or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › The Official Onkyo TX-SR705 Thread (FAQ in 1st Post)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Official Onkyo TX-SR705 Thread (FAQ in 1st Post) - Page 130

post #3871 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Anderson View Post

Well, part of what Audyssey's MultEQ XT is designed for is to make response more even from seat to seat (i.e. eliminating "sweet spots"). Yes, you're correct that bass can vary greatly from position to position. For instance, near room boundaries, you'll get a boost. That's just an unavoidable truth of the nature of low frequencies. This sort of thing is why audio is more complex than just "set it and forget it", and is why you hear people suggest corner-loading subwoofers to get the smoothest overall response. It's also why people who expect Audyssey to work miracles without the careful setup that SHOULD take place beforehand will almost always be disappointed in the results.

If you want to make your head swim, here's another little nugget to complicate your life: Avia's subwoofer tones are actually located in the main channels, not the LFE channel. So if you set all channels to full range, none of Avia's tones will even come out of the subwoofer. They do this so you can assess bass management in the system, and so long as you're crossing your speakers over at 80Hz or above, you're likely getting accurate results. The rub is that because Avia is dependant on the system crossovers, setting the crossovers below 80Hz makes the tone dependant on both the subwoofer and that individual speaker, introducing the potential for phase cancellation problems that can throw off the reading. So while Avia is a great tool for system verification, certain variables may make it better for you to just use the internal tones (which, by the way, should all read 75dB on a C-weighted meter on all channels, subwoofer included... and those tones are NOT crossover dependant).

My big question: Why are you calibrating for the center of your room anyway? Calibrate level for where your ears will be when you use the thing! And as I said before, the final setting should be determined solely by your listening preferences... NOT by any meter.

Oh, I wasn't calibrating for the center of my room, I only meant that when I moved the meter closer to tyhe central part of my room, then the meter read 82.5 db for sub channel...when i moved the meter to my seating position, about 3 to 3 1/2 feet from the back wall, my sub level reads about 86 to 87 db. Getting a sub properly balanced is really hard and I guess as long as you are not bottoming out the speaker, which I have heard is VERY audible, then you're probbly okay. So basically at my seating possition the sub is equal to or 1 db higher than the rest of my channels. I have all my mains crossed over at 100 hz, so the measurements should be accurate.
post #3872 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Anderson View Post

The internal test tones play back at the same level no matter what you have the volume set to. Setting the level trims so they read 75dB with a SPL meter should get things lined up so that 0 on the volume control will produce reference level - i.e. 105dB peaks from the speakers and 115dB peaks from the subwoofer (because the LFE channel gets a 10dB boost during decoding as a matter of course).

Calibration discs, on the other hand, are recorded at specified levels. For instance, with Avia, set volume to 0 and you should get 85dB for the speakers and 82.5dB for the subwoofer (because Avia's sub tone is a 40-80Hz band-limited tone).

Audyssey doesn't line up the channel trims to a specified level, though it does make sure that each channel matches. In other words, the above is only important if you want to know that 0 = reference level. If you don't care or are using the numerical volume reading, just make sure each channel reads the same and you're good.

Thank you, Jeremy, for your lengthy explanation. I think it is beginning to sink in a little, but I can't guarantee it
post #3873 of 8885
since the PS3 is my primary bluray player I'm holding off getting this until either the PS3 can process DTS-MA or pass that signal onto the receiver. Otherwise I think I'll stick with my TX-SR702 for now.
post #3874 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by corwiniii View Post

That's pretty typical, in that they are all different. I forget what kind of speakers you have, but you can safely change the crossovers to something either a) more in line with your speaker's specs or b) something you enjoy hearing better. It is odd to see 80hz from surround back - those are typically bookshelf-sized speakers, so I would assume a crossover something like your surrounds. LPF should be at 120hz, no questions asked.

As for your last statement, it's just really hard to say "yes" or "no" to that. You can try that and see what you think. There is no wrong answer to this stuff, just differences. You need to decide which sounds best.

What exactly am I listening for when I change the frequency crossovers? Just would like to know what to hunt for when/if I change them.
post #3875 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by amb7247 View Post

since the PS3 is my primary bluray player I'm holding off getting this until either the PS3 can process DTS-MA or pass that signal onto the receiver. Otherwise I think I'll stick with my TX-SR702 for now.

Ok... who cares? This is an owners thread... not a NON owners thread to let everyone know they don't want to own it.

Justin
post #3876 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrgribbles View Post

I think its relatively important to realize that when you tweak Audyssey it doesn't follow your lead. If you change speaker settings like going from full band to 80hz for example Audyssey doesn't go back and re-calculate its equalization points, etc. I'm not saying not to do it but Audyssey cautions us on making major adjustments to speaker config settings. But as usual, at the end of the day its what works best for the listener.

So if you want to get what Audyssey intended don't change anything? If you don't like the settings either do not use them or rerun with some different points.
post #3877 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATAD IO View Post

So if you want to get what Audyssey intended don't change anything? If you don't like the settings either do not use them or rerun with some different points.

First of all, even the Audyssey guys have said if Audyssey sets your speakers to full band and they really are not then it is perfectly fine to change them to a different crossover. This has NO EFFECT on the Audyssey EQ AT ALL. Go and check the Audyssey thread for more info on that topic. Audyssey even explained that the receiver manufacturers determine what the receiver will read as "full band" or needing a crossover which is why Audyssey can be tweaked to change the crossover on any speaker.
Again, changing the crossover will not effect the EQ already set
post #3878 of 8885
I like Audyssey, it is a good software routine to do overall calibration. I find it generally very accurate and able to produce good sound for my Family/Great room. My room is a bit complex as it has a 19ft ceiling, and has an open extension to the left where I have a dining area and kitchen. Even with these acoustical challenges it results in very balance and delightful sound output, very natural. Only modification I made to Audyssey is to change the setting for my downfiring subwoofer (back corner placement). I adjusted from the Audyssey setting of -11db to -6db as I felt low bass was somewhat absent. Now I like the results a lot better. Oh, btw, I also changed the front speakers (B&W 685s) and the center speaker (B&W HTM62) front full band to 80Hz (one of the small settings). The selection of full band is an Onkyo criteria not Audyssey. To maximize LFE I made this change to 80 Hz. I also set the LPF of LFE to 120Hz, this is a user, not Audyssey setting. Overall, the Onkyo 705 after 1.5 months of ownership sounds real good to me. That is my two cents for what it is worth.

Best Regards,
Larry
post #3879 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw1063 View Post

Anyone? I want to get all of the parts and pieces ordered ASAP in hopes that a new unit will be arriving shortly.

Thank you.

I would assume that since the 705 can remember the last volume for each input source that "Zone 2" would be no exception....
Anyone using Zone 2 can clarify this?
I know that it will remember the volume setting for each source that I have used...DVD,PC,Game,etc....
post #3880 of 8885
Is there an AVS preferred step-by-step "Dummie's" style post on setting up your speakers? Preferably with an Onkyo 705?

I am overwhelmed at all of the settings and crossover frequency talk. I would love to at least know the basics and make sure my settings are optimized and at least in the ballpark.

I have tracked down the specs of my speakers. Where do I go from here? I am assuming I need to buy the Radio Shack analog SPL meter to start.

Thanks in advance for any tips or links!

Left and right main speakers
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 7-1/2"W x 15-1/4"H x 8-7/16"D

Center channel speaker
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 12-3/4"W x 5-7/8"H x 6"D

Surround Speakers
# 4" full-range driver
# frequency response 100-20,000 Hz
# 7-7/8"W x 5-7/8"H x 5-9/16"D

Subwoofer
# bass-reflex (ported) cabinet design
# 10" woofer

* 60 watts (rated at 28-200 Hz, 1% THD)
* 100 watts (rated at 80 Hz, 10% THD)

# frequency response 28-200 Hz
post #3881 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by bshoe54 View Post

I'm glad to hear that you got it working. I tried to go through the same procedure to see if it would help me but no such luck.

Did you already have the component cable hooked up when you reset to factory defaults? When I reset mine, I lost the video sync so I had to hold in the stop and play buttons to get it to 480p mode before I could even see the set-up menu again. That action set the HDMI Video back to "on" automatically.

I then went back and changed the audio to bitstream and turned off the HDMI video. None of this helped in my set-up. Maybe I should turn off the HDMI Video feed before I set the Audio items back to "bitstream". I will try that next.

I find it crazy that a cable handshake has full control of setting the input/output modes on these units without the ability to manually override settings. I know this HDMI "one connection" is supposed to make life easy but this is insane.

If I remember correctly when I restored to factory defaults I had the BD30 hooked directly to the TV's HDMI (I still had the componet cables hooked to the 705 at this time). I was hooking it up directly in order to get a picture so I could then go into the setup to turn the HDMI video out to "off" so I could then use the component out. I then powered down the BD30 and went to the 705 setup menu to set the video "in" to component for the proper input. I was then getting the HD Master signal to the 705 while still viewing via component. I then went into the BD30 setup again and turned the HDMI video out back to "on" which instantly changed the video back to HDMI through the 705. I would not think it would make a difference how you had it hooked up when you do the reset but you might give it a try. Thanks for the tip on how to force the player to 480p with the stop/play buttons on the player. That sounds much easier then jumping through all the hoops like I was doing with the component out. I am also very frustrated with the whole HDMI thing. It should make things easier for everyone, not more difficult. I hope you get yours working.
post #3882 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by dolfer View Post

Is there an AVS preferred step-by-step "Dummie's" style post on setting up your speakers? Preferably with an Onkyo 705?

I am overwhelmed at all of the settings and crossover frequency talk. I would love to at least know the basics and make sure my settings are optimized and at least in the ballpark.

I have tracked down the specs of my speakers. Where do I go from here? I am assuming I need to buy the Radio Shack analog SPL meter to start.

Thanks in advance for any tips or links!

Left and right main speakers
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 7-1/2"W x 15-1/4"H x 8-7/16"D

Center channel speaker
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 12-3/4"W x 5-7/8"H x 6"D

Surround Speakers
# 4" full-range driver
# frequency response 100-20,000 Hz
# 7-7/8"W x 5-7/8"H x 5-9/16"D

Subwoofer
# bass-reflex (ported) cabinet design
# 10" woofer

* 60 watts (rated at 28-200 Hz, 1% THD)
* 100 watts (rated at 80 Hz, 10% THD)

# frequency response 28-200 Hz



For starters, don't get hung up for now with your speaker specs. No need for an SPL meter. No need for a dummies guide. Get a tripod and mount the microphone on top facing up. Set the tripod up in listening position #1, your centeral most preferred seating position. After plugging in your microsphone run audyssey per the onscreen directions on your TV screen. Get out of the way so you don't inhibit sound waves, be quiet, turn off phones, clocks, kids, etc. Run through the onscreen prompts. Take at least 5-6 readings for different listening positions. When you are done, it will calculate the results of all these readings. After you are done with calculations, save settings. You can revisit the settings, write them done, and present them here, and you will may need a bit of tweaking for fronts, center and subwoofer. Share with the Forum your crossovers (i.e, full band or Hz settings), your trims (i.e., =/- db settings), and make sure your speakers are all identified at the beginning. Also, make sure that the distances shown from the #1 seating position are accurate. Once you have all of this, the Forum can make suggestions.

Good luck. Not hard, just do it.

Best Regards,
Larry
post #3883 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcarithers View Post

First of all, even the Audyssey guys have said if Audyssey sets your speakers to full band and they really are not then it is perfectly fine to change them to a different crossover. This has NO EFFECT on the Audyssey EQ AT ALL. Go and check the Audyssey thread for more info on that topic. Audyssey even explained that the receiver manufacturers determine what the receiver will read as "full band" or needing a crossover which is why Audyssey can be tweaked to change the crossover on any speaker.
Again, changing the crossover will not effect the EQ already set

Correct. So long as you're going from full range UP to a crossover, you're good. In that case, the equalization was done for the speaker's entire range... and so long as the subwoofer is in phase with the other speakers (which it should be after Audyssey sets the distances), you shouldn't have a significant change in response by changing the crossover. Changing the crossover point then basically throws out the equalization below that point (since you won't need it). Chris from Audyssey has said that they tried to get Onkyo to use 40Hz as the threshhold for "full range" but that Onkyo chose to use 80Hz.

Now, if the opposite is true - i.e. your speakers that should be good down below 80Hz detected as 120Hz - setting them to a LOWER crossover DOES affect the equalization, since Audyssey only EQs down to the point it detects as the cutoff.
post #3884 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Anderson View Post

Correct. So long as you're going from full range UP to a crossover, you're good. In that case, the equalization was done for the speaker's entire range... and so long as the subwoofer is in phase with the other speakers (which it should be after Audyssey sets the distances), you shouldn't have a significant change in response by changing the crossover. Changing the crossover point then basically throws out the equalization below that point (since you won't need it). Chris from Audyssey has said that they tried to get Onkyo to use 40Hz as the threshhold for "full range" but that Onkyo chose to use 80Hz.

Now, if the opposite is true - i.e. your speakers that should be good down below 80Hz detected as 120Hz - setting them to a LOWER crossover DOES affect the equalization, since Audyssey only EQs down to the point it detects as the cutoff.



Great point on the opposite impact of setting crossover lower than calibrated. I experienced that, set my sides to 80hz and it sounded lousy. Went back to 120hz per audyssey, and overall system sound was a great deal better. Thanks,
Larry
post #3885 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcarithers View Post

First of all, even the Audyssey guys have said if Audyssey sets your speakers to full band and they really are not then it is perfectly fine to change them to a different crossover. This has NO EFFECT on the Audyssey EQ AT ALL. Go and check the Audyssey thread for more info on that topic. Audyssey even explained that the receiver manufacturers determine what the receiver will read as "full band" or needing a crossover which is why Audyssey can be tweaked to change the crossover on any speaker.
Again, changing the crossover will not effect the EQ already set

The following is from a post in September of '07. Please note that it quotes the Audyssey FAQ and also provides a link to the Audyssey site. However, the link no longer works so it may be assumed that Audyssey has re-evaluated their response to this question.

The original posted question: "if i play with crossover freq.on speaker set-up, would i have to rerun auddessy? mains now set at 80, but would like to try 60."

The response:

From the Audyssey FAQ:http://www.audyssey.com/faq.html#Parameters%20change

"What happens to the MultEQ settings when the parameters are changed?

MultEQ corrects for room acoustical problems. Changes in the tone controls do not change the filter performance. They do change the tonal balance based on the preferences of the customer. The benefit of MultEQ is that it allows a customer (or installer) tone control setting to work on all program material in a much more predictable way than it would on an uncalibrated system. Changes made to the crossover frequency or small and large settings of the loudspeakers will affect the performance of the MultEQ filters and Audyssey does not recommend changing them."
post #3886 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by dolfer View Post

Is there an AVS preferred step-by-step "Dummie's" style post on setting up your speakers? Preferably with an Onkyo 705?

I am overwhelmed at all of the settings and crossover frequency talk. I would love to at least know the basics and make sure my settings are optimized and at least in the ballpark.

I have tracked down the specs of my speakers. Where do I go from here? I am assuming I need to buy the Radio Shack analog SPL meter to start.

Thanks in advance for any tips or links!

Left and right main speakers
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 7-1/2"W x 15-1/4"H x 8-7/16"D

Center channel speaker
# two 4" woofers
# 1" dome tweeter
# frequency response 80-20,000 Hz
# 12-3/4"W x 5-7/8"H x 6"D

Surround Speakers
# 4" full-range driver
# frequency response 100-20,000 Hz
# 7-7/8"W x 5-7/8"H x 5-9/16"D

Subwoofer
# bass-reflex (ported) cabinet design
# 10" woofer

* 60 watts (rated at 28-200 Hz, 1% THD)
* 100 watts (rated at 80 Hz, 10% THD)

# frequency response 28-200 Hz

The 705 comes with a mic and the calibration software. That is to me the easiest way to do the calibration (for dummies). You paid for it as part of the 705. Are you not fully satisfied with the results after the calibration?
post #3887 of 8885
I ran Audyssey (again). This time with a 5.1 system. It set my surround speaker distance at 30 feet! Mind you, I have the surrounds connected with the Rocketfish Wireless Kit, so I don't know if that explains it. But anyhow, is this a known flaw in Audyssey, or should I leave it at 30 feet because somehow Audyssey is compensating for the wireless setup to the surrounds? The actual distance of the surrounds from the average listening area is only 5 feet. Should I change it to that?

Also, it set the surround calibration level for both speakers at -5.0db.
post #3888 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrgribbles View Post

The following is from a post in September of '07. Please note that it quotes the Audyssey FAQ and also provides a link to the Audyssey site. However, the link no longer works so it may be assumed that Audyssey has re-evaluated their response to this question.

The original posted question: "if i play with crossover freq.on speaker set-up, would i have to rerun auddessy? mains now set at 80, but would like to try 60."

The response:

From the Audyssey FAQ:http://www.audyssey.com/faq.html#Parameters%20change

"What happens to the MultEQ settings when the parameters are changed?

MultEQ corrects for room acoustical problems. Changes in the tone controls do not change the filter performance. They do change the tonal balance based on the preferences of the customer. The benefit of MultEQ is that it allows a customer (or installer) tone control setting to work on all program material in a much more predictable way than it would on an uncalibrated system. Changes made to the crossover frequency or small and large settings of the loudspeakers will affect the performance of the MultEQ filters and Audyssey does not recommend changing them."

Note that the original question addressed going to 60 from speakers detected at 80Hz, hence no equalization was done below 80Hz. As my previous post stated, this is a vastly different issue than going from full range, where the entire range was equalized, to a crossover point.
post #3889 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourbeef View Post

I ran Audyssey (again). This time with a 5.1 system. It set my surround speaker distance at 30 feet! Mind you, I have the surrounds connected with the Rocketfish Wireless Kit, so I don't know if that explains it. But anyhow, is this a known flaw in Audyssey, or should I leave it at 30 feet because somehow Audyssey is compensating for the wireless setup to the surrounds? The actual distance of the surrounds from the average listening area is only 5 feet. Should I change it to that?

Also, it set the surround calibration level for both speakers at -5.0db.

First,the most important question. How does it sound?
post #3890 of 8885
I have a question regarding THX on this receiver. I currently have an Onkyo TXDS 797 that has THX, and back in the day certain DVD's were "THX Certified", even though regardless of the DVD, I could apply THX post processing to the signal. With the new HD audio formats like TrueHD and DTS-MA, what is THX's relevance in today's world?

Will I be able to apply THX post processing to either a PCM signal coming from my PS3, or if down the line I have a standalone BD player that will bitstream HD audio formats? and if I can, is there anyone that would attest that it sounds any better?

I've always been somewhat confused on THX certification and what the end benefit is other than knowing your receiver passed a couple tests in a lab.
post #3891 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePlungerMan View Post

Sorry off topic here but didn't want to start a thread and a quick search netted me nothing. I'm looking for a book that will give me an understanding of audio, and video for that matter. Like how to analyze specs on speakers, amps and knowing what it means. The jargon if you will etc. This so i can know how to phase my system to together. Like crossover from this speaker to the sub kinda stuff,,, and also so I can understand what all you audiophiles are saying. Thanks for any and all input.

I didn't get a response (understandable) So I thought I would try again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryis1 View Post

.. Run through the onscreen prompts. Take at least 5-6 readings for different listening positions. When you are done, it will calculate the results of all these readings. After you are done with calculations, save settings. You can revisit the settings, write them done, and present them here, and you will may need a bit of tweaking for fronts, center and subwoofer. Share with the Forum your crossovers (i.e, full band or Hz settings), your trims (i.e., =/- db settings), and make sure your speakers are all identified at the beginning. Also, make sure that the distances shown from the #1 seating position are accurate. Once you have all of this, the Forum can make suggestions.

Good luck. Not hard, just do it.

Best Regards,
Larry

I saw this so I thought I would give my audessy settings a try on here, this also because I'm clueless.

My 7.1 speakers are,, drum roll please.

Center BW LCR 60 S3
Freq response 70 Hz-22Hz
Sensitivity 88
8 ohms

Fronts BW DM 603 S3
Freq response 50 Hz-22Hz
Sensitivity 89
8 ohms

Surrounds and surround backs Definitive pro monitor 800
Freq response 57 Hz-30Hz
Sensitivity 88
4-8 ohms

And my kicken sub LOL Olympus Pro sw 100p (swapped a higher end driver in it) ((I'm not a bass head))
Freq response 42 Hz-200Hz
Sensitivity 80
4-8 ohms
I set the volume to almost half and frequency to 70 for set up then turned volume down after.

Audessy results

2.2 speaker config
Fronts Full Band
Center Full Band
Surround 120 Hz
Surround back 100 Hz (1st set up netted these at 120Hz)
Surround back channel 2 ch
LPF LFE 80 Hz THX
Double Bass On

2.3 distance,,, going to add 5 feet for lip sync. That worked well before I re did set up,,, needed after set delay to 0

Left 12
Center 11.5
Right 12
SR 4.5
SBR 7.5
SBL 8
SL 10
Sub 26.5

2.4 Calibration
Left -3
Center -4
Right -4
SR -3
SBR -1
SBL -1
SL -1
Sub -9

So there it is there. Go ahead and give it to me straight, don't pull any punches, I'm a big boy. Do I need to trash the sub and if, what is the lowest price one I can get away with. I use it for movies and usually turn it off for music. I also turn it down after the set up as it was at 30 feet for what I usually set it at. I auditioned another sub at a higher end store, retail $750. And wasn't impressed.

Also what about the mix matching of my fronts with my surrounds? I know it's my ears not yours. But what is the general consensus as a search here didn't offer up much.

Thanks again and any and all feedback is highly appreciated.
post #3892 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianEK View Post

I have a question regarding THX on this receiver. I currently have an Onkyo TXDS 797 that has THX, and back in the day certain DVD's were "THX Certified", even though regardless of the DVD, I could apply THX post processing to the signal. With the new HD audio formats like TrueHD and DTS-MA, what is THX's relevance in today's world?

Will I be able to apply THX post processing to either a PCM signal coming from my PS3, or if down the line I have a standalone BD player that will bitstream HD audio formats? and if I can, is there anyone that would attest that it sounds any better?

I've always been somewhat confused on THX certification and what the end benefit is other than knowing your receiver passed a couple tests in a lab.

The THX company does a lot of things, so it gets confusing. One of the things they do is come up with recommended designs for home theater equipment - receivers, speakers, and subwoofers. You follow their checklist, then send them a prototype. You change/fix the things they ask you to change, then they give you a THX certification. They do (did?) the same thing with DVD's. THX certified means a DVD was produced in accordance with their recommendations. It has nothing to do with which codecs get used on the DVD.

THX also develops signal processing algorithms (listening modes) to improve home theater sound reproduction. Some were developed in partnership with other companies like Dolby. I think all THX certified receivers include THX listening modes. They can be applied to any kind of signal - DD, DTS PCM, TrueHD etc.

I'll leave whether the THX listening modes sound good to somebody else.
post #3893 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePlungerMan View Post

I didn't get a response (understandable) So I thought I would try again.


I saw this so I thought I would give my audessy settings a try on here, this also because I'm clueless.

My 7.1 speakers are,, drum roll please.

Center BW LCR 60 S3
Freq response 70 Hz-22Hz
Sensitivity 88
8 ohms

Fronts BW DM 603 S3
Freq response 50 Hz-22Hz
Sensitivity 89
8 ohms

Surrounds and surround backs Definitive pro monitor 800
Freq response 57 Hz-30Hz
Sensitivity 88
4-8 ohms

And my kicken sub LOL Olympus Pro sw 100p (swapped a higher end driver in it) ((I'm not a bass head))
Freq response 42 Hz-200Hz
Sensitivity 80
4-8 ohms
I set the volume to almost half and frequency to 70 for set up then turned volume down after.

Audessy results

2.2 speaker config
Fronts Full Band
Center Full Band
Surround 120 Hz
Surround back 100 Hz (1st set up netted these at 120Hz)
Surround back channel 2 ch
LPF LFE 80 Hz THX
Double Bass On

2.3 distance,,, going to add 5 feet for lip sync. That worked well before I re did set up,,, needed after set delay to 0

Left 12
Center 11.5
Right 12
SR 4.5
SBR 7.5
SBL 8
SL 10
Sub 26.5

2.4 Calibration
Left -3
Center -4
Right -4
SR -3
SBR -1
SBL -1
SL -1
Sub -9

So there it is there. Go ahead and give it to me straight, don't pull any punches, I'm a big boy. Do I need to trash the sub and if, what is the lowest price one I can get away with. I use it for movies and usually turn it off for music. I also turn it down after the set up as it was at 30 feet for what I usually set it at. I auditioned another sub at a higher end store, retail $750. And wasn't impressed.

Also what about the mix matching of my fronts with my surrounds? I know it's my ears not yours. But what is the general consensus as a search here didn't offer up much.

Thanks again and any and all feedback is highly appreciated.


Here are my two cents. Change fronts & center to "small speaker setting. I would try 80Hz (THX). Don't turn your sub on and off. Does your sub have a power setting called "Auto", if so, leave it on auto and it will deploy for music, tv, or movies when needed (i.e., when the LFE channel is fed). Use 120Hz for LPF of LFE (this is a user setting, not an Audyssey setting). If you sub does not produce enough low bass, then you might want to vary this seeting to increase bass depending on your taste.
I don't know much a lip synch since I don't have this issue with my set-up and have not engaged these settings. Perhaps others can comments on this.

Regards,
Larry
post #3894 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Anderson View Post

Chris from Audyssey has said that they tried to get Onkyo to use 40Hz as the threshhold for "full range" but that Onkyo chose to use 80Hz.

I assumed this to be the case until I read post # 1817 in the Audyssey thread where a crossover point of 70Hz was found with an 875. I don't know if this was his mistake or whether the 875 is different from the 705 in the way crossovers are reported and set.
post #3895 of 8885
When I ran Audyssey for a 5.1 setup today I got the following:

SP Level
Fronts, Center 0.0
Surrounds -5.0
Sub -1.0

Speaker Distance
Fronts 12.5, actual same
Center 12.0, actual same
Surrounds 30.0, actual 5.0
Sub 11.5, actual same

So when I tested my setup with the SPL meter for the first time, I got pretty much 75db on every speaker and sub I was questioning earlier about the surround speaker distance that it set, and the fact they were set at -5.0db, but the SPL confirmed a near 75db on all of them Is my receiver, Audyssey, and Audyssey-running-technique really THAT GOOD! ........ It bears mentioning again that I am running my surrounds with the Rocketfish "Wireless" Kit, in case this has some bearings on why Audyssey would set the distance at 30 feet, even though they are actually just 5 feet from the listening sofa.

So this should mean at those SP levels set by Audyssey, then I am at the correct reference level when my volume is set to ZERO, even though it sounds a little loud to my ears AT TIMES, not all the time. Is my thinking correct about this?
post #3896 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by sourbeef View Post

When I ran Audyssey for a 5.1 setup today I got the following:

SP Level
Fronts, Center 0.0
Surrounds -5.0
Sub -1.0

Speaker Distance
Fronts 12.5, actual same
Center 12.0, actual same
Surrounds 30.0, actual 5.0
Sub 11.5, actual same

So when I tested my setup with the SPL meter for the first time, I got pretty much 75db on every speaker and sub I was questioning earlier about the surround speaker distance that it set, and the fact they were set at -5.0db, but the SPL confirmed a near 75db on all of them Is my receiver, Audyssey, and Audyssey-running-technique really THAT GOOD!

So this should mean at those SP levels set by Audyssey, then I am at the correct reference level when my volume is set to ZERO, even though it sounds a little loud to my ears AT TIMES, not all the time. Is my thinking correct about this?


I feel that your thinking on this is dead on! I was a bit skeptical about Audyssey as well, and have corresponded with Chris and he has given me detailed feedback that have enhanced my understand of their software and process. I am very pleased with there results. Other than changing fronts and center from full band to 80Hz., and increasing a bit on the subwoofer (from -11db to -6db), I have accepted and feel very comfortable with all other results. This is a very reliable process that produces generally fine results.

Best Regards,
Larry
post #3897 of 8885
Installed my new Panasonic BD-30 with anticipation of seeing the TruHD and DTS-MA lights for the first time. I set up everything by the book, upgraded to the 1.6 firmware, inserted BD disks with the appropriate audio tracks. Result was standard DD or DTS 5.1 channel on my Onkyo display.

I then searched this thread. Reports of the same issue, but no definite solutions. Searched the BD-30 thread with keyword "factory reset" and discovered the following:

"""""""Originally Posted by Zip2
If you are having a problem getting your BD30 to send HD audio formats to your reciever, here is a workaround.

I posted this over in the Blu-ray.com forums but figured this would be helpful to some here too. Haven't seen anyone else come up with this solution yet.

You can hook up an external monitor or another input on your TV via the included RCA cables until you get the initial setup done or here is the other option.....


The issue is actually written kind of vaguely in the manual and the problem only occures if you don't have a 1080p capable TV.

So here are the steps to get it to work and yes, it's crazy.

The Panisonic DMP-BD30 starts it's operation, out of the box, in 1080p mode when hooked up via HDMI.

Step #1 is to use the (play button) + (stop button) combination on the player itself to switch the video mode to something more suitable for use with older TV's.

Now here is where it gets tricky...

In the manual it states that when you do this No HD audio will be output from the player via bitstream until the player is reset back to factory defaults (through the setup menu). Problem is, when you do that, the player reverts back to 1080p mode and an endless loop begins.

So what you have to do here (remember I said it's crazy) is memorize the button presses so you can get into the display mode settings and change it to whatever your native resolution is (1080i for me).

Once you have the button presses memorized (or written down) go into the setup menu and select -Reset to Factory Settings-

Once again the screen will go black. Hit setup, enter your button sequence, and you will once again have picture.

Last thing you have to remember to do is go back into your audio settings and change everything to Bitstream, also remember to turn secondary audio to off.

Anyway, all should work fine after that. Holy crap, what a pain.
I've been working on this for pretty much two straight days now, with two different receivers and figured it out. It sucked, but I must say it was satifying. For those of you that doubt this is the only way to fix it, trust me, it is, I've tried EVERYTHING! This just happened to be the very last thing I was going to try.

Hope this helps the few people with this problem. """"""""""""


I have reposted here as many Onkyo owners may encounter the same issue. It is triggered by the BD-30 assuming that a 1080P capable display is connected to the Onkyo. It then defaults via 'auto resolution' to 1080P output. If your display does not support 1080P, this issue may occur. I can confirm that instead of memorizing keystrokes, using an alternate video input such as composite or component directly into your TV allows you to perform the factory reset, change your HDMI resolution, and the reset the audio to bitstream with secondary audio off.
post #3898 of 8885
Quick question, as I am about to splurge on a 705:
I was reading the pass through section, and something confused me.

Can I successfully pass through 1080p component through my HDMI out?
post #3899 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by larryis1 View Post

I feel that your thinking on this is dead on! I was a bit skeptical about Audyssey as well, and have corresponded with Chris and he has given me detailed feedback that have enhanced my understand of their software and process. I am very pleased with there results. Other than changing fronts and center from full band to 80Hz., and increasing a bit on the subwoofer (from -11db to -6db), I have accepted and feel very comfortable with all other results. This is a very reliable process that produces generally fine results.

Best Regards,
Larry

Yes, I changed my fronts/center to 80 (for now) too since Audyssey did FULL on those. I like to hear the sub too, so I think it is good to change them, even though my fronts are rated at 40hz (-3db limit) and the center is 65hz (-3db). So in that sense Audyssey did right by setting them (fronts) at FULL. I will probably increase the sub from -1.0 to around +4.0 just for more kick . I will leave it on -1.0 for awhile just to hear regular cable programming.

I am beginning to think that the idea I got from some posters that the (Relative) ZERO volume setting equals 75db is INCORRECT. I am new at using an SPL, so you have to take that into consideration too. But based on using the SPL when listening to cable TV programs just this afternoon, I think the ZERO relative volume setting is closer to 80db, which begins to make sense when you consider that the equivalent ABSOLUTE volume IS 82 on the scale!!!!!!

But that is just my humble opinion as a newbie, if I am wrong and you know it, correct me on this volume issue. Thanks.
post #3900 of 8885
Quote:
Originally Posted by urosai View Post

Quick question, as I am about to splurge on a 705:
I was reading the pass through section, and something confused me.

Can I successfully pass through 1080p component through my HDMI out?

Short answer... nope.
As to the "why's" and such, refer to the FAQ on page one.

Skid
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › The Official Onkyo TX-SR705 Thread (FAQ in 1st Post)