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Anyone seen a Coax Splitter Wall Plate?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I would like to get a coaxial cable splitter that is intigrated into a wall plate so I can send a single cable input to two separate devices. Has anyone seen one of these? I did a Google search and didn't see anything.
post #2 of 13
There are some here:

http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/home-wiring.html

You might have to do some creative stuff in the wall to make it happen.
post #3 of 13
I don't recall ever seeing one. If you can't find one marketed, it seems it would be fairly siimple to build. A soft plastic plate, drill two holes, attach with nuts. The only concern I would have is the lack of depth of the wall box interfering with the input connection. Low voltage wall boxes don't require full enclosures, so an existing wall box could be stategically modified to accomodate the module.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarpon6 View Post

I would like to get a coaxial cable splitter that is intigrated into a wall plate so I can send a single cable input to two separate devices. Has anyone seen one of these? I did a Google search and didn't see anything.

No such thing. The only option is a short jumper from the wallplate to a 2-way splitter then to your devices.

As raouliii wrote, the depth of outlet boxes if of primary concern. The box/wall would need to be at least 5" deep.
post #5 of 13
Why would you need a depth of 5"? A typical splitter is only 2-2.5" deep. If it were me doing it, this is what I would do:

1. Get an Old Work 2 gang box (double wide). Cut a hole for it in the wall, and cut the back out of it.
2. Buy a double f connector receptacle from Ram or somewhere else. Mount it on one side of the box.
3. Buy a nice splitter, and run the incoming connection to the in, and 2 outs with short pieces of coax. (make the pieces long enough so you can loop them rather than bending them. You can shove the extra into the wall out of the rear of the box.
4. Run the outs to the 2 f connectors.
5. Buy (when you buy the box) a decora style wall plate with an opening on one side and a blank on the other (you can get this at home depot or lowes.

The splitter goes on one side and is covered by the blank, the receptacles are on the other side.

An alternative, although not as clean is to do as suggested with the drill. Do the same double gang box, but buy a full double gang blank plate and drill holes in it and mount the splitter directly into the wall plate.

It can be done, just need to be creative. It sounds like a hack job, but if you do it right, it'll totally look professional.
post #6 of 13
I'm not sure I know what exactly you're tying to do. To divide the signal equally with a walplate mounted passive splitter, such that, half of the signal becomes available for continuing on behind the wall to source another wallplate elsewhere, you use a wallplate-style splitter called an MS-2D. Some companies make -4dB wall taps that do roughly the same thing. A more commonly manufactured walltap that will likely meet your needs is a -6dB wall tap. The signal power division will not be exactly equal, but since the "out" line from that tap will be going through additional cable, the actualk signal strength at the two wall plate locations may actually be closer to equal than if you used a two-way splitter.

Whatever you do, don't stick the single port of a splitter through the wallplate hole, because you will have crated an invalid "through" path through the splitter, resulting in uneven attenuation of about 20 to 25dB to the other wallplate.
post #7 of 13
I personally would not put the splitter in the box. It goes against the whole idea of structured wiring. The wiring should be permanently installed in the wall then you can attach anything you want on either end. In this case, I would just put a short jumper from the one f-connector on the wall-plate connected to a splitter which is then connected to your two components.

If you have the splitter in the wall, it could cause trouble-shooting hardships for the next owner of the house...

Carl
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntAltMike View Post

....Whatever you do, don't stick the single port of a splitter through the wallplate hole, because you will have crated an invalid "through" path through the splitter, resulting in uneven attenuation of about 20 to 25dB to the other wallplate.

I don't follow what you are saying. Are you talking about a signal path through a splitter in the opposing direction?
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
I found this on eBay: item 320171086348
post #10 of 13
The eBay item looks like it does what you want, and for ten bucks, your search will be over. When you get it, I would be interested in hearing what the label on the wall mounted tap says. It may say -4dB by 2, or -6 dB by 2 or it may really be a two way splitter.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by fedders View Post

I personally would not put the splitter in the box. It goes against the whole idea of structured wiring. The wiring should be permanently installed in the wall then you can attach anything you want on either end. In this case, I would just put a short jumper from the one f-connector on the wall-plate connected to a splitter which is then connected to your two components.

If you have the splitter in the wall, it could cause trouble-shooting hardships for the next owner of the house...

Carl

this sounds the best or is typical...short jumper off the single wall plate to a splitter to the devices. this is how I did the job the last 40 years.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by beartooth View Post

Why would you need a depth of 5"? A typical splitter is only 2-2.5" deep.

The splitter itself is 2.5" deep. Then you add another inch for the connector, then add 1.5" for the cable to exit the connector and have a proper bend radius. Much less than 5", and you'll be shoving things and making the cable bend too sharp just so it will fit
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by egnlsn View Post

The splitter itself is 2.5" deep. Then you add another inch for the connector, then add 1.5" for the cable to exit the connector and have a proper bend radius. Much less than 5", and you'll be shoving things and making the cable bend too sharp just so it will fit

That makes sense. I wasn't doing the math the same way.
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