or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Master Burn-In/IR/Break In Thread Part II: All Posts Here Only
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Master Burn-In/IR/Break In Thread Part II: All Posts Here Only - Page 111

post #3301 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalWldLif View Post

I edited the slides like you suggested.
Yes, I ran slides with center black and the
top and bottom the colors. for every 1hr of
2.35 to 1 I ran 1/2hr of slides.
This is during the first 1000hrs.

Would you mind sending/e-mailing me those slides by chance?

brandon.w.robinson@gmail.com
post #3302 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattydr View Post

Hi all. Bought a 42" GT25 in July. My wife's favorite channel is TLC, and the stupid logo is burnt in at the moment. Noticed it about two weeks ago, since then she has watched very little, and I have run probably 15-20 hours of football as well as cumulative 2 hours of the screen wipe. It doesn't appear to have faded at all.

I'm pretty surprised to have encountered this, she doesn't watch more than 7 hours a WEEK, and I have used it plenty for gaming, football, etc. In fact if anything I was worried about getting burn-in from the DKCR HUD, but there is nothing at all there. We watch movies as well.

Everything I read was that we didn't really need to worry about this unless we were watching one station with a static logo/ticker for many hours a day. I'm sure we got at least 50-75 hours on the TV before we even got cable service at all, and like I said our usage has always been well-mixed. I'm really disappointed about this. Ultimately it's not the end of the world, I don't really notice it unless I look for it, but it's not something that I feel I should have to be dealing with.

So, besides just venting, I was wondering if there is anything I can do to try to get this logo to fade? I see some people saying this stuff fades with time, others saying they have IR/burn-in that has never gone away. The screen wipe doesn't help much because it only lasts 15 minutes. Any suggestions for something I can leave running over night that could help? I see mention of solid-color slides, will running those continuously over night do me any good? Obviously TV stations are out due to logos . . .

Anyone had luck with warranty claims with Panasonic over burn-in?

TIA

Well, I've looked a bit closer and I'm very unhappy with what I've found. I ran some slides of various colors as well as shades of grey, and it turns out I have not JUST the TLC logo burnt in, but ESPN and FOX as well. These three stations certainly represent our "most-watched" channels, but it's not as if we keep it tuned to those three stations only. I do watch football on all the major networks, so I understand that's 3 hours at a sitting. But I'm often jumping around between games, and it's not like it stays on one channel all day - different games, different channels. We watch programming several other channels, (ABC, CBS, misc cable stations, etc) as well as watch movies and play video games. The TLC logo has shown zero signs of fading over the past three weeks despite using the TV plenty and zero TLC. It's such a shame, because I love the picture on this TV. Ugh.
post #3303 of 5199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Traxion View Post

I have a Pioneer Kuro PDP-5020FD, and while the picture quality is great, this thing suffers from burn-in issues after even short gaming sessions of 1-2 hours. Everyone spreads around this non-sense about how "modern day plasmas don't suffer from burn-in anymore," but my experience has shown that to be completely untrue.

My first encounter with this was about a year ago with the FOX Business channel's static logo on the bottom left of the screen. A couple hours in the morning everyday for a couple weeks (despite several hours of logo free programming for the rest of the day) was all it took to leave a ghosted image on my screen that is still there to this day.

Now, after playing a new racing game that just came out a couple weeks ago, I have the lap timer and place position that is displayed while racing burned in the top right corner of my screen, despite only playing for a couple hours a night and having plenty of time in the menus between races where the HUD is not displayed. Very disappointing...

Wow that really sucks. I have a Kuro too and I have gamed the same game (a roll player) with bright red health bar for over 8 hours! and no IR what so ever. I wonder how one set can get it so fast and another not. That sucks, sorry to hear about that. I usually game COD for 4 - 5 hours straight every Friday night and no problems.
post #3304 of 5199
Well, according to the service menu, my Panasonic 50GT30 has hit roughly 154 hours of use.

I've found it impossible to avoid playing Batman Arkham City on it, and I initially started seeing some retention of the 'Detective Mode' text from the GUI.

running several hundred National Geographic photographs through the set on the built in randomized Collage slide show (which places photos at random spots on the set, and even a bit off screen,eventually creating a varied massaging of colours) for a few hours while listening to music on my Roku 2 massaged that out easily.

So. I've decided that I can easily live with the degree of image retention this set has even this early in its life.
post #3305 of 5199
So first time plasma owner here (65VT30) and am in the process of running the "panel prep" slides for the first 100 hours before I use some settings from another forum.

What should I do after this? We normally watch movies (60/40 2.35:1) a few nights per week, I play an hour or two of games per day (not the same game every week or day), and my wife watches a lot of Food Network HD and we have a regime of shows that we try and catch. I also watch sports here or there.

Is this going to be OK? Should I run the "wipe" function after I change viewing activity (after I'm done gaming, after a movie, before I go to bed)? Run the slides every so often with my new settings?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated. I loved the picture in the store with Cinema and THX, dialing in some Pro settings will be even better, and I just don't want to ruin my three thousand dollar TV.

Thanks!
post #3306 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesalesman View Post

I just purchased the GT30 and broke in the set for about 160 hours. Add a month or two of casual watching I was well over the break in point. I just bought Dark Souls and can definitely see image retention on all corners of the screen. It's not really noticeable in casual watching, but if you watch for you can catch it on occasions.

I think I permanently burned the Estus Flask from Dark Souls into my 500M. I even played without the HUD for ~90% of the game. Fortunately it's not noticeable during normal viewing. It only shows up as an ever-so-slightly darker patch of black on an all-black screen. Still hoping it will fade over time, but after ~25 hours of normal full-screen content it hasn't budged. I love plasma, but man I hate having to baby them.
post #3307 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamR View Post

This thread is for all discussion related to burn in, IR, and break in questions/concerns/info on flat panel TVs. Please post all discussions on this topic in this thread.

With today's new technologies (2007 and beyond) burn in is nearly non-existence if users use common sense. While still possible, it is highly unlikely if common care is used. A lot of newer TV's (i.e. Pioneer's 8th gen sets) have new technologies that help to also prevent IR. Combined with break in and common care/use, IR can be dramatically reduced if not even eliminated completely.

This thread is for the Plasma and LCD Flat Panel Displays Forum: there is a SEPARATE thread for RPTV


Download Break In DVD (SVCD)

Another good thread for information regarding break-in. Thread is in the Panny section but applies to all plasma's.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...6#post14472276

I have tried to read all of the pages..

But has it been determined that it is still a good idea to give the newer 2010/2011 Plasma screens a break-in?? [I have a new set being delivered later this week!]

I currently have a older Toshiba 720P/1080i 40" Plasma and even did everything that I could to give it a break-in, others in the house did not understand and would leave the set on watching 4:3 programming (while I was at work) during the first year of ownership (2006) and causing a slight burn-in on the side images. Now since most stations are now broadcasting in 16:9, I am hoping that I will not have the troubles as before.

avid
post #3308 of 5199
Yep another plasma newbie has arrived (and thats a good thing I hope)!

So recently a friend convinced me in purchasing a Sammy PN51D8000 to replace my 2008 Sammy 40" LCD. I was able to purchase this thing for $1400 and saw it was the 'best' HDTV to get compared to other Plasmas/LED/LCD. I've read through this as well as other PND8000 related threads in this forum seeking help however.

I didn't look into how to handle plasmas as I was being told "modern day plasmas don't burn in". I learned hard way this is not entirely true as first hours of using my PN51D8000 I was already getting IR from watching news, sports, 4:3 programing etc. I now know this is very bad during this 100-200 break-in period. I already have a dead pixel on my display (I can't tell if it was my fault or just died on own) and have a warranty replacement coming from Samsung thank god. While I wait for the replacement I want to gather experience while I can.

I've downloaded the break-in slides and I do have the time available to run a burn in for 100+ hours. What I'm not sure of however is what settings I should have on the TV while its breaking in. Everything is set to "standard" so cell light is at 10 and contrast is at 90. Don't I need to increase cell light to 15 and contrast down to like 60? Is there anything else I need to be doing?

Like most newbies here, I'm not a videophile but I'm a strong believer in getting most bang for your buck. I will use this PN51D8000 to play Wii/PS3/Xbox, FIOS tv, blu-ray and maybe even some PC use. If I can get better picture and preventing my display to burn out (at no additional cost lol) I will. Thanks in advance for any help.
post #3309 of 5199
Sounds like definate burn in, vs. image retention. I had the same problem with my Sammy PN58C8000. Luckily, for me, Samsung authorized a replacement panel for my tv so my screen is new. Cartoon Network logo is what burnt into my screen, most likely by my then in home babysitter. If your panasonic is fairly new, I would contact them and just let them know how upset with the quality of their product you are, they may cave and just replace the panel for you.
post #3310 of 5199
I have a Panasonic P50S30 and I'm wondering if I have burn in or image retention.

I can see the logos from ESPN and USA on the bottom right of my TV. I've refrained from watching those stations to see if it would go away but it hasn't. I've run the white bar deal that comes on the TV to get rid of image retention/burn in but that didn't work.

Do you guys think that is image retention or burn in? I've been trying to find stations with no logos or transparent logos to help. It just sucks because I bought the TV 4-5 months ago and I can't watch the stations I want to without feeling bad because it will make the logos more noticeable.
post #3311 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by speed3driver View Post

Sounds like definate burn in, vs. image retention. I had the same problem with my Sammy PN58C8000. Luckily, for me, Samsung authorized a replacement panel for my tv so my screen is new. Cartoon Network logo is what burnt into my screen, most likely by my then in home babysitter. If your panasonic is fairly new, I would contact them and just let them know how upset with the quality of their product you are, they may cave and just replace the panel for you.

Its still surprising that the networks don't alternate their logos from left/right during the broadcast. I saw this happen during a few football games, when they went to break and came back, the logo was on the other side of the screen. It should be a broadcasting standard to alternate logo placement every 1hr or so.
post #3312 of 5199
could anyone tell me if this video is a safe alternative way to break in your plasma? The 360 version only, not the ps3. (He starts the break in method at 3:25)



I'm really bad with computers and burning stuff so I wouldn't even know where to begin with Break in slides.
post #3313 of 5199
Purchased 9 months ago - I thought I followed all the proper break in/etc recommendations, and still use the THX settings. Apparently my son has been watching a lot of 4:3 with the black bars - I now have lighter strips on the left and right side of the picture - not really IR but I guess the phosphors have "aged" more in the middle of the picture than on the outside where black has been displayed?
Is there any way to to fix this or at least reduce? I can see the change in brightness on any solid color/non moving scene and it is driving me crazy. Very depressing since other than that, this is an awesome TV.
post #3314 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by muffinmcfluffin View Post

So... it is ill-advised to run my TV for 150 hours non-stop with break-in slides? Basically, I don't want to watch any TV content until I at least reach 150 hours with the slides. Does that mean it might take me a month until I start watching my TV if I'm going to give the television set actual breaks?

The slides have nothing to do with IR or burn in. D-nice has repeated this so many times that I'm surprised that he even bothers to repeat it at this point. In theory, running the slides for 100 hours ages the set's phosphors evenly so that D-nice's picture settings can be used to the best effect (or for a professional calibration). I didn't bother with the slides, was very careful about what I watched on my ST30 for the first 100 hours and still see way too much IR after only brief periods of static images onscreen (i.e. On Demand or DVD menus). I doubt that the slides would have made one bit of difference. My issue is with Panasonic and the engineering of its plasma panels.
post #3315 of 5199
Interesting that some of these Pannys get IR and others do not... I have had the P50ST30 for 3 weeks now and my viewing is probably 75% espn/sports and gaming... almost never watch movies, not my thing... other 25% is cable/sat shows. I have experienced zero burn-in or IR even after playing 12 hours of uncharted 3 in a marathon session this weekend... must be the panel lottery coming into play again, by the way I had a June build and had the A-board replaced a week ago for FBr.
post #3316 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal1981 View Post

The slides have nothing to do with IR or burn in. D-nice has repeated this so many times that I'm surprised that he even bothers to repeat it at this point. In theory, running the slides for 100 hours ages the set's phosphors evenly so that D-nice's picture settings can be used to the best effect (or for a professional calibration). I didn't bother with the slides, was very careful about what I watched on my ST30 for the first 100 hours and still see way too much IR after only brief periods of static images onscreen (i.e. On Demand or DVD menus). I doubt that the slides would have made one bit of difference. My issue is with Panasonic and the engineering of its plasma panels.

Actually, your statement is incorrect. D-Nice's statement is that the slides are intended for aging the panel to prepare it for applying his reference settings, not for preventing IR. He never actually states that it can't help, just that it's not his intended purpose of people using them to age their sets. The reason for this is simple. If he says the slides help prevent IR and then someone runs them and gets it, then they start whining and blaming him. That doesn't mean they have no effect and considering that you never ran them, you're not exactly in position to comment.

My personal take is you should run the slides and then thoroughly test the set for IR-proneness (especially if you're a gamer or watch a lot of static content) while you're still in the return period. That way if you lose on the panel lottery, you can swap out for a working set. Talking about the panel lottery though, Samsung and LG tend to be even more IR prone than Panasonic for their plasmas. There's even a few unlucky folks who got IR-prone Pioneers, even though vast majority don't have that problem. All manufacturers can put out a few duds, but since it's not covered under warranty you need to test while you can return. Just like LCDs have their own host of potential issues that you need to check while you can return them (backlight bleed, dead pixels, color uniformity, IR [yes they can get it too if you lose on the LCD panel lottery], etc..).

My one last comment is that I prefer webapalooza's 120-slide set that includes more gradations and cycles more frequently (depending how you set them to run), even though it won't line up 1:1 with D-Nice's break-in procedure.
post #3317 of 5199
As someone who is trying to decide between plasma and LED, it's disturbing to find that IR & burn-in are still issues. What percentage of sets still experience problems? Anyone take a guess?
post #3318 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbbransc View Post

As someone who is trying to decide between plasma and LED, it's disturbing to find that IR & burn-in are still issues. What percentage of sets still experience problems? Anyone take a guess?

Yup, it's either flashlights and clouds vs IR and baby sitting...arrrgh!
post #3319 of 5199
I was thinking of getting a plasma since I read that burn in isn't a problem anymore blah blah.

Thank god I read this thread. Never will I get a plasma since my purpose is gaming. Thank you to avsforums for steering me clear of this disaster known as Plasma (for gaming) even in the year 2011. I guess I have to go back to researching input lag for LCDs.

100+ hours of running something to "prep" your TV? Sigh.
post #3320 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknomancer View Post

I was thinking of getting a plasma since I read that burn in isn't a problem anymore blah blah.

Thank god I read this thread. Never will I get a plasma since my purpose is gaming. Thank you to avsforums for steering me clear of this disaster known as Plasma (for gaming) even in the year 2011. I guess I have to go back to researching input lag for LCDs.

100+ hours of running something to "prep" your TV? Sigh.

If you get a very bright LCD and lose out on the panel lottery, you can get IR as well. I've seen it actually. If you're spending a lot on a tv, you owe it to yourself to check it out thoroughly instead of just assuming everything will be ok and then be unable to return it. This goes for LCD or Plasma. Neither cover BI under warranty.

Many commercial LCDs actually have anti-burn in tech just like plasma because they're aware it can be a problem and the people (or rather companies) buying them usually check on these things. For consumer displays, LCD manufacturers are happy if you drink their kool-aid.
post #3321 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlplover View Post

If you get a very bright LCD and lose out on the panel lottery, you can get IR as well. I've seen it actually. If you're spending a lot on a tv, you owe it to yourself to check it out thoroughly instead of just assuming everything will be ok and then be unable to return it. This goes for LCD or Plasma. Neither cover BI under warranty.

Many commercial LCDs actually have anti-burn in tech just like plasma because they're aware it can be a problem and the people (or rather companies) buying them usually check on these things. For consumer displays, LCD manufacturers are happy if you drink their kool-aid.

Hmm.. How can I check? I can only go by researching what other customers have said on the internet. In the stores where I can buy it, how can I test if I get burn-in or not after say 4 or 5 hours of gaming? No stores here really would entertain someone hogging on of their plasma displays with hours of testing.

Or is there some other way to test?

I -do- do a lot of research and reading before buying. I'll be MORE than happy to get a Plasma for my gaming needs (because I don't have to worry about input lag nonsense with LCDs) and if I don't have to "prep" it for 100 to 200 hours before I can even play a game without being scared about burning it in. I wouldn't mind spending extra for a particular model that i know works "out-of-the-box" and is well suited for gaming.
post #3322 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknomancer View Post

Hmm.. How can I check? I can only go by researching what other customers have said on the internet. In the stores where I can buy it, how can I test if I get burn-in or not after say 4 or 5 hours of gaming? No stores here really would entertain someone hogging on of their plasma displays with hours of testing.

Or is there some other way to test?

I -do- do a lot of research and reading before buying. I'll be MORE than happy to get a Plasma for my gaming needs (because I don't have to worry about input lag nonsense with LCDs) and if I don't have to "prep" it for 100 to 200 hours before I can even play a game without being scared about burning it in. I wouldn't mind spending extra for a particular model that i know works "out-of-the-box" and is well suited for gaming.

Sorry, I left out a few words there. I meant to say that you should thoroughly check out your display once you buy it for defects, regardless of LCD or plasma. There's plenty of problems defective sets can have and if you're spending more than $500 on a set, you owe it to yourself to check/test them thoroughly within the return window - even if you shouldn't have to. It's a hassle we shouldn't have to deal with, but if you want to be more confident in your set it's worthwhile to do so. LCD's don't typically benefit from break-in procedures due to the type of tech they are, but you should still check them thoroughly for any signs of being IR prone.

I had a high-end LCD that was IR prone unless I turned down the brightness. It lasted for several years before having major issues with the screen (odd-shaped streaks that didn't appear to have any direct bearing on the content viewed). Given how easily it could get IR if I turned up the brightness I really can't help but feel that probably was a big contributing factor. I'd drunk the kool-aid and assumed LCD's can't get retention, but it's simply not true. And even when I saw it I assumed that because it was LCD it wouldn't be a problem as long as I turned down the brightness and that was a mistake. I've also seen a number of other LCDs that have a few years on them that've gotten IR of various forms. I think part of why people assume they can't get it is that a lot of people who buy LCD's are the same people who assume newer is always better and are frequent upgraders (which means they keep sets for a shorter period of time).

Be it LCD or plasma, check out whatever display you get thoroughly while you're in the return window. Most sets should be fairly resilient to IR these days, but there's still the panel lottery and you want to find out if you got a junker while you can return it. Also, I'm now proactive with pushing slideshow wallpapers on pc instead of static ones and always having the screen turn off when not in use. You think logos or HUD's are bad, come back once you've got your desktop wallpaper stuck on your LCD screen.
post #3323 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlplover View Post

Sorry, I left out a few words there. I meant to say that you should thoroughly check out your display once you buy it for defects, regardless of LCD or plasma. There's plenty of problems defective sets can have and if you're spending more than $500 on a set, you owe it to yourself to check/test them thoroughly within the return window - even if you shouldn't have to. It's a hassle we shouldn't have to deal with, but if you want to be more confident in your set it's worthwhile to do so. LCD's don't typically benefit from break-in procedures due to the type of tech they are, but you should still check them thoroughly for any signs of being IR prone.

I had a high-end LCD that was IR prone unless I turned down the brightness. It lasted for several years before having major issues with the screen (odd-shaped streaks that didn't appear to have any direct bearing on the content viewed). Given how easily it could get IR if I turned up the brightness I really can't help but feel that probably was a big contributing factor. I'd drunk the kool-aid and assumed LCD's can't get retention, but it's simply not true. And even when I saw it I assumed that because it was LCD it wouldn't be a problem as long as I turned down the brightness and that was a mistake. I've also seen a number of other LCDs that have a few years on them that've gotten IR of various forms. I think part of why people assume they can't get it is that a lot of people who buy LCD's are the same people who assume newer is always better and are frequent upgraders (which means they keep sets for a shorter period of time).

Be it LCD or plasma, check out whatever display you get thoroughly while you're in the return window. Most sets should be fairly resilient to IR these days, but there's still the panel lottery and you want to find out if you got a junker while you can return it. Also, I'm now proactive with pushing slideshow wallpapers on pc instead of static ones and always having the screen turn off when not in use. You think logos or HUD's are bad, come back once you've got your desktop wallpaper stuck on your LCD screen.

Fair enough points. I'm usually very careful with taking care of my electronics but how would one objectively check for such IR errors? Do I have to stare REALLY close at the pixels on the screen to look for pixel-wise errors or are there some tools that somehow shows up such errors?
post #3324 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknomancer View Post


Fair enough points. I'm usually very careful with taking care of my electronics but how would one objectively check for such IR errors? Do I have to stare REALLY close at the pixels on the screen to look for pixel-wise errors or are there some tools that somehow shows up such errors?

Green is the easiest color to see IR with, IMO.
post #3325 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknomancer View Post

Fair enough points. I'm usually very careful with taking care of my electronics but how would one objectively check for such IR errors? Do I have to stare REALLY close at the pixels on the screen to look for pixel-wise errors or are there some tools that somehow shows up such errors?

Run through color slides, not automated like you would for break-in slides, but manually slide at a time. Hooking up via pc is preferable since it's usually quicker/easier to navigate but either way will do. Plasma usually green or black screens show retention earliest, but you should check all colors. On LCDs, it's usually grays or whites where retention shows up first. In either case, cycle through all the slides and see if you see anything.

Also, if you plan on gaming heavily or watching a lot of channels with static logos etc.. make sure you run through its paces to see how it handles that kind of content. The break-in slides for plasma are good in this respect because you can use them to quickly get through a couple hundred hours (during which many sets are more IR prone - even if it's just ghosting - than they are after that) so you can tell easier if any tendency towards IR with real content is lessening or staying the same/getting worse if it exists.
post #3326 of 5199
Why is it with Plasma there is this myth of a break in period?

There was never the issue with CRT, both use phosphere.

No one said about break in periods for CRT's yet also suffered from IR which would go.

Never broke mine in played video games, watched movies, no problems, but always by nature turn my brightness down below 50% anyway.

The only thing I noticed was I did have IR, but never lasted.

No one ever said CRT's needed a break in period, so what makes Plasma any different? Both almost use the same idea. CRT was analog and used Phoshere just like Plasma whereas Plasma is digtal, but both use a common screen type.
post #3327 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by denodan View Post

Why is it with Plasma there is this myth of a break in period?

There was never the issue with CRT, both use phosphere.

No one said about break in periods for CRT's yet also suffered from IR which would go.

Never broke mine in played video games, watched movies, no problems, but always by nature turn my brightness down below 50% anyway.

The only thing I noticed was I did have IR, but never lasted.

No one ever said CRT's needed a break in period, so what makes Plasma any different? Both almost use the same idea. CRT was analog and used Phoshere just like Plasma whereas Plasma is digtal, but both use a common screen type.

CRT's were a lot dimmer than plasmas are and not everyone turns their brightness down below 50%. Also, simply something using the same core materials doesn't mean the way they use them is 1:1. Specifically the reason people like to break-in their sets is to age the panels uniformly during the hot period to then apply standardized settings once their set has stabilized a little. Some people also like to do this because the phosphors in PDP's decay the most when they're fresh and the curve levels off dramatically so the early period is when they're changing the most. Some people like to run break-in during this period for the purpose of simply getting further along that curve so they're less likely to get permanent IR during it and hopefully not have to worry about it (at least as much).

CRTs varied from set to set just like plasma or LCD in terms of IR susceptibility . I've seen a number of CRT's with IR when they were more common and like I said before, they don't usually even get that bright. Plasmas generally have gotten much better about resisting IR, but there's still a chance and also the individual panel lottery (each set is a little different despite being same brand/model).

If people are using break-in to try and prevent IR it is mainly to prevent it during the hottest period when it's most likely to get it - down the road content watched will matter much more. Some also use it to quickly get some hours on the unit so they can see any defects that develop while in return period so they can get it replaced. And again others do it for color uniformity to apply standardized settings.

It should not be considered necessary, but there are good reasons why it may be considered useful - especially if you bought an expensive PDP rather than a cheapo toss-away.
post #3328 of 5199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidEC View Post

I have tried to read all of the pages..

But has it been determined that it is still a good idea to give the newer 2010/2011 Plasma screens a break-in?? [I have a new set being delivered later this week!]

I currently have a older Toshiba 720P/1080i 40" Plasma and even did everything that I could to give it a break-in, others in the house did not understand and would leave the set on watching 4:3 programming (while I was at work) during the first year of ownership (2006) and causing a slight burn-in on the side images. Now since most stations are now broadcasting in 16:9, I am hoping that I will not have the troubles as before.

avid

I still feel it is good to run the break in not to help with IR etc. but to get the panel some even usage so that you can then re-calibrate it. I've seen numerous sets that people calibrate them right out of the box, and then not to long after that the settings need to be changed. The biggest thing for me is I want ALL the cells to be used evenly so I can accurately calibrate the set. If you immediately begin watching letter box content those cells are not used like the rest of the set in mu opinion (unless you use gray bars or something). I would rater uniformly use the set and the calibrate it.
post #3329 of 5199
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamR View Post

I still feel it is good to run the break in not to help with IR etc. but to get the panel some even usage so that you can then re-calibrate it. I've seen numerous sets that people calibrate them right out of the box, and then not to long after that the settings need to be changed. The biggest thing for me is I want ALL the cells to be used evenly so I can accurately calibrate the set. If you immediately begin watching letter box content those cells are not used like the rest of the set in mu opinion (unless you use gray bars or something). I would rater uniformly use the set and the calibrate it.

Would it be a good idea to run the color slides out of the box for 100hrs, adjust the settings (D-Nice settings), and then run the break in DVD?
post #3330 of 5199
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReedsAle View Post

Would it be a good idea to run the color slides out of the box for 100hrs, adjust the settings (D-Nice settings), and then run the break in DVD?

You are loosing valuable time with your precious new TV. I would just watch full screen content for the first 100 hours, no letter bars (top AND side) stretch all content if you have to and avoid the same logo, etc. in the same spot for the first 100 hours. THEN I would calibrate it, use D-Nice's settings, then adjust to your personal preference. I would re-adjust the settings after a few months and then a year as most sets seem to change after time.

I would highly recommend a good calibtration DVD/Blu-Ray. They are soooo easy to use and some even come with colored filters to use for the tint/color. They are not that expensive. This will let you dial the set into more of what you personnally feel is best as not everyone will want their set exactly to what D-nice has just because everyone is different. But his settings are a great starting point. The calibration DVD lets you fine tune the set over the course of the sets life. And then you can use the settings for starting points for other inputs (e.g. the cable/satellite).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Plasma Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Master Burn-In/IR/Break In Thread Part II: All Posts Here Only