absolutely won't want to have to pull them out and start over...
post #73 of 136
Thread Starter 
Bidda bump.
post #74 of 136
If you had to place the velvet border with 3.25 mdf trim and cover some excess laminate on a wood frame, it will be hard to nail it in as you could nail the laminate.

Quick Question:

In this scenario what would you use to attach the velvet/trim border to screen if Laminate overlaps on wood frame - Would you glue or use Velcro?

Just dont want to break the laminate.


Thanks

Dave
post #75 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studio2000 View Post

If you had to place the velvet border with 3.25 mdf trim and cover some excess laminate on a wood frame, it will be hard to nail it in as you could nail the laminate.

I'd NEVER risk shooting a nail through a material like a Laminate. Better to "RIP" your Velvet to 5.5" wide sections so as to leave a 1" wide exposed strip down the Rear center of the Trim after wrapping it with the Black Velvet, so you can attach one half of a strip of Industrial Strength Velcro to that location. Use an quick drying epoxy to glue the Velcro strips (get the non-adhesive type if possible...) onto both surfaces (scrape any paint off the Laminate where the footprint of the Velcro will be....) because ain't none of the adhesive used on Velcro worth a Tinker's tinkle.

Quote:


Quick Question:

In this scenario what would you use to attach the velvet/trim border to screen if Laminate overlaps on wood frame - Would you glue or use Velcro?

Just dont want to break the laminate.

Thanks

Dave

Gee...now why didn't I think about that...?

Why...I guess I'd suggest using Velcro.

Go figure.
post #76 of 136
Hey guys - I am back!! Serioulsy, last year I frequented this thread and ended up doing a nice BOC frame and linacoustic and triangle bass traps in my home in Kansas City area. Sadly, 2 months after I got my theater the way I wanted it, my employer forced me to move to Florida. So, I had to sell my house (with my theater - sob sob) and I am currently renting in Florida and building a house. I am getting a 15' 6" x 21' room above the garage for the theater. However, I don't have the energy or money or the inclination to make it a full fledged "dedicated theater". However, I would like to get the corner triangles made again and possibly use linacoustic or 1" OC 703 on the screen wall. My question is this. Last time I was debating between a painted screen and BOC. I chose BOC because of imperfection in the drywall, etc.

Should I go with BOC again this time so that I can treat the wall behind the BOC with linacoustic or can I just paint the wall and treat around it. I would like a 120" diagonal screen.
post #77 of 136
Ok there is fuzzies everywhere


All I can say is that Mississippiman's tips have been extremely helpful with regards to the velvet.

Ok - Tonight all I did was cut the velvet, and tomorrow I will attempt to attach the velvet to the trim.

Wait.... Did I mention Cut..... No No.... Per Mississippiman's suggestions was to RIP the velvet.

So this evening I swept the bathroom floor, took a swiftie and ran across floor let it dry.

Laid down the Velvet, cut a 2" slit at approx 6" wide" and then my wife walked opposite directions without stopping and just RIPPED a 144.5" length Velvet in 3 seconds.

The straightest line you will every see. I could not see myself cutting a straight line cutting the velvet which would have taken me much longer.

So I can attest to literally "RIP" the velvet. Now I have all my lengths and I can get started with attaching the velvet to the trim.

Thanks Mississippiman!

Dave
post #78 of 136
Just wanted to update this thread with a pic of a screen I put together using a lot of MM's guides. Used the N8 gain grey paint, the guide described here about the wrapping in velvet, and I was inspired by the molding in the initial pictures. I ran speaker wire between the velvet and the extra molding. It works well.


It's in an apartment so making minimal holes was a goal.
post #79 of 136
Thread Starter 
Copy Cat.

Looks very well done!
post #80 of 136
Question please, and yes, I know my budget is showing here....can the velvet be spliced together? It would save me from buying a few yards of material that I do not really need.
post #81 of 136
Thread Starter 
Not a good idea. The velvet frays along any cut/ripped edge.

Buying 3 yards will take care of almost any screen in the 110" diagonal or less size. Will you have considerable left overs? Yes, but ya gotta consider that the "Luxury Tax" of using such an ideal material.

At the prices it's sold for here, http://www.syfabrics.com/View.aspx/P...Velvet/681/264

.............you really cannot use any decent replacement material for less anyway.
post #82 of 136
Thanks,

That must be the reason you apply the velvet to the four frame members before assembly. Being a woodworker, I would normally assemble the frame first.

Thanks for all the tips; I will order from the site you suggested. That amount of material should allow for four attempts at getting the job done!

Jerry
post #83 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSiemens View Post

Thanks,

That must be the reason you apply the velvet to the four frame members before assembly. Being a woodworker, I would normally assemble the frame first.

Thanks for all the tips; I will order from the site you suggested. That amount of material should allow for four attempts at getting the job done!

Jerry

Even if I construct a "Complete Frame" before hanging it, I always wrap the individual Trim Pieces first.

Besides it being easier to wrap a precise Corner, the trim is more easily placed correctly if the Bottom "long" piece is put up first, the Sides placed vertically "straight", and the "Top" then settles nicely into place. Also, if one must remove a piece/all of the trim, being toed into the Wall using Finish Nails, a single piece will come away easier than an entire Frame, which as I'm sure you know being a Woodworker, would require Corner Bracing as well.

I love using a Finish Nailer w/1-1/2" nails, but I'm just as comfortable using Bright Finish Nails and a Hammer, and setting them underneath the Velvet with a fine pointed Nail Set.
post #84 of 136
Thanks so much for this thread, MM. It's because of your threads that I've decided to simplify my home theatre and get it to a usable state more quickly. I'd previously had a recess (fully wired up with ethernet, HDMI USB etc.) built into the wall for a 60" TV and was going to get a 120" retractable screen to drop in front of it. However, I've decided to wait until both TVs and tab tensioned screens drop in price. Therefore I'm going with a temporary solution for now.

Thus, we've now covered the recess with a horizontally hung (screwed in) piece of drywall with 120" diagonal of 16:9 proportions. This will be painted exterior grey (or silverfire if I can get all the stuff) for my Epson 8350. I want to make a velvet trim for this, but heres the problem; there's only 1.5" or so between the edge of my drywall screen and the frames of the in-wall speakers to be (currently only the holes have been cut out and the wiring done).
Is it worth doing a 1.5" trim and what's the best way to do so, if so? Just use 1.5" mdf molding?

Thanks for any help you can offer. We were going to cover 2" of the drywall edges in velvet, but I just realised that not only may this create a slight shadow, but it'll also result in the visible area of the screen no longer being exactly 16:9; this could be a big deal for HTPC use, where you don't want much overscan at all.
post #85 of 136
Thread Starter 
Da Bump.

For those who need to know....
post #86 of 136
I found this thread extremely helpful. Sadly, after 5 attempts of following the instructions I was never able to make a perfectly smooth finish. This is because when the large flap is folded and stapled, it creates 3 thick layers of velvet along the mitered joint. Is it the way it's supposed to be?

So, I've been experimenting with a different approach where I cut the flaps into 3 pieces prior to stapling them. It is much easier, except there are two small areas with only 1 layer of velvet. So, when the two pieces of frame are put against each other (last photo), there is a slight gap visible since the contact point is the thicker part with 2 layers.
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post #87 of 136
One more attempt at a perfectly smooth mitered joint. This time I was able to make 1 layer throughout the entire joint. I stretched the recessed corner and stapled towards the protruding corner. Then I cut off the ear from the protruding corner and sew it off.

This is the best result I've achieved so far. The only minor problem is a slightly jagged corner where I sew because of fraying velvet.
LL
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post #88 of 136
Thread Starter 
My original Tutorial didn't show how I often trim off as much material from the underlying fold as I possibly can. With the smaller sized Trim, this actually becomes an issue to consider.

But in fact, having a double thick layer over the "Butt edge" is a good thing because compressing two such ends together tightly always make the joint disappear. It's getting the correct fold that is the key, and it helps greatly to pull the material as tautly as possible while doing so.

Also...the sharp, pointy corners of the MDF Trim (...especially that outside one...) tend to wind up poking through with far less probability than otherwise.
post #89 of 136
Thread Starter 
I've added an image and Home Depot SKU# in the 1st post (...and in this post as well...) to help those needing such info be able to determine the correct (most favorable) MDF Base Trim to consider using.

MDF "Base" Trim. (3.25" wide x 5/8"" thin)



Home Depo Store SKU # 526895
post #90 of 136
Thread Starter 
Bumpin' ta please......this is a good thread to have nearer to the First page than 5 months back. biggrin.gif
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