or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › Self gratification build thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Self gratification build thread

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Framing is underway.









post #2 of 78
Thread Starter 
The red lines represent (roughly) the location of the double walls.
The vacuum is on the screen wall.









post #3 of 78
looks like a lot of fun!
post #4 of 78
Thread Starter 
The double wall borders what will be my daughter's bedroom. Because of the funky shape of that room, her bed will probably be on the double wall.

I have a terrible feeling that I am going to end up with an amazing theater that I can't use after 8:00 at night (bedtime).
post #5 of 78
Thread Starter 




My builder went a little schickzo at the doorway. He added a doubled up rafter in front of the double wall, I'm assuming it is for drywall. It is attached to this brace ** That goes through the theater wall, not touching it, out into the hallway to this crazy ledge. The ledge is attached to the walls in the hallway. Madness. But, framing is done, so, one less thing.

Regardless, I'm roughing in electric, running pex tubing in the basement, and trying to get my shades ordered. I'm also drooling over the NAD M25.

Oh yeah, there are RISC clips decoupling the wall from the ceiling.
post #6 of 78
Thread Starter 
Double wall detail at ceilinghttp://ghause.googlepages.com/walldetail2

I'm thinking of using double 1/2" (+gg) drywall on exterior walls and ceiling. Mainly for ease of dealing with recessed lights and electrical boxes. Double 5/8 when bordering living space. Thoughts?
post #7 of 78
I would go 5/8ths all around. The extra mass is worth it.

Being adjacent to a bedroom, I would pre wire for buttkickers or bass shakers, cause it think lfe may be arisk. Good luck.
post #8 of 78
Also be aware the penetrations for recessed lights and electrical boxes may limit the effectiveness of your sound isolation efforts. Consider back boxes and/or other lighting.
post #9 of 78
I love the framing phase of a project, you go from nothing to , poof, it looks half done.
post #10 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

Also be aware the penetrations for recessed lights and electrical boxes may limit the effectiveness of your sound isolation efforts. Consider back boxes and/or other lighting.

or check out puttypads. Look at the last post I put in my build thread for details...
post #11 of 78
Being right next to that bedroom, I would seriously consider getting an acoustical engineer or the like to help plan the isolation of that room now. Especially to take into account things like lighting, hvac, even outlets. If it's not too late, may want to redo that wall with staggered studs.
Just a thought.
post #12 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

I would go 5/8ths all around. The extra mass is worth it.

I am confused with this point. What is it worth? I'm only concerned with isolation at the double wall.?

I am planning on boxing the outlets on both sides of the double wall and in addition, double 5/8 on that wall and on the adjacent bedroom wall and ceiling. Double 1/2" will let me install switch and outlet boxes without too much extra effort.

I'm not entirely sure why I want double sheetrock on the exterior walls at all. I'm on the fence about putty pads on the other outlets and boxing the lights. Will I hear any benefit from using them on exterior walls?

My reasons for not boxing the lights are as follows:
  1. Hatred of MDF dust
  2. Wife looks at me like I have completely lost my mind when I suggest it
  3. Fear of the reaction my backwoods electrical inspector will have when he sees them
  4. No rafter cavities are shared between the rooms

My reasons for boxing the lights:
  1. Better theoritical isolation

So let me summarize. I hate MDF dust enough that I am making up excuses to aviod it and I'm not convinced that 1/4" of drywall is worth the minor effort that I will have to exert in the electrical dept to gain it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by malbo1 View Post

...I would seriously consider getting an acoustical engineer or the like to help plan the isolation...
...may want to redo that wall with staggered studs...

bpape is on the job; and is not a double wall preferable to staggered studs?
post #13 of 78
Take a look at the aquarium concept. That you need to hold all the water in (sound), and a hole anywhere will get you that dead fish smell. The issue you have is flanking. Your isolation will be compromised by any weak links in the chain. How much, who knows, but 5/8ths vs 1/2 is negligible on price, why risk it.

Definitely spec air-tight IC cans if you don't back box. You are insulating all walls and ceilings, right?
post #14 of 78
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc_pilgrim View Post

Definitely spec air-tight IC cans if you don't back box. You are insulating all walls and ceilings, right?

I have the cans already
http://www.nicorlighting.com/products/pdfs/19002A.pdf. I don't have any experience with recessed lighting but these were reasonably priced, my lighting guy recommended them and I like to support local business whenever possible.

Exterior walls will be r21 (I think) + plywood + rigid insulation + cedar. Ceiling will be high density r38. Mineral wool in each of the double walls.
post #15 of 78
It says right on the top of the that pdf that they are air-tight IC cans. I would visually inspect them to see if you thing they might rattle. Ithe they do there are usually tricks ways to tighten up the install to guard against it. Or I have seen people talk about addressing future rattles in their installs.

Good luck. Keep the pics coming.
post #16 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghause View Post

and is not a double wall preferable to staggered studs?

You are correct, double wall is better than staggered studs, it was hard to see the double wall in the picture, so I only thought there was a single wall.

Still, as mentioned, sound, like water, is fluid and will find any weak point to squeeze through.

Just trying to save you from having to install that kill switch on your theater with a timer set for 8PM.
post #17 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by malbo1 View Post

Still, as mentioned, sound, like water, is fluid and will find any weak point to squeeze through.

Just trying to save you from having to install that kill switch on your theater with a timer set for 8PM.

Correct. Sound is either very smart of very stupid, depending on your point of view. It refuses to accept any imaginary boundaries which we define as the "home theater."

- Terry
post #18 of 78
Thread Starter 
You guys are making it really hard for me to cop out of doing this right.

Where can I get a theater kill switch, smarthome? Can I get one with rs232?
post #19 of 78
Home depot , $10, no rs232 though.


The kill switch was really more of a joke, but some basic home automation could control that if you really needed it.
post #20 of 78
Thread Starter 
LOL. I was reciprocating the joke. I haven't seen one of those timers since I was a little kid.
post #21 of 78
This is the insulation I use in the custom homes I build. The sound deadening properties are excellent, as well as the insulation, flame retardency, air infiltration, and energy efficiency. The benefits outweight the minimal additional cost over fiberglass insulation, and you get a slightly higher R-value in the same depth cavity. I will say, I haven't compared the cellulose to mineral wool, but it's worth a look. (ie: the cellulose could be used for all perimeter walls and attic space) It would be dense packed around your (proper) recessed light fixtures and your outlet/switch boxes etc. also, which may help those concerns as well. Here's a specific link to the manufacturer I use.

http://www.nuwool.com/products/cellu...ndcontrol.html
post #22 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by 70chevelle View Post

This is the insulation I use in the custom homes I build. The sound deadening properties are excellent ...

Every light, porous absorbing insulation performs about the same. Sorry, but none "deadens" sound better than any other.

- Terry
post #23 of 78
Thread Starter 
I've accepted my fate and spent my morining building little mdf boxes for outlet boxes out of any scrap material I could scrounge from the remains of my speaker building period.

Now I'm to a point where I need to make some wiring decisions. My theater is going to have four circuts. My issue is as follows, 1 line for mini-split (radiant heat, no ducts), 1 for lights (this will extend a little further into the house).

Herein lies the dilemma. I can give my amp(s) a dedicated line and let the rest of my gear (preamp, player(s), htpc) share a line with the pj, or go the other way and give the pj its own line. Thoughts?
post #24 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghause View Post


Herein lies the dilemma. I can give my amp(s) a dedicated line and let the rest of my gear (preamp, player(s), htpc) share a line with the pj, or go the other way and give the pj its own line. Thoughts?

What is worth considering is taking 2 circuits into the equipment room/closet. Use one dedicated to the closet and spur off to the projector and the sub position(s).

By doing this you have the option of running both the PJ & Subs via a conditioner by connecting the spurs to extention cords (Like I did)

Cheers,
Mark
post #25 of 78
Thread Starter 


Ok. I have this liquid nailsed and screwed 5/8" proud of the studs. Does this seem right? I'll just drywall around the mdf box with the first layer, caulk all around the edges, then leave enough of an opening for the electrical box in the second layer of drywall. Sensible?

(I hope so because I have 8 more of these boxes waiting for their glue to dry right now.)
post #26 of 78
Thread Starter 
Terribly dark, sorry.

Double Wall 1 - from theater
Double Wall 2 - from theater

Double wall 3 - from bedroom
post #27 of 78
Thread Starter 
An open message to the wasps who seem to have aspirations to aquire the airspace in my addition above seven feet:

You will not be winning. This is your last warning.

post #28 of 78
That looks right with your outlet boxes. I'm glad to see you deep-sixed those wasps too. Stinging, flying insects suck.
post #29 of 78
Thread Starter 
Wiring the outlets has been a pain in the neck. As I am learning how to be an electrician as I go. I bought a handful of boxes that have only 3/8 knockouts. I did not take into consideration the clamps you need to use to hold the romex in place, mostly because I didn't know about them. And I drilled out my MDF boxes before I learned this. So, some of my MDF boxes are just wide enough to hold the metal box. I spent 45 minutes this evening enraging wasps and gouging out channels in an MDF box to get everyting to fit.

Fortuantely I only have a couple of these.

I don't even want to get into how I had to deal with the ground screw. Lets just say it is a good thing that there are two holes for the screw.
post #30 of 78
Thread Starter 
I've got a situation that I knew was coming and now it looks like I'm going to have to deal with it. The deal is that the main support rafters are 2x12s and the remaining are 2x10. So where they meet there is up to 2' of support rafter protruding from the plane of the ceiling. Like this:



I'm afraid that the easiest solution is to plane the main rafters down to match the others. This will introduce someweakness and be a miserable job.

The alternative is to tear down my lights and build up the smaller rafters to match the larger, this may be impossible because all of the primary rafters seem to protrude at different amounts.

I'd be happy to consider any ideas any of you guys may have.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › Self gratification build thread