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MEMS-based displays (TMOS/DMS) news thread

post #1 of 137
Thread Starter 

TMOS (Time Multiplexed Optical Shutter) is a new type of transmissive display technology that could offer significant advantages over existing technologies in virtually all areas of display production and picture quality. They include:

- simplified production (TMOS consists of 6 layers and could be fabricated in as little as 12 steps vs. 128 for LCDs).
- scalability (TMOS displays could be as small as half an inch and as big as 110" or bigger).
- manufacturing capacity (one TMOS plant using roll-to-roll manufacturing could output more displays in less time than all the other existing LCD and PDP plants combined).
- with minor modifications, existing LCD plants could start mass producing TMOS displays soon.
- optical efficiency (TMOS allows >60% of light to pass from the backlight to the display surface while LCD allows only 5%).
- energy consumption (TMOS displays would use a tiny fraction of energy that LCDs and PDPs consume due to optical efficiency of TMOS and efficiencies inherent to LED or laser light sources).
- significantly increased lifetime (TMOS could work with either LED or laser illuminated backligths and would be limited only by the lifetimes of these light sources).
- 1 microsecond pixel response time.
- TMOS displays could be flexible and thin.

More info:
http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/s...leID=198001203
http://displaydaily.com/2007/05/23/u...-lcd-displays/
http://www.uni-pixel.net/overview.htm
http://www.uni-pixel.net/assets/unip...r_20070717.pdf

DMS (Digital Micro Shutter) is similar to TMOS and offers almost identical benefits in terms of manufacturing and picture quality. The main difference between the two lies in the implementation of the micro-electro-mechanical shutter layer.




More info:
http://www.pixtronix.com/technology/index.asp
http://www.pixtronix.com/downloads/P...Whitepaper.pdf

IMOD (Interferometric Modulator Display) is a reflective display that uses no backlight. Extremely low power consumption, excellent viewability in bright-light conditions. Currently limited to displays for mobile devices.




http://boredsysadm.blogspot.com/2008...n-display.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interfe...ulator_display
http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Art...technology.htm
http://www.qualcomm.com/common/docum...e_03-26-08.pdf
http://www.qualcomm.com/common/docum...rive_12-07.pdf
post #2 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by reio-ta View Post

That sounds cool!

Wonder if you can use laser backlight as your sig says and also if this can be used as a front projector? LCOS and DLP will be left in the dust.

RGB lasers can be used in front/rear projection as well as in BLUs. As good as LEDs are now, or will be in the future, they'll never match the benefits of lasers (efficiency, lifetime, cost, simplicity, and color gamut) and 2008 promises to be the beginning of a shift toward laser-based illumination.
http://www.videsignline.com/products/199601622
http://displaydaily.com/2007/05/24/n...in-long-beach/
http://www.novalux.com/
post #3 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by reio-ta View Post

Sorry, I meant I wonder if TMOS can be used as front and rear projection?

I don't think so. TMOS is essentially a transmissive display while front/rear projection is a reflective technology. TMOS is similar to LCD except with liquid crystal layer replaced by optical shutters that don't leak light and have better-than-OLED pixel response times.

Quote:


When in 2008 do you predict LASERs? Would it be good to wait until a LASER solution comes out? I've been waiting a long time to replace my CRT HDTV, I would like to go 60"+ but I only have about $4,500 and I dread lamp replacements

I think Mitsubishi plans on introducing Laser TV (thin RP) next year. Other companies have been working on this too and several consumer models should show up at CES08. We'll see. Personally, I'm also really excited about laser FP of the "scanning beam" flavor which should look spectacular.
post #4 of 137
"Blends color in time."

Doesn't that sound familiar? Wouldn't it have the same drawbacks as DLP- rainbows and headaches in some?
post #5 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by navychop View Post

"Blends color in time."

Doesn't that sound familiar? Wouldn't it have the same drawbacks as DLP- rainbows and headaches in some?

Artifacts usually associated with field sequential color don't exist at such extreme frequencies of operation. (At least that's what Unipixel claims).
post #6 of 137
For such a supposedly brilliant technology, Unipixel doesn't mention one number, like say contrast ratio, black level, % NTSC color gamut, etc. on their Advantages page. Instead, they fill the page with such inspiring rhetoric as:

"Brilliance/Energy Ratio"
"Simply Superior."

"we believe UniPixel will have measurable advantages"... now the question is not what UniPixel believes, but what I, and investors with cash, believe. Hard numbers are what I believe, produced with real measurement instruments on real products or prototypes.

Instead, of the numerous advantages they quote, those which are measureable are not measured. We are given no numbers for contrast ratio, color purity, response time, power consumption or 'brilliance' (maybe that one is lumens/watt, or lumens/m^2 ?)

I guess their new tech is so 'brilliant' that it is just beyond the scale of current measuring devices, much like the great SED in the sky...

And also like that legend, it will live on in the dreams of those such as Auditor55, and there only. Such is the future for this kind of technology, fortunately.

A milking cow for investor rape,
and off runs dracula in his cape,
his thirst satisfied he just pretended to try
then quickly let it wither and die.

To ask why he might entertain
the investor's eye and withered brain,
with thoughtless delusions of gain
is to ask why the rain falls upon wheaty grain.
post #7 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isochroma View Post

For such a supposedly brilliant technology, Unipixel doesn't mention one number, like say contrast ratio, black level, % NTSC color gamut, etc. on their Advantages page. Instead, they fill the page with such inspiring rhetoric as:

"Brilliance/Energy Ratio"
"Simply Superior."

Instead, of the numerous advantages they quote, those which are measureable are not measured. We are given no numbers for contrast ratio, color purity, response time, power consumption or 'brilliance' (maybe that one is lumens/watt, or lumens/m^2 ?)

Specs on their website:
http://www.unipixel.com/assets/press20070529.pdf
(15th slide)
post #8 of 137
"A milking cow for investor rape,
and off runs dracula in his cape,
his thirst satisfied he just pretended to try
then quickly let it wither and die.

To ask why he might entertain
the investor's eye and withered brain,
with thoughtless delusions of gain
is to ask why the rain falls upon wheaty grain."

Sounds like FMD.....
post #9 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtms View Post

Specs on their website:
http://www.unipixel.com/assets/press20070529.pdf
(15th slide)

UniPixel certainly made some big claims for TMOS in that chart though from the sounds of it they were only based on testing/modeling estimates. Also though several of the claims made about the other display technologies in that chart were wrong I was surprised that UniPixel would even try to claim that OLED would have a 450:1 contrast ratio. Did anyone else notice that?
post #10 of 137
Thanks for pointing that one out... Laughable as it is, I'll coin a new phrase by calling it and future progeny the '450 claim'.

Their PDF is chockablock full of claims, but I don't see a single working model to prove any of them. That is even worse than SED, which despite having lots of impressive working models is itself a bit DED right now.

You'd think with the touted simple, low-cost fabrication that they'd have at least one of their Simply Superior, Brilliant displays to show investors and maybe even the (god forbid) press? Zilch.
post #11 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isochroma View Post

Their PDF is chockablock full of claims, but I don't see a single working model to prove any of them. That is even worse than SED, which despite having lots of impressive working models is itself a bit DED right now.

Are you against new technologies or something? They just started working on this, relax. To claim this technology will fail at this early stage in its development is ridiculous. You don't know that. IMO, this technology has much more potential to replace LCDs than OLED which seems on its way to become the new SED.
post #12 of 137
What the hell. It costs nothing to see if they can pull it off. SED appears to have been toe tagged, and iFire has been doused, so OLED and perhaps this one, are the only futuristic options still breathing. I will say this for them; they have at least put some thought and effort into their website. It costs nothing to keep an eye on what they are doing.

...
post #13 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland View Post

What the hell. It cost nothing to see if they can pull it off. SED appears to have been toe tagged, and iFire has been doused, so OLED and perhaps this one, are the only futuristic options still breathing. I will say this for them; they have at least put some thought and effort into their website. It costs nothing to keep an eye on what they are doing.
...

Exactly. If chronic naysayers had their way we would still be stuck with B&W CRTs. Innovation and technological progress are good things. They promote higher quality and stimulate competition. MEMS-based technologies are in their infancy. We should all hope Unipixel and Pixtronix have their prototypes ready in a year or two. I really don't want to wait another 5-10 years for 50" OLED.
post #14 of 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtms View Post

Exactly. If chronic naysayers had their way we would still be stuck with B&W CRTs. Innovation and technological progress are good things. They promote higher quality and stimulate competition. MEMS-based technologies are in their infancy. We should all hope Unipixel and Pixtronix have their prototypes ready in a year or two. I really don't want to wait another 5-10 years for 50" OLED.

Yep!. You've got to beware of those Amish Videophiles who want us all to come over in our horse and buggies to catch their shadow puppet displays!.
post #15 of 137
@vtms: A little dose of skepticism to prevent this becoming another SED thread. I'm not against new technologies, but cast my evil gaze upon such operations as UniPixel. There seems to be a pattern emerging, one of these start-ups constantly milking investors and issuing periodic press releases, but not really getting a product to market, and sometimes not even a display to show their creditors.

I repeat, after two years and five months (probably longer, but since their news page's earliest article is February 2005 I'll be easy on them) of sucking up investor cash (including a $12 million infusion on February 14, 2007), they don't even have a working prototype.

If I owned any of their shares, it would be selling time next minute. They are just corporate welfare bums feeding at the trough of foolish investors. Even if their technology works and is remotely economic to mass-produce, they don't stand a chance against the LCD juggernaut.
post #16 of 137
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isochroma View Post

@vtms: A little dose of skepticism to prevent this becoming another SED thread. I'm not against new technologies, but cast my evil gaze upon such operations as UniPixel. There seems to be a pattern emerging, one of these start-ups constantly milking investors and issuing periodic press releases, but not really getting a product to market, and sometimes not even a display to show their creditors.

I repeat, after two years and five months (probably longer, but since their news page's earliest article is February 2005 I'll be easy on them) of sucking up investor cash (including a $12 million infusion on February 14, 2007), they don't even have a working prototype.

If I owned any of their shares, it would be selling time next minute. They are just corporate welfare bums feeding at the trough of foolish investors. Even if their technology works and is remotely economic to mass-produce, they don't stand a chance against the LCD juggernaut.

Okay, now I see what your point was. Anyway, let's see what happens. Actually, I've read somewhere that they had managed to produce some half-baked prototypes which helped them validate the technology. Who knows, maybe it's a big scam, but if it is, at least it is based on an interesting and technically plausible ideas. IMO, it's not a scam.
post #17 of 137
It does seem they have spent their porkbarrel funds well, by appointing themselves in a richly designed and built lab, photos of which they wisely omit on their site but show in the PDF:







Note the high-end car in the parking lot
post #18 of 137
Some more details on who the owners are:

http://sev.prnewswire.com/computer-e...9022005-1.html
post #19 of 137
This article may be of interest. Sort of recaps the competition.
post #20 of 137
Thread Starter 
post #21 of 137
Very interesting, but I see this idea going as far as hydrogen powered vehicles in the US. If it does happen it'll probably be on a very small scale for several years...
post #22 of 137
Thread Starter 
post #23 of 137
It's basically a SAH display so that = blur to some degree. Everybody's getting away from that now with BFI/120hz but these "fixes" may not be applicable to a time-based dithering display (or are they?).


post #24 of 137
Thread Starter 
Even OLED exhibits more SAH behavior than TMOS.
post #25 of 137
Thread Starter 
post #26 of 137
Thread Starter 
http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/i...422815_12.html
Quote:


/PRNewswire-FirstCall via COMTEX/ -- Uni-Pixel, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: UNXL), the developer of flat panel color display technology called Time Multiplexed Optical Shutter ("TMOS"), today announced it has successfully completed the assembly of a series of prototype TMOS display systems. Leveraging its recent agreement with and efforts supported by Philips' open innovation center, the MiPlaza Facility at the High Tech Campus in Eindhoven, Netherlands, UniPixel completed the assembly of six display prototype devices. This series of TMOS prototypes encapsulate a range of materials with varying attributes which will be tested and evaluated to determine the impacts of the variations in design and materials on system functionality.

Mr. Reed Killion, President of UniPixel, stated the following: "UniPixel set a goal to deliver prototype devices by the end of the year. The TMOS displays we have in house today meet that objective. The initial performance results we are seeing as we test each system fall right in line with our predictive models and associated expectations. We are very pleased with the performance of the TMOS prototype devices we have in the lab today. The pixel performance is good enough for full motion video and some of the prototypes are actuating under twenty volts. Over the course of the next few months we will put these systems through exhaustive testing to fully characterize and optimize each of the TMOS sub-systems. We expect these optimization efforts to further demonstrate the superior performance advantages that TMOS display technology offers. We look forward to announcing the test results from these TMOS prototypes as they are completed."
post #27 of 137
Thread Starter 
http://sst.pennnet.com/display_artic.../laser-tv.org/


Micrograph of TFT backplane with Opcuity film bonded on top. Source: Uni-Pixel [Opcuity is a trademark of Uni-Pixel]


Comparison of TMOS and LCD output based on light losses per layer. Source: Uni-Pixel.
post #28 of 137
Thread Starter 
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/s...8,395884.shtml
Quote:


At SID, UniPixel will unveil three TMOS display platforms, each developed for specific market applications. These include enunciator display systems that can be used for simple image and icon systems; dot-matrix display systems that can be used for alpha-numeric displays; and thin film transistor (TFT) systems that can be used in all types of electronic display products, ranging from cell phones to televisions.
post #29 of 137
Thread Starter 
http://www.tradingmarkets.com/.site/...0News/1745667/
Quote:


Results from UniPixel's lab tests found that the TFT-TMOS display operational voltage has been reduced to less than 12 volt operation -- allowing TFT panel manufacturers to use existing TFT processes to design TFT-TMOS backplanes. TMOS display pixel actuation (shutter speed of an on-to-off pixel) was measured to be less than two (2) microseconds. Leveraging this tremendous speed, TMOS systems have been measured running in excess of 150 frames per second of video output.
post #30 of 137
Thanks for the update.
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