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Is there any devices out there that will record HD on a DVD?  

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
See the question in the subject please.
post #2 of 12
I make short HD demo clips and music clips (from the tonight show) using PC based HD cards. I edit these and burn to CDR. You can get 5 min of HD transport stream files on a 700MB CDR. They play back fine from CDR using my DVD drive. If you have a DVD-W you should be able to get about a half hour. They won't play on a normal home DVD player, however.

Dave
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Can you view the CDR on your DVD player? What is the quality like? Does it come through as progressive? I wouldn't think it would because I read something that said it only records 350 lines of resolution.
post #4 of 12
Quote:
Can you view the CDR on your DVD player?
No, You need the ATSC decoder on the PC card. (AccessDTV, HiPix)

Dave
post #5 of 12
What about this technology?

From The New York Times.................








Another Entry in the 'DVCR' Race
In last week's State of the Art column, I reviewed Panasonic's new DMR-E20, a video recorder that uses DVD's instead of tape. I wrote that the discs last longer than tape, never require rewinding and never open you to the risk of recording over something by accident.

Well, the landscape has changed already.

First, as soon as the machine hit the streets, its published price of $1,500 seemed to mean little. Several people wrote to me that they've spotted it for $900 in Manhattan stores.

Second, Pioneer sent me details about its own "DVCR," called the DVR-7000. (The suggested price is $2,000, but I'm not going to fall for that one again.)

The Pioneer unit lacks one feature that makes the Panasonic recorder so special: the ability to play and record simultaneously. On the Panasonic, you can "chase record" -- watch the beginning of a show you're still recording -- and you can also "tape" one show while playing back another.

The Pioneer offers a couple of goodies of its own, however. Like the Panasonic (which actually contains Pioneer's DVD-burning technology), it can burn two kinds of discs. One is DVD-R, discs that can play back in almost any DVD player but can't be re-recorded. The other disc format, in Pioneer's case, is DVD-RW. These discs play in about 70 percent of consumer DVD players, according to the company.

Pioneer's recorder also has a FireWire input, to which you can connect a DV camcorder. That's a significant perk: It means that you can pour your home movies directly onto a DVD. (And if you pour it onto a DVD-RW disc, you can then edit it on the recorder.) Even if you've edited your movie on your Mac or PC (using a program like iMovie, for example), you can still enshrine it on DVD, for distribution or archiving, using this player.

So Panasonic offers a much lower price and simultaneous recording and playing; Pioneer offers a FireWire jack and DVD-RW recording. The nice thing is that you have a choice.

-------

:confused:
post #6 of 12
The problem with the scenario above, as explained to me by the manufacturer of 200 disk DVD-RAM carousel is that Firewire/Optical disk is not fast enough to store the incoming HD streams. An app would have to be written that can move the data from the hard disk to the RAM drive in two steps, although you can play back from these devices without a problem.

Just think, a DVD-RAM Jukebox is over a TeraByte of storage, which is seen as a single disk for enormous amount of recordings.

Kei Clark
Digital Connection
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally posted by Kei Clark
The problem with the scenario above, as explained to me by the manufacturer of 200 disk DVD-RAM carousel is that Firewire/Optical disk is not fast enough to store the incoming HD streams. An app would have to be written that can move the data from the hard disk to the RAM drive in two steps, although you can play back from these devices without a problem.

Just think, a DVD-RAM Jukebox is over a TeraByte of storage, which is seen as a single disk for enormous amount of recordings.

Kei Clark
Digital Connection
I thought that 1394 would easily carry, asa a standard hd info. Is the problem then the disc writing?..or is it that firewire WILL carry only more compressed HD stream??

Bill
post #8 of 12
The 1394 Firewire on these DVD recorders is supposed to allow digital-digital dubs from DV camcorders. Since the DV signal is 25Mbits, and the highest HD is 19Mbits, there is no reason why it couldn't record the signal. So bandwidth of the Firewire port isn't the issue.

My suggestion is to contact 169time, they may do mods on this device too:rolleyes:
post #9 of 12
This might be an interesting development:

http://www.mediostream.com/about/news/11052001.html
post #10 of 12
Quote:
The 1394 Firewire on these DVD recorders is supposed to allow digital-digital dubs from DV camcorders. Since the DV signal is 25Mbits, and the highest HD is 19Mbits, there is no reason why it couldn't record the signal. So bandwidth of the Firewire port isn't the issue.
I do not own this recorder, so I can't confirm or dispute it. I did receive this info from the manufacturer or the device. As they explained it, while you can read the data without any problems, writing takes longer. I guess you can state that this is not a limitation of the Firewire interface, but rather the DVD-RAM transport in the Jukebox. I'm not quite sure how 169 time would fit into the equation.

By the way, the MediaStream link only spoke of DVD editing, I did not see mention of the ability to capture HD streams, so I don't know how their product would benefit either.

Kei Clark
Digital Connection
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally posted by Bill Schmeling


I thought that 1394 would easily carry, asa a standard hd info. Is the problem then the disc writing?..or is it that firewire WILL carry only more compressed HD stream??

Bill
DV CAN handle it, but the device itself has to be able to talk to something that will give it the data. You MIGHT be able to use something like DVTransfer to control the pioneer, but even then you will need multiple DVD's to bakup anything except for 30 minute chunks.
post #12 of 12
How are you getting the HD into the recorder? I understand on a HTPC with HIPX/access DTV, but a standalon box only has regular video inputs, right?
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