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Things that make you go Hmmm. Laserdisc Versus HDM - Page 12

post #331 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post

Was the store Videodisc Marine?

ah!

was on 2nd Street, in San Francisco, Near south park.
post #332 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post

Was the store Videodisc Marine? Or called that at one time? And had stuff like the CLV DiscoVision of Smokey And The Bandit II for 3 bucks?

That's the one! It was called Laser World when I found it in 1985. They rented Laser Discs too, and I was thrilled to find Rollercoaster for rent there, since it had never been released on any other home video format at that time. Smokey And The Bandit 2 was actually a two-disc CAV version; it was never reissued in Extended Play by MCA Discovision. My copy there cost $10, still sealed, and How To Stop Smoking cost $5.
post #333 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisW6ATV View Post

That's the one! It was called Laser World when I found it in 1985. They rented Laser Discs too, and I was thrilled to find Rollercoaster for rent there, since it had never been released on any other home video format at that time. Smokey And The Bandit 2 was actually a two-disc CAV version; it was never reissued in Extended Play by MCA Discovision. My copy there cost $10, still sealed, and How To Stop Smoking cost $5.

...Bandit II WAS re-issued in CLV on the DiscoVision label - it was a Pioneer, Kofu, Japan pressing too! Why MCA did that, I have no idea because the CAV was easily available. The CLV is actually the more 'rare' version - it was kept in the Pioneer and MCA Videodisc catalog until 1984 or so.

And, oh, How To Stop Smoking - the title 'dead side' collectors bought in huge quantities to see what 'goodies' the dead side held. My 'best' dead side find on "Smoking" was a tour through the Torrance, CA DiscoVision mastering lab and the Carson, CA pressing plant. Another dead-side has a Japanese dog-racing game meant for Pachinko games in Japan!
post #334 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkmedia2 View Post

Why would you need a faster modem back then? no flash, no sound, no annoying pop ups and banner ads. Oh no graphics and pictures the majority of the time. What images that were available either filled the cache or you had to download to view. I almost always used the web with graphics off as it was faster and it was not worth it anyway. Half the time I said screw gui of mosiac and used lynx.

Online services (AOL/Q-Link/AppleLink/PCLink, GEnie, Compuserve/MicroNet/The Source, Prodigy/Trintex, were a completely different matter as by the late 1980's they had lots of graphics and took a long time to load anything. 9600 was the absolute min by then.

I mostly used FidoNet and UUCP. I only used GEnie for the multiplayer games. Used "The Well" infrequently borrowing someone else's account. The Web mostly when I can get a terminal and telnet into a university while using Lynx, elm. SLIP was a bit too hard for most of the universities computers at the time as there were always too many users.

After I was on eWorld, AOL and Compuserve, I thought I would try Prodigy, just to check it out - I tried it one time and never again - I couldn't believe the sheer UGLINESS of the system and all the damn ad's scrolling and flashing, etc... just imagine if they had had the capability to use JPEG's and stuff like that then instead of ASCII graphics!

My first Apple Performa came with a 2400 baud modem and about 6 months later an online Apple dealer had a 14.4 modem on sale for $150 - I snatched it up, amazed that they were selling something so fast for such a low cost! And my 16 Mb RAM upgrade for my PowerMac cost $350... you know, young whippersnappers nowadays who cry over the cost of Blu-ray players and discs don't know how good they've got it! Now, when I used to walk 10 miles, barefoot, to school in 6 feet of snow, up-hill both ways....
post #335 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by EJ View Post

i was a c64 user and signed up for quantumlink. the company later became aol. all this on my 300 baud modem!

Wow, small world. QuantumLink was my first ever online service.

Oddly enough though, I recently came across some old issues of Macworld from 1984 and 1985. The advertising in those mags is filled with modem offers, email programs, and online providers like "The Source" (remember that?) and MCI Mail. Many people probably think that email and online services only began in the late 1990's during the dot-com boom, but it's amazing that some of us have been using said services for over 20 years now.
post #336 of 430
[quote=SuperGrafx;13217731]Wow, small world. QuantumLink was my first ever online service.

Old? I had a Coleco Adam with a 300 baud modem and used Compuserve when it had Adam support in 1986. Love the name to SuperGrafx. Classic NEC system and I still have my Turbo Duo.
post #337 of 430
I remember it taking an incredible amount of time to download the smallest programs. I think I could read faster than the the time it took for the words to scroll across the screen.

By the way, here is a broshure for my LD player.

http://www.laserdiscarchive.co.uk/la...r_cld-m401.htm
post #338 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thezlog View Post

Wow, small world. QuantumLink was my first ever online service.

Old? I had a Coleco Adam with a 300 baud modem and used Compuserve when it had Adam support in 1986. Love the name to SuperGrafx. Classic NEC system and I still have my Turbo Duo.

Ah, a gamer with good taste!
I still maintain that the PCEngine/TurboGrafx library was far more compelling than the Sega MegaDrive/Genesis offerings back in the late 80's and early 90's. Shame that the majority didn't feel this way though.

I remember the Coleco Adam (it came in a gigantic box) though I never did own one. Surprised to hear that you could use CompuServe with it.
post #339 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperGrafx View Post

Ah, a gamer with good taste!
I still maintain that the PCEngine/TurboGrafx library was far more compelling than the Sega MegaDrive/Genesis offerings back in the late 80's and early 90's. Shame that the majority didn't feel this way though.

The market spoke. I felt the way the market did, far more interesting games on Genesis/Megadrive. PC Engine was a completely different market than Turbografx, which has a negligible amount of games released over the Japanese market.

The Supergrafx, what a shame, handful of games and poof, it was gone.
post #340 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jet-X View Post

The market spoke. I felt the way the market did, far more interesting games on Genesis/Megadrive. PC Engine was a completely different market than Turbografx, which has a negligible amount of games released over the Japanese market.

The Supergrafx, what a shame, handful of games and poof, it was gone.

I LOVED my TurboGrafix CD system - "Y's I & II" was the only RPG game I've ever been interested enough in to finish. And "It Came From The Desert" was a superb CD game that took its inspiration from the classic Warner film "Them!". "Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective" was also fun but after you solved the mysteries the game was, for all intents and purposes, done, with no replay value. It's amazing playing a TurboGrafix CD-based game now - it's SLOW! The load-times and access times seem agonizing now - and back then I didn't think twice about it. The TG-16 Hu-Card game "Alien Crush" is still the best pinball game ever made for a video system, I think.

NEC was really good with their support for TG-16 owners, bringing in games from Japan and such to keep us supplied - they could have just abandoned the market and yet they didn't. Class act all the way.

Did anyone ever own the CD-I competitor 3DO? I think it was Panasonic that marketed the first system - 3DO was thought to be the 'killer' interactive platform, one that would take the household by storm... it flopped probably worse than CD-I did!

My dad bought me a Coleco ADAM - or I should say, 'tried to buy me' - we went through four of them and never got one that worked for more than 24 hours. The first one was dead right out of the box. The second one died when I first turned it on - flip the switch and there was a loud "pop" and the smell of something burning. The third one's data drive wouldn't work reliably - it seemed to randomly erase parts of the tape as it was searching - it would search and seach and then the tape was unusable. The fourth lasted all that first day and the next morning I turned it on and - NOTHING - it was dead. There was a slight 'humming' sound coming from inside but that was it. Dad wouldn't let me try another - so, my experience with ADAM had come to an end... and the box was HUGE - the box alone made the system seem exciting! Poor Coleco, they had such high hopes for the ADAM! They even had a contract with RCA to create CED-ROM VideoDisc games for the ADAM - the "control" port on the SJT-400 Interactive disc player was put there just for the ADAM. RCA hired people to come up with a data-coding and error correction system that was suited to the types of errors the capacitance disc created - so it would be a CED-ROM system! Apparently a capacitance disc could store vastly greater amounts of information than optical - not the CED disc system itself, but a theoretical capacitance disc system - and RCA was excited about exploring the possibilities with a partner that actually had some commercial prospects and not just a project for the research labs.
post #341 of 430
For Disclord, some Hi-Vision pron...just a sampling of what I have...








post #342 of 430
oh god that is sooooo hotttt!

(you know you're a dork when you'd rather see the above than actual porn)
post #343 of 430
Beautiful, beautiful!!!! We sure don't get the beautifully designed equipment like Japan does! It's not fair!

I wish someone could translate all the Japanese text - I'd love to be able to create english Adobe Acrobat PDF versions of all the Japanese brochures - as well as printable versions. I have some brochures from Japan for PALCOM and Sony Lasermax players and Pioneer's first catalog for LD's introduction in Japan.
post #344 of 430
Drooooool.......

I want one so bad. I just can't bring myself to pay the piper. Even on my CLD99, I cheaped out with one I scored on the bay cheap and had it sent to the guru for a complete refurbish before I got it. It's been a good player, but nothing like the MUSE players.
post #345 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNnDENVER View Post

Drooooool.......

I want one so bad. I just can't bring myself to pay the piper. Even on my CLD99, I cheaped out with one I scored on the bay cheap and had it sent to the guru for a complete refurbish before I got it. It's been a good player, but nothing like the MUSE players.

I can't afford it either so I just comfort myself by saying "They're really not THAT good." Although I know it's not true... I just want to see what the MCA DiscoVision opening bumper looks like played on an HLD-X9. I have a bootleg Pet Shop Boy's DVD of their videos that was taken from the Pioneer Artists LD using the HLD-X9 for playback - it's a fully pressed disc with excellent MPEG-2 encoding and except for the Pioneer Artists logos and LD copyright warnings, you'd never know it was made from an analog LD - the video looks like it came from a true digital component source and not from an LD at all.
post #346 of 430
post #347 of 430
EJ, that clearly Pioneer-designed turtle logo even showed up on some late MCA Discovision discs. Much more interesting were the "dead sides". A dead side is how I first found out House Calls existed.
post #348 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post

Going through old CD-ROM backups today, I found two JPEG files of the logo's Pioneer was planning to use for their "Super" LaserDisc format back in the late 1980's... too bad it never got off the ground! It would have been 100% backwards compatible with any LD player that had Digital Audio capability - there was no compatibility with players that had ONLY analog audio because the two FM audio carriers were to be dropped to extend the video bandwidth without changing the video carrier frequency or FM deviation. A Faroudja-developed chroma bandwidth expansion technique was to be used also - it switched the I and Q chroma carriers in a field sequential manner, expanding one to dual-side-band, then the other, for 2 MHz of color resolution. For 'standard' televisions and LD players without a decoder, a 30Hz chroma flicker would be present, but we are very insensitive to chroma flicker like that so it wouldn't be a problem.

Anyway, here are the two files I have...

The LaserVision-XR "compatibility" mark:


And Pioneer's LaserDisc brand LaserDisc eXtended Resolution with Super-Wide-Band-Color logo:


I never found out if the Wide-Band Color had to always be implemented with the resolution extension or if they could be done seperately - like standard NTSC on LD with extra chroma or just extended bandwidth with no wide-band color... I wonder how it would have worked? Too bad the LD market had sold so few players in total that Pioneer never introduced the system - not even in Japan! I guess they figured component-based Hi-Vision MUSE LD's would be the next big 'step' and not an 'enhanced' composite NTSC system... I believe Television Digest carried an article about LD-XR in 1988/89 or sometime in there.

Hmmm, never seen that logo before looks cool.

Joined the lddb (Laserdisc Database) site was it last year or the year before, doesn’t really matter when. There are some tasty laserdisc titles I wouldn’t mind adding to the collection, not sure when I’m going to buy or just keep looking though the database files.

Some dts titles from Japan whew talk about an arm and leg, now that’s what I call rare.
http://www.lddb.com/shops.php?global...&display=cover


http://www.lddb.com/
post #349 of 430
I also stumbled upon this clip. A cable access show where they sent a "reporter" to the 1981 CES. I love nostalgia like this. They mention the CED disc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_lO6FAqli0
post #350 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by EJ View Post

I also stumbled upon this clip. A cable access show where they sent a "reporter" to the 1981 CES. I love nostalgia like this. They mention the CED disc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_lO6FAqli0

Whoa hehehehe everyone is buying VHS. Thanks for the link that was most interesting lets have more sharing of these rare videos.

Hmmm, I didn't know the selector vision discs where black until I saw that video.
post #351 of 430
Now this has to be collectable laserdisc.

Playing a BLOOD RED laserdisc of Evil Dead 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXQJw...eature=related

You know one the most interesting thing’s about Youtube is reading the disrespectful comments aimed at your own countrymen, calling them a “retard” I guess this Muppet can’t learn to decipher words without losing his cool, what a Muppet!

Kerry Decker TV Show: Laser Discs & CDs (1985)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxKVF...eature=related

Wow that was smashing demonstration of the laservision disc buy that chap, I guess this is what the early forums used to look like in the early days.
post #352 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBLsound4645 View Post

Now this has to be collectable laserdisc.

Playing a BLOOD RED laserdisc of Evil Dead 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXQJw...eature=related

You know one the most interesting thing's about Youtube is reading the disrespectful comments aimed at your own countrymen, calling them a retard I guess this Muppet can't learn to decipher words without losing his cool, what a Muppet!

Kerry Decker TV Show: Laser Discs & CDs (1985)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxKVF...eature=related

Wow that was smashing demonstration of the laservision disc buy that chap, I guess this is what the early forums used to look like in the early days.

The weird thing about Ray Glasser's LD demo is that the player and discs are so out-dated for the time - the demo is from 1985, but the player he uses is a Magnavox Magnavision VH-8000 which was discontinued in 1981 and had never been considered a good player. Philips completely redesigned it internally before the UK launch because it was such a hunk of junk otherwise. And the DiscoVision discs he uses were already considered antiques by then. So it's odd that he would choose that player and discs for the demo.

Ray used to advertise and stuff in the Videophile Newsletter, which was published from 1976 to 1981. I have around 20 copies and it sure is fun to read still.
post #353 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBLsound4645 View Post

Hmmm, never seen that logo before looks cool.

Joined the lddb (Laserdisc Database) site was it last year or the year before, doesn’t really matter when. There are some tasty laserdisc titles I wouldn’t mind adding to the collection, not sure when I’m going to buy or just keep looking though the database files.

Some dts titles from Japan whew talk about an arm and leg, now that’s what I call rare.
http://www.lddb.com/shops.php?global...&display=cover


http://www.lddb.com/

I got the logo's from a guy who worked for Philips "LV/CD-Video" division in the Netherlands. Apparently, since the LaserVision Association was still around at the time, all member companies had to give approval for anything released to the consumer market. The LV Association was formed in late 1980 by MCA, Magnavox, Philips, Pioneer and Sony in a desperate attempt to salvage the consumer image of the optical videodisc and 'firm-up' the specifications for discs and players so everything was guaranteed to work correctly - which it didn't always do. They also had to give the format a name since every company called it something different.

It's too bad the LD upgrade never came out - although I don't think it would have boosted sales any. Only die-hard LD fans would have cared.

It's fun going through the LDDB to see what was released - especially the incredible title duplication, such as a million releases of Star Wars! And sometimes I'll run across stuff I didn't even know had made it to LD. It seems like some LD releases were kept hidden, as if they were some major secret - or IMAGE didn't want them to actually sell, so they could have a nice big tax-write-off.
post #354 of 430
I've tried to print that LDDB... No way... I'd sure like to be able to buy a complete listing printed out in like alpha order.

If I browse it that way, I always find treasures that I never knew existed. but browsing in that manner is to slow online. I'd love to have a print out of it in alpaha to scan down each page some time.


My current LD hunt? 200 Motels - Frank Zappa
post #355 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHNnDENVER View Post

I've tried to print that LDDB... No way... I'd sure like to be able to buy a complete listing printed out in like alpha order.

If I browse it that way, I always find treasures that I never knew existed. but browsing in that manner is to slow online. I'd love to have a print out of it in alpaha to scan down each page some time.


My current LD hunt? 200 Motels - Frank Zappa

Although they are old, the two 8-inch LD-Single 'catalogs' IMAGE released are a lot of fun to put on and browse through. Of course, I still browse through the 1981 Sears TeleShop Catalog they released on LD way back when... it's fun going through it and watching the product demo's and such... and seeing the 'fashions' from back then. And that neat, but HUGE, Cobra cordless phone, with a 200 foot range! WOW!
post #356 of 430
Thanks guys! I've now got LD's on the brain again! I just won an auction for a collector's edition of Amadeus. Has a play script, 50 page color booklet, alternate directors commentary not on DVD. A 2-CD soundtrack all for $20 shipped. Only 10,000 printed, It originally sold for $150

People just aren't interested in the format much. Most ebay listings have no bids. Players, however, seem to be holding there value very well.

ej
post #357 of 430
The prices are great now - I saw that Big Emma's has The Ultimate Oz collection for $9 on eBay. While everything on the disc was released on DVD, the LD is much easier to navigate and the sound quality of the audio-only portions is better than the DVD's.

A number of years ago I paid over $60 for the Japanese LD of Madonna Blond Ambition Japan Tour 90 and recently saw an auction for it end on eBay for 2 bucks with no bids!
post #358 of 430
It's almost like you could replace 1984 with 2008, and RCA with Toshiba.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvrXHQVU81E
post #359 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post


A number of years ago I paid over $60 for the Japanese LD of Madonna Blond Ambition Japan Tour 90 and recently saw an auction for it end on eBay for 2 bucks with no bids!


That's the Mitsubishi Special right?
post #360 of 430
Few oldies but goodies...

First Pioneer MUSE player - HD-V500 (1992 I believe, industrial model).



Sanyo also had a player, but I can't find a model # on the 'net nor in the picture (quality is degraded) - it too looks like an industrial player, but alas I'm at a loss...

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