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Should You Ask For A Refund If The Movie Is Bad? (Poll)

post #1 of 79
Thread Starter 
I raised/pursued the question of whether you should ask for your money back if the movie has been misrepresented or didn't deliver what it promised or was otherwise bad.

So, what do you think?

(Note: I am not talking about technical problems - e.g., bad print, bad projection or sound, noisy and disruptive audience. I'm referring to the movie content.)
post #2 of 79
If you figure out it was bad as the credits roll, no. 20 minutes in is another deal entirely.
post #3 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim GoodBooty View Post

If you figure out it was bad as the credits roll, no. 20 minutes in is another deal entirely.

That sounds like a "Sometimes" vote.

(On the other hand, what if the ending totally ruins an up-until-then tolerable movie? E.g., you're watching a suspense flick, and then at the end, instead of resolving things, you're treated to the equivalent of the characters performing "The Aristocrats" to the plot and storyline - i.e., not just a total mental mindfork to what you've been thinking, but also the leaving of a terrible bad taste in your mouth.)
post #4 of 79
Free popcorn

(Hey, it's often as much as the tickets.)
post #5 of 79
First 5-10 mins if you get up and walk out, yes. If you sit through more than half the movie I figure you're SOL...
post #6 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

I raised/pursued the question of whether you should ask for your money back if the movie has been misrepresented or didn't deliver what it promised or was otherwise bad.

So, what do you think?

(Note: I am not talking about technical problems - e.g., bad print, bad projection or sound, noisy and disruptive audience. I'm referring to the movie content.)

I think technical problems would be the only legitimate reason to ask for a refund. Granted, there have been some terrible movies where I would have liked to redeem the 2 hours or so of my life spent watching them, but it was my choice to go in the first place.
post #7 of 79
I would only take it back if, it had a legitimate DVD authoring problem, and it can only be exchanged for another DVD around the same price, or a few other titles that are in the sale, that would match the same price you paid.
post #8 of 79
Recently I was thinking about asking the same question. I saw that somebody wrote they asked for a refund after seeing Cloverfield. Then I have seen a woman return a DVD to Blockbuster and ask for a refund because she didn't like the movie. Personally I think it is ridiculous when they give back the money to these people. It was their choice and I understand you want to keep a customer but I figure if somebody starts to realize they can get away with it they will keep doing it. Especially if they see different staff working that day. Basically it would get to the point where you want to keep a customer but you are doing at the expense of giving them a free movie showing. I really do believe there are people that abuse the system that way. When I worked at a restuarant a woman ate her food (a lot of it because it was a buffett) and then said she walked by the desert and saw something that made her lose her appetite. What she said made her lose her appetite was nothing disgusting or anything like that.
post #9 of 79
You only get to ask for your money back if there is some sort of misrepresentation going on. Something like showing up "Walt Disney presents Little Mermaid III" and the movie is hard-core porn. But just "I didn't like the movie" doesn't mean you get your money back. Does that work anywhere else?

Personally, it's not so much the $8 I want refunded, it's the 2 hours of my life I want back.
post #10 of 79
I like Josh Z's post in the other thread. It's not the theater's fault the movie sucked. If you really think you deserve your money back, write the studio and ask for it. I'm sure they'll be happy to cut you a check.

larry
post #11 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveFi View Post

First 5-10 mins if you get up and walk out, yes. If you sit through more than half the movie I figure you're SOL...

If you've only seen 5-10 minutes of the movie, how do you know whether it's good or bad?

This reminds me of when I tried to watch The Matrix with my wife. She fell asleep while the Warner Bros logo was still on screen at the beginning, woke up just as the end credits came on, and promptly declared "That movie sucked!"
post #12 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

If you've only seen 5-10 minutes of the movie, how do you know whether it's good or bad?

Well, there's a school of thought that if a movie doesn't hook you in for the duration at that point, then it's not really a good movie. It might be a bad movie with good parts (or just bad all the way through.)
post #13 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa View Post

Well, there's a school of thought that if a movie doesn't hook you in for the duration at that point, then it's not really a good movie. It might be a bad movie with good parts (or just bad all the way through.)

That school was closed because it lacked accreditation. Seriously, I've found quite a few movies that got off to a slow start and ended up being very good. I think 20-30 minutes gives a much better indication. If you're 1/3rd the way through and you still don't like it, chances are it's a dud.
post #14 of 79
I have an odd case which wasn't due to content and strictly speaking wasn't a technical problem either (since it was intentional).

In that case, I demanded my money back for capcom dots. However, I asked the manager before I entered the movie if it had capcom (he didn't know) and told him if it turned out to have capcom dots I was going to want my money back.

The first dots showed up about halfway through the movie, so I walked out and got my money back.
post #15 of 79
Quote:


Well, there's a school of thought that if a movie doesn't hook you in for the duration at that point, then it's not really a good movie. It might be a bad movie with good parts (or just bad all the way through.)

Wasn't that the ADD School of Criticism?

Anyway, it's silly to even consider doing this, IMO. It's entertainment. It's impossible for the person who made the movie, the theater that's presenting the movie, or you, to know up front if you will like it or not. This is incredibly obvious to anyway, and you just have to accept you might not like it. It's like if you went into a restaurant and ordered a dish you'd never tried before. If you didn't like the way it tasted, would you think you could ask for your money back, though it's perfectly good food to everyone else in the room who ordered it?
post #16 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Roddey View Post

Wasn't that the ADD School of Criticism?

Anyway, it's silly to even consider doing this, IMO. It's entertainment. It's impossible for the person who made the movie, the theater that's presenting the movie, or you, to know up front if you will like it or not. This is incredibly obvious to anyway, and you just have to accept you might not like it. It's like if you went into a restaurant and ordered a dish you'd never tried before. If you didn't like the way it tasted, would you think you could ask for your money back, though it's perfectly good food to everyone else in the room who ordered it?

Actually, many restaurants, if the waiter asks you how you like your food and you say you don't like it, will offer to bring you something else, at no extra charge.

This happened with us once, and the offer has been extended at other times, but we chose to stick with what we told them was an "okay" meal even though it didn't live up to the menu expectations, because we were content to keep eating and not have to start over.
post #17 of 79
I was assuming that the food was made perfectly correctly, but that it's just something you've never tried before and it turns out not to be to your taste. You took the risk and shouldn't expect them to cover it for you. If they offer, that's great. But it's nothing you should demand or expect.
post #18 of 79
I believe that movies are often not very good but often a matter of taste. I think you bought the ticket not knowing much perhaps hoping to enjoy not knowing it you will or won't but that's simply part of the experience. If the theater was bad, the control of noise, quality of the presentation are bad that is differernt but the film itself I do not believe one should ask for let alone get arefund.

Art
post #19 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliens View Post

That school was closed because it lacked accreditation. Seriously, I’ve found quite a few movies that got off to a slow start and ended up being very good. I think 20-30 minutes gives a much better indication. If you’re 1/3rd the way through and you still don’t like it, chances are it’s a dud.

I didn't say it was necessarily a slow start, but one that starts out bad. Like, you shut off your brain because its bad.
post #20 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

This reminds me of when I tried to watch The Matrix with my wife. She fell asleep while the Warner Bros logo was still on screen at the beginning, woke up just as the end credits came on, and promptly declared "That movie sucked!"

post #21 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss View Post

Actually, many restaurants, if the waiter asks you how you like your food and you say you don't like it, will offer to bring you something else, at no extra charge.

I would question how many restaurants today would do this... but it's besides the point. They aren't giving you your money back, just providing another option. The equivalent of getting up from theater 1 and watching the movies in theater 2 instead.
post #22 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmoneous View Post

I would question how many restaurants today would do this... but it's besides the point. They aren't giving you your money back, just providing another option. The equivalent of getting up from theater 1 and watching the movies in theater 2 instead.

Which leads to another potential poll or poll question or sub-poll, i.e.:

What if the (bad) movie you saw was in one of those theater grill theaters, where you order dinner with the movie. If the movie is bad, but the food is okay, do you ask for all your money back, or just what you spent on the movie? If the movie is okay, but the food is bad, do you ask for your food money back? If the movie makes you throw up your dinner, do you ask for your food and/or movie money back (a possible situation if the movie is CLOVERFIELD)? Etc.
post #23 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac The Knife View Post

In that case, I demanded my money back for capcom dots. However, I asked the manager before I entered the movie if it had capcom (he didn't know) and told him if it turned out to have capcom dots I was going to want my money back.

Capcom dots? What's that, little characters from Mega Man crawling over the screen?

Perhaps you should have asked him about CAP Code dots.
post #24 of 79
Fro technical problems I would definitly talk to the manager and let them know what I though and ask for a refund.
But what you go see is your own choice so if you make a bad choice you got to live with it. Its not the theaters fault.
post #25 of 79
If you believe the hype/advertising, and want to be one of the first to experience something, then you take your own risks. To ask for your money back is infantile. If you don't want to take the chance, then wait and get the oppinion of those you trust. You still may get burned, but the chance is less. Same for listening to a concert, reading a book, eating at a restaurant, or dating a woman. Life is full of taking chances. It is up to you to stack the deck as much as you can, and dealing with what is dealt.

Chris.

PS. I just pasted my response to the same thoughts in Cloverfield. Still applies.
post #26 of 79
My local Movie Gallery rental store will allow something like five "bad" rentals. I don't know if they advertise it as I've never read it, but I brought a movie back a couple years ago that I thought was horrible. When I dropped it into the return slot, the employee asked me what I thought of it. When I told him I was dissapointed and couldn't even make it through the entire film, he gave me a credit and said you are allowed up to five a year. That's actually the only time I've ever received a credit as I never ask, but there have been several movies that I disliked. This is the same local rental store in my VERY small town that also carries Blu ray and HD DVDs.
post #27 of 79
At your own risk is how I see it. But then there are people who will bitch about any perceived problem thinking they are ENTITLED to complete satisfaction in everything.
post #28 of 79
The only legitimate reason to seek refund is if the presentation is fouled-up (egregious sound or projection problems that are clearly the fault of theater equipment or employees). If the movie lacks artistic merit or entertainment value...tough.
post #29 of 79
When you buy a movie ticket you're not buying a guarantee that you will like the film. Only in today's entitlement mentality would people even consider this.

Sanjay
post #30 of 79
I guess the other question is, if the movies turns out way better than you thought, should you offer more money? If not, and no one ever does, then you don't really have much right to ask for your money back if it's not as good as you thought it would be. Fair is fair.
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