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Playing with my new toy. XG-110 - Page 3

post #61 of 107
Nautikal is pretty much correct. Moving raster centering will move astig core a bit. Moving astig will move raster centering a bit. Start with static at 0.

Dropzone if your stressing save it for later when you have more time. Doug
post #62 of 107
Thread Starter 
Jeff and Doug, thanks for the pointers on astig. I think I will wait until after my little get together to try that. I was up doing geometry and convergence until midnight last night. I could not hold my eyes open any longer. Doug, I can say without reservation that you and the other guys that do this for a living are worth every penny. Hopefully one day I can have someone set this thing up in a way that truly does it justice. Until then...I will keep squinting at the screen and pushing buttons in the dark.
post #63 of 107
Thread Starter 
Well, continuing with the room dressing I am posting a few pictures of the curtains we made to cover my ugly white walls. I started out thinking I was only going to cover the side walls but it turns out I had plenty of fabric to frame out the screen wall as well.

I bought 35 yards of soft suede in ebony from Fabric.com. Highly recommend them as they were very quick to ship and your first order ships for $2.99! In this shot we had been through about half of the fabric.


The first piece goes up on the wall. Starting at the front left corner and working back. At this point we were not even thinking about the screen wall because I was not sure I had enough fabric. I was not sure how much fabric would be used to achieve the pleating effect I was hoping for. This fabric as with most was 54" wide. I had figured at worst case I would get panels at 30" wide after pleating. Luckily, it ended up being more like 42" wide after pleating. Therefore, the walls got covered with fewer panels than originally anticipated and I knew after the first wall went up that there would be extra fabric. Sweet.


You can see here how the panels went up. We attached the fabric to the same 1x2 pine strips we had been using for the pelmet frame. The original plan was to attempt to staple the fabric directly to the bottom rail. This would have meant a lot of climbing up and down the ladder and an awkward position for stapling. Instead we did all of this on tables at waist level and then secured the panel directly above the bottom rail. This also provided some extra height to the top edge of the fabric and will do a better job of hiding things underneath the pelmet header pieces.


Here you can see the top edge where the fabric panels were attached to the 1x2 pine strips. The edges of the fabric were ragged from making cuts but all of this is hidden anyway.


Now this stuff is just too cool. I don't own a sewing machine and I did not plan on buying one for this project. For about $2 a roll I found this hemming tape which is basically double sided tape for fabric. Worked like a charm for hemming the bottom edge of the fabric to the correct length and to hide the frayed end of the fabric.

post #64 of 107
Thread Starter 
Here is a shot of a complete wall but before doing any side hemming. The material falls so well that you really don't notice the breaks from side to side. I was pleased that we were able to achieve the pleated effect all the way across the wall.


The other wall almost finished.


Both side walls are pretty much complete at this point and we begin to think about covering the screen wall.


Here is the first screen wall corner panel. Same principal as the others except that the wood strips and fabric panels are shorter. Pleats are closer together but continue in the same direction as each opposing wall.


Here is the other side. Now to fill in the gaps with a top and bottom panel.


A view from the rear of the room shows that things are really starting to take shape. It was interesting to note the changes in sound and lighting as we went along. I have no acoustical treatments of any kind in this room and it was just an extra bedroom so not ideally isolated or treated. However, we noticed a distinct softening and deadening right away as the fabric began to soak up reflections of both light and sound. It got more and more difficult to see in there!


Here we are with the top panel hung and framing of the screen is almost complete. I was very glad that we had enough fabric to cover these areas as I would have had to buy actual curtains and probably would not have been able to achieve the same look.


Here we have the bottom panel secured and it's pretty much finished! I will get more pictures once all of the junk is out of the room and the pelmet header pieces are attached above the curtains. This stage of the project took all day Saturday and a few hours on Sunday to complete. Once we figured out the pleat spacing and how to maintain the consistent look everything went pretty smoothly. The most time consuming parts were cutting the fabric and stapling it to the wood strips. If I had this to do over again I would get a larger working surface as my two tables were just not wide enough to roll out a 54" wide bolt of fabric and really spread things out. We worked around it but it would have saved time had we not had to handle the fabric so much. A few things for those that might consider doing something like this. An electric stapler is a life saver and was $30 well spent! The hemming tape is inexpensive and works really well for projects like this. Walmart had it in their craft section for about $2 for a roll of 60 yards. We ended up using about 4 rolls. Fabric pencils! We did not have one and just made do with a marker which did not do a good job of marking the fabric. About half way through we found a piece of chalk and this worked better. Next time I would pick up a few fabric pencils and save a lot of time and headaches. The staples we used were T50 3/8" which was perfect for securing the fabric and getting just the right depth into the wood.


I think that's about it. The next pictures should be of the completed room!
post #65 of 107
It looks great so far. It will be interesting to hear your opinion on the change in picture now with the room treatment. On thing you may want to address with sound is the fact that with all of that fabric on the walls it will cut medium and high freq. quite well but may leave alot of problems with boomy bass, standing waves, and just a muddied sound overall in the low end. I am helping my son build his control room and isolation booth for his recording studio and when we applyed the foam treatment on the walls it seemed to be working but the bass started sounding bad before we started putting bass traps in the corners. If you have this problem I can post an easy and inexpensive way to build a bass trap. We are in the process of building a set and if I can borrow a camera, (my only camera is being repaired), I will be able to take pics. of the progress.
post #66 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larrykelly View Post

It looks great so far. It will be interesting to hear your opinion on the change in picture now with the room treatment. On thing you may want to address with sound is the fact that with all of that fabric on the walls it will cut medium and high freq. quite well but may leave alot of problems with boomy bass, standing waves, and just a muddied sound overall in the low end. I am helping my son build his control room and isolation booth for his recording studio and when we applyed the foam treatment on the walls it seemed to be working but the bass started sounding bad before we started putting bass traps in the corners. If you have this problem I can post an easy and inexpensive way to build a bass trap. We are in the process of building a set and if I can borrow a camera, (my only camera is being repaired), I will be able to take pics. of the progress.

Thanks Larry, I would be interested in that bass trap idea when you get the time. As for the picture, I am also in the process of redoing my setup and convergence of the projector but I can already tell that the perceived contrast is just so much better having that dark fabric all around the screen. It just really makes things pop so much more. I still have to run the setup on my receiver once I move the speakers back into the room so I'm not sure what kind of issues I will have but I suspect you are correct about the overbearing bass I will probably notice. Luckily, there is room in the corners for traps if it comes to that.
post #67 of 107
Wow that looks very nice! I wonder if you could somehow attach the curtains on the bottom and top of the screen to notches for easy masking. Hmmmm....
post #68 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NautikaL View Post

Wow that looks very nice! I wonder if you could somehow attach the curtains on the bottom and top of the screen to notches for easy masking. Hmmmm....

Yeah, that would be nice and I will probably work on something like that in a few weeks. Right now I'm just trying to get the room workable for Saturday because family will be coming over for my birthday. My fiancee has planned a movie themed party for me so I have been under the gun to make this look like something.
post #69 of 107
Thread Starter 
Here are some pictures of the room after everything was hung and ready to go. I still have more plans for the header pieces and the room in general.


Flash off, overhead track lighting and rope lights all on.


I really like the rope light and how the light follows the shape of the header on the ceiling and beneath.


Other side. A few more blocks to fill in as well as some paint touch up on the screws.


From the back of my little room. I hope to upgrade seating in the future.


The DIY speaker stands are one of my favorite items in the room. Adding sand to the PVC tubes really made them solid.
post #70 of 107
Looks very nice. Great job.
post #71 of 107
That looks very nice, do you mind if I ask how much the fabric cost.

Thanks,

Erik
post #72 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fellenz View Post

That looks very nice, do you mind if I ask how much the fabric cost.

Thanks,

Erik

It was about $176 for 35 yards and I had a few yards left over to do things like wrap that little center channel stand. Shipping was just $2.99 for my first order so I took advantage of that. Fabric.com is in Georgia so I received it in 2 days.
post #73 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropzone7 View Post

It was about $176 for 35 yards and I had a few yards left over to do things like wrap that little center channel stand. Shipping was just $2.99 for my first order so I took advantage of that. Fabric.com is in Georgia so I received it in 2 days.

Dude, that room is AWESOME. LOVE IT!!!!!

You should build some accoustic panels to put behind the curtains for sound treatments. VERY NICE ROOM!

Cliff
post #74 of 107
Lookin' good. Are you planing on darkening the celing in anyway?
post #75 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by overclkr View Post

Dude, that room is AWESOME. LOVE IT!!!!!

You should build some accoustic panels to put behind the curtains for sound treatments. VERY NICE ROOM!

Cliff

Thanks Big Dog! Now if I could just stumble across a G90 I would be set! Acoustic panels are my next project as soon as I can find a local source for Owens Corning 703 or something similar.
post #76 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogRocks View Post

Lookin' good. Are you planing on darkening the celing in anyway?

Yeah, it needs something doesn't it. Perhaps some panels suspended from the ceiling would tone down that nasty white.
post #77 of 107
So how are things coming along?
post #78 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NautikaL View Post

So how are things coming along?

Well, I'm pretty much done for now. I got a little refrigerator for Christmas and a Harmony 880 remote. Now we can have cold beer upstairs without having to leave the movie! I plugged up the remote and charged it but have not had a chance to set it up yet. I got several HD DVD's also that I need to crack open. I thought I was going to buy a new subwoofer a few days ago but the post holiday money situation made me think twice...
post #79 of 107
Thread Starter 
Cleaned up all of the Christmas decorations and mess today. We made a gingerbread house about a month ago and it's been a table center piece during December. Today I decided to give it a glorious death. It's amazing how resilient this little bastard was. I had to punch a small hole in the back wall and stuff it with napkins. Then I set those on fire and eventually the inside got hot enough to crack it open and it really started to burn then. I took a few pictures before it was totally consumed. By the time I took these the walls were already collapsing from the heat and flames and the roof started to crack open.







post #80 of 107
Ahhh, reminds me of the little pyro in me!!!!!

Cliffy
post #81 of 107
Thread Starter 
A few screenshots I took last night. I am still trying to figure out my camera but after some trial and error I felt that these most accurately represent what I am actually seeing. Aside from being a little out of focus in the pictures they look close.















post #82 of 107
This was probably the most fun I've had reading a post in a long long time. You and your dad applied some very nice innovative touches that are truly one of a kind.
I hope you don't mind but I'm going to steal your idea for the rope lights and film panels. Who did all the artwork on those?

As for the ceiling, Parts Express (and I'm sure a zillion other distributors) has 12x12 ribbed acoustic panels. I THINK there's something like 16 in a box. A dab of silicone on each corner will hold them up and you'll be able to get them down without ripping holes in the ceiling.

Very, VERY nice! The screenshots look great too BTW.

Greg
post #83 of 107
Thread Starter 
Greg, thanks so much for the kind words! It really was fun working on the room and I think my dad and I were kind of sad to see it done in a way. However, your suggestion about the acoustic tiles has got me thinking...that's a great idea and I will certainly look into it. I love Parts Express and have bought a ton from them already. By all means, take anything you can from what I have done and I hope you can make it work in your room. That was the whole point of me posting the pictures was in hopes that someone might be inspired or become interested. My girlfriend (now wife as of two weeks ago) did all of the painting of the film panels. We actually plan to go back and touch up the screw holes and also add some kind of embellishment to the joints where the pieces come together. I actually needed a little kick in the rear to get working on the room again so thanks a ton for the compliments AND the idea!
post #84 of 107
Thread Starter 
Well, I did a lot of tinkering this weekend and it paid off. I had this lingering green focus problem on the far right of the screen. Did optical focus and electronic focus over and over again. Worked on convergence and really helped things out there. Then I checked green astig and that solved my focus problem. The edge adjustment on the right side of the screen was pretty far off and tweaking astig there made a huge difference. I'm seeing the best video image I have ever squeaked out of this projector and I love it. I know it's not perfect, I know it needs more work but dam does it look good to me. I will try to get some more screenshots posted soon.
post #85 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropzone7 View Post

I will try to get some more screenshots posted soon.

Get your ass to work! I'm tired of posting all of these damn screenshots all the time!

Cliffy
post #86 of 107
Thread Starter 
Okay, so my camera skills still suck but here are a few from the DTS Demo.











post #87 of 107
Looking good!
post #88 of 107
Thread Starter 
So, just thinking out loud here and have posed the question over at Curt's forum as well. I'm picking up an XG852 locally which has a toasted green tube but appears to be in good shape otherwise. I think I understand that that 852 is considered a little nicer model than the 110 that I currently have. Along the lines of the PGXtra as compared to the PG or PG+. So, I'm thinking of taking the 110 down and changing my good green from that unit into the 852. Is there any reason why I should NOT do this? Am I asking for trouble and is it going to mean that I have to perform white balance procedures and astig on the 852 after the tube swap? I removed all three tubes from my plain PG over the weekend so I have a little experience with the removal part now. It's placing the magnetics back on the new(used) tube that concerns me and what kind of work I will be making for myself.
post #89 of 107
I didn't think the 852 was regarded as any better. From Curts website the 110 has a higher Horiz scan rate up to 110 while the 852 only goes to 85. It also has a higher listed max resolution.

I thought the main advantage it has over the 110 was component inputs. Might be wrong though...

If you have things all setup I wouldn't worry about swapping, although it isn't hard to do.

Nice looking theater again BTW.
post #90 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_mitch View Post

I didn't think the 852 was regarded as any better. From Curts website the 110 has a higher Horiz scan rate up to 110 while the 852 only goes to 85. It also has a higher listed max resolution.

I thought the main advantage it has over the 110 was component inputs. Might be wrong though...

If you have things all setup I wouldn't worry about swapping, although it isn't hard to do.

Nice looking theater again BTW.

That's exactly what I was thinking but I asked this question over at Curt's site and the few that have responded say that the 852 was a late model and included component inputs as you say in addition to the MCAT feature which allows a very quick convergence of red and blue once green is manually set for proper geometry. All in all, probably not much different in the sets but it is 3 years newer than mine and I would be interested in seeing how the MCAT feature works. I'm just worried about getting the green tubes swapped out correctly. I know I can do physical swap but I'm afraid of having to do mechanical astig on the green. I'm not sure if it would make a difference if I just swapped the tubes with all coils and magnets intact or not? Thanks for the compliment by the way, I need to do some more in that little room but it's just hard to find the time.
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