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"The" Onkyo TX-SR875 Thread - Page 188

post #5611 of 6043
Bump...Anybody?
post #5612 of 6043
Bump-aroo??
post #5613 of 6043
I just bought an Onkyo TX-SR875 and I'm not getting any sound output from the speaers/headphones. I looked through the firmware versions and all but the DSP versions look like normal. However the DSP firmware versions all say something like ?????.????????. Is this something I can fix with the SPDIF firmware update or will I have to spend money to get this repaired?
post #5614 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by superboy95 View Post

I recently traded up from a 605 to the 875. Low and mid range punch is noticeably better and overall sound quality seems to be more pleasing. Other than the long(er) lag times when switching between inputs I have been happy with the unit.

Here's the surprise and problem...when I really want to crank it upmusic or movies, doesn't matterthe 875 will not go as loud, not even nearly as loud as the 605. After about 65-75 volume (I'm using the 0-100 volume scale b/c that's what I was accustomed to from the 605) the volume stops increasing. I can run it all the way up to 100 and back to ~70 before there is any noticeable volume change.

I used the audussey calibration in the same manner as the 605 and other than setting the sub way too low (just like the 605), the calibration seems to be on par (distance wise) with the 605 and seems to work fine. The Max volume setting is not on. I have dual cooling fans so heat is not an issue. I have checked and re-checked every possible menu and setting and cannot figure out how 145 watts per channel cannot play as loud as 90 watts per channel. Any ideas or suggestions?

Thanks!

Look for the volume limiter in the settings
post #5615 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiasco View Post

Look for the volume limiter in the settings


First thing I checked and it's set to "maximum". Any other ideas guys?
post #5616 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by superboy95 View Post

I recently traded up from a 605 to the 875. Low and mid range punch is noticeably better and overall sound quality seems to be more pleasing. Other than the long(er) lag times when switching between inputs I have been happy with the unit.

Here's the surprise and problem...when I really want to crank it up…music or movies, doesn’t matter…the 875 will not go as loud, not even nearly as loud as the 605. After about 65-75 volume (I'm using the 0-100 volume scale b/c that’s what I was accustomed to from the 605) the volume stops increasing. I can run it all the way up to 100 and back to ~70 before there is any noticeable volume change.

I used the audussey calibration in the same manner as the 605 and other than setting the sub way too low (just like the 605), the calibration seems to be on par (distance wise) with the 605 and seems to work fine. The “Max” volume setting is not on. I have dual cooling fans so heat is not an issue. I have checked and re-checked every possible menu and setting and cannot figure out how 145 watts per channel cannot play as loud as 90 watts per channel. Any ideas or suggestions?

Thanks!

Hello,
It is literally impossible that your 605 goes louder than the 875. The amplifier section in the 875 is THX Ultra2 Certified and the Bench Test results were beyond impressive:http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/rec...-receiver.html
Here are the results for the 605:http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/rec...-receiver.html

Unless your 875 is defective, there simply is no possible way that your 605 went louder. The 875 is truly in another league than the 605 as the price attests.
The TX-SR875 is a classic combining a powerful amplifier section with excellent video processing (fw 1.04 onward)
Cheers,
AD
post #5617 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiodork View Post

Hello,
It is literally impossible that your 605 goes louder than the 875. The amplifier section in the 875 is THX Ultra2 Certified and the Bench Test results were beyond impressive:http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/rec...-receiver.html
Here are the results for the 605:http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/rec...-receiver.html

Unless your 875 is defective, there simply is no possible way that your 605 went louder. The 875 is truly in another league than the 605 as the price attests.
The TX-SR875 is a classic combining a powerful amplifier section with excellent video processing (fw 1.04 onward)
Cheers,
AD

Hi.

I wouldn't believe it if I didn't experience it myself. I had the 605 for almost two years so I was very accustomed to the sound it produced. Like I said, I can hear richer, fuller sound...especially in the lower frequencies, but the overall volume just isn't there.

Hopefully it's just a setup error by me, but I don't know what it could be. What would cause the 875 to just stop producing volume gains around 65-70 % volume on the dial? I've check and triple checked the maximum volume and it's set to "off."

Side note...does this thing have a fan as the article you linked stated? I have dual dc fans on the top of it. It gets damn hot without them and i've never heard a fan come on.

Thanks again.
post #5618 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by superboy95 View Post

Hi.

I wouldn't believe it if I didn't experience it myself. I had the 605 for almost two years so I was very accustomed to the sound it produced. Like I said, I can hear richer, fuller sound...especially in the lower frequencies, but the overall volume just isn't there.

Hopefully it's just a setup error by me, but I don't know what it could be. What would cause the 875 to just stop producing volume gains around 65-70 % volume on the dial? I've check and triple checked the maximum volume and it's set to "off."

Side note...does this thing have a fan as the article you linked stated? I have dual dc fans on the top of it. It gets damn hot without them and i've never heard a fan come on.
Thanks again.

Volume you hear does not say anything. A not so powerfull amp can create the same hearing volume as a powerfull one. The only thing you will hear with less powerfull amp is more mid and high freq. sound because it is lacking power for the full dynamics.
To your ears it will sound harder than the 875 but the 875 will give you more dynamics,low freq. sound and control over the speakers. Those things require more power from an Amp.

When you listen to the most crappy HT system with the little "milk can" speakers and a sub (you know, the 15kW PMPO ones ;-) ) it is possible to create an annoying amount of noise but it will sound like sh*t.

Did you use audessey to calibrate the amp? You can try setting that to "off".
When I use the setup mic to calibrate I get bad measurements which cause the amp to produce less volume and dynamics.
I think room acoustics/background noise has a big influence on the measurements. I live in an very old appartment (1495) with on one side an 1m thick wall and the other side cardboard and an oak floor.

On my 875 the fans never kicked in as far as I know. In the summer the temps are topping at 68 degrees. I dont know if they are temp controlled or volume controlled tbh.
post #5619 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by superboy95 View Post

Hi.

I wouldn't believe it if I didn't experience it myself. I had the 605 for almost two years so I was very accustomed to the sound it produced. Like I said, I can hear richer, fuller sound...especially in the lower frequencies, but the overall volume just isn't there.

Hopefully it's just a setup error by me, but I don't know what it could be. What would cause the 875 to just stop producing volume gains around 65-70 % volume on the dial? I've check and triple checked the maximum volume and it's set to "off."

Side note...does this thing have a fan as the article you linked stated? I have dual dc fans on the top of it. It gets damn hot without them and i've never heard a fan come on.

Thanks again.

That's odd; my 875 displays volume in db with respect to reference, not percentages. I can confirm that -65db is indeed too quiet for my configuration after calibration.
post #5620 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noubourne View Post

That's odd; my 875 displays volume in db with respect to reference, not percentages. I can confirm that -65db is indeed too quiet for my configuration after calibration.

Volume display can be changed from -reference scale to a 0-100 scale. The later is what I'm using.
post #5621 of 6043
I am coming from a Denon 788. Source switching on the Denon 788 was instant and silent.

I am not too bothered by the clicking on the 875 going from one source to another, but I am bugged by the delay. Note my receiver is updated to the latest firmware.

On my Xbox 360, when switching between items in the dashboard, the audio source format changes - sometimes from stereo to DD 5.1. There is a significant delay in the Onkyo swapping from one source format to another. Enough to miss sound effects and/or the beginning of an audio track.

Anyone know why this happens? Is it related to the upscaling features or something? Any way for me to adjust a setting in the receiver to remove this?
post #5622 of 6043
Hi All:

Question on L-PCM from hdmi to the Onkyo875. I understand with the PS3 (old version) in order to get the HD audio you have to selet Linear and let the PS3 decode the signal to the separate 5.1 or 7.1 channels. Then the Onkyo simply takes the decode audio and sends it as a multichannelm amplifies it and sends it to the speakers.

Would this be the same with say a motorola cable box. I have a DCX3400 and if I set the hdmi audio setting to "through", I do get the flags on my reciever that say dolby. But I also use a powered splitter that sends the hdmi from the cable box to my reciever and also to another TV in my bedroom. But upstairs the audio will drop out, even if i change the channel or power off the TV. I keep getting a message that says.......

"incompatible audio signal, please check the device settings"

I get this from my sharp 46D64u and I've switched out boxes left and right and also did the lastest firmware for the TV. The only way I can fix it is by going into the user settings of the motorola cable box and selecting it to "L-PCM" The only that sucks about that is that it doesnt stick or stay. I mean it'll stay if I power off the tv and cable box upstairs. But if go back downstairs and use the onkyo and cable. Something happens, not everytime, but the cable box audio setting will swicth out of L-PCM and back to AUTO. Which okay when im down stairs and listening to dolby. But If I go upstairs I get the error message again.

Thanks for any advice or help you can provide.
post #5623 of 6043
By the way, I checked the service manual and the fan is controlled by both the temp and voltage. The manual is on my other comp, will post pcture of table fot those who is interested tomorrow.
post #5624 of 6043
Today the HDMI video output stopped working on my Onkyo 875

Directv HR20->onkyo input 3
XBMC PC->Onkyo input 4
Onkyo->LG 60" TV

We had a recent power outage. Is there a menu setting that could have been reset?
post #5625 of 6043
You could do the VCR hold down procedure, it will reset everything, just make sure write down all yuor settings.
post #5626 of 6043
What is the procedure
post #5627 of 6043
To reset the AV receiver to its factory defaults,
turn it on and, while holding down the [VCR/DVR]
button, press the [STANDBY/ON] button. “Clear”
will appear on the display and the AV receiver will
enter Standby mode.


Also, before you do that and reset everything, go into the Onkyo setup menu and then monitor out, and see if its set at HDMI. Maybe during the power outage it reset to the factory default, which is compnent output for the monitor output. You can do this on the front of the onkyo display if you can't see it on the tv.
post #5628 of 6043
Sorry if this has been brought up before, but the search didn't help and I'm at my wits end.

I had all my equipment working perfectly...until I moved. After I plugged my receiver back in I lost all my settings . When I play my PS3 or watch a Blu-ray it shows that all my speakers are in use. When I switch to a DVD or my HD cable box, it only shows that sound is coming out of FL & FR. Everything is hooked up through HDMI. Any help with this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance
post #5629 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyman85 View Post

Sorry if this has been brought up before, but the search didn't help and I'm at my wits end.

I had all my equipment working perfectly...until I moved. After I plugged my receiver back in I lost all my settings . When I play my PS3 or watch a Blu-ray it shows that all my speakers are in use. When I switch to a DVD or my HD cable box, it only shows that sound is coming out of FL & FR. Everything is hooked up through HDMI. Any help with this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

I would make sure the settings of the source components are set to multichannel output


Warren
post #5630 of 6043
Hey guys, i am considering buying a 875 used and need some input. I have an older (2002) pioneer elite that puts out 100wpc and i am using analog inputs i am extremely happy with this receiver. Considering the 875 for more power and so i can once again get a ps3. Should i steer clear of the 875, does it just run too hot and have to many failures? Thanks for your help and input.
post #5631 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIT RATE MASTER View Post

Hey guys, i am considering buying a 875 used and need some input. I have an older (2002) pioneer elite that puts out 100wpc and i am using analog inputs i am extremely happy with this receiver. Considering the 875 for more power and so i can once again get a ps3. Should i steer clear of the 875, does it just run too hot and have to many failures? Thanks for your help and input.

The 875 is a brute of an Amp. I'm sure you would notice a step up from your current one. The 875 is warm, but as long as it isn't placed inside a cabinet, you will be fine.
post #5632 of 6043
Anything specific i should look for when i am checking it out? I am worried about the longevity and reliability of the amp, i feel like the 8 year old pioneer has another 8 years in it, i will be sellling it if i get this onkyo
post #5633 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIT RATE MASTER View Post

Anything specific i should look for when i am checking it out? I am worried about the longevity and reliability of the amp, i feel like the 8 year old pioneer has another 8 years in it, i will be sellling it if i get this onkyo

Why get rid of the Pioneer if you are happy with it? Hopefully not for just 40 watts more?
post #5634 of 6043
I really would like some more power, i am driving klipsch rf-82s, so yes the more wattage is a real big part of it. Also stepping up to hdmi would be nice, although i dont play many games i wouldnt mind getting a ps3 again. Right now i am using analog inputs to get the hd codecs. Any more advice would be great, not going to check the receiver out for a few more days. Can anyone give me an idea of what a good deal would be on one of these?
post #5635 of 6043
You don't need much power to drive ANY Klipsch speaker - you won't have enough difference in power to worry about if the difference is 40 watts.

For example... it is generally accepted that a 10 dB increase in SPL (aka "volume") is what people call "twice as loud". In other words, if you hear sound at 70 dB, you'd think 80 dB was about twice as loud and 60 dB would be about half as loud.

You have to double amplifier watts to get a 3 dB increase in SPL (volume level). That means for an amplifier to play any speaker "twice as loud", you would have to double the amplifier power a little more than 2 times. That means a 100 w amp would have to be about 480 watts for you to double the sound pressure level (aka volume). Going from 90 watts to 125 watts is NOTHING. Your maximum sound pressure level would go up maybe 1 or 1.25 dB.

Your Klipsch speakers are rated at 98 dB for 1 watt at 1 meter. That means probably 95 dB at a more typical listening distance (say 8 feet or so). 95 dB is LOUD... too damn loud to be listening to for any length of time. Hearing damage begins within 5 minutes at sustained sound pressure levels of 95 dB or more. 95 dB is the reference level for movies... which I find to be too loud. You'll get 98 dB with just 2 watts, 101 dB with just 4 watts, 104 dB with 8 watts, 107 dB with 16 watts, 110 dB with 32 watts. Nobody in their right mind would listen to their system playing that loudly - it is bordering on the threshold of pain. To say nothing of how fast it can damage your hearing.

Do you STILL think you need more power for the speakers? Hint: You shouldn't.

More power isn't the real issue. If your Pioneer is 8 years old, the sound quality SUCKS. All AVRs had sucky sound quality back then. Something happened about 3 years ago... some power amp ICs (integrated circuits) began appearing that sound surprisingly good. That's what is in the 875... it and just about every AVR I've heard in the last 3 years all sound MUCH better than older AVRs. Prior to about 3 years ago, AVRs sounded uniformly dark, compressed, thin, closed-in, and had very unimpressive highs and poor bass quality. Newer AVRs sound so much better it's hard to describe - everything is better from bottom to top.

So forget more watts as being any sort of influence on whether you need a newer AVR or not. You should focus entirely on better sonics and more "modern" features. But keep in mind, the 875 is already old enough that it doesn't support any of the "latest" features like 3D.
post #5636 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

More power isn't the real issue. If your Pioneer is 8 years old, the sound quality SUCKS. All AVRs had sucky sound quality back then

I don't agree with that..you must have been listening to the wrong units

In fact there there are several from the 8 + years ago time period...if playing the same format.... that sound much better than the 875
some examples include
Yamaha RXV1, Pioneer VSX-47tx, and Denon 5700, Harman 8000 etc

I own an 875 and have owned in the past all of the above units above excluding the Denon, Harman units

if you like analog audio and 2 channel stereo...there are several older units that will blow the 875 away

The HDMI capability makes the 875 much easier to use than the older units...and using one of the older receivers dictates that you buy a very good blu ray player( oppo, pioneer elite, denon) than has analog out and great DAC's

With the 875 you can buy a cheap blu ray player and use the HDMI pass through for sound and let the 875 Reon chip do the upconverting of non-HD material

Warren
post #5637 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by turnne1 View Post

I don't agree with that..you must have been listening to the wrong units

In fact there there are several from the 8 + years ago time period...if playing the same format.... that sound much better than the 875
some examples include
Yamaha RXV1, Pioneer VSX-47tx, and Denon 5700, Harman 8000 etc

I own an 875 and have owned in the past all of the above units above excluding the Denon, Harman units

if you like analog audio and 2 channel stereo...there are several older units that will blow the 875 away

The HDMI capability makes the 875 much easier to use than the older units...and using one of the older receivers dictates that you buy a very good blu ray player( oppo, pioneer elite, denon) than has analog out and great DAC's

With the 875 you can buy a cheap blu ray player and use the HDMI pass through for sound and let the 875 Reon chip do the upconverting of non-HD material

Warren

I am reporting exactly what I have experienced. Earlier AVRs sounded MUCH better when you use external amplifiers. Modern AVRs (last 3 years or so) sound MUCH better using their internal amplifiers than they used to. The Onkyo is included. I've heard (mid-to-high priced) AVRs from the 1980s and 1990s that would alter the sound so much into "serious" speakers (those with more complex loads) that they could make Elton John's voice sound like it probably did when he was 11 years old. This was all related to the limited capabilities of the amplifiers. And I've heard several Pioneer receivers from 7 to 10 years old and as far as I'm concerned, my observations stand with those as well. In fact, I have a 4-year-old Pioneer AVR I paid for to have as a reference and the 2 year old Onkyo sounds far better.
post #5638 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

I am reporting exactly what I have experienced. Earlier AVRs sounded MUCH better when you use external amplifiers. Modern AVRs (last 3 years or so) sound MUCH better using their internal amplifiers than they used to. The Onkyo is included. I've heard (mid-to-high priced) AVRs from the 1980s and 1990s that would alter the sound so much into "serious" speakers (those with more complex loads) that they could make Elton John's voice sound like it probably did when he was 11 years old. This was all related to the limited capabilities of the amplifiers. And I've heard several Pioneer receivers from 7 to 10 years old and as far as I'm concerned, my observations stand with those as well. In fact, I have a 4-year-old Pioneer AVR I paid for to have as a reference and the 2 year old Onkyo sounds far better.

I don't find that to be the case at all

what specific older Pioneer etc AVR's were you using for comparo purposes?

In my home set up...I have an Onkyo 875 in one room and Onkyo PRSC885 Pre amp( basically an Onkyo 905 without an amplifier section) with a Sherbourn 5/1500A multichannel amp( 200x5) in the family room. The family room speakers are the atlantic technology 350thx ultra speaker system. One that has a reported impedence of 4-6 ohm. The other room has a set of 8 ohm kefs being driven by the 875
While I have never swapped the speakers between rooms...there is a HUGE difference in the sound of the 875 and Onkyo pre pro/Sherbourn combo
Some attributed to the speakers..no doubt...but most of that attributed to the sherbourne amp vs the internal one of the 875
I am a fan of the 875...esp for the $599 I paid...but it has shortcomings...especially in the analog section. Most people probably are not buying the unit for that reason...to get a stellar digital and analog section in an AVR these days dictates thousands...the Denon 5308 comes to mind

in fact to compare the same brand...I have the older Pioneer VSX-47TX...which was a 3K piece 8 years ago. I also have a Pioneer SC07. The SC07 is highly regarded...both in these forums and A/V testing publication. Other than the new codecs that it can process and its room correction technology..I would say its older brother the VSX-47TX is a much better unit especially when pushed hard in a low impedence situation or using any analog audio source

But hey..if you think the newer units sound better..that is great as your opinion is a less expensive option


Warren
post #5639 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

Earlier AVRs sounded MUCH better when you use external amplifiers.

By the way...I have to ask the question/make the statement as I have seen this mentioned several times
Why would anyone buy a receiver and then use it as a preamp only?
There are preamps available and always have been
As I understood it one of the advantages is to have separation of the heat from the amp and the other internal circuitry of the unit...further to this the more expensive units always seems to have better isolated components built into them


Warren
post #5640 of 6043
Quote:
Originally Posted by turnne1 View Post

By the way...I have to ask the question/make the statement as I have seen this mentioned several times
Why would anyone buy a receiver and then use it as a preamp only?
There are preamps available and always have been
As I understood it one of the advantages is to have separation of the heat from the amp and the other internal circuitry of the unit...further to this the more expensive units always seems to have better isolated components built into them


Warren

The issue comes up because the lower cost stand-alone processors' prices tend to start at $1500 or so and go up from there. An AVR model without the amplifiers but similar sound quality if you bypass the amplifiers may sell for $1000 or even less. The surround processor may carry some extra features like XLR inputs and/or outputs that the comparable AVR doesn't have - but the circuit boards inside may be the same circuit boards used in a less expensive AVR.

As you move into higher price ranges and non-Asian manufacturers, you tend to see processors that may not have AVR "brothers" - but if the company does sell an AVR, there's a good chance there's a lot in common between the AVR and processor. We assume a $2000 processor is going to be "better" than a $2000 AVR, but it may not necessarily be true if you bypass the $2000 AVR's amps. Now... if you are going to spend $2000 on a processor, you probably would go for the stand-alone processor since there's no reason to confuse things with idling amplifiers in a $2000 AVR. But if you can get a $1000 AVR that sounds as good as a $2000 processor... bypassing the internal amplifiers might sound like a great way to save $1000 since you are going to have the external amps for the $2000 processor anyway.

When I review an AVR, it is always helpful to know how the front-end performs and how the "back end" or amplifier section performs as separate entities even though few owners may ever use the AVR that way. But some enthusiasts on a budget might consider something like an AVR selling for, say $800 or even less if the front-end sounds great because their stand-alone processor options may not start until well over $800. They won't care about the amplifier sound as long as the front-end processing works well.

Something very significant happened with the sound quality of AVRs in general about 3 years ago - I still don't know what it is... but it is NOT digital amplifiers as the AVRs I find to have good-sounding amplifier sections don't have digital amplifiers. AVRs still can't control a speaker like a decent stand-alone amp... they just don't have the power supply capability to provide the drive capabilities, especially in the bass octaves, that you get from a good standalone amp. Of course, the whole AVR may cost less than a good stereo stand-alone amp... you do (often) get what you pay for in external amps. I have stereo amps here that have a transformer or transformers that weigh more than entire AVRs... and that's a key to getting superior current-drive and control capabilities. The sound quality improvement in AVR amps has been observed in AVRs with both integrated circuit amps and discrete transistors. I remain a non-fan of digital amplifiers, though some standalone high-ish-end digital amps are starting to sound pretty good.

Another AVR feature that had been appearing in more and more AVRs in recent years is the ability to assign amplifier channel in several different ways including bi-amplifying the front main speakers - this has made a HUGE difference in driving my reference speakers (Vandersteen 3A Signature nominal 6-ohm rating with 2 or 3 dips to 4 ohms or so). A single 125 watt AVR amp driving these speakers typically sounds very uninspiring but when these are bi-amped with good AVR amps, they sound FAR better... good enough that one could live with the AVR's amps whereas 4 or more years ago, an AVR in a similar place in the product line (no fair comparing an earlier top of the line model to a current middle-of-the-line model) would not produce sound that's very listenable.

If you are discussing top of the line AVRs ONLY... I don't see the big changes I've encountered in mid-priced and lower-priced models. Denon's top of the line hasn't changed much over the years, for example.
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