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The Official Panasonic DMP-BD30 Owner's Thread - Page 2

post #31 of 12539
What is behind the total lack of dts-HD-MA decoders in ANY new BDP?

I have read AVS until my mind is numb and it just doesn't make since for Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, etc. to not include all of the new audio (including dts-HD-MA) decoders in their new models. With so many people (a lot of the people that actually Care about the new HD formats) with HDMI 1.1 receivers, it is just inexcusable for the manufacturers to continue to release new players without these decoders. All it does is punish people that have been the first ones to give these company's their hard earned money. They should have had all the new decoders mandatory in all HD DVD and Blu-Ray players or they just should have had no new "so called" formats and just used uncompressed PCM on all new hd discs. End of confusion. It boggles the mind that they didn't.

post #32 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BAMAVADER View Post

What is behind the total lack of dts-HD-MA decoders in ANY new BDP?

I have read AVS until my mind is numb and it just doesn't make since for Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, etc. to not include all of the new audio (including dts-HD-MA) decoders in their new models. With so many people (a lot of the people that actually Care about the new HD formats) with HDMI 1.1 receivers, it is just inexcusable for the manufacturers to continue to release new players without these decoders. All it does is punish people that have been the first ones to give these company's their hard earned money. They should have had all the new decoders mandatory in all HD DVD and Blu-Ray players or they just should have had no new "so called" formats and just used uncompressed PCM on all new hd discs. End of confusion. It boggles the mind that they didn't.



<><

i agree with you, but how many generations of sd dvd players did it take to get one that internally decoded dts???? 5th, maybe 6th generation???
post #33 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BAMAVADER View Post

What is behind the total lack of dts-HD-MA decoders in ANY new BDP?

I have read AVS until my mind is numb and it just doesn't make since for Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, etc. to not include all of the new audio (including dts-HD-MA) decoders in their new models. With so many people (a lot of the people that actually Care about the new HD formats) with HDMI 1.1 receivers, it is just inexcusable for the manufacturers to continue to release new players without these decoders. All it does is punish people that have been the first ones to give these company's their hard earned money. They should have had all the new decoders mandatory in all HD DVD and Blu-Ray players or they just should have had no new "so called" formats and just used uncompressed PCM on all new hd discs. End of confusion. It boggles the mind that they didn't.



<><

But you do understand that decoding DTS-HD MA takes a great deal of horsepower, much greater than needed for legacy codecs, or even Dolby THD...... the core + lossless extension model, I have been told, is "labor" intensive....

Having PCM as the only option is very limiting (i.e. downconversion of 7.1 or 24/96 5.1 for example, secondary audio, etc...)... Lossless codecs help in these circumstances...
post #34 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidHir View Post

What is the display you're using?

I find this disappointing if this is the case. I too am using a PS3 and I will not upgrade strictly for bitstream - it will have to be for both bitstream and PQ.

I am using a Samsung 4095 LCD. I watch from a distance of about three feet.
post #35 of 12539
Alright, here we go…
Yes, I was able to pick one of these players up at a nearby CC, where they have just begun arriving. Those of you who frequent the BD hardware page might have seen my mini-takes on the new Samsung 1400, the Sony BD500, and the Pioneer 95. All of which I ended up returning in favor of continuing to use the PS3 for now. While the video/audio quality of these players was good to excellent, I found them all to be very flawed. The Samsung had problems with bitstream lock lags and Spiderman playback, the Sony didn’t bitstream DTS-MA, and the Pioneer was essentially the Sony with DTS-MA and an extra $300 added to the price tag.

Oh, and they were all incredibly slow and clunky with Java discs. Titles like Spiderman 3 or Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer would take between 2:05-2:30 just to load initially. Unacceptable for any player (and certainly one costing $1000). To say I’ve been very hard on standalone players is an understatement and has made the search for a worthwhile standalone that much more irritating. I’ve seen (in my system) the Samsung BD1000, Panasonic BD10 (which I still have), the PS3 (which I still have), Sony BD500, Samsung BD1400, Pioneer 95, and now the Panasonic BD30.

Well, I’ll say now that if you’re within the 30 day return policy of the Samsung, Sony, or Pioneer players, you should return those puppies ASAP. The Panasonic BD30 is finally the player all these other manufacturers have been promising.

First the bad (and by bad, I mean the things we already knew). No, the BD30 doesn’t include an Ethernet port. But while the Samsung, Pioneer, and Sony all do have Ethernets, none of the players are now, or appear to possibly ever be, profile 1.1. The Panasonic is. That makes it the most future proof player on the market right now, outside of the PS3 (but even that still isn’t profile 1.1, despite the over-promised/under-delivered 2.0 firmware update).

Second, internal audio decoding. No, the Panasonic doesn’t internally decode high-res audio to PCM. Those with outdated audio gear that don’t provide the newest audio format decoding are going to be less impressed with the BD30. If you have the Panasonic BD10, you’re obviously losing both TrueHD and DTS-HD High Res (I don’t include Dolby Plus, because no Blu-rays utilize that format and I don’t think they ever will at this point). For those with the PS3, the Samsungs, the Sonys, or the Pioneers (basically all other players) you’re only losing internal TrueHD… Not necessarily the same hit since there only appear to be about a dozen BD titles that use TrueHD, but lack a PCM track (namely some Warner stuff, Spidey 1&2, and Immortal Beloved).

But, for the purposes the player was designed for (those with the most current audio gear for bitstreaming who want a standalone that can stand up to or surpass the PS3), this is the player!

Picture Quality:
I would put the BD30 up against any player thus far released. Certainly more detailed than the PS3, the player is going to be seen as noisy by some. But what it is actually showing is more of the visible grain contained in the film. Throwing in a pure looking disc (like the stunning looking Meet the Robinsons or Kingdom of Heaven), the BD30, in my opinion, outputs a reference image (which, BTW, I’m viewing on a 70” JVC 1080p LCOS). In fact, because of the additional picture controls in the BD30, you can actually tweak settings a bit more and push a little extra performance out of the discs. I bumped up the sharpness setting on the player during Meet the Robinsons and it gave it unreal dimensionality and detail. My display isn’t 24p capable, so I can’t speak to that aspect of the player’s performance. I also haven’t really done a ton of SD upconversion looks, but based on some of the SD supplements I viewed; it appears that the BD30 does an excellent job of upconverting. Perhaps a hair softer/smoother to my eyes than some others, but I find that more appealing than an over-enhanced SD upconversion (which I find the XA2 to do. Not a huge fan of the Reon).

Audio:
Bitstreaming the high-res audio to my Denon 3808, I now have every audio format available to me and it is heaven. One note… If you are going to bitstream these formats out to a new receiver, you must switch off secondary audio mixing in the setup menu. Leaving this on (as it is in the default) will reencode/transcode any audio that also includes button noises to legacy Dolby Digital. Switching this off allows bitstreaming of everything. The bitstreams are output immediately (no lag like the 4-second one on the Samsung). Not too much else to say here.

Speed:
Grab hold of something!! From off to on with tray open is 22 seconds. As I earlier indicated, loading Java titles on any of the other standalones was an exercise in patience. It would generally take between two to two and a half minutes to go from 0 to 60. Well here are the load times I tested yesterday (all times were clocked from the disc tray open to the appearance of the first play screen (logos, FBI warnings).
First, a non-Java disc:
X-Men 3 - 21 seconds

Java discs:
Pirates 1 - 48 seconds
Pirates 2 - 45 seconds
The Fly - 49 seconds
Spiderman 3 - 48 seconds
Fantastic Four:SS - 60 seconds
Surf’s Up - 60 seconds
Day After Tomorrow - 61 seconds

These load times are within 15-30 seconds of the PS3 and are remarkable for a standalone. Menu functionality is also greatly improved. One thing standalones have sucked at is the animation of complex menus. Surf’s up, for example, has menus where, any time you make a selection, a penguin appears on-screen and blows a dart into your choice. On all the other players, this animation was chunky and slow, ticking through the movement one stutter at a time. With the PS3, the animation was smooth and flowed perfectly. The BD30 is very close to the PS3 in this regard. The menu movements finally don’t feel like they’re choking the player and put the BD30 in a class by itself as the only standalone player to offer performance that is overall on par with the PS3 (even exceeding it in many areas). Needless to say, the PS3 has now been removed my equipment shelf.

One other nice addition I was glad to see in the BD30 was the addition of a format identifier. It’s not a bitrate meter (thank God), but it will tell you if a disc is AVC, VC1, or MPEG2.

Panasonic have also given us an “Open” button on the remote. This was one of my big dislikes about the BD10. That player required you to actually go to the player, manually drop down the face and open the disc tray. The BD30 loses that manual faceplate (although it still appears on the right 2/3 of the player to cover the control buttons) and allows you to open the tray from the couch.

I know there’s probably tons more stuff I’m missing, but these are the highlights for now. Bottom line… If you’re looking for a player that you’re going to be using with bitstreaming, the BD30 appears to be the only player you should consider. In fact, it so over-performs, Pioneer and Sony should be embarrassed of the players they just released. It appears that while those two have been doing God knows what, Panasonic has actually been working hard to make a player worth a damn.
post #36 of 12539
Thanks Brad. Your review was comprehensive, informative and enlightening. Can't wait for mine to arrive. Much appreciated.
post #37 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmMixer View Post

Having PCM as the only option is very limiting (i.e. downconversion of 7.1 or 24/96 5.1 for example, secondary audio, etc...)... Lossless codecs help in these circumstances...

I would take only uncompressed PCM on all hd dvd and BD in a minute over the confusion and mess ("does it have a decoder?, which decoder is it?, it doesn't decode dts-HD, no that's not really dts-HD, dts-HD-MA is really dts-HD, It doesn't decode dts-HD-MA though, but it decodes DD+, what is that, it's like dts-HD, you mean dts-HD-HR, what's that? it's like DD+") we have now. Just a bunch of crap.
post #38 of 12539
so to my surprise this delivery required a signature which wasnt specified on the tracking info until they treid delivering it so now I have to go to the Fedex location to pick it up instead of it being on my step when I got home....very disappointing

i will post a quick review after trying it out tonight
post #39 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

Leaving this on (as it is in the default) will reencode/transcode any audio that also includes button noises to legacy Dolby Digital. Switching this off allows bitstreaming of everything. The bitstreams are output immediately (no lag like the 4-second one on the Samsung). Not too much else to say here.

Are you saying that if you leave it on it will not bitstream any of the new codecs at all even if you are just playing the movie? For example on the Samsung I noticed that during main menu it switches to PCM output but when watching the movie it goes back to bitstream.
post #40 of 12539
Thanks for the review Brad. Have you tried to play Spiderman 2/2.1 yet? Any issues?
post #41 of 12539
very nice review Brad, thanks...

i was contemplating on getting a ps3 to go along with my dmp-bd10a to use in another room, but i think i'll get a dmp-bd30 instead now..
post #42 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

Alright, here we go
Yes, I was able to pick one of these players up at a nearby CC, where they have just begun arriving. Those of you who frequent the BD hardware page might have seen my mini-takes on the new Samsung 1400, the Sony BD500, and the Pioneer 95. All of which I ended up returning in favor of continuing to use the PS3 for now. While the video/audio quality of these players was good to excellent, I found them all to be very flawed. The Samsung had problems with bitstream lock lags and Spiderman playback, the Sony didn't bitstream DTS-MA, and the Pioneer was essentially the Sony with DTS-MA and an extra $300 added to the price tag.

Oh, and they were all incredibly slow and clunky with Java discs. Titles like Spiderman 3 or Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer would take between 2:05-2:30 just to load initially. Unacceptable for any player (and certainly one costing $1000). To say I've been very hard on standalone players is an understatement and has made the search for a worthwhile standalone that much more irritating. I've seen (in my system) the Samsung BD1000, Panasonic BD10 (which I still have), the PS3 (which I still have), Sony BD500, Samsung BD1400, Pioneer 95, and now the Panasonic BD30.

Well, I'll say now that if you're within the 30 day return policy of the Samsung, Sony, or Pioneer players, you should return those puppies ASAP. The Panasonic BD30 is finally the player all these other manufacturers have been promising.

First the bad (and by bad, I mean the things we already knew). No, the BD30 doesn't include an Ethernet port. But while the Samsung, Pioneer, and Sony all do have Ethernets, none of the players are now, or appear to possibly ever be, profile 1.1. The Panasonic is. That makes it the most future proof player on the market right now, outside of the PS3 (but even that still isn't profile 1.1, despite the over-promised/under-delivered 2.0 firmware update).

Second, internal audio decoding. No, the Panasonic doesn't internally decode high-res audio to PCM. Those with outdated audio gear that don't provide the newest audio format decoding are going to be less impressed with the BD30. If you have the Panasonic BD10, you're obviously losing both TrueHD and DTS-HD High Res (I don't include Dolby Plus, because no Blu-rays utilize that format and I don't think they ever will at this point). For those with the PS3, the Samsungs, the Sonys, or the Pioneers (basically all other players) you're only losing internal TrueHD Not necessarily the same hit since there only appear to be about a dozen BD titles that use TrueHD, but lack a PCM track (namely some Warner stuff, Spidy 1&2, and Immortal Beloved).

But, for the purposes the player was designed for (those with the most current audio gear for bitstreaming who want a standalone that can stand up to or surpass the PS3), this is the player!

Picture Quality:
I would put the BD30 up against any player thus far released. Certainly more detailed than the PS3, the player is going to be seen as noisy by some. But what it is actually showing is more of the visible grain contained in the film. Throwing in a pure looking disc (like the stunning looking Meet the Robinsons or Kingdom of Heaven), the BD30, in my opinion, outputs a reference image (which, BTW, I'm viewing on a 70 JVC 1080p LCOS). In fact, because of the additional picture controls in the BD30, you can actually tweak settings a bit more and push a little extra performance out of the discs. I bumped up the sharpness setting on the player during Meet the Robinsons and it gave it unreal dimensionality and detail. My display isn't 24p capable, so I can't speak to that aspect of the player's performance. I also haven't really done a ton of SD upconversion looks, but based on some of the SD supplements I viewed; it appears that the BD30 does an excellent job of upconverting. Perhaps a hair softer/smoother to my eyes than some others, but I find that more appealing than an over-enhanced SD upconversion (which I find the XA2 to do. Not a huge fan of the Reon).

Audio:
Bitstreaming the high-res audio to my Denon 3808, I now have every audio format available to me and it is heaven. One note If you are going to bitstream these formats out to a new receiver, you must switch off secondary audio mixing in the setup menu. Leaving this on (as it is in the default) will reencode/transcode any audio that also includes button noises to legacy Dolby Digital. Switching this off allows bitstreaming of everything. The bitstreams are output immediately (no lag like the 4-second one on the Samsung). Not too much else to say here.

Speed:
Grab hold of something!! From off to on with tray open is 22 seconds. As I earlier indicated, loading Java titles on any of the other standalones was an exercise in patience. It would generally take between two to two and a half minutes to go from 0 to 60. Well here are the load times I tested yesterday (all times were clocked from the disc tray open to the appearance of the first play screen (logos, FBI warnings).
First, a non-Java disc:
X-Men 3 - 21 seconds

Java discs:
Pirates 1 - 48 seconds
Pirates 2 - 45 seconds
The Fly - 49 seconds
Spiderman 3 - 48 seconds
Fantastic Four:SS - 60 seconds
Surf's Up - 60 seconds
Day After Tomorrow - 61 seconds

These load times are within 15-30 seconds of the PS3 and are remarkable for a standalone. Menu functionality is also greatly improved. One thing standalones have sucked at is the animation of complex menus. Surf's up, for example, has menus where, any time you make a selection, a penguin appears on-screen and blows a dart into your choice. On all the other players, this animation was chunky and slow, ticking through the movement one stutter at a time. With the PS3, the animation was smooth and flowed perfectly. The BD30 is very close to the PS3 in this regard. The menu movements finally don't feel like they're choking the player and put the BD30 in a class by itself as the only standalone player to offer performance that is overall on par with the PS3 (even exceeding it in many areas). Needless to say, the PS3 has now been removed my equipment shelf.

One other nice addition I was glad to see in the BD30 was the addition of a format identifier. It's not a bitrate meter (thank God), but it will tell you if a disc is AVC, VC1, or MPEG2.

Panasonic have also given us an Open button on the remote. This was one of my big dislikes about the BD10. That player required you to actually go to the player, manually drop down the face and open the disc tray. The BD30 loses that manual faceplate (although it still appears on the right 2/3 of the player to cover the control buttons) and allows you to open the tray from the couch.

I know there's probably tons more stuff I'm missing, but these are the highlights for now. Bottom line If you're looking for a player that you're going to be using with bitstreaming, the BD30 appears to be the only player you should consider. In fact, it so over-performs, Pioneer and Sony should be embarrassed of the players they just released. It appears that while those two have been doing God knows what, Panasonic has actually been working hard to make a player worth a damn.


Thanks for the review. Can you check if the player can show time remaining for the film. BD10 only shows elapsed, which is absurd.
post #43 of 12539
CKNA,
Why are you quoting the full review that was just posted on this same page?
Very noobish and annoying
post #44 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by rveras View Post

Are you saying that if you leave it on it will not bitstream any of the new codecs at all even if you are just playing the movie? For example on the Samsung I noticed that during main menu it switches to PCM output but when watching the movie it goes back to bitstream.

Yes, although it will bitstream as long as there is nothing else programmed on the disc as secondary audio to conflict with. X-Men 3 bitstreamed DTS-MA out of the box. The Fifth Element output Dolby Digital, as did FF:ROTSS with button sounds mixed in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekimzulad View Post

Have you tried to play Spiderman 2/2.1 yet? Any issues?

Yes I have and no there are not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CKNA View Post

Thanks for the review. Can you check if the player can show time remaining for the film. BD10 only shows elapsed, which is absurd.

That was my number two pet peeve about the BD10. Unfortunately, the BD30 still doesn't give you a time remaining. Although the display button opens up a bar with time elapsed and total running time, so a little math is all that's required. The Samsung didn't even give you that much. But I agree, time remaining is something I use(d) often on the PS3.
post #45 of 12539
Brad,

Thanks for the review. I have a Panny 10A, but are within my 30 day return. I ruled out he Panny 30 because is does not decode HD audio and my relatively new Marantz reciever does not either. With that said, what are the 5.1 analog audio outs for on the Panny 30?
post #46 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post



Picture Quality:
I would put the BD30 up against any player thus far released. Certainly more detailed than the PS3, the player is going to be seen as noisy by some. But what it is actually showing is more of the visible grain contained in the film. Throwing in a pure looking disc (like the stunning looking Meet the Robinsons or Kingdom of Heaven), the BD30, in my opinion, outputs a reference image (which, BTW, I'm viewing on a 70 JVC 1080p LCOS). In fact, because of the additional picture controls in the BD30, you can actually tweak settings a bit more and push a little extra performance out of the discs. I bumped up the sharpness setting on the player during Meet the Robinsons and it gave it unreal dimensionality and detail.

As my earlier post indicates, I had a different impression. So far, I cannot see a difference from the PS3.
post #47 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by smsprague View Post

Brad,

Thanks for the review. I have a Panny 10A, but are within my 30 day return. I ruled out he Panny 30 because is does not decode HD audio and my relatively new Marantz reciever does not either. With that said, what are the 5.1 analog audio outs for on the Panny 30?

Yeah, as I said, with the BD10 and no up to the minute new reciever w/ new audio formats, the BD30 is a slightly harder sell as it also takes away DTS-HD High Res. I can completely understand not wanting to part with the BD10 (which BTW is no slouch in loading times either. Not as fast as the BD30, but much faster than the other standalones.)
post #48 of 12539
Brad, excellent post. Probably one of the best I've seen on AVS, period. Extremely informative and comprehensive. You've answered all my questions about this player and delivered the news I wanted to hear. We we've waiting long enough for a standalone to at least match the PS3. Thanks so much for your contribution.
post #49 of 12539
Man I wish Circuit City would take my Sammy back? I'm out of the 30 days return period
post #50 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

In fact, because of the additional picture controls in the BD30, you can actually tweak settings a bit more and push a little extra performance out of the discs. I bumped up the sharpness setting on the player during Meet the Robinsons and it gave it unreal dimensionality and detail. My display isn't 24p capable, so I can't speak to that aspect of the player's performance.

For me the goal is to deliver what's on the disc (24fps). I try not to alter the image by adding "extra performance" If I really wanted artificial sharpness my projector will be more than happy to apply such. Is this what you were referring to as "more detailed than the PS3" or some thing else?
post #51 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

For me the goal is to deliver what's on the disc (24fps). I try not to alter the image by adding "extra performance" If I really wanted artificial sharpness my projector will be more than happy to apply such. Is this what you were referring to as "more detailed than the PS3" or some thing else?

No, but I'm saying there are additional options available to try if you want them. The sharpness setting was something I experimented with briefly on one movie. Even without the sharpness setting, the image is still reference.
post #52 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

No, but I'm saying there are additional options available to try if you want them. The sharpness setting was something I experimented with briefly on one movie. Even without the sharpness setting, the image is still reference.

The question is what makes it reference? I'm sure there are lot of people like myself who would purchase a better image... what exactly makes it better?
post #53 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

No, but I'm saying there are additional options available to try if you want them. The sharpness setting was something I experimented with briefly on one movie. Even without the sharpness setting, the image is still reference.

As I have noted before, to my eyes it is not "more detailed than the PS3."
post #54 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick99 View Post

As I have noted before, to my eyes it is not "more detailed than the PS3."

I also have a PS3 and the new pani player. Take in mind I only have couple Netflix blu-ray disk ( and the blu-ray disks are terrible for comparison sake), and overall the picture looks "pretty much" like all blu-ray players but I think the Pani looks better. I do not know if this is attributable to the settings I change on the Pani or the circuitry or just what my mind wants to think. But I do see a difference on my my Pioneer 5010, I can't say I see more shadow detail but the colors look more sharp and vibrant (whatever that means).
post #55 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick99 View Post

As I have noted before, to my eyes it is not "more detailed than the PS3."

Ok, to my eyes, it is. Does that make me wrong? You seem to be running all over the internet trying to justify this purchase to yourself. Keep in mind that you're viewing on a 40" LCD set. As you go up in screen size a lot of different things become more visible. There were things I thought looked very, very good @ 50" that completely fell apart @70" (Lethal Weapon 2). Ask the guys using 100+ inch screens if they see differences in various players. You don't see the improvement... I think we get it. If you don't like it, take it back.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

The question is what makes it reference? I'm sure there are lot of people like myself who would purchase a better image... what exactly makes it better?

I just see more resolution of fine grain. That's why I said some people are going to attack this player as noisy. Additional texture is the only way to describe it. Rocky Balboa is a great example. During the first 3/4 of the film, there's a slightly more gritty, grainy texture to image that looks very detailed and filmic. Once the movie gets into the final fight and the photography switches to HD cameras, all that grain and grit vanishes and the picture is smooth and extremely detailed. But it's the loss of that film texture that tells me its not video noise, but rather exceptional texture and detail in the film portions of the movie. I've thought (sorry Patrick) that the PS3 was slightly softer overall than some of the other players out there, so the upgrade in the BD30 was a pleasant bump up. Is it the difference between going from DVD to HD? No, most people can't or won't be able to see the advantages.

Having said that, I'm not going to answer any more questions about PQ since it's so obviously dependant on displays and opinions. I fear that this player is going to make a lot of people angry.
post #56 of 12539
I picked mine up today at the South Austin CC.

Since the dude above gave such a detailed description, I will only add a few things.

Load up time for the menus on RATATOUILLE were far different than on my PS3. Much slower. On the other hand, the load up time for 28 WEEKS LATER and MR. BROOKS were about the same.

And with the pic included, seeing DTS MASTER HD finally light up on my Yamaha RX-V3800 was a HUGE delight for me.

I have a Sony BDP-S1 and a PS3, and now this, and this Panasonic is very, very nice. Picture quality is superb on my Sony 60A3000 in 24p mode.

I love all of the control you have inside the menus with this player. The ability to mess with speaker output is quite cool.

I also really like the remote. But dammit, why can't anyone make a lit remote anymore? I hate the ones that aren't backlit. Yeah Sony I'm talking to you too!

I'm a little concerned with the no Ethernet port, since it's a breeze FW update players with them, but we'll see how it plays out updating through the SD card or media.

Other than that, great player!!
LL
post #57 of 12539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Ley View Post

I've thought (sorry Patrick) that the PS3 was slightly softer overall than some of the other players out there, so the upgrade in the BD30 was a pleasant bump up. Is it the difference between going from DVD to HD? No, most people can't or won't be able to see the advantages.

I appreciate your input on why its image is a little superior. I have used roughly a half-dozen Blu-ray players and the only one that popped out to me was one of the Samsung's and after looking at its menu I noticed it had sharpness enabled by default.

Now I'm using 24fps and unless I'm mistaken that's pulled directly off the disc so all of the players have to be equal? That being the case it's nice not to have to worry about which is the best, is it worthwhile to upgrade, etc.
post #58 of 12539
So far I am very happy with my BD30 also. I have not had any problems or long delays with anything I have tried.

Uncompressed PCM is sounding great on my non-HDMI ( 5.1 Analog in receiver ) - I am probably going to pick up a Denon AVR-2808 I think that will play the formats bitstream but I'm still a little confused about it all - I'll need to make sure first.

Picture quality and SD Upconversion looks great for me.
post #59 of 12539
with the analog 5.1 outs can you get uncompressed pcm through your receiver?
post #60 of 12539
Brad...Great post...I was waiting to hear how Surf's up loaded....My pioneer 95 is going back as I'm in the 30 day period.

About the lack of ethernet...WHY? Is this an issue to anyone?

Now, where to buy...hmmm...
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