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Vinyl May Be Final Nail in CD's Coffin - Page 2  

post #31 of 234
The vinyl sales numbers I cited earlier come from this chart.

Note that this is a consumer telephone survey, not RIAA's shipment data. The shipment data is limited to RIAA members, so excludes a lot of small labels. But the consumer survey simply asks people, what have you bought in the last month? This captures everything in the market. Vinyl's market share has been pretty consistently in the 0.6-0.7% range for the last decade.
post #32 of 234
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

...I really think some of the 'allure' of LPs for some hobbyists is that there are so many 'toys' associated with them...to make them work *the way they're supposed to*. CD's pretty boring in that respect.

This is a very insightful post and is, IMO, spot on. Do I listen to vinyl because I believe, in my system, it generally sounds better than CD? (mainly classic rock and blues)? Yes. But is a significant part of the experience do to the above? Yes. I love the whole experience. I like the albums. I like pulling the one I want to listen to. I like focusing on both the music and enjoying the art that comes with the cover. I enjoyed setting my system up for vinyl, tweaking the two channel sound, etc. I find that, these days, most of my critical listening is with vinyl, most of my casual listening is with CD, and all of my travel listening is via MP3. All three have a place and I, personally, enjoy all three formats. I suspect that most would agree although the naysayers on both sides are more vocal.
post #33 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

I really think some of the 'allure' of LPs for some hobbyists is that there are so many 'toys' associated with them...to make them work *the way they're supposed to*. CD's pretty boring in that respect.

That is the only explanation that makes sense to me for vinyl's popularity.
post #34 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post


I really think some of the 'allure' of LPs for some hobbyists is that there are so many 'toys' associated with them...to make them work *the way they're supposed to*. CD's pretty boring in that respect.

Of course.

I have always thought that's why so many have fallen for the bogus CD "tweaks" that are available (green pens, mats, clarifiers, etc.). They miss the ritual of playing vinyl.
post #35 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamZX11 View Post

Of course.

I have always thought that's why so many have fallen for the bogus CD "tweaks" that are available (green pens, mats, clarifiers, etc.). They miss the ritual of playing vinyl.

Yes. Much of the original audiophile hobby was built around tweaking fussy analog equipment, where every tiny change made an audible difference. CD players, being 100% perfect right out of the box, offer no such opportunities.
post #36 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

I really think some of the 'allure' of LPs for some hobbyists is that there are so many 'toys' associated with them...to make them work *the way they're supposed to*. CD's pretty boring in that respect.


that's true, it's what we refer to as the "Fondle Factor" , also explains why us vinyl guys like large breasted women as well !!
post #37 of 234
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by twitch54 View Post

that's true, it's what we refer to as the "Fondle Factor" , also explains why us vinyl guys like large breasted women as well !!



This is the type of post that requires a response from Chu.
post #38 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnarus View Post

The vinyl sales numbers I cited earlier come from this chart.

Note that this is a consumer telephone survey, not RIAA's shipment data. The shipment data is limited to RIAA members, so excludes a lot of small labels. But the consumer survey simply asks people, what have you bought in the last month? This captures everything in the market. Vinyl's market share has been pretty consistently in the 0.6-0.7% range for the last decade.


Those nr are not correct, sorry to say. Those are not even in the same ballpark as the correct nr.
post #39 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by PULLIAMM View Post

That is the only explanation that makes sense to me for vinyl's popularity.


Yes, you are deaf so you cannot hear any difference in mastering so I understand your point.
post #40 of 234
I like vinyl...all colors. At my age, you can't be picky unless you pay

post #41 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chu Gai View Post

I like vinyl...all colors. At my age, you can't be picky unless you pay


Excellent, I knew you wouldn't let us down!
post #42 of 234
I know no one that actually uses vinyl records anymore.
post #43 of 234
well i almost stopped reading this thread at the end of the first page but i'm glad i kept going. thank you for giving us something interesting. my $0.02 is that records are a little easier on the ears for prolonged high volume listening. no facts, just preference from a media collector.
post #44 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pocket Aces View Post

I know no one that actually uses vinyl records anymore.

you might be surprised.
post #45 of 234
When's the last time you loaded a vinyl record into your car's head unit. CD's aren't going away anytime soon unless they are pretty much replaced by portable MP3 players and harddrives.
post #46 of 234
Vinyl sounds better than CD!
post #47 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pocket Aces View Post

I know no one that actually uses vinyl records anymore.

My brother does, but only because he has a lot of antique records that have never been released on CD. He has replaced as much of his collection as possible with CDs, since he recognizes the fact that they are inherently superior.
post #48 of 234
I also have many records that either won't be released on CD or that are out of print and hard to find. Most of them I got from thrifts and yard sales, I seldom pay more than $1 for a record. You can nab some interesting music that way. Good vinyl can indeed sound glorious, but so can digital, and without the surface noise...provided the mastering engineer isn't forced by the pond-scum mooks at the label to destroy the audio with excessive peak limiting.

Todd in Cheesecurdistan
post #49 of 234
how about a new ultra-high res format based on blu-ray, something like 64bit @ 1ghz.
post #50 of 234
Quote:


Those nr are not correct, sorry to say. Those are not even in the same ballpark as the correct nr.

So what are the correct numbers?
post #51 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssteel01 View Post

I wonder how much of that is due to a renewed interest in vinyl per se, as opposed to a growing interest in better sounding (i.e., non compressed) products. Not to mention the fact that vinyl is inherently DRM free...


Scott

Vinyl audio is compressed.
post #52 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by swifty7 View Post

how about a new ultra-high res format based on blu-ray, something like 64bit @ 1ghz.


What about it? The only things about it that have a real impact versus CD are that it can be multichannel, and feature more stringent copy protection. One of those is good for consumers, the other, not so much.
post #53 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pocket Aces View Post

When's the last time you loaded a vinyl record into your car's head unit.

What a stupid statement / question ! Like car audio has any relevance to faithfull music reproduction !! Pleaaaaaaase !!
post #54 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by PULLIAMM View Post

My brother does, but only because he has a lot of antique records that have never been released on CD. He has replaced as much of his collection as possible with CDs, since he recognizes the fact that they are inherently superior.

As deaf as you I suppose?
post #55 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by twitch54 View Post

What a stupid statement / question ! Like car audio has any relevance to faithfull music reproduction !! Pleaaaaaaase !!


If you are maximally concerned with faithful music reproduction, you wouldn't be touting vinyl. Unless 'faithful' means something other than 'accurate'
post #56 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

... Unless 'faithful' means something other than 'accurate'

Might have something to do with 'faith?'
post #57 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by NIN74 View Post

Yes, you are deaf so you cannot hear any difference in mastering so I understand your point.

I guess the composers and other pros who partook in this testing are also deaf too as they coudn't tell their own out takes they didn't like

Gould, Glenn, "The Grass is Always Greener in the Outtakes," High Fidelity, Aug 75, pg 54-59.
post #58 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabapple View Post

If you are maximally concerned with faithful music reproduction, you wouldn't be touting vinyl. Unless 'faithful' means something other than 'accurate'

Hi "krabballs", where in that statement of mine that you "quoted" was there anything mentioned about vinyl ???? Not only are you deaf, but blind in one eye and can't see out of the other !!
post #59 of 234
I always find these threads to be interesting. Vinyl may sound warmer, seems to sound better to some ears, but the fact is that it is a major step backwards from a longevity and convenience standpoint.

Very few want to worry about scratching your record, bending your stylus, replacing your stylus, etc??? For those that do, go for it, have fun...this is an enthusiasts hobby after all.

But the suggestion that vinyl is the threat to CD's does not make sense to me. The threat to CD's is web based digital media sources. This is the way the industry is going. I love my expensive system, but from a lifestyle standpoint, I listen to music more on my ipod than on my home system. I travel with work, I can take an enormous amount of music on vacation, etc...

As bandwidth increases and storage costs decrease, there will certainly be advances in digital sound quality. Will it ever replicate vinyl? Probably not. But quality is in the ear of the listener, and the listener is more and more on the move.

The article makes no mention of the possibility that this trend is being driven by aging baby boomers driven as much by nostalgia as anything. The article mentions the indy movement...but this is unconvincing at best. The indy artists tend to be "modern throwbacks". My 10 year old nephew is listening to classic rock...and Sharper Image carries turntables....

In short, I believe this to be a passing trend, not an industry or consumer long term movement toward vinyl.
post #60 of 234
I love all music formats, I prefer Frank Zappa on vinyl.
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