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'Mad Men' on AMC HD - Page 5

post #121 of 2329
Give me Hendricks allday, anyday...she looks like she actually enjoys life...an occasional beer, etc...not someone sitting around starving themselves and anyone else around.
post #122 of 2329
I normally like the slow pace this show goes at but this episode comes as close to "nothing happened" as any I've seen. We got a little more character reveal but that was it. Did any of the plots advance an inch? And did we really have to hear Paul sing?
post #123 of 2329
I enjoyed this episode. Don't agree that nothing much happened; it was pure 'Mad Men' character study. We found out a little more about Peggy's wild side, and the pot scenes - circa early 60's - were pretty funny. We found out that Don is, underneath it all, still a proletarian at heart. We found out that Roger really does love his new young wife, and is desperate for everyone to see it. We found out that Betty is still vulnerable to flattery and open to temptation (and we'll probably see more of that guy). We found out that her dad has an ol' softie side, and maybe isn't as forgetful as he makes out. And we saw more seeds of discontent being sown in Joan's calculated path to the finer things in life. And didn't Christina Hendricks just knock it out of the park again? That accordion scene was wonderful. As was Peggy's earnest affirmation of her life to her - her! - very own secretary. Lots of great moments this week.
post #124 of 2329
I guess I didn't find these character revelations all that surprising.

Peggy's wild side? She's already had a baby out of wedlock and just slept with a guy from a bar. We already knew she had a secretary.

Betty open to flattery? When did we she think she wasn't?

Don's proletarian "acting" was interesting. Inside every successful man there's a Charles Foster Kane with a Rosebud in his garage, but remember Don is a chameleon. He can switch roles to fit into any social situation. He can hang out with New York high society or hang out with beatniks in the Village. I think part of his success has been the ability to see what various people want and expect from not only him, but from advertisements.

Roger loves his new wife. Give it time. He also loved his former wife as we saw after he had a heart attack and he burst into tears when she arrived (wonderful scene). Don confronting him about his "conspicuous happiness" (I think that was Roger's phrase) was great. Perhaps Don's brutal honesty will lead to more tension between them.

Betty's dad has a soft side. Nice, but where is this going? Looked like a ten minute filler one-off subplot to me.

Joan playing the accordion wasn't as painful as Paul singing but was also obviously filler.
post #125 of 2329
These last two episodes have been a drastic improvement over the season opener (in my opinion, obviously). I loved the little things in this episode. The only big event was Don telling Roger that people think he's a fool. That may reverberate for some time.

I know it's not this episode, but I just have to mention this line: "You ever get three sheets to the wind and try that thing on?"

-R
post #126 of 2329
From USA Today - Veteran ad exec says 'Mad Men' really were about sex, booze

Jennifer S. Altman, USA TODAY
Jerry Della Femina is an advertising executive at Della Femina/Rothschild/Jeary and Partners and was a real-life "Mad man."


Craig Blankenhorn, AMC
In a scene from "Mad Men," ad execs hang out at a club with women who aren't their wives.

AMC cable TV drama Mad Men— a critics' favorite that recently opened its third season to its largest audience ever — depicts a hard-drinking, chain-smoking, casual-sex-in-the-office lifestyle for top ad agency executives in the 1960s. How much of this is made-for-TV embellishment — and how much is real?

USA TODAY marketing reporter Bruce Horovitz took that question to Jerry Della Femina, the veteran ad exec widely regarded as one of Madison Avenue's biggest personalities, most creative thinkers and an over-the-top publicity-seeker. At 73, Della Femina is still a force in the ad biz. He got into it some 57 years ago, starting at age 16 in a Manhattan ad agency mailroom. Currently, he's chairman, CEO and executive creative director at New York agency Della Femina/Rothschild/Jeary and Partners. He's also a successful restaurant owner and a best-selling author. Trade magazine Advertising Age ranks him among the "100 most influential advertising people of the 20th century."

In a no-holds-barred interview, Della Femina, known for his trademark shaved head and aviator glasses, sets the record straight: All the drinking, smoking and sex depicted on Mad Men may be an understatement.

Q: Did ad agency executives really drink that often — and that much — in the 1960s?

A: If anything, it's underplayed. There was a tremendous amount of drinking. Three-martini lunches were the norm.

Q: At your agency, too?

A: My (former) agency, Della Femina Travisano & Partners, had five top people. We'd go to the Italian Pavilion (now Michael's in Manhattan), and as we walked through the door, the bartender would see us and start shaking the martinis. As we were being seated at the table, he'd put them down. Everyone had one, and without even asking, the second would arrive. Then, while we were still looking at the menu, the third would arrive.

Q: This was lunch?

A: This was lunch. Then we'd order food and a bottle of wine. Then, when lunch was over, invariably at dessert time, someone would ask for a double scotch and drink it, and then we'd go back to work.

Q: How could you possibly work after that?

A: The only thing that saved us was that the clients and agencies that we were going back to drank as much as we did. One time, while pitching the Geritol account, my brain was so fried that I asked for far more money than I should have. I realized my mistake and told them — but they were still ready to give it to me.

Q: But the show makes it look like everyone kept a bottle or two in their desk drawer. And it wasn't Geritol.

A: Bottles in desk drawers were not the exception but the rule. I had an open bar at the agency in which I kept 10 to 15 bottles of booze. Anyone at the agency could walk in and get it. Invariably, one or two guys would come in at 9 a.m., pour a shot and slug it down. It was a business of drinking. The way we lived really would make the characters in Mad Men all look like Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. We drank and screwed around.

Q: And now?

A: Nobody drinks or screws around like that anymore. It all stopped (by the mid 1980s) when the financial guys took over. Maybe the agency chairman can still drink, but not the soldiers. Today it's about people looking at the bottom line. It's changed as a business. Mad Men is celebrating a time that no longer exists.

Q: Did agency executives really smoke that much?

A: I smoked three to four packs a day. Everybody smoked at all times in all meetings. Once, when I was sitting in a meeting for the Contac account, I had a (lit) cigarette in my hand and another in the ashtray. When I put down the cigarette to do a chalk talk, I tried to light the piece of chalk.

Q: Was some of that smoking to kiss up to tobacco company clients?

A: We had two R.J. Reynolds brands (Winston Super Kings and Carter Hall pipe tobacco). The R.J. Reynolds guys would get off the elevator on our floor where we had two of those tall ashtrays filled with sand. The RJR guys would claw through the sand to see if there were butts from any other brands. These were executives. They wanted to know what our people were smoking.

Q: Did those clients smoke?

A: One time I went to visit RJR in Winston-Salem (N.C.). They hosted a big party at some country club, and they had a giant dance floor with everyone milling about. I walked up to the balcony and looked down and noticed that everyone was holding a cigarette — all the clients and all of their wives. But something wasn't right. I noticed that none of the cigarettes were lit. They were simply holding them. They believed the statistics.

Q: Do you still smoke?

A: I haven't touched a cigarette in 20 years. I have heavy allergies and developed asthma. The doctor said if I touched another cigarette, I'd die.

Q: Did agency execs really dress so snappily in the 1960s?

A: Yes, people dressed. We went to Brooks Brothers to get our uniforms. We certainly dressed better than any other business. Since we weren't bankers, doctors or lawyers, we could wear suits that were high fashion. The amount of money we had to spend on clothes, well, this was the kind of money we thought we'd never have. All for writing a headline or some body copy or doing a nice layout. It was more money than we could possibly spend. A lot of people were afraid it would go away. And it was that fear that led people to drink, smoke and screw around.

Q: As long as you're alluding to it, what about all the office sex depicted on the show?

A: There was a tremendous amount of sex. I don't know of a single marriage that survived that time. My first marriage ended after 24 years.

Society had changed. Suddenly, it wasn't just the WASP establishment living the good life. Suddenly, there were ethnics and kids — who once hoped they could earn $12,000 per year — earning fortunes.

All of this money shocked us people in the middle of it. We lived a Hollywood life. Did I grow up thinking I'd ever be paged at the Beverly Hills Hotel? Did I ever think I'd make so much money writing ads? No. It was a lot of people in a great celebration.

But no one wanted to go home. It was too good. There was too much booze, too many cigarettes and too many women. People found themselves in this wonderful gold rush. Mad Men only touches on how wild it was. It was beyond whatever I thought could happen to my life.

Q: Can you give one example of this "tremendous amount of sex" at your former agency?

A: We used to have an agency "sex" contest near the end of every year. … We'd go to a no-name Mexican restaurant, … and we'd drink giant margaritas all day. It was an idea I had when I realized our people were spending too much time talking and thinking about sex, and not working it.

We'd take a blind vote to name the person at the agency you'd most want to go to bed with. We also took a vote on the person of the same sex you'd like to go to bed with. We did this for 15 years. I'd get to announce the winners each year. The first prize was a weekend at The Plaza hotel for the winning couple. Second prize was one night at The Plaza. The third prize was a night on Ron Travisano's office couch. People took this very seriously. Of course, the clients didn't know about it. One year, we had to rip down signs about the contest when a client unexpectedly showed up at the agency.

Q: Was this contest for real — or for fun?

A: Only one couple took advantage of it.

Q: Were you, perhaps, half of that winning couple?

A: I did win one year. It was a great honor. My wife even asked me why I got home so late from the party. But, no, I didn't take advantage of winning.
post #127 of 2329
The extras on the DVD/Blu-ray releases cover this in great detail in an interview with a Mad Man. He also described how the entry of women executives changed the workplace atmosphere but were necessary for the business because the men didn't have a clue how to advertise to women (the "Jackie or Marylin" ads from last season were a great example).

He said things were wild because their jobs didn't involve much work.
post #128 of 2329
Mad Men has been renewed for a fourth season.
post #129 of 2329
That's good news!
post #130 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipdrive View Post

And didn't Christina Hendricks just knock it out of the park again? That accordion scene was wonderful.

When her fiancé said she played an instrument, I would have bet lunch he would bring out a Ukulele (or a Sax) along the lines of "Some Like It Hot".
In any case, it was a great bit of business...
post #131 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kib View Post

When her fiancé said she played an instrument, I would have bet lunch he would bring out a Ukulele (or a Sax) along the lines of "Some Like It Hot".
In any case, it was a great bit of business...

And, I enjoyed it thoroughly. That woman is the entire deal; beauty, talent, brains, attitude, and on and on....
post #132 of 2329
Was that Conrad Hilton (Connie) at the bar with Don? born in San Antonio if I remember correctly...
post #133 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kib View Post

When her fiancé said she played an instrument, I would have bet lunch he would bring out a Ukulele (or a Sax) along the lines of "Some Like It Hot".
In any case, it was a great bit of business...

Nope, my first thought was immediately an accordian; plus, how sexy.
post #134 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by barhoram View Post

Was that Conrad Hilton (Connie) at the bar with Don? born in San Antonio if I remember correctly...

That was what my wife thought, as well. With this show, it's hard to know how a scene like that figures in--will we see 'Connie' again? Or was that exchange just to reveal something about Don?

All in all, a good episode, and when I found myself getting impatient, I had to remind myself that this show has a rhythm of it's own, and that's what makes it great. Sometimes, not a lot seems to happen, so you just spend time with some pretty great characters.
post #135 of 2329
Again, brilliant from start to finish. Sorry, skeptics.
post #136 of 2329
Of course the best quote of all time:

Quote:


I'm Peggy Olson, and I would like to smoke some marijuana.
post #137 of 2329
Now that's how you make a proper drink.
post #138 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by McDonoughDawg View Post

Now that's how you make a proper drink.

And a mess on the bar for someone else to clean up. Don is no "prole."
post #139 of 2329
Poor Sal, His sham marriage is ironically the strongest relationship on the show, yet had to do the Ann-Margaret bit so well that his wife is on to him.

Amazing how they made posting a simple "Roommate Needed" note on a bulletin board become an exercise in effective advertising.
post #140 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Amazing how they made posting a simple "Roommate Needed" note on a bulletin board become an exercise in effective advertising.

I thought it was more of an exercise in illustrating how someone so talented and accomplished professionally could be so inept socially.
post #141 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

I thought it was more of an exercise in illustrating how someone so talented and accomplished professionally could be so inept socially.

Or how wasted Joanie is in her current job.
post #142 of 2329
Quote:


Again, brilliant from start to finish. Sorry, skeptics.


I think episodes 2-4 have been great. It was the opener that stunk up the room.

-R
post #143 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

I thought it was more of an exercise in illustrating how someone so talented and accomplished professionally could be so inept socially.

Or how she wasn't aware that she could apply her professional talents to her social life. She didn't realize that she was "advertising" for a room mate.
post #144 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reagan View Post

I think episodes 2-4 have been great. It was the opener that stunk up the room.

-R

Try 1-4, the season opener was excellent, because it had continuity without easy explainations just as if you dropped back in months later.
post #145 of 2329
"Nothing about the Holy Father."
"He's still dead, Ma."
post #146 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sangs View Post

Or how wasted Joanie is in her current job.

Well, from her point of view, sure, but from management POV, she's a keeper in that position.
post #147 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Poor Sal, His sham marriage is ironically the strongest relationship on the show, yet had to do the Ann-Margaret bit so well that his wife is on to him.

i thought the same thing, the look on her face was priceless.
post #148 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken H View Post

Well, from her point of view, sure, but from management POV, she's a keeper in that position.

She has more talent than half the dopes in the place. And I'm not just saying that because of, you know, obvious reasons a guy like me might say that.
post #149 of 2329
Quote:
Originally Posted by sangs View Post

She has more talent than half the dopes in the place. And I'm not just saying that because of, you know, obvious reasons a guy like me might say that.

You are looking at it from 2009 morals. From 1963 morals, she is in her place. Women like Joan were to be looked at and make snide remarks about. She was the unobtainable "Marilyn" physically and a "bitch" mentally. And that shaped her internally. That is why she knows the "ways of the world" in ways other women on the show don't. That is how she survives. She uses her assets to exhibit control, not her skill as Peggy is trying to do. Joan is a feminist at heart but will never break out to be one because it will mean she has to change too much internally and externally. She is too comfortable in her skin at this point. She knows how to work the system to her advantage. And that is what makes Joan such a great character and why she on occasions has some of the best lines and scenes in the show. And Christina Hicks pulls it off very well. Peggy optimizes one type woman of the period and Joan another. Olive another. Betty another. Watch closely. The show really isn't about the men, but the women of the period. Look at it in those terms and you see a whole other level of writing.

America was a MUCH different place in 1963 on many moral and social levels. You can't really compare apples to apples in that regard. Remember, Civil Rights were still 2 years away from being passed at this point in the show. I suspect they are setting Peggy up to be a future feminist. Now THAT could be interesting. She has all the signs of it.
post #150 of 2329
Oh, I know that fox. I'm just saying. These "brilliant" guys have a golden nugget right under their noses and all they want to focus on are her other assets. Put Joanie in Peggy's place and just imagine how much more successful she'd be. Then again, maybe I'm biased, seeing as I'm in love with her.
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