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Explain to me Hz - kHz for speakers

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
So I've been looking into new speakers for my theater, and I'm a little confused as too what specifications to be paying attention to. I have been looking at the frequency response, but now I'm confused as to the broadest range.

Which of these ranges is better on a center channel...

100Hz - 24kHz
55Hz - 50kHz
60Hz - 20kHz

Or should I be looking at a different spec?!

Any help is welcome!!
post #2 of 20
First, most adult humans cannot hear above 16-18kHz, so all of the ones listed have more than adequate high frequencies.
Second, the middle one seems to have more bass extension than the others but....
Third, none of these specify a tolerance for those ranges. No speaker is flat and for a range, such as those, to have any useful meaning, it must be qualified as being within a range of limits. For example, speaker 2 could be 55Hz - 50kHz (+/-10dB) while speaker 3 could be 60Hz - 20kHz (+/- 6dB). In that case, #3 is probably better.
Fourth, none of such specs is very useful in isolation from all the others, most of which are not given.
Fifth (and last), the most important parameter for a center channel is that it match the left and right speakers in timbre. This is usually accomplished by choosing one from the same line or, better, an identical one.
post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaximAvs View Post

So I've been looking into new speakers for my theater, and I'm a little confused as too what specifications to be paying attention to. I have been looking at the frequency response, but now I'm confused as to the broadest range.

Which of these ranges is better on a center channel...

100Hz - 24kHz
55Hz - 50kHz
60Hz - 20kHz

Or should I be looking at a different spec?!

Any help is welcome!!

Assuming all three are using a standard +/- 3 dB tolerance, the 55 to 50kHz speaker has the "best" spec.

But, there are a myriad of other issues ... such as:

1. How accurate those specs are compared to measured results
2. How the measure off axis
3. Their relative efficiencies
4. How do they sound to you ?

In other words, specs don't mean a lot.
post #4 of 20
That spec is not really meaningful in any way in terms of telling you much at all about how a speaker sounds, not to mention they give absolutely no +/1, so each of those could sound abjectly horrible anyway, and the lower number could be -10db or it could be -3db, we don't know.

It's kind of like choosing which car to buy based on what tires it has on it. Not really that relevant.
post #5 of 20
It all comes down to how big the speaker is. If it's a bookshelf or center channel and it falls on you, it's a hertz. If it's a huge tower and it falls on you and kills you, it's a kilaherz...
post #6 of 20
Is it true to say that the frequency response is the best judgement of where the crossover should be set?
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigsub View Post

Assuming all three are using a standard +/- 3 dB tolerance, the 55 to 50kHz speaker has the "best" spec.

Bad assumption since any speaker that does not specify a tolerance is unlikely to have such a good one.

Quote:


But, there are a myriad of other issues ... such as:

1. How accurate those specs are compared to measured results
2. How the measure off axis
3. Their relative efficiencies
4. How do they sound to you ?

In other words, specs don't mean a lot.

Agreed and, especially, the ones quote.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by czwsecurity View Post

Is it true to say that the frequency response is the best judgement of where the crossover should be set?

Yes, if the number is trustworthy and there are no complicating circumstances relating to acoustics.
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
So what I'm getting out of this is that if the company doesn't post a tolorance range, the speakers could be not that great?!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by swgiust View Post

It all comes down to how big the speaker is. If it's a bookshelf or center channel and it falls on you, it's a hertz. If it's a huge tower and it falls on you and kills you, it's a kilaherz...

Was I the only one to laugh at that?
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by swgiust View Post

It all comes down to how big the speaker is. If it's a bookshelf or center channel and it falls on you, it's a hertz. If it's a huge tower and it falls on you and kills you, it's a kilaherz...

NICE!!
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaximAvs View Post

So what I'm getting out of this is that if the company doesn't post a tolorance range, the speakers could be not that great?!

What is means is that the specs are meaningless but it may not reflect anything about the speakers.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Yes, if the number is trustworthy and there are no complicating circumstances relating to acoustics.

That just came to mind, im ready to upgrade my speakers and ive been shopping for some sattelites (room and space issues) from Polk, Klipsch, and Infinity and I noticed most of the time the frequency responce drops around 100hz. With the crossover set to 100hz wouldnt that send some midrange or unwanted signals to the subwoofer?

EX. Klipsch Quintet 2 speakers (100hz - 20khz) and the ED A2-300 (the A2-300 range is 100hz-18hz I believe
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by czwsecurity View Post

That just came to mind, im ready to upgrade my speakers and ive been shopping for some sattelites (room and space issues) from Polk, Klipsch, and Infinity and I noticed most of the time the frequency responce drops around 100hz. With the crossover set to 100hz wouldnt that send some midrange or unwanted signals to the subwoofer?

EX. Klipsch Quintet 2 speakers (100hz - 20khz) and the ED A2-300 (the A2-300 range is 100hz-18hz I believe

100Hz is not mid-range; it is definitely upper bass. My concern with such a crossover to the sub is its potential audibility.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by swgiust View Post

It all comes down to how big the speaker is. If it's a bookshelf or center channel and it falls on you, it's a hertz. If it's a huge tower and it falls on you and kills you, it's a kilaherz...

It's a good thing I was not eating while reading this ... TOO funny ...
post #16 of 20
OH MY GOD!

CRAIGSUB THINKS I'M FUNNY!

THE UNIVERSE HAS ALIGNED, MY TAXES WENT DOWN, MY SKIN CLEARED UP,
AND THERE'S PEACE IN THE WORLD......


Now please send me those leftover subs your not using...
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by swgiust View Post

It all comes down to how big the speaker is. If it's a bookshelf or center channel and it falls on you, it's a hertz. If it's a huge tower and it falls on you and kills you, it's a kilaherz...

ROFLMAO!
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by bilbo3660 View Post

ROFLMAO!


OK what do all these acronyms mean???
ROFLMAO

I see this stuff all the time and I can only figure out a tiny few of them!
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaseman View Post

OK what do all these acronyms mean???
ROFLMAO

I see this stuff all the time and I can only figure out a tiny few of them!

Rolling On the Floor, Laughing My A$$ Off. You can google any of these.

Ed
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaseman View Post

OK what do all these acronyms mean???
ROFLMAO

I see this stuff all the time and I can only figure out a tiny few of them!

I could have said LOL (laughing out loud) but I got a bigger chuckle than that. Most times the threads and posts in these forums are so serious, and they probably should be, that I find humorous comments quite refreshing.
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