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Triad Owner's Thread - Page 9

post #241 of 6133
We are doing a 5.1 set-up with Triad bronze speakers (all mounted in the ceiling).

Is the Marantz SR7002 a decent choice for a receiver for this modest family room setup?
post #242 of 6133
I have a 7.2 Triad setup with LCR Golds, silver surrounds, and two Bronze in wall subs.

I never paid much attention to the subwoofers until I started trying to "tune" the system. I noticed I wasn't hearing anything from one of the subs. I used an ohm meter and measured the resistance at the reciever ends of the speaker cable and found that the LCRs were all 4 Ohm, the surrounds were all 6 Ohm and one of the subs was 6 Ohm but the sub that doesn't do anything was something like 3000 Ohm.

I'm thinking if it was a shorted speaker cable the resistance would be 0. Is this likely a problem with the subwoofer? The problem is the sub is in a GOM covered column and I only have easy acces to the receiver end of the speaker wire so I don't want to "dismantle" the theater unless I am pretty sure the speaker is bad.

I obviously made a huge mistake not testing all the speaker wire and the speakers before encasing them in GOM covered columns/walls :-(

Gregg
post #243 of 6133
Just thinking ahead if I end up getting the Omni Silver/8 speakers for my surrounds, I want to be sure they will fit where I would want to install them. (I'm looking at the Silver/8 because it is the only in-ceiling speaker that will fit as the joists in that section of the ceiling are not far enough apart for any of the larger enclosure in-ceiling speakers.)

It is not clear from the CAD drawings on the web site (or I may have just missed it), but where are the speaker wire connections located on the enclosure? Are they on the side directly behind the baffle holding the drivers? Are the connectors spring loaded or screw posts?

Also, does one side of the enclosure need to be fastened to a ceiling joist or does the enclosure just have retainer clips that grab onto the sheetrock?
post #244 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggavigli View Post

I have a 7.2 Triad setup with LCR Golds, silver surrounds, and two Bronze in wall subs.

I never paid much attention to the subwoofers until I started trying to "tune" the system. I noticed I wasn't hearing anything from one of the subs. I used an ohm meter and measured the resistance at the reciever ends of the speaker cable and found that the LCRs were all 4 Ohm, the surrounds were all 6 Ohm and one of the subs was 6 Ohm but the sub that doesn't do anything was something like 3000 Ohm.

I'm thinking if it was a shorted speaker cable the resistance would be 0. Is this likely a problem with the subwoofer? The problem is the sub is in a GOM covered column and I only have easy acces to the receiver end of the speaker wire so I don't want to "dismantle" the theater unless I am pretty sure the speaker is bad.

I obviously made a huge mistake not testing all the speaker wire and the speakers before encasing them in GOM covered columns/walls :-(

Gregg

Gregg, are you referring to a bass driver in one of your speakers, or a Triad PowerSub? In any event, call Brent Passmore or Willy Fulton at Triad (800 666 6316) and run all this by them. They'll be glad to help. Sorry you're having an issue. I hate to hear that.
post #245 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCCaniac View Post

Just thinking ahead if I end up getting the Omni Silver/8 speakers for my surrounds, I want to be sure they will fit where I would want to install them. (I'm looking at the Silver/8 because it is the only in-ceiling speaker that will fit as the joists in that section of the ceiling are not far enough apart for any of the larger enclosure in-ceiling speakers.)

It is not clear from the CAD drawings on the web site (or I may have just missed it), but where are the speaker wire connections located on the enclosure? Are they on the side directly behind the baffle holding the drivers? Are the connectors spring loaded or screw posts?

Also, does one side of the enclosure need to be fastened to a ceiling joist or does the enclosure just have retainer clips that grab onto the sheetrock?

The 5-way binding posts (no spring clips!!) are on the enclosure, and they are usually on a corner so they are accessible but don't require additional height within the ceiling. The enclosures do not need to be attached to a joist. They're actually very simple to install, they stay put and do not rattle at all, ever, and I've never heard of one falling from a ceiling.

The InCeiling Silver/8 Omni was recently redesigned to be slightly narrower and a little taller, to match the size of the InCeiling Silver/8 Omni SE. We thought it would cause problems to have these two similar models different dimensions, and now they're interchangable.
post #246 of 6133
I've got questions regarding Triad speaker impedance and suitability for use with amplifiers/receivers where the impedance rating is mismatched.

I've been planning to use a Yamaha RX-V2700 AVR that has settings for 8 Ohms or 6 Ohms. All of the Triad speakers I plan to use (already ordered) are rated for 4 Ohms. Am I going to have problems here? I simply failed to notice this little discrepancy when I was putting this system together.

The RX-V2700 is rated for 140 watts/channel @ 8 Ohms. The speakers are rated 150W @ 4 Ohms. At 6 Ohms, the amp should (theoretically) be capable of generating 175 watts. With a 4 Ohm load, the speakers will be 'asking' for twice the rated output from the receiver. While I am slightly worried about the speakers being overloaded, I am really more concerned with the long term health of the receiver.

FWIW, the homeowner is unlikely to be pushing this system very hard. The neighbors won't ever be calling the cops with a noise complaint. These are retired folks that wanted "good speakers" and were particularly concerned with aesthetics--so they got in-wall speakers.

On another project, I am (was?) about to propose some Triad Mini LCRs as bookshelf fronts with an OnWall MiniLCR for the center channel (it won't be mounted on the wall) and a pair of OnWall Bronze Surrounds. The same Yamaha receiver was part of the proposal... These speakers are rated for 100 watts @ 4 Ohms, making this combination even worse than the one above.

Should I be concerned about this, or am I worrying needlessly?
post #247 of 6133
First of all, unless you drive the speakers to abusive, headbanging levels, you will not be asking the receiver to put out 175 watts. In my experience, a receiver that will deliver more power into 6 ohms than 8 ohms is probably safe into a 4 ohm load. Almost all receivers use digital output sections now, and they don't generate the heat that the older Class AB output designs did, so you won't go into thermal protection. And a receiver will limit current so it protects itself.

I've been speaking with higher-ups at a few electronics companies lately, and they have to use an "8 ohm minimum" rating for legal and government regulation reasons. We were just told by Jeff Hipps at Sherwood that the Newcastle receivers will drive the snot out of a 4 ohm load, but the manuals say 8 ohms. The more recent Yamaha receivers will drive a 4 ohm load very well, and much better, actually, than their early-'80s models, which I burned up with great regularity. My daughter is using Triad front speakers with a $279 Panasonic receiver, and they work great.

Another consideration is speaker sensitivity. A speaker that has a rating of 87 dB will use twice as much power to reproduce 100 dB as a speaker with a sensitivity rating of 90 dB. Our LCRs are rated at 87 dB, 90 dB, 92 dB, and 94.5 dB. Despite the 4 ohm rating, that makes them easier to drive. A typical 4 ohm design will be a few dB more sensitive than an 8 ohm version of the same design.

The Mini LCRs will work fine with a Yamaha receiver. Power ratings and power handling is so obscure and vague that it doesn't mean much. Played at a moderately high level, most speakers are drawing ten watts with fifty watt peaks. I wouldn't be concerned.

The ONLY speaker we've received ANY phone calls about with lower-cost receivers has been the Gold LCR and Gold Center combo, which should be used with at least mid-range electronics. They're not hard to drive with good electronics, but within the next year, we'll do a subtle redesign to make them "6 ohm speakers."
post #248 of 6133
Thanks for the response, Paul. There's a lot of good info in that post.
post #249 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by shazza View Post

We are doing a 5.1 set-up with Triad bronze speakers (all mounted in the ceiling).

Is the Marantz SR7002 a decent choice for a receiver for this modest family room setup?

Sorry, I didn't see this post earlier. Marantz receivers have robust output stages and they work well with Triad. Make sure to run the fronts as "small."
post #250 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

First of all, unless you drive the speakers to abusive, headbanging levels, you will not be asking the receiver to put out 175 watts.



Played at a moderately high level, most speakers are drawing ten watts with fifty watt peaks. I wouldn't be concerned.

what data support these comments?

are you referring only to speakers that are run "small" or are you also referring to speakers that are run "full range"?
post #251 of 6133
Greetings all, looking at Triads for my living room/theater and was originally considering in wall speakers, but think I am going to go with on-walls since I suspect I will be moving in the next 18-24 months.

Looking for suggestions/feedback about the optimal Triad solution for my current room but will also provide me with nice sound in whatever my future setup may look like. My current equipment and room:

Receiver: Rotel RSX-1057
TV: Pioneer PDP-5070
Other: Toshiba HD-A2, custom built HTPC

Attaching a image of my first attempt at Google Sketch-Up of the room and setup.

So my questions:

(1) I am have had the opportunity to audition the Paradigm Millenia 30 setup at a local dealer. Has anyone had the opportunity to compare and contrast the Millenia's with the Triad OnWall Bronze/LCR? Thoughts?

(2) My couch is only going to be about 18-24 inches from the window with the wall. I have speaker cable in the wall about 4.5 feet from the ground on the right and left sides of the windows on the back wall AND I have speaker cables in the ceilings on the the wall opposite the TV. Would I be better going with speakers on the wall or putting in some ceiling speakers? And if I went with the wall speakers, would the onwall Bronze be the way to go?

I haven't had a chance to chat with one of the two local dealers (plan on calling them to see if I can swing by tomorrow to take a listen) to find out pricing but I'd be interested to know the suggested retail pricing on the LCRs and the surrounds if anyone has that info and can post it or PM me.

Thanks in advance for any guidance and counsel you can offer!!

Regards,
Brian
LL
post #252 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrible_Tom View Post

I've got questions regarding Triad speaker impedance and suitability for use with amplifiers/receivers where the impedance rating is mismatched.

I have what would be considered a "low end" receiver around these parts (Denon 3806). It is "mismatched" with the Triads according to the manual. I can turn the volume all the way up on the Denon without stressing the Gold LCRs or making my ears bleed. I do have a theater room with a lot of acoustic treatment that makes it pretty dead so that is probably a big factor.

I recently bought a used NAD 2400 THX amp that is rated for 4 Ohm loads and hooked it up to the Gold Center LCR. Still don't think I'm stressing the center speaker yet but now it can get louder than I can stand :-)

Gregg
post #253 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTD02 View Post

what data support these comments?

are you referring only to speakers that are run "small" or are you also referring to speakers that are run "full range"?

Okay, I was too general. But didn't you have a wattmeter when you were a kid?? (I did.) One watt will play a speaker with 90 dB sensitivity to...90 dB. Obviously, speakers run full range will require more when there are bass frequencies present.
post #254 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

The 5-way binding posts (no spring clips!!) are on the enclosure, and they are usually on a corner so they are accessible but don't require additional height within the ceiling. The enclosures do not need to be attached to a joist. They're actually very simple to install, they stay put and do not rattle at all, ever, and I've never heard of one falling from a ceiling.

Thanks, Paul. That's what I thought, but just wanted to be sure.

Mark
post #255 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

Okay, I was too general. But didn't you have a wattmeter when you were a kid?? (I did.) One watt will play a speaker with 90 dB sensitivity to...90 dB. Obviously, speakers run full range will require more when there are bass frequencies present.

i did not have a watt meter when i was a kid. i was taught math. 90db is a good start for AVERAGE SPL. however, onto that one must add allowances for dynamic range, which in well recorded music are 15db. then, if you are using the speakers to play kick drums, bass guitar or other instruments with a 60hz fundamental, then you must allow for another 10-12db for equal loudness curves (aka fletcher munson). on top off all that, one must allow for power compression, which for a REALLY good speaker is going to be another few db as it approaches rated power. then, since you are not typically sitting one meter from your speaker, you must add another 10db to account for distance losses. from this you get to subtract about 4db because you will typically have two speakers pseudo-coupling and you also get to subtract about 9db for boundary additions.

so the math is:
90db [average desired spl at the listening position]
+15db [peak to average]
+10db [equal loudness curves]
+3db [power compression]
+10db[listening at 10ft from speaker, not 3 feet]
-4db [addition from second speaker]
-9db [boundary additions]
_____________
= 115db

115db this is the requirement at the _source_ in order to have undistorted music at 90db @ 60hz at the _listening position_.

most of the speakers in the triad line will fail to meet this objective. this does not make them bad speakers.
post #256 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by LTD02 View Post

i did not have a watt meter when i was a kid. i was taught math. 90db is a good start for AVERAGE SPL. however, onto that one must add allowances for dynamic range, which in well recorded music are 15db. then, if you are using the speakers to play kick drums, bass guitar or other instruments with a 60hz fundamental, then you must allow for another 10-12db for equal loudness curves (aka fletcher munson). on top off all that, one must allow for power compression, which for a REALLY good speaker is going to be another few db as it approaches rated power. then, since you are not typically sitting one meter from your speaker, you must add another 10db to account for distance losses. from this you get to subtract about 4db because you will typically have two speakers pseudo-coupling and you also get to subtract about 9db for boundary additions.

so the math is:
90db [average desired spl at the listening position]
+15db [peak to average]
+10db [equal loudness curves]
+3db [power compression]
+10db[listening at 10ft from speaker, not 3 feet]
-4db [addition from second speaker]
-9db [boundary additions]
_____________
= 115db

115db this is the requirement at the _source_ in order to have undistorted music at 90db @ 60hz at the _listening position_.

most of the speakers in the triad line will fail to meet this objective. this does not make them bad speakers.

Good post. My original comment was a general one, but so is yours in a few instances. You can't add arbitrary elements together and derive a sum. There's no way to determine standard peaks for all music (some have peaks of 6 dB while some may have peaks of 30 dB or more), room reflections will vary at a set listening distance from room to room, power compression may be more or less, etc. You offer excellent elements to be considered, but half of them become estimates in the real world. And before we go further, I am in agreement with you.

The "average" SPL is generally a reference to the average on a frequency response curve; not when playing program material. The level is an average with a steady tone into the speaker. If the speaker is +/-2 dB within a range of 88 dB and 92 dB with one watt input, usually the sensitivity will be stated as 90 dB. I've never used an average dB standard on music, and although it would be interesting to see, I'm more concerned with the speaker handling peaks, which is presumably what you are pointing out with the 115 dB number.

Here is a great link from Crown which illustrates your point well, and it shows how inadequate most speakers are in reproducing high peaks without distress or compression. http://www.crownaudio.com/apps_htm/d...ct-pwr-req.htm I've posted in other threads that in the majority of systems, peaks are compressed by the amp and the speaker and most listeners don't even realize it unless they've heard a speaker of high sensitivity, high power handling (you usually don't get both) and lots of amplifier power.

I think the key is using the appropriate speaker for the application, and powering it properly. I mentioned in a thread (you'll recall) that my small-room, two-channel speakers are 86 dB, and I listen around 6' away at moderate levels with a 70 watt amp. I don't throw any Big Loud Music at them, and they work very well, within limitations. They are appropriate for this venue, but inappropriate for theater. My theater uses speakers that will handle double the power, and they're 92 dB with 375 watts per channel being used. I'll probably never listen at 110 dB again, so I'm within the parameters. I used to use a 94.5 dB speaker with a huge amp, and the dynamics were perceptively better at high levels, but they didn't do other things as well as what I'm using now, so these are better for my application.

I would be at a loss to come up with a brand name consumer loudspeaker that can play to high levels without compression. Most of the big names are 86 dB to 90 dB with modest power handling, and almost all would be taxed by having to hit high SPL in any venue. B&W, Paradigm, Ariel, James, Atlantic, Martin Logan, Kef? And at the same price point, JBL?

One of the balancing acts we're faced with in engineering at Triad is maintaining the highest sensitivity we can, and that means designing 4 ohm systems instead of 8 ohm speakers. In testing, a 4 ohm version will usually measure about 2 dB more sensitive than the same design using drivers that are 8 ohms (regardless of theory.) The problem is, although many newer receivers can drive 4 ohms, the manufacturers are specifying a 6 ohm minimum, which is overly conservative. What makes it tougher is, and I can't tell you why, drivers that are 96 dB and higher sensitivity seem to have other annoying sonic attributes, based upon our driver evaluations, unless they're expensive as hell. The Holy Grail would be a 107 dB sensitivity speaker that would handle 500 watt peaks, be fairly compact and affordable, and still sound good at low levels, too.

Thanks for bringing up some important points, one of the most important being distance loss, which is hugely ignored, and made worse by the fact that the higher the frequency, the more the loss over distance.
post #257 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

The "average" SPL is generally a reference to the average on a frequency response curve; not when playing program material. The level is an average with a steady tone into the speaker. If the speaker is +/-2 dB within a range of 88 dB and 92 dB with one watt input, usually the sensitivity will be stated as 90 dB. I've never used an average dB standard on music, and although it would be interesting to see, I'm more concerned with the speaker handling peaks, which is presumably what you are pointing out with the 115 dB number.

by "average spl" i merely meant root mean square spl taking over some period of time, which is the level that people typically adjust their listening volume to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

I would be at a loss to come up with a brand name consumer loudspeaker that can play to high levels without compression. Most of the big names are 86 dB to 90 dB with modest power handling, and almost all would be taxed by having to hit high SPL in any venue. B&W, Paradigm, Ariel, James, Atlantic, Martin Logan, Kef? And at the same price point, JBL? .

that's pretty sad, isn't it?

anyway, as you know, most music power and most of the equal loudness contours effect occurs in the bass, so there is not a whole lot of need to build it into the "mains". i'm not sure why speaker manufacturers even try. jbl has a good subwoofer, the s1s-ex hercules. unlike just about every other subwoofer out there, it is designed to be efficient (99db/1wm and it has an 8 ohm nominal driver!). i'm not sure what it costs though. however, essentially the same thing can be had for $900 in the 4645C, which is a cinema sub. with maximum CONTINUOUS spl of 126db, it should fit the bill.

http://www.jblpro.com/pub/cinema/4645c.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

One of the balancing acts we're faced with in engineering at Triad is maintaining the highest sensitivity we can, and that means designing 4 ohm systems instead of 8 ohm speakers. In testing, a 4 ohm version will usually measure about 2 dB more sensitive than the same design using drivers that are 8 ohms (regardless of theory.) The problem is, although many newer receivers can drive 4 ohms, the manufacturers are specifying a 6 ohm minimum, which is overly conservative.

if i recall, every receiver that has "thx" on it is at least certified for 4 ohms on the *main* channels. BUT, thx has a standard for volume keyed to 0db on the receiver. while watching a movie, the amp is taxed very little. all the headroom is reserved for peaks. when people play music, they don't have this same reference. they just keep turning up the volume until it sounds "loud enough" and a 4 ohm nominal could have some really low dips. that and combined with trying to drive inefficient speakers to a constant high average spl will put dangerously high demands on the receiver. not to mention that some speaker manufacturers may "fudge" their numbers; you know how it is, in the world where "louder is better", speaker guys have all the incentive in the world to make their speakers louder than the next guys when hooked up to the same amp/volume setting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

What makes it tougher is, and I can't tell you why, drivers that are 96 dB and higher sensitivity seem to have other annoying sonic attributes, based upon our driver evaluations, unless they're expensive as hell.

this is not the first time this has been alluded to but not expanded on. could you help fill us in? it seems like there are lots of high efficiency, high quality drivers on the market today.
post #258 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

There's no way to determine standard peaks for all music (some have peaks of 6 dB while some may have peaks of 30 dB or more), room reflections will vary at a set listening distance from room to room, power compression may be more or less, etc. You offer excellent elements to be considered, but half of them become estimates in the real world.

while true that not all music has the same standard peaks to average, peaks of 12-16db are reasonable for some significant portion of most peoples music. the low peak of 6db is more common for highly compressed music, but that music often has LARGE synthetic bass added back. at the other end 30db or more is quite common in orchestral works, but the average listening volume for these works tends to be much lower. so, all in, when specing a system, 12-16db is a good working rule-of-thumb for dynamic headroom.
post #259 of 6133
Paul,

I am planning to buy the following Triad speakers for my family room:

2 In Wall Silver/4 Monitor (Front L/R in wall)
1 In Wall Silver/6 Monitor (Center in cabinet)
2 In Wall Silver/4 MiniMonitor (Rear in sloped ceiling)
2 In Wall Silver/15 PowerSub - w/RackAmp500 (In cabinet)

I have not found any documentation on your web site regarding in cabinet installations of these speakers, so I thought I would ask you for your thoughts on this subject.

I am attaching a drawing of the front wall to demonstrate my current plans, which include putting the center channel (placed horizontally) and the 2 subs in a custom cabinet that will be built by a cabinet/furniture maker. I need to provide the dimensions of the openings for the speakers and want your opinion of how much space to allow between the sides/top/rear of each speaker and the cabinet walls. Should I allow enough to put open cell upholstery foam (maybe 2 inches on each side) or just enough to slide the speakers in the space (i.e. drywall opening specifications)?

Also, would you recommend designing the cabinet to use the retro brackets or just placing them on the cabinet shelf?

I appreciate any feedback you could provide to help ensure I don't do this incorrectly.

Thanks,

Al Broyles
LL
post #260 of 6133
my bad.
post #261 of 6133
Paul, how inappropriate would it be for me to use five OnWall Bronze LCRs in a 5.1 setup with an InRoom Bronze Sub? The construction of the room (this is a retrofit install) more or less prohibits the OnWall Surrounds and the customer really likes the idea of custom painted speakers. Also, this guy has a serious aversion to MDF, so I'd like to stick with an aluminum enclosure. Would the OnWall Gold Omni be better for the surrounds?
post #262 of 6133
Everyone...

I'm about to board a plane, and I haven't had time to respond for a few days. My apologies. I should have some computer time later today or tomorrow and I'll answer your questions as well as I can then.

Regards,

Paul
post #263 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

Sorry, I didn't see this post earlier. Marantz receivers have robust output stages and they work well with Triad. Make sure to run the fronts as "small."

Paul, we're going to go with Gold LCR (in-walls), along with other Triad in-walls (not sure of silver or bronze depending on budget) for a 7.1 HT system in a 14x20 room with 8' drop ceiling. Is a Marantz SR8002 or an Integra DTR8.8 enough to drive the Triads or do I need to get a separate amp. And if so, should I then scale down the receiver. Any combo recommendations? Thanks!
post #264 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by queendvd2 View Post

Paul, we're going to go with Gold LCR (in-walls), along with other Triad in-walls (not sure of silver or bronze depending on budget) for a 7.1 HT system in a 14x20 room with 8' drop ceiling. Is a Marantz SR8002 or an Integra DTR8.8 enough to drive the Triads or do I need to get a separate amp. And if so, should I then scale down the receiver. Any combo recommendations? Thanks!

Your best bet is to scale down the receiver and use a separate amplifier that can easily drive a 4 ohm load. The Marantz should work, but I am almost hesitant to say we're hearing the Integra receivers of late don't drive Gold LCRs all that well. I love the Integra products, but reports from the field on pairing them with Gold LCRs have not been that good. What separates do you have available to you?
post #265 of 6133
Thread Starter 
Quote:


I love the Integra products, but reports from the field on pairing them with Gold LCRs have not been that good. What separates do you have available to you?

We are having great success with the following separate amps mated with the Triad Gold LCR's:

Parasound Halo A51 or New Classic Series 5250
NAD Masters M25
Sherboun 7/2100A (excellent budget amp)
Bryston 9B-SST (not cheap)
Simaudio Titan (seriously not cheap)

There are many other worthy contenders, however, we feel the Parasound Halo and NAD Masters mate perfectly with the Triad Gold's.

I agree, spend less on your processing and add the separate amplifier....I sound like a broken record I know, but it's really good advice when you want to get the most out of the Triads. At low to moderate volume levels the higher current amp will bring the Triads or any other speaker for that matter to life with effortless ease.
post #266 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttowntony View Post

There are many other worthy contenders, however, we feel the Parasound Halo and NAD Masters mate perfectly with the Triad Gold's.

I have used Parasound and NAD on Triad speakers in the past, and I'm "currently" (pun) using NAD in my office system. They both work great. I also agree on the Sherbourne suggestion, but really anything that will deliver considerably more power into 4 ohms than into 8 ohms is good.
post #267 of 6133
Will be building from scratch since I am keeping my existing system in another room. If I go with either Parasound or NAD, are there any specific receivers you recommend as a good match. If indeed Marantz, maybe an SR7002?
post #268 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli View Post

Your best bet is to scale down the receiver and use a separate amplifier that can easily drive a 4 ohm load. The Marantz should work, but I am almost hesitant to say we're hearing the Integra receivers of late don't drive Gold LCRs all that well. I love the Integra products, but reports from the field on pairing them with Gold LCRs have not been that good. What separates do you have available to you?

Arghh.. I just purchased an Integra DTR-8.8! I'm literally picking it up tomorrow

CJ
post #269 of 6133
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJO View Post

Arghh.. I just purchased an Integra DTR-8.8! I'm literally picking it up tomorrow

CJ

Argh. I don't want to start a sheitstorm, but I have heard some cases where the Gold LCR presented too low of an impedance for the new Integra receivers. At 92 dB, it is not a sensitivity issue at all. As I stated, I like Integra, but the Gold LCR is a 4 ohm speaker...not 5 ohms. My advice is to hook it up and try it, unless you did things backwards and bought your electronics before your speakers. Speakers first...electronics second, to match.

Good luck, and let us know how it works out.
post #270 of 6133
I ran a pair of Classic Gold Inwall LCR's in a hacked together system (ipod into Integra DTR-8.8 with LCR's and Gold Sub setup on a ping pong table in my basement) last night and didn't have any problems over 2 hours at fairly high volume levels.

CJ
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