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Master Burn-In/IR/Break In Thread Part II: All Posts Here Only - Page 98

post #2911 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemical360 View Post

LMAO!! Indeed, and well said.

I guess it comes down to they are making me paranoid. I have a wife, 3 year old etc... So buying another close to $2000 TV is out of the question. And not being an expert makes me wonder which side is right.

But it does come down to exactly what you said, untrained VS. trained. For me, I am loving the black level where in the beginning of the ST30 thread, people were complaining about the MLL levels? Very odd. I see BLACK, dead as night black. So these levels mean nothing to me at the moment.

Either way, I am taking Bad Company for a spin later this evening regardless of whether the experts say give it two weeks to adjust.

Heck, I am a baseball fan and this is baseball season. There is no way in hell I am not watching the Sox play for two weeks. Sorry.

The MLL complaint is great example of trained vs untrained. I know what they're talking about, b/c I was trying to decide between a Sammy and Panasonic. I went with Sammy, but that's another story; it was not however because of the MLL rising black level though- another good example of picking out the specks. You love the PQ on yours so enjoy it. Be smart and enjoy!!!
post #2912 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

You can never offset a price for a damaged or flawed product -- new or used, it's either a problem or not, in your case, it seems to be a problem. The burn might or might not go away depending on the severity of it. Contrary to all the theories and beliefs of ridding IR or Burn-In is to leave the set on for an equal amount of time (ie; image left for 2 days, and it'll take 48 hours of regular TV viewing for it to go away) well, I can attest to you that this is NOT true, if so your problem would of been at least solved.

I speak from experience because I once acquired this nasty burn back in Feb. 09, 2011 (or officially IR now) on the top right corner of my screen from setting up my new receiver. All it took was 25 minutes for the bright branding logo to get embedded...BUT...it also didn't take 25 minutes of viewing time for it to go away, it took more than TWO MONTHS. To this day, it is about 99.9% gone.

This is what I did when I discovered the problem:

I did this subsequently and NOT for days straight...dreaded but I had to do it...
1. I ran the slides for 48 Hrs w/ an SD card inserted (Cinema Mode w/ Contrast: 50, Brightness: 50)...then turned Off and rested for the next day.
2. Unplugged the RF to my TV and ran the snow on a blank input for 24 hours. (25% improved up to about now). Off and rested for the next day.
3. Had the Cartoon Network on for 12 hrs in late nights (Zoomed station logo away). Off and rested for the next day.
4. Ran the slides again for another 12 Hrs (Photo Mode w/ Contrast: 96, Brightness: 96). Off and rested for the next day. (about 60% improved now).

By now, I can only see the flaw on panning scenes of grey or bright white backgrounds, such as skies. But I can still easily see it and I usually pull up a slide or two and look for it.

After a month later, I decided to watch my TV with all SD channels zoomed-in. In HD, I watched a lot of Discovery and NatGeo. From time to time I would pull up a slide to do a test search and little by little without being stress-out about it, the logo has pretty much disappeared.

Hope this helps, but again, it depends on how severe the burn is (or IR).

Thank you, I will keep trying with the slides. It doesn't seem to be getting any better as of yet. Also my I do not have anything hooked to my coax input so my tv will not let me set it to the snow. I have been using a mutli colored snow dvd I have to try washing it out too with no luck.
post #2913 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjacks84 View Post

The MLL complaint is great example of trained vs untrained. I know what they're talking about, b/c I was trying to decide between a Sammy and Panasonic. I went with Sammy, but that's another story; it was not however because of the MLL rising black level though- another good example of picking out the specks. You love the PQ on yours so enjoy it. Be smart and enjoy!!!

Nevermind...
post #2914 of 5198
Owning a TV is no science and neither one has to be smart nor careful about it, just simple rules to adhere from the handy bible that came along with your set known as the 'Owner's Manual'. The first few pages will tell you exactly what to do to avoid problems such as IR -- which can potentially led to permanent burns in the future. So the first few hundred hours counts.

I was having dinner last night at a restaurant and sat about 10 feet away from a 42" Toshiba Plasma hanging on the wall with the Lakers game on, during transitional scenes and commercial breaks I can see burn-ins of every sort imaginable plastered all over its screen; side pillar burns, horizontal letterboxed burns, static channel logos, scoreboards, and closed captioning shadows, etc...it was horrendous. The funny thing is most of the people that sat with me didn't even realize it until I pointed it out to them. I guess the few hundred hours wasn't applied to that poor TV.

The situation I had with my 25-min incident was unheard of, I mean; what can happen in such little time right? I'm not watching letterboxed contents and certainly not 4:3, but my new receiver at the time when it displayed, not only all its texts contents were bright white but the receiver created a dimmed backdrop so the bright white texts can stand out even more which eventually embedded a text logo image on my screen for more than two months. As I mentioned on other posts, the image was hard to point out and most people wouldn't be able see it even if they tried looking for it. I guess the moral of this post is: if you think about it and look for it, you will find and see it, if you don't then you won't. So, in the first few hundred hours, be cautious and enjoy your new Plasma TV!
post #2915 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

Owning a TV is no science and neither one has to be smart nor careful about it, just simple rules to adhere from the handy bible that came along with your set known as the 'Owner's Manual'. The first few pages will tell you exactly what to do to avoid problems such as IR -- which can potentially led to permanent burns in the future. So the first few hundred hours counts.

I was having dinner last night at a restaurant and sat about 10 feet away from a 42" Toshiba Plasma hanging on the wall with the Lakers game on, during transitional scenes and commercial breaks I can see burn-ins of every sort imaginable plastered all over its screen; side pillar burns, horizontal letterboxed burns, static channel logos, scoreboards, and closed captioning shadows, etc... It was horrendous. I guess the few hundred hours wasn't applied to that poor TV.

The situation I had with my 25-min incident was unheard of, I mean; what can happen in such little time right? I'm not watching letterboxed contents and certainly not 4:3, but my new receiver at the time when it displayed, not only all its texts contents were bright white but the receiver created a dimmed backdrop so the bright white texts can stand out even more which eventually embedded a text logo image on my screen for more than two months. As I mentioned on other posts, the image was hard to point out and most people wouldn't be able see it even if they tried looking for it. I guess the moral of this post is: if you think about it and look for it, you will find and see it, if you don't then you won't. So, in the first few hundred hours, be cautious and enjoy your new Plasma TV!

I guess what we need to do here is define cautious. I mean, I never leave static images on my screen intentionally. When not being used, it's off, period. When I am watching, I prefer full HD content 1920x1080 etc... However, my son, being 3, enjoys 4:3 content from older childrens programs or childrens programs that are new but don't have a budget for overly expensive HD cameras to film their shows.

In the above case, we get black bars. Now, there is NO WAY I can prevent him from watching TV for 200 hours. It just won't happen. Not even with a 27" LCD in his bedroom. He likes being in the same room with mommy and daddy, which means he watches my TV and only uses his at bedtime to fall asleep.

So, what am I looking at here? I am doing endless amounts of research on this and am finding all kinds of things such as black bars will age the pixels slowly and therefore uneven and eventually, burn in. Others say, don't worry, you're good. Yes still other say, buying a plasma if you are doing anything but watching movies was stupid.

I stress my TV's, it is just who I am. I play games for hours. I watch movies for hours, I watch TV whether it be HD or 4:3 every second I am home. I am a baseball finatic, baseball all the time which means scoreboards. Hell, even when eating dinner, I watch TV. I mean I, for intents and purposes, am an entertainment junky.

This is why I am nervous. This is why your 25 minute incident makes me want to suck up the horrible quality of an LED just so I can relax and not chew my fingers off worrying about what will happen to the screen.
post #2916 of 5198
There a few things you can do for your kid, and it doesn't mean that you can't watch TV for the first 200 hours. When you are watching TV, you are essentially breaking it in, in all aspects, every minute counts towards the so called 'break-in' period. During those times you might want to 'zoomed' all 4:3 contents to full screen (or fill the pillars gray if you don't want to zoom) and set the brightness/contrast below 50 (or 50%). Turned on the Pixel Orbiter and set it to every 1 minute. The key here is 'variety', if you finish watching a sports channel, tune it to something else to even out your screen so that the static logo from the previous channel (especially ESPN) gets its fair share of phosphor wear. If you want to speed up the procedure, run the slides for an hour or so during times when you or your family is not utilizing the television, ie: before you shower in the morning or during cooking times before dinner.
post #2917 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

There a few things you can do for your kid, and it doesn't mean that you can't watch TV for the first 200 hours. When you are watching TV, you are essentially breaking it in, in all aspects, every minute counts towards the so called 'break-in' period. During those times you might want to 'zoomed' all 4:3 contents to full screen (or fill the pillars gray if you don't want to zoom) and set the brightness/contrast below 50 (or 50%). Turned on the Pixel Orbiter and set it to every 1 minute. The key here is 'variety', if you finish watching a sports channel, tune it to something else to even out your screen so that the static logo from the previous channel (especially ESPN) gets its fair share of phosphor wear. If you want to speed up the procedure, run the slides for an hour or so during times when you or your family is not utilizing the television, ie: before you shower in the morning or during cooking times before dinner.

I see. Good advice, never even considered zooming. Now, I seen what I belive is the "Pixel Orbiter" I am not sure what it is called in my menu, but I did see it. I will turn that on during his usage and when static images are on screen, like scoreboards.

Good advice here.

One question and I feel stupid asking. I have no idea what "run the slides" means. Can you just give me a quick crash coure on what it is and how to do it?

I appreciate your last post, that was most helpful. Thank you!
post #2918 of 5198
The "Break-In Slides" as we call it here was introduced by a member named D-Nice I believed. It is a series of colored slides designed to cover and intermittently flow through your entire screen to help even-out phosphor wears and to reduce the chance of any heavy image-retentions (or potential burns). As long as you are watching TV regularly you should be fine without it, but if you think certain channels rendered more of a pronounced IR then maybe the slides will help even the process in the first 200 hours. I only started using it because of my "25-min incident" and with a series of other gimmicks I was able to phase-out the mark.

You can either burned the slides into a DVD-R or save a zip file to an SD card like I did. Afterward, I inserted it to my TV and hit the remote to turned it on as a picture slideshow in loop mode. I left the card in there ever since. For the life of me, I just couldn't find the link anymore, maybe someone here can help.
post #2919 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

The "Break-In Slides" as we call it here was introduced by a member named D-Nice I believed....

You can either burned the slides into a DVD-R or save a zip file to an SD card like I did.... For the life of me, I just couldn't find the link anymore, maybe someone here can help.

I think... think... this is it: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showp...15&postcount=1 I'm sure 80's can confirm. I haven't burned it myself yet, but I'm having problems with that on the AVS 709 calibration disc forum trying to get help. I've never done anything to an SD card on my notebook, but would like to. 80's, would you give some general instruction on how to do this? I would appreciate it. Is it as simple as just putting in a blank SD card and copying to media or do you have to use something like ImgBurn?
post #2920 of 5198
Oh yeah, all you have to do is save the file to your desktop.
Create a folder and name it Break-In-Slides, or similar on your SD card,
Open the zip file and copy all the file slides (not with the zip folder) and paste it to the new 'Break-in' folder in your SD card. Stick it to the side of your tv.

On the tv:
You should be able to push the 'SD CARD' button on the top of your remote and it will launch, then choose PHOTO. When the slides appear, choose the first one and hit ENTER. At this point, make sure you hit 'Menu' from the remote and go to 'Slideshow settings' and set 'Repeat playback' to ON so it can loop endlessly.

Controls from the remote:
You can use the > (play) button to proceed playing for any reason if it didn't start,
>>| to skip it manually.
Press Stop to for the photo menu or hit 'SD CARD' to exit completely and go back to watching TV.
post #2921 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

Oh yeah, all you have to do is save the file to your desktop.
Create a folder and name it Break-In-Slides, or similar on your SD card,
Open the zip file and copy all the file slides (not with the zip folder) and paste it to the new 'Break-in' folder in your SD card. Stick it to the side of your tv.

On the tv:
You should be able to push the 'SD CARD' button on the top of your remote and it will launch, then choose PHOTO. When the slides appear, choose the first one and hit ENTER. At this point, make sure you hit 'Menu' from the remote and go to 'Slideshow settings' and set 'Repeat playback' to ON so it can loop endlessly.

Controls from the remote:
You can use the > (play) button to proceed playing for any reason if it didn't start,
>>| to skip it manually.
Press Stop to for the photo menu or hit 'SD CARD' to exit completely and go back to watching TV.

Thank you 80's!! Does the link I pasted appear correct? It was by D-Nice, but I figured you know since you have it. I'd hate to present it to Chem as the right link if I am in fact wrong.
post #2922 of 5198
You're welcomed. Yes I believed those were the same images, it's been months since I last looked at the links.
post #2923 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post
I was having dinner last night at a restaurant and sat about 10 feet away from a 42" Toshiba Plasma hanging on the wall with the Lakers game on, during transitional scenes and commercial breaks I can see burn-ins of every sort imaginable plastered all over its screen; side pillar burns, horizontal letterboxed burns, static channel logos, scoreboards, and closed captioning shadows, etc...it was horrendous. The funny thing is most of the people that sat with me didn't even realize it until I pointed it out to them. I guess the few hundred hours wasn't applied to that poor TV.
80s, were you able to see it during normal viewing on that TV during your dinner or was it only seen momentarily on blank screen?
post #2924 of 5198
80sguy it does not say anything about breakin in the user manual of my new Samsung so your information is incorrect. You had bad luck with your television it obviusly is broken. Guys just check for extreme IR while you can still exchange the TV. That is much wiser than waiting for 200 hours as there is no proof whatsoever that it will prevent IR. Stop wasting your time with this stuff.
post #2925 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickSP View Post
80s, were you able to see it during normal viewing on that TV during your dinner or was it only seen momentarily on blank screen?
I can see it on certain scenes, especially during light backgrounds. It was pretty hard to see during the game because of scoreboards, closed captioning was on and there were too many movements and camera panning, but when the break came to commercials it was obvious. I pointed it out my friends otherwise they wouldn't even have noticed it. They were kind of in awe because they couldn't believe things like this can happen to TVs.
post #2926 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post
80sguy it does not say anything about breakin in the user manual of my new Samsung so your information is incorrect. You had bad luck with your television it obviusly is broken. Guys just check for extreme IR while you can still exchange the TV. That is much wiser than waiting for 200 hours as there is no proof whatsoever that it will prevent IR. Stop wasting your time with this stuff.
Never once did I mentioned about "break-in slides on Samsung owner's manuals" or ANY plasmas for that matter. I did wrote about telling folks to adhere to the manuals of their set. You can scroll up a few posts or pages and do some re-reading. Also, my TV wasn't defective and I will state that IR and BURN-INS are NOT hard to get. If you look hard enough, you might not like what you find -- being if you are not cautious from the beginning that is.
post #2927 of 5198
I know exactly what you wrote and it was wrong. Well anyway do you actually believe your TV would not be this extremely prone to IR if you had broken it in? That goes against common sense and sounds like denial to me. Nowadays it is hard to even find a plasma with IR and that has nothing to do with breakin.
post #2928 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post
I know exactly what you wrote and it was wrong....
Enlighten me a bit of what I wrote and how was I wrong???
My TV only had one little burn (99% gone by now, but not quite). The situation was a bit different because my TV, Receiver, and 5.1 Speakers were all purchased at the same time, and pretty much arrived all at the same time - given a day or two difference. Unpacking everything at the time was another story but I was too excited about getting everything up and running. After going through all the manuals, starting with the receiver and while setting up Audyssey with the TV on, that's how I got the burn. Waiting after 200 hours without a receiver is a definitely big no no. Honestly, if I even knew what 'broken-in' meant I'd 'probably' could of avoided that blemish, but the manual does not tell you about break-ins, all it stated was to avoid watching 4:3 content, letterboxed content and bright static logos for prolonged periods of time. The manufacturers knew that burn-in on plasmas are still an issue therefore they buried the "burn-ins are not covered" somewhere deep in the warranty section. They considered this to be negligence. Unless I'm holding a cigarette lighter up close enough to 'burn' the screen, I wouldn't call any it negligence.


Quote:
Nowadays it is hard to even find a plasma with IR and that has nothing to do with breakin.
You need to get your head out of your @$$ and look real hard, as a matter of fact, watch ESPN for 30 minutes and look at your Samsung, tell me you won't find a trace of IR. Image-Retentions are the blood and bones of all plasmas, it is phosphor-base and are known to retain after effects of certain images, and if you neglect, you will get burned!
post #2929 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post
80sguy it does not say anything about breakin in the user manual of my new Samsung so your information is incorrect. You had bad luck with your television it obviusly is broken. Guys just check for extreme IR while you can still exchange the TV. That is much wiser than waiting for 200 hours as there is no proof whatsoever that it will prevent IR. Stop wasting your time with this stuff.
Felix, have you checked your E-manual? There are 3 pages about "screen burn" for the PN64D7000 on pages 132, 133, & 134. It does not have anything about break in, but screen burn and specific tools provided by Samsung are covered in several pages to assist in preventing screen burn... well... it certainly does not indicate to me it is something restricted only to defective TV's as you have stated. Also, from the D7000 user manual, I quote,
Quote:
Displaying stationary images for more than 5% of total viewing time can cause
uneven aging of your PDP display and leave subtle, but permanent burned-in ghost images in the PDP picture. To avoid this, vary the programming and
images, and primarily display full screen moving images, not stationary patterns or dark bars.
On PDP models that offer picture sizing features, use these controls to view different formats as a full screen picture.
Be careful about the television formats you select and the length of time you view them. Uneven PDP aging as a result of format selection and use, as well
as burned in images, are not covered by your Samsung limited warranty.
It's covered in the warranty section and specifically excluded, so again I do not think it is merely restricted to defective TV's. In fact it is excluded by the warranty. We all know manufacturers will write a warranty to protect themselves primarily. All that being said, I still like your idea about trying to return one by testing whether or not it gets IR. It is an interesting thought/ position worth considering with a new PDP. I'll go with break-in slides, however, because that is what most of the ISF and THX certified calibrators recommend in the calibration forums.

Now, the option for using slides and for break in is an opinion shared by many on AVS Forums and it is an opinion/ position that does NOT profess to be a panacea for burn-in or IR; rather, it is meant to give you a means for exercising phospors consistently to "break-in" a TV. The hope then is that it will get one past the more susceptible beginning. A lot of us like to calibrate our TV's and you don't want to do that during the break in period because of those phosphors being so new and how much they fluctuate. You don't believe it. Okay, that's fine. As another poster mentioned, this is a community that allows folks to come here to identify issues/ problems, commonalities, and to seek solutions. It's not self congratulatory. As I read this, providing quotes and page citations from the user and e-manuals, there is an argument supporting 80's Guy pretty darn well- not to mention the 98 pages on this thread about burn in. Let's not start a sh*tstorm. You've stated your position. As with any forum the reader should decide for themselves what they believe and what they will do.
post #2930 of 5198
Welp, either way, I am sure I am going to go home today and find out just how tough this 55ST30 really is. My mom is watching my son today and I guarantee, she is going to be watching 4:3 content even though I specificaly stated, please try and stay inside the HD channels and make sure the picture is full screen.

Plus, she watches alot of news type shows with the running bars.

Ugh! I am like chewing my fingers off already thinking about the possible damage.

LOL. This is just no way to live, mang.
post #2931 of 5198
What I was referring to is that there is nothing about breaking in a TV in the manual as you stated yourself. Of course I know that burnin exists but it will not happen under normal circumstances so there is no need to be cautious about it. There is no need to be cautious about IR anyway because it is temporary by definitiom. That is why I am questioning the use of breaking in slides and such for the reasons 80sfan thinks they are for. They are of course useful as you noted if you want to calibrate your television quickly and not wait until the plasma has aged by itself but as a tool to protect it from damage they are not needed.


I am not saying every TV with a little IR is defective. That is a matter of opinion because on some TVs of the same model there is none and on some is a lot IR so I guess those ones could be called defective or at least they are worse and I would exchange them. However 80sfan has week long IR from displaying a logo for 24 minutes. I would definitely call that defective. Imagine what is going to happen if he plays an entire movie with black bars. I would not hesitate a second to exchange that TV. And if you wait a month it will be too late that is the reason I am so sceptical about being careful in the first period of time after you buy it. There is no proven benefit but the danger of endig up with a defective unit as has 80sfan.
post #2932 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post

What I was referring to is that there is nothing about breaking in a TV in the manual as you stated yourself. Of course I know that burnin exists but it will not happen under normal circumstances so there is no need to be cautious about it. There is no need to be cautious about IR anyway because it is temporary by definitiom. That is why I am questioning the use of breaking in slides and such for the reasons 80sfan thinks they are for. They are of course useful as you noted if you want to calibrate your television quickly and not wait until the plasma has aged by itself but as a tool to protect it from damage they are not needed.


I am not saying every TV with a little IR is defective. That is a matter of opinion because on some TVs of the same model there is none and on some is a lot IR so I guess those ones could be called defective or at least they are worse and I would exchange them. However 80sfan has week long IR from displaying a logo for 24 minutes. I would definitely call that defective. Imagine what is going to happen if he plays an entire movie with black bars. I would not hesitate a second to exchange that TV. And if you wait a month it will be too late that is the reason I am so sceptical about being careful in the first period of time after you buy it. There is no proven benefit but the danger of endig up with a defective unit as has 80sfan.

Well, I am not going to pretend to know more than anyone here. I have said that many times and will say it again, I know nothing about the in depth little variances. But I will say this, a 24 minute IR that lasted two months would have me freaking the F out.

This is what got me concerned in the first place. I am by no means being cautious at this point. I am using my TV the way I want to use it and we will see what happens. I don't have time for 200 hours of slides for break in as this is the family TV. So I will use it as I would an LED and see where that takes me. That said, I will be cautious about long term static images such as baseball scoreboards but I will run it with the Pixel Orbiter and hope that this will prevent IR.
post #2933 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemical360 View Post

I am using my TV the way I want to use it and we will see what happens. I don't have time for 200 hours of slides for break in as this is the family TV. So I will use it as I would an LED and see where that takes me. That said, I will be cautious about long term static images such as baseball scoreboards but I will run it with the Pixel Orbiter and hope that this will prevent IR.

There you go!!! There's all sorts of ways to approach this stuff. What is important is assimilating information and deciding for yourself what is best for you! Good luck!
post #2934 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post

What I was referring to is that there is nothing about breaking in a TV in the manual as you stated yourself. Of course I know that burnin exists but it will not happen under normal circumstances so there is no need to be cautious about it. There is no need to be cautious about IR anyway because it is temporary by definitiom. That is why I am questioning the use of breaking in slides and such for the reasons 80sfan thinks they are for. They are of course useful as you noted if you want to calibrate your television quickly and not wait until the plasma has aged by itself but as a tool to protect it from damage they are not needed.


I am not saying every TV with a little IR is defective. That is a matter of opinion because on some TVs of the same model there is none and on some is a lot IR so I guess those ones could be called defective or at least they are worse and I would exchange them. However 80sfan has week long IR from displaying a logo for 24 minutes. I would definitely call that defective. Imagine what is going to happen if he plays an entire movie with black bars. I would not hesitate a second to exchange that TV. And if you wait a month it will be too late that is the reason I am so sceptical about being careful in the first period of time after you buy it. There is no proven benefit but the danger of endig up with a defective unit as has 80sfan.

Fair points! I would have to say if I had IR that bad after minutes I would try to think of some reason to return, as well. Hopefully, none of us have the problem.
post #2935 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjacks84 View Post

Fair points! I would have to say if I had IR that bad after minutes I would try to think of some reason to return, as well. Hopefully, none of us have the problem.

Indeed. I think that was Felix's point though. Rather than defend against for the entire length of your "remorse" period, put the TV through the ringer out of the gate and see how it performs.

The Sox are playing tonight. That will be a few hours of a scoreboard in a static location... If I see that screboard after the game is over when watching a movie or playing a game, back to Best Buy it goes.

And before some screams at me for "taking advantage of the system." That is why the law was put in place, to prevent big box retailers from sticking it to their customers as they do already by 100% mark up.

And I gotta tell ya, buying a TV prone to IR and eventually burn in make me incredibly remorseful I bought that set.
post #2936 of 5198
Great analogy guys.
Again, regarding my 24-min incident; I didn't noticed it towards the end of the third week and going on the fourth. I traced it back because the IR mark says 'Denon' so it's gotta be when I was setting up Audyssey. Like I mentioned before, it is very hard to see and most of us wouldn't even be able to point out at the time, and especially now when it is almost entirely and 99% gone. Seriously, there was not one thought of remorse nor ill-feeling towards my purchase of this TV and certainly the thought of returning the set wasn't feasible considering this was a small problem and ultimately it has pretty much remedied. For the price I paid which totaled to about five Ben Franklins plus four Andrew Jacksons -- it is unheard of and a steal for a 42" Panasonic Plasma!
Returning a perfectly working set would not yield better results and certainly would not reduce your chance of getting IR or Burn-ins; adhering to the first few pages of the manual is key.

The fact is I didn't start to use the slides after the mark was discovered. Also, during those times in the first two hundred hours I was watching mostly DVD movies and many from Netflix streaming. Some covered the screen fully and others with the top/bottom black bars. Some traces of IR were visible and fortunately (after switching to regular TV on full) it didn't marred my set in any way. I can still see image-retentions when I switch inputs (on a blank screen) but it'd always go way quickly once something is on. And a few wise words from the veteran AVS members: "There is no such thing as a perfect TV, not even a Pioneer Kuro." So enjoy and let it break-in naturally.
post #2937 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix19 View Post

I know exactly what you wrote ....

......Nowadays it is hard to even find a plasma with IR and that has nothing to do with breakin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post

Enlighten me......


You need to...[censor]....and look real hard, as a matter of fact, watch ESPN for 30 minutes and look at your Samsung, tell me you won't find a trace of IR. Image-Retentions are the blood and bones of all plasmas, it is phosphor-base and are known to retain after effects of certain images, and if you neglect, you will get burned!

Prime example here, I feel sorry for the guy.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...6&goto=newpost
post #2938 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80sGuy View Post


You need to get your head out of your @$$ and look real hard, as a matter of fact, watch ESPN for 30 minutes and look at your Samsung, tell me you won't find a trace of IR. Image-Retentions are the blood and bones of all plasmas, it is phosphor-base and are known to retain after effects of certain images, and if you neglect, you will get burned!

Yes a static image for 30 mins will cause IR but it will be gone the next day.
I have been testing my samsung lately and when I play like 5-6 hour gaming sessions with bejeweled 2 and zumba i get IR. But the next day when I turn on my tv it is gone for some reason. I have done this multiple times and cant explain it
post #2939 of 5198
Well as of right now, this ST30 is a trooper. Two straight hours of sprout with the logo in the bottom right as static as can be, Red Sox game and two hours of Battlefield Bad Company 2 and not a trace of IR. I sat here staring at the screen for 10 mins and cannot see anything. Yes, i have Pixel Orbiter going but with all those static graphics for that long, you would think something might happen.

Nope, the Panasonic ST30 is incredibly impressive right now as far as how well it holds up against unavoidable imagery.
post #2940 of 5198
Quote:
Originally Posted by chemical360 View Post

Well as of right now, this ST30 is a trooper. Two straight hours of sprout with the logo in the bottom right as static as can be, Red Sox game and two hours of Battlefield Bad Company 2 and not a trace of IR. I sat here staring at the screen for 10 mins and cannot see anything. Yes, i have Pixel Orbiter going but with all those static graphics for that long, you would think something might happen.

Nope, the Panasonic ST30 is incredibly impressive right now as far as how well it holds up against unavoidable imagery.

Not that I want you to have IR ot BI (burn-in) but the real way to see IR or BI is to turn off ALL the lights in the room and then turn your TV on without any input being fed OR,
simply turn your TV off and although you turn your TV off, the phospors will still be active and show you all the BI or IR.
Now if these two tests above don't show you any of those then you are truly in plasma heaven (LOL).
Also, if you don't see any BI or IR while watching TV then you are also at the same place.
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