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Flat Panel Reliability and Issues with Popular Displays

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I'm [again!] in the market for a new TV as my Mits 1080p DLP will not be repaired or fixed by the only service center within 150 miles and Mitsubishi won't replace it. I've had previous negatives with rear projection TV's as well, including the XBR1 "green blob" optical block hell and an older Samsung DLP where a part was on indefinite back order.

I'm looking at the 52" Sony XBR4/5 as well as the Pioneer Kuro, but am worried about issues with these technologies. Are they as prone to repairs as the rear projection varieties (which apparently are much higher)? What do I have to worry about in regard to an LCD or a Plasma as far as picture issues (burn in, bad blacks, glare, viewing angles). Plus, what issues are unique to the two displays I mentioned?

My wife is going nuts that we have yet another issue with the rear projections and is willing to spend more money, but she would like some sort of guarantee, which I know can never exist. I'm just hoping that the later generation flat panel technology has worked out the kinks. Plus we want at least a 50" display, so the price IS a factor (need to sell the more expensive display).

Any help would be MUCH appreciated. Thanks!
post #2 of 8
Consumer Reports readers have determined that LCD and Plasma TVs are VERY reliable. The average flatscreen from a trusted name (Sony, Sharp, Samsung, et al) has a 5% repair rate at worst, contrary to DLP RP which is in the 19-34% range.

As for a top LCD TV, you'll have to spend a little cash. If you get plasma you have to worry about burn-in. In the LCD department, the best for the buck (and it's still expensive!) is the Sony KDL52W3000.
post #3 of 8
I am curious about all the burn-in talk??? I posted on my first thread here a link where I found a white paper PDF done by Pioneer where they intentionally torture tested some plasmas for 48 straight hours, and indeed they experienced burn-in issues but surprisingly when they ran a DVD movie on the panels with burn-in and looped them for 24 hours the burn-in disappeared. Now my question is are they telling the truth???? If this is in fact the honest truth then I would think that burn-in would be a non-issue anymore. Very new to all of this so please be gentle.
post #4 of 8
I would say the Pioneer paper was correct. Burn in, for the most part, is not an issue with current pdps. There are cases of IR but that fades over time.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by albiemanmike View Post

I found a white paper PDF done by Pioneer where they intentionally torture tested some plasmas for 48 straight hours, and indeed they experienced burn-in issues but surprisingly when they ran a DVD movie on the panels with burn-in and looped them for 24 hours the burn-in disappeared. Now my question is are they telling the truth????

Only two days? Not a week or two? A lot of people in restaurants or offices might be tuned to Fox Business for weeks at a time and have the Fox Business logo burn in!
post #6 of 8
Burn in is a non-issue with normal home viewing and when using a decent plasma. Even with serious gaming, it only becomes an issue if a static image is left on the set for a very very long period of time...the biggest danger being a static start page that is left on accidentally. Modern normal gaming usually has a pretty active screen. Static images such as maps might be a problem if you are seriously addicted to one game, and do not watch television between gaming sessions.

Should some burn in occur, it usually can be washed out by playing other images or whiting out the screen.

The example of a bar playing the same channel with a logo is a good point, but at home, the issue is unlikely to become a big deal.

In other words, if you vary your viewing with any normalcy, you should not have a problem.
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help. I guess the burn-in thing is a bit overblown, and usually I turn on the TV, watch a movie/football/play a game for a couple hours and then we turn it off...no risk for burn-in, right?

Also, do most Sony LCD's and Pioneer Plasma's accept 1080p over component? I have a regular 360 and have no need to get the Elite and would still like 1080p output.

Now to decide which to get. The 52" XBR4 is about a grand cheaper than a 50" Kuro...hmmmmm.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post

Only two days? Not a week or two? A lot of people in restaurants or offices might be tuned to Fox Business for weeks at a time and have the Fox Business logo burn in!

exactly....station logos on channels seem to do burn in quite well on current models.

Certain video games can also burn in the Plasma. In a general mix of viewing most Plasmas will not see burn in occur. But watch the same content over and over....IE news stations and or video games.....burn in is a real risk.

If you are TV user... risk......IF you are using the plasma for home theater.....very very low risk.
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