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After the Analog cutoff: TV in 2012

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Imagine tomorrow is Jan 1, 2012. It's been 3 years since the analog cutoff and 5 years since D* rolled out 100 channels of HD, leading to the great merger mania of 2008 which shook up the telecommunications landscape like never before.

As you sit in your living room, the happy benefactor of the HiDef wars between AT&T/Dish and Google/Directv, you've seen the launch of satellites capable of delivering 500 channels of true HD programming.

The words "upconverted" and "Stretch-o-vision" have been relegated to Wikipedia footnotes. You now have 10 channels offering 3D movies. 5 channels offering the newest high resolution, "UltraHD" movies. Marc Cuban's "FirstRun" network regurlarly releases same day theater, dvd, and satellite first run movies on his 5 HD networks. Alacarte programming packages, mandated by congress at the insistence of the public and from a mandate from President Harold Ford Jr. are all the rage. Everything from infomercials to blockbuster movies are all presented in glorious 1080p.

The HDDVD Blu-Ray wars were eventually rendered irrelevant in early 2009 as Apple's Steve Jobs, together with a formidable group of major Hollywood studios launched iTV, delivering full length 1080p movies on demand over broadband connections directly to the home. Utilizing proprietary 6th generation mpeg technology, full HD movies could begin playing immediately using Apple's "pre-cog" technology which predicts the movies you will want to see based on your birthdate, middle initial and the color of your iTv box, and stealthily pre-caches the first 10 minutes of movies on your home.

A guy can dream, huh?
post #2 of 26
Keep dreaming about those broadband connections.

I can't imagine the cable companies/phone companies would offer the kind of bandwidth needed to download 1080p films for anything less than $150/month, based on the $50/month I pay for 640K DSL…
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinnergy View Post

Imagine tomorrow is Jan 1, 2012. It's been 3 years since the analog cutoff and 5 years since D* rolled out 100 channels of HD, leading to the great merger mania of 2008 which shook up the telecommunications landscape like never before.

As you sit in your living room, the happy benefactor of the HiDef wars between AT&T/Dish and Google/Directv, you've seen the launch of satellites capable of delivering 500 channels of true HD programming.

The words "upconverted" and "Stretch-o-vision" have been relegated to Wikipedia footnotes. You now have 10 channels offering 3D movies. 5 channels offering the newest high resolution, "UltraHD" movies. Marc Cuban's "FirstRun" network regurlarly releases same day theater, dvd, and satellite first run movies on his 5 HD networks. Alacarte programming packages, mandated by congress at the insistence of the public and from a mandate from President Harold Ford Jr. are all the rage. Everything from infomercials to blockbuster movies are all presented in glorious 1080p.

The HDDVD Blu-Ray wars were eventually rendered irrelevant in early 2009 as Apple's Steve Jobs, together with a formidable group of major Hollywood studios launched iTV, delivering full length 1080p movies on demand over broadband connections directly to the home. Utilizing proprietary 6th generation mpeg technology, full HD movies could begin playing immediately using Apple's "pre-cog" technology which predicts the movies you will want to see based on your birthdate, middle initial and the color of your iTv box, and stealthily pre-caches the first 10 minutes of movies on your home.

A guy can dream, huh?

You better keep that dream in the oven for an extra decade...
post #4 of 26
My predictions for 2012: analog SD channels continue to live on cable to pacify everyone who doesn't want to upgrade; HDLite becomes the norm and some enterprising company comes out with HD+, only to fold Voom-style after a year or 2 of operation when they realize that the AVS crowd isn't big enough to support that sort of niche product.
post #5 of 26
Sheesh talk about confusing. I rather go back into time and buy a simple 24 inch Sony tube and enjoy it without the knowledge of the internet and reading about the flaws that my new set has.
post #6 of 26
Has someone been reading a little too much Tom Clancy "Debt of Honor"?
post #7 of 26
Downloadble movies are a long ways off. Many still use dial-up you expect them to pay xx.xx per month to watch movies isn't going to happen. Their will always be physcail media.

The question is how will the analog cut off go their are still a lot with OTA analog sets in ther house. I think theirs a lot more then folks think. As not all tvs in a house have cable or sat. Theirs 2 in my home that are analog OTA only. I don't think either will be upgraded when the time comes as they are low traffic TVs.

All the kitchin and garage TVs may become useless
post #8 of 26
They'll never shoot blockbuster movies in 60p much less 3D. The entire movie industry has built around 24p for over a century and no one wants to change it. Even the push to get 48p accepted as a standard film speed has been a failure. We'll sooner see our highways paved with Italian marble.
post #9 of 26
2012 is only 4 years away. You're talking like it's the "future"
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JTH182 View Post

2012 is only 4 years away. You're talking like it's the "future"

Ever heard of Moore's Law? Basically it holds that processor speed doubles every 18 months. Between now and Jan 1 2012, you have the equivalent of a tripling of processor speed. Four years in this market is equivalent to 10-15 a decade ago. Can you imagine what Steve Jobs or the folks from Google labs will do in four years?
post #11 of 26
Well, Jobs will probably finally make the keyboard from Tron.
post #12 of 26
Apple= No thanks. Broadband movies= No thanks. I'd rather have the disc. ^^ I never know Steve Jobs designed CPUs, plus whether that law is still applicable is up for debate. I doubt all of America is going to have decent broadband by that time either.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinnergy View Post

Ever heard of Moore's Law? Basically it holds that processor speed doubles every 18 months. Between now and Jan 1 2012, you have the equivalent of a tripling of processor speed.

Four years ago... I was watching HDTV. Just like I am tonight. Triple the processor speed in another four years and I bet I'll still be watching good old fashioned MPEG-2 HDTV.

Also it's generally called "Moore's Observation" since it's not a law in any sense of the word.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spinnergy View Post

Ever heard of Moore's Law? Basically it holds that processor speed doubles every 18 months. Between now and Jan 1 2012, you have the equivalent of a tripling of processor speed. Four years in this market is equivalent to 10-15 a decade ago. Can you imagine what Steve Jobs or the folks from Google labs will do in four years?

I'm well aware of Moore's law, but seriously, how much different are things than they were 4 years ago?

We've progressed, sure, but not by the leaps and bounds like we did in the 80's and 90's.

2015 is only 3 years after 2012... maybe we'll have flying cars and hoverboards like Back to the Future 2?

(Hmmm, maybe the Cubs will actually win the world series too.... nahhhh )
post #15 of 26
Well, we won't have flying cars or hoverboards, but we could have a TV like Marty Jr.'s. All we need now is multiple PIP, voice command, and the Atrocity Channel.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by QiG View Post

Has someone been reading a little too much Tom Clancy "Debt of Honor"?

Wow, that's interesting. The post you are referring to is gone and no post from a moderator saying "Political post removed". That is very interesting.
post #17 of 26
Hey ya'll, stop giving the OP a hard time. All of what he dreamed is very possible.
Only problem is, the next night he had a nightmare about the latest version HDMI-239.17 interface
that is required by Hollywood to hook it all up. The bugs for that should be worked out by 2057.


post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephenC View Post

Wow, that's interesting. The post you are referring to is gone and no post from a moderator saying "Political post removed". That is very interesting.

Ooops.

Political post removed.
post #19 of 26
Bump. It's 2012...

I've decided that we already have the Atrocity Channel, as long as web sites with videos count. A site I got inflicted with today, in particular. (No, I won't say its name.)

More encouragingly, voice control seems to be arriving on schedule.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wmcbrine View Post

Bump. It's 2012...

I've decided that we already have the Atrocity Channel, as long as web sites with videos count. A site I got inflicted with today, in particular. (No, I won't say its name.)

More encouragingly, voice control seems to be arriving on schedule.

well analog cable is coming to a end on most comcast systems and other cable systems only have like limited basic on analog.
post #21 of 26
The real question is when will all those SD channels go away?
post #22 of 26
I'm disappointed nobody's put any pirate analog TV stations on the air. What has anyone been doing with the freed-up analog frequencies anyways?
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpillar View Post

The real question is when will all those SD channels go away?

when cable and satellite systems get around to swapping out all the old boxes.

NOW the DTA are SD only and are some what NEW (But they don't get the full lineup) So it can be a slow trun off back the box down RES HD to SD for older tv's (drop HD fees) and start turning off SD channels.

Lot's of sports bars and hotels only have SD mini head ends / switchers. Some hotels still run analog from the headend to the rooms.
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8traxrule View Post

I'm disappointed nobody's put any pirate analog TV stations on the air. What has anyone been doing with the freed-up analog frequencies anyways?

Digital stations are on them now.
post #25 of 26
...And isn't cell phones and other wireless devices on the frequencies that were sold off? Regardless the FCC would probably shut down such a station even if the frequencies weren't currently being used.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

...the FCC would probably shut down such a station even if the frequencies weren't currently being used.

So fast it would scare you
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