Sony HXD late series 995 can I avoid HDD reformat PRUN after fit new DVD drive unit? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 11Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 34 Old 04-10-2018, 08:42 AM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Question Sony HXD late series 995 can I avoid HDD reformat PRUN after fit new DVD drive unit?

Hi all,
My question is: can I fit a new DVD drive unit in my HXD995 AND keep the recordings on the HDD?
I have read with interest many of the expert posts here about the Pioneer-Sony collaboration way back when and am trying to get a handle on my options with my admittedly old UK model Sony HXD995. Can I fit the new part (DVR-U13HDD) and use the Pioneer-based CPRM menu (ESC STEREO) as hinted at in the service manual? I am confused by an apparent contradiction in the service manual causing me to come here with what I am calling the Sony HXD ESC-STEREO conundrum.

I really like the HXD995 and have burned hundreds of DVDRs over the years. I decided to put in a new disc drive unit because I couldn't burn all I wanted to off the 250GB HDD before the burner packed up. I had a new disc drive unit put in in 2012 and they wiped the HDD for me despite my request to keep the recordings so this time I thought I'd do it myself. So far so good. But now I am stuck. Having fitted the new DVD drive unit (DVR-U13HDD from EET here in UK) I still cannot access the HDD. I read that E01 on the FL is expected when the drive unit (or HDD - but not in this case) is changed.
Version information check screen (ESC DISP) shows HDD recognised but not authorised (# mark beside 250 on HDD data line just below the 3 OKs) So recognises the original HDD but needs (looking at Pioneer sm explains # means CPRM key needs to be copied - how in Sony HXD?) a handshake somehow.

One option for me is clear. I could easily get rid of E01 and do the 'Factory Check' (not reset) routine via P.RUN command but that reformats the HDD and I lose the recordings I want to keep. There must be an alternative since related Pioneer manuals have a handy reference table of outcomes with certain procedures. Drive unit change leaves HDD contents intact.

The late '9' series HXD service manual (without weird Pioneer-Sony model setting binary choice 1 or 2) implies original HDD contents can be kept. 'Performance check will not erase HDD contents' on the E01 service map. How to get from input of the 4-digit code for the model name setting (done) to Performance check is only hand-waved in the service procedure flow chart.

There are two apparently contradictory statements (also attached):
In 'Model setting after replacing the engine' (replacing the DVD drive unit) tagged onto the bottom part of the page (Model name setting page otherwise identical in other Sony service manuals except for this bit) it says in gibberish:


[Symptom] 'If the following operation is performed, set won’t be able to be restored'
[Remedy]
Must not be performed the following operation using service remote.
If it is performed, set won’t be able to be restored.
And if set is broken by the operation, we can’t guarantee the set when
pressing in order of the following button.
* [ESC]--> [STEREO]
([ESC]--> [Any button which is not described in SM])

Then in contradiction it says elsewhere concerning HDD identification setting to press the ESC then STEREO keys. (This command is the same for the Pioneer ID data setting menu).
• How to clear the cumulative HDD-on time data
FLASH ROM:
When the HDD Identification Setting is configured, the cumulative HDD-on time data is automatically cleared.
The HDD Identification Setting is automatically configured when the CPRM setting is configured on the CPRM setting screen.
(To display the CPRM setting screen, press the “ESC” key, then the “STEREO” key.)
Note: The cumulative HDD-on time data is not cleared when resetting to default values.
The cumulative HDD-on time data is not cleared when the system-control computer software is downloaded.

Interesting to note that when I did a factory reset ('resetting to default values') the HDD-on time WAS CLEARED. Not as Sony claim above.
I also took the plunge and displayed the CPRM setting screen pressing ESC then STEREO keys. I got the Pioneer confirmation screen with a new (different) ID number.
this must be the ID number belonging to the U13HDD (it has the 'motherboard' or part of it attached). I wrote down the C number (CPRM key) from the version info screen (ESC DISP) before and after fitting the unit so I could check everything (aka service manual filling in HDD return sheet information - written down by the engineer on a service sheet for customer records - includes multiple choice circling items etc).

Any light that can be shed on this conundrum about the use of the 'Pioneer' ID menu ESC STEREO in the Sony OEM (Pioneer) late model HXDs is much appreciated.

About trying to keep the recordings on the HDD. I am getting the idea that it is not possible to change the U13 burner-board AND keep the recordings. I have been lucky enough (not easy) to chat with Sony technical services. They gave me an additional service manual for the drive unit but they do not know how to save HDD recordings and I asked if they use a data disc (As Pioneer DVRs did). They said no. They also said they were not that familiar with Sony RDRs so I am left wondering what more there is to know which is why I ask here. Anyway, it looks like Sony always routinely wiped the HDD in servicing as they did mine against my request when I sent it off the first (and only) time.

If anyone has read this far then thank you for your time and patience. Any comments would be much appreciated. I have to decide whether to do P.RUN and wipe HDD and take the loss on the chin, or keep asking around for a way to do it and keep the recordings. This could be using the 'Pioneer' menu ESC STEREO ID data screen- STOP CLEAR (delete- rewrite) with a Pioneer data DVD. I have not seen anyone try to do this use a Pioneer data disc in a Sony HXD 9 series. Has anyone?

Attached files are from the HXD '9' series SM.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	HDD-CPRM.png
Views:	27
Size:	64.1 KB
ID:	2388154   Click image for larger version

Name:	HXD-ModelName-Warning.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	190.4 KB
ID:	2388156  
Wynos995 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 34 Old 04-10-2018, 11:54 AM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Citibear or jjeff should have a [best] answer for you .. I can't really address the issue as you've laid it out.

But there is another option open to you (I think) depending on how crucial the recordings are, I only bring it up in case its wedding videos or something priceless.

You could replace the drive and put the old one on a shelf.. and "explore" or look for a geek with the "nerve" to export the recordings as mpg files from the hard drive.

There is an old Pioneer "recovery" toolset over on GitHub that specifically mentions your model Sony HXD995

Recovery program for Pioneer DVR-633H, DVR545H harddisks

Last edited by jwillis84; 04-10-2018 at 02:26 PM. Reason: Way too much word salad
jwillis84 is offline  
post #3 of 34 Old 04-10-2018, 07:11 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
[quote=jwillis84;56011656]



There is an old Pioneer "recovery" toolset over on GitHub that specifically mentions your model Sony HXD995

/quote]
Thanks for the tip jwillis84. That pioneer-rec tool looks interesting. I see a guy called Ken Rolland got it to work on the Sony HXD995.
Even though there is nothing wrong with my hard drive there's no reason why the pioneer-rec salvage tool couldn't be used on a healthy hard drive to sort out the jumbled titles.
There's only a few things I want to find and keep anyway. A couple of cult movies and documentaries. The odd music video unlikely to be repeated anytime soon.
jwillis84 likes this.
Wynos995 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 34 Old 04-10-2018, 10:53 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
@ Wynos995
Don’t know how much this will help but if you decide to copy your HDD files before wiping the HDD – I came across this a few years ago and archived it with all my other RDR-HX780 info.

Pretty sure that your 995 has the same file system as my 780. I know that the service procedure of changing out the DVR-U13HDD and/or the HDD is the same.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Sony RDR-HX780 HDD/Hard disk Backup under windows 7

Backuping the content of the physical harddrive of the Sony RDR-HX780.

All steps below are at your own risk!!!!

Steps:
- 1) Prepare a external USB - SATA connector or a free internal sata connector with power adepter;
- 2) You will need to open the RDR-HX780 and uncouple the hdd (4 screws in the case for the hdd very simple and 5 for the casing itself)
- 3) Connect the HDD to your computer trough the sata connection you prepared
- 4) Boot your device in to windows (7)
- 5) Download PhotoRec (PhotoRec - CGSecurity)
- 6) Extract the zip file
- 7) Start photorec_win.exe
- 8) Open the 160GB Disk Probably start with WDC WD16....
- 9) Choose the partition: FreeBSD
- 10) Choose the filesystem type option [Other] (its probably using ReiserFS as filesystem, interesting story read on wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReiserFS)
- 11) Choose the backup location on a local drive (not the HDD recorder drive)
- 12) Start Backing up!

------------------------------------------------------------------

I never tried this as I never had a problem with my DVR-U13HDD Drive or my HardDrive.

Here is a link for the PhotoRec wiki with a direct link to PhotoRec there.
https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec
Wynos995 likes this.
Super Eye is offline  
post #5 of 34 Old 04-17-2018, 04:49 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked: 142
While the Pioneer and Sony collaborative recorders are very very similar in most ways, Sony opted not to use Pioneer's "Service Data I.D. Disc" system. Admittedly, that was an idiotic, redundant, pointless Pioneer concept that accomplished nothing whatsoever other than frustrate DIY repairs and force authorized repair centers to pay for a new $80 dvd every year. The disc literally does nothing except say "I'm here!" at the required point when replacing the optical drive or HDD (it isn't used for any other service task).

As irritating as Pioneer's service disc requirement was, Sony's choice to copy every bit of Pioneer's firmware BUT the service disc procedure creates unnecessary problems ten years later, for the few stubborn souls trying to keep these machines running. Instead of presenting a united front to make servicing uniform and simple, Sony inexplicably opted for a bizarre Frankenstein interface, cobbling together aspects of Sony's own earlier (very peculiar) service routines with some Pioneer service menus, dropping the Pioneer service disc process, but adopting the Pioneer service remote (then not employing it in quite the same way Pioneer did).

One of the areas where Sony's hybrid approach creates a roadblock is the subject of this thread: swapping out the burner in some models triggers a very Pioneer-esque demand for a CPRM matching dance, which the Sony cannot actually do because Sony did not explicitly include a driver for the service disc that performs the "marriage". Presumably they issued a service manual addendum to cover this paradox at some point, but I have never seen it, and the primary service manuals offer no clue how to work around this bottleneck.

If it were my own RDR-HX995, I would bypass the entire issue by carefully opening both disc drives and swapping the internal circuit boards (put the board from the old drive into the new one). The final Pioneer/Sony models had an odd "split motherboard" arrangement: half in the recorder chassis, half in the optical drive. This deters a great many DIY techs from repairing these models, but it is not that difficult if you think things through and examine the drives carefully. A board swap between drives is not only possible, it may be the ONLY way to replace the dvd drive without being forced to erase existing recordings on the HDD.

Its been a few years since I did one of these board swaps, but it was easier than I imagined once I figured out how to get the drive open. I can't remember the exact details now, but the trick is to look the drive over carefully to spot where the board attaches (with a series of pressure clips and screws). It is very intimidating at first glance: the custom Sony optical drive gives the appearance it can't be disassembled at all (this put me off repairing my Pioneer for a very long time). But it CAN be disassembled: just don't force anything, and be careful with board connections. Good luck!
Super Eye and Wynos995 like this.

Last edited by CitiBear; 04-17-2018 at 04:55 PM.
CitiBear is offline  
post #6 of 34 Old 04-17-2018, 05:19 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
If it were my own RDR-HX995, I would bypass the entire issue by carefully opening both disc drives and swapping the internal circuit boards (put the board from the old drive into the new one). The final Pioneer/Sony models had an odd "split motherboard" arrangement: half in the recorder chassis, half in the optical drive. This deters a great many DIY techs from repairing these models, but it is not that difficult if you think things through and examine the drives carefully. A board swap between drives is not only possible, it may be the ONLY way to replace the dvd drive without being forced to erase existing recordings on the HDD.

Its been a few years since I did one of these board swaps, but it was easier than I imagined once I figured out how to get the drive open. I can't remember the exact details now, but the trick is to look the drive over carefully to spot where the board attaches (with a series of pressure clips and screws). It is very intimidating at first glance: the custom Sony optical drive gives the appearance it can't be disassembled at all (this put me off repairing my Pioneer for a very long time). But it CAN be disassembled: just don't force anything, and be careful with board connections. Good luck!
I was actually thinking about the above. I never done that so it would have been inappropriate to post info I don’t have experience with to confirm . Good to know that you have done that CB. Another valuable tip I will copy and archive with my RDR-HX780 info.
Wynos995 likes this.
Super Eye is offline  
post #7 of 34 Old 04-18-2018, 01:54 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post
I was actually thinking about the above. I never done that so it would have been inappropriate to post info I don’t have experience with to confirm . Good to know that you have done that CB. Another valuable tip I will copy and archive with my RDR-HX780 info.
For the longest time, I would stare at the internals of my late-period Pioneers and actually wonder if illusionist David Copperfield had consulted on the layout: as you and I have discussed previously, these Sony/Pioneer units give the impression there is no conceivable way to disassemble them. But eventually I discovered its reasonably easy (gaining access to BOTH the Pioneer and Sony service manual illustrations finally clued me in). The hardest part is getting the optical drive out of the chassis: until you figure out where the release screws and catches are, its a real head-scratcher. But once freed of the chassis, you'll see that the board is sandwiched into the burner not all that differently from the old boxy PC burners. Most important things to be wary of are the fragile plastic retaining clips and ribbon connectors.
Wynos995 likes this.
CitiBear is offline  
post #8 of 34 Old 05-02-2018, 07:00 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
That's it- swap the boards!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

If it were my own RDR-HX995, I would bypass the entire issue by carefully opening both disc drives and swapping the internal circuit boards (put the board from the old drive into the new one). The final Pioneer/Sony models had an odd "split motherboard" arrangement: half in the recorder chassis, half in the optical drive. This deters a great many DIY techs from repairing these models, but it is not that difficult if you think things through and examine the drives carefully. A board swap between drives is not only possible, it may be the ONLY way to replace the dvd drive without being forced to erase existing recordings on the HDD.

What a great suggestion! A while back I’d read one of your posts about doing this with a Pioneer model which led me to examine my old U13 drive unit but didn’t try to take it apart since it looked almost welded in and would probably require soldering plus there was nothing in the service manual to guide me. I just closed the door on that idea for my Sony at the time. But then I read CitiBear’s encouraging suggestion in this Sony thread to swap the boards and I knew right away this was the signpost I’d been looking for.
So yesterday, I had another look at the old U13HDD. Having two spare, I decided to practice on the old one so I could go on a learning curve and mess up it wouldn’t matter. Six screws and four cables and pressing lightly on a pair of retaining clips on each side of the chassis and bob’s your uncle. The RD-066 board came out. That seemed easy enough. Now when it came to putting it back together I was glad I’d used that spare one. As CitiBear pointed out in his post ‘just don't force anything, and be careful with board connections’. Well 2 of the 4 connections needed very close attention because they have little fiddly clips. Although it was easy to remove the cables putting them back was slightly more difficult. At first the big one (to the main chip) wouldn’t go in. I found the trick is to make sure the clip is fully open on both sides of the connection then feed the cable in straight and level then gently pushing the clip closed. After putting everything back together I had another go and this time it went smoothly.
I am now about ready to swap the boards. The board would then be the one that the HDD was working with so there should be no CPRM flag. As Citibear said it should bypass the issue. There are a couple of other considerations. Although the board will be as before the pickup will be different and as indicated in Pioneer sms the ‘PU data’ probably has to be entered if different followed by LD adjustment (Pioneer sm- required when a PU and board pairing has changed?).
Whatever happens after the swap the additional Sony guide for the DVD unit deals with both issues which is useful to have. Just noticed the disassembly diagrams for removing the laser assembly* can be co-opted for the board swapping procedure as it mentions how to handle the fiddly cables. I should have spotted this before having a go!

*At one time a replacement laser assembly (and the large fiddly cable) was available (from August 2007 before the HXD series came out) and this drive unit service manual was issued. It has the procedures for installation and LD adjustment when the laser assembly is replaced.

The other consideration is about firmware. Since I have been trying all sorts I also upgraded the firmware. The board going back in will have the earlier version. I don’t know how much this could matter in swapping the boards. I read somewhere that the firmware is based in the Flash ROM on the board anyway and I would be installing the board with the earlier version. If part of the motherboard is split off then could there be some kind of conflict? It would only matter if it could affect the setup sequence at startup to prevent powering up properly.
Wynos995 is offline  
post #9 of 34 Old 05-03-2018, 08:21 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked: 142
As I've mentioned, while the Sony and Pioneer recorders were developed together and look exactly alike inside/out, the two brands did inexplicably each retain a couple of eccentric exclusive service elements that may or may not operate the same way. I have performed simple servicing on a couple of Canadian Sony 780s and previous American 525s, but it was long ago and limited to replacing dead HDDs. I have swapped the burner boards in the Pioneer units countless times, and it worked perfectly on both the early "100% Pioneer" and later "Sony/Pioneer" models. But I have not personally tried it with a Sony-branded model, so can't say from experience that it would definitely work the same. It should.

Regarding the service manual info on laser alignment, etc.: it never arose as an issue with any of the three dozen Pioneers whose burner boards I've swapped. I believe that procedure was only required if just the laser pickup was changed out: I'm willing to wager virtually no repair tech ever did that particular repair (it's more work, takes more time, so in essence doesn't save anybody any money even if the laser pickup was cheaper than a replacement burner on paper). When you swap the board, it connects to a new completely aligned burner assembly that it can easily adjust itself to. So there shouldn't be any issues with laser power, alignment, etc. - it should just work, as it does in the Pioneer versions.

Firmware is another story. Over the years, the majority of fellow tinkerers I've been in contact with have all said the same thing: don't tamper with it or try to upgrade it, esp in the Sonys. Messing with the firmware to try and trick the machine to recognize larger HDDs leads to more headaches than any other tinkering. Sony and Pioneer may have been lax in other areas, but they were positively obsessed with preventing anyone installing a larger HDD in the cheaper models. A handful of blessed souls on this forum got away with it, but the majority experience has been it causes functionality issues at best and bricks the unit at worst. The only people who seem to have "jailbroke" the firmware with repeatable success are the dealers in Hong Kong who offer hot-rodded Sonys and Pioneers with terabyte HDD upgrades for $1000. Don't know how they do it, its a closely-guarded secret, and I honestly could care less: the use case for more than 160GB in these machines is very niche, and the more capacity you fill, the more videos you can lose when the unit burps up a "Repairing HDD... Please Wait" alert.

That said, whatever firmware changes you made should not be affected by a burner board swap. A) you'd be putting back the same board the firmware knows anyway and B) the recorder firmware is located in the chassis half-motherboard, not the burner half-motherboard. The laser pickup and mechanical drive parts have a generic identity to the recorder operating system, only the burner controller board does any handshakes, so as long as you retain the original board in a new burner you should be good.
Wynos995 likes this.

Last edited by CitiBear; 05-03-2018 at 08:25 AM.
CitiBear is offline  
post #10 of 34 Old 05-03-2018, 09:55 AM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wynos995 View Post
The other consideration is about firmware. Since I have been trying all sorts I also upgraded the firmware. The board going back in will have the earlier version. I don’t know how much this could matter in swapping the boards. I read somewhere that the firmware is based in the Flash ROM on the board anyway and I would be installing the board with the earlier version. If part of the motherboard is split off then could there be some kind of conflict? It would only matter if it could affect the setup sequence at startup to prevent powering up properly.
On reflection I don't need to worry about firmware because the U13HDD burner-board from EET ships with the basic firmware version 1.03 to be fitted in a range of compatible machines (HXD*9 series (June 2008), HX*8 series (April 2008) and AT series (March 2009)) with an inherent range of possibly different firmware. With board swapping with different firmware on the swapped-in board it'll be effectively the same as installing another one from EET. S'cuse self quote since no edit post privilege and big thanks to my mate Henri Flexion.
Wynos995 is offline  
post #11 of 34 Old 05-03-2018, 03:20 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
I had not seen CitiBear's post earlier today when I posted earlier. Thanks for the tipoff about the laser self-adjustment and the techs not doing it. I had been wondering when combing through the various service menus of my setup before removing the old burner board that the there was 'FFFF' logged for the LD adjustment which meant that no calibration had been done when I sent it in for a new burner board back in 2012. Well now I know he wasn't doing a bad job just doing what was needed.

I agree that the firmware shouldn't prejudice the outcome of a board swap. I planned to upgrade the firmware as a last step because I was following the Pioneer's convenient listing of service procedures to be carried out for replacing certain parts. Sony service manuals also recommend installing the latest firmware at servicing and as you say these late model Frankensteins are hybrids of uncertain origin especially when trying to pinpoint form and function. I had also noticed that there had been a big problem here in the UK with Sony RDRs frequently and inexplicably losing digital channels and other functional problems (including some with E01 when turned on) and a special firmware update was issued. I upgraded to this firmware (I was getting desperate by now having tried most everything else I could think of) thinking it just might perform the handshake that the recognised and original hard drive was waiting for. No such luck.

As regards having an outsize hard drive well I couldn't agree with CitiBear more. Since burner failure has happened to me twice now, I've always ended up with loads of stuff I really want to watch yet haven't got round to it plus those must haves scattered amongst the pile I left sitting there precisely because I was waiting for something to make a more satisfying thematic disc. The very thought of facing sudden burner failure - and we know how hard that is to predict- with a vast and bloated hard drive, is stacking the odds against you walking away with a smile on your face. No, 250GB is enough for me. What I probably need is better disc management going forward. Aiming to keep the hard drive in the opposite manner to a fuel tank. Fuel tank roughly between half and full, hard disc roughly between half full and a practical minimum. When burner failure first appears, as twice before, I know it has been a race against the clock because you have no actual idea how much time is left to deal with what is already stacked up on the drive.

Thanks once again for allying my concerns about possible problems connected with doing a board swap.
Wynos995 is offline  
post #12 of 34 Old 05-03-2018, 05:09 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
Regarding fooling the machine into putting in a bigger HDD – I agree with CitiBear and Wynos 995 putting a bigger HDD is not necessary and may cause more harm than good.

That said I must point out that a few years ago I happened upon a blog run by a Canadian who had the RDR-HX780 and he claimed to fool his Canadian market (CA April 2008 FIRMWARE) RDR-HX780 into accepting a larger HDD and he claimed that his machine had no problem recognizing the larger HDD and the machine had no ill effects. If/when my original HDD dies out – I might try it – only because small 160 HDDs are pretty hard to get and why waste the space of a a 1GB HDD if you don’t have to.

As to swapping out the board on the DVR-U13HDD ASSY what CB stated below makes perfect sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
Regarding the service manual info on laser alignment, etc.: it never arose as an issue with any of the three dozen Pioneers whose burner boards I've swapped. I believe that procedure was only required if just the laser pickup was changed out: I'm willing to wager virtually no repair tech ever did that particular repair (it's more work, takes more time, so in essence doesn't save anybody any money even if the laser pickup was cheaper than a replacement burner on paper). When you swap the board, it connects to a new completely aligned burner assembly that it can easily adjust itself to. So there shouldn't be any issues with laser power, alignment, etc. - it should just work, as it does in the Pioneer versions.
The only thing I’m a little concerned about is the laser hours memory of the old DVR-U13HDD retained. CitiBear, with the swap out (new laser assembly mated with the old laser board) will the laser hrs reset or will the laser hours continue reading from the old laser due to being mated to the old laser assembly board?
Super Eye is offline  
post #13 of 34 Old 05-04-2018, 03:30 AM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post
The only thing I’m a little concerned about is the laser hours memory of the old DVR-U13HDD retained. CitiBear, with the swap out (new laser assembly mated with the old laser board) will the laser hrs reset or will the laser hours continue reading from the old laser due to being mated to the old laser assembly board?
Very good point made by Super Eye. I cannot say at this point. All the Sony service manual says is typically Frankenstein-ian with their proof readers not bothering to aim for consistent syntax using 'Loader' copied almost verbatim from the Pioneer sms. From Sony HXD*9 sm (p78 first paragraph removed for clarity)

MTTF hours for each LD
DVD : 4,700 hours
CD : 11,000 hours

Since data on lighting time of each laser diode (LD) are stored in the flash ROM on the MAIN Assy, after the MAIN Assy is replaced,
the data will be cleared. However, after the LOADER Assy is replaced, data on lighting time of each LD will be retained in the MAIN
Assy. Therefore, before either the MAIN Assy or LOADER Assy is to be replaced, it is recommended that you write down the lighting
time data.

This seems to imply that the old laser time will continue accumulate even though a new laser will be in place after a board swap. There is mention of clearing some logs after some procedures but the laser accumulated time isn't one of them. Interesting to note that the Sony sm also says that if the total read/write laser time exceeds 4700 hours the lasers may be burnt out. I recorded the 'Writer Maintenance Info' screen of the failed burner (see attached) and the combined total is over that.
Since the predicted total for burnout is in the right ballpark it just occurred to me that since I have a service remote I could monitor laser time going forward so next time I'd be ready and could even decide to happily exchange the hard drive as well.

One curious anomaly is that the figures for R and W are the wrong way round. I was always burning but hardly ever watching DVDs on the 995.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Laser-time-fail.jpg
Views:	14
Size:	32.1 KB
ID:	2398814  
Super Eye likes this.
Wynos995 is offline  
post #14 of 34 Old 05-04-2018, 12:21 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 136 Post(s)
Liked: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wynos995 View Post
there had been a big problem here in the UK with Sony RDRs frequently and inexplicably losing digital channels and other functional problems (including some with E01 when turned on) and a special firmware update was issued.
I've always envied EU buyers of these Sony units, because they received more attentive and extended support. The USA Pioneer/Sony and Canadian Sony versions were completely unsupported post-sale: after the warranty expired, you were on your own. Even during warranty, major bugs were not addressed in any meaningful way. During the entire run of Pioneer DVD/HDD recorders 2002-2008, they only issued ONE firmware update to fix a titling issue in timer mode of the initial 2006 Sony-based models. Even during the crisis 2005 model year, when the North American 530 series proved disastrously misengineered, Pioneer offered squat. They sat on their hands, while thousands of units broke down or otherwise thwarted thousands of owners. Only when the tidal wave of warranty claims reached the point of bankrupting their recorder division did they react: and even THAT wasn't a true fix. They simply threw in the towel, arranged a hasty shotgun marriage with Sony, and began swapping warranty-claim 530 recorders with the new Sony recorders. I imagine theres a landfill loaded with Pioneer 531-533-633 recorders somewhere, perhaps next to the old Atari cartridge cemetery.

One significant issue never addressed in North America is the recalcitrant "E01" hard drive controller glitch you mentioned, which afflicts many 2007/2008 Sonys and Pioneers with SATA drives. There is virtually no DIY fix for this when it hits: the unit becomes a useless brick. Until your post, I had never heard of Sony or Pioneer confirming the problem, much less issuing firmware to prevent it. In part, this might be due to Sony soldiering on alone for another year or two after Pioneer imploded in late 2008: since they were still in the EU recorder business, they had to solve the E01 glitch. In USA/Canada, Pioneer just evaporated overnight while Sony walked away whistling. Not very nice: if you're unlucky enough to have your N.A. Pioneer or Sony develop the E01 syndrome, the only way out is to find another similar model and move your old HDD to it. The problem is the motherboard HDD controller gets stuck in a processing loop: the hard drive data itself is usually fine, but the interface is locked in a snafu.

Re the laser life odometer: I wouldn't worry too much about that. Its useful data, but not necessarily applicable in practical terms. I've gathered an enormous amount of user reports over the past decade, and consensus is there isn't much grey area in laser durability of the Sony burners used in these machines. The statistics are completely binary: either the units stop burning after 1000-1500 discs, or they go on forever without a hiccup. The latter is much rarer, tho on this forum Super Eye and a couple other owners have reported burning an astonishing number of discs with no end in sight. So the service menu laser meter applies, yet doesn't. Also, burning ability declines gracefully: the units can continue to burn in special "VR" HDD backup mode for quite some time after they cease being able to burn normal finalized -/+ R. At least this give you a fighting chance to transfer the video files intact to another similar model.

Last edited by CitiBear; 05-04-2018 at 12:26 PM.
CitiBear is offline  
post #15 of 34 Old 05-04-2018, 05:22 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
Re the laser hours reset.
I was thinking that the laser power calibration process may partly base its calculations on the total hours used and new laser/old board combo may prematurely put out a little more than necessary power – unnecessary ware. But from what Whynos995 posted I see I was wrong. It probably performs a little pre-burn and gets all power information from that. Jotting down the laser hours when replacing the assembly is a very good idea for your own records.

Regarding the Write / Read hours. Not sure how Sony calculates the hours but I assume that 2 actual real time hours of reading would put a lot less stress and ware on the laser than two actual hours of writing at 6x. The laser power difference between the two is like night and day. Reading a DVD takes around 5mW of power. Writing @ 6x takes something like 120mW of peak power. Granted writing at high speed the laser pulses and may not be continues power but still. Big difference between 5mW and 120mW. These are ballpark figures and depend on quality of disc, compatibility between deck firmware and disc etc. But should be close to actual power figures.

CitiBear. I’ve only burned hundreds of discs so far and there are a few concerts on my HDD that I may not transfer because the broadcasters either screwed the 5.1 to 2.0 stereo mix down (losing volume on vocals) or the HD feed is so bit rate starved that its hard to watch on a HDTV once down converted to SD. I wish I could post my hours but I can’t find my clone service remote.
Super Eye is offline  
post #16 of 34 Old 05-05-2018, 12:07 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Wynos995's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Berkshire UK
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Swapping Sony RDR HXD995 boards works!

My original question was:can I fit a new DVD drive unit in my HXD995 AND keep the recordings on the HDD?
Well yesterday was crunchtime. I swapped the boards as CitiBear had convinced me should work in the SonyRDR HXD and it worked! Working slowly and carefully I first of all removed thenew U13 burner-board I had installed in my HXD995 (refusing access to the HDDby a CPRM # flag). Then I removed the new board from it. I then took the old U13burner-board with the failed burner that the HDD had been working with beforeand removed the board. Then I did one last check before I did the swap that theright board was going in the right burner (Of course everyone is sure of thiswhen you begin, but I found it momentarily confusing when it came to the actualswap over). Check done and verified, I then fitted the old board into the newburner, then worked backwards reinstalling the new-old hybrid U13 burner-boardinto the Sony RDR HXD995.
Connected up, switched onwith user remote. Blue light stayed on. No E01 – yellow light. Success!! Icould access the HDD title list and play my recordings, they’re all stillthere.
No model setting required(after all was able to switch on with user remote). Version information (ESCDISP with Sony service remote) showed all Ok with firmware rolled back to as itwas. I haven’t retuned yet with easy setup so haven’t got the 995 up andrunning in full order but all looks perfectly fine for now.
A big thank you to CitiBearfor pointing the way with solid encouragement, I haven’t used forums much butthis is a fantastic resource. There’s no way without it I could have found myway without setting off in the wrong direction and possibly ‘bricking’ my machine.
I’ll post again to confirm whenI’ve got the Sony 995 fully operational.
Wynos995 is offline  
post #17 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 10:01 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 0
It looks like I might need to embark on this routine. Before I do though I'd welcome any advice readers here might be able to offer. I have a Sony RDR-HXD995 which is working well with the one exception it will not write to a dual layer DVD. I have tried Philips +R DL discs and Verbatim -R DL discs. Neither will work, but it will write to single layer discs with no problem.


Sony UK suggest the laser diode has degraded meaning it can no longer write to dual layer discs. My firm question does this sound correct - that it could degrade such that single layer discs can be written fine but dual layer cannot?
When I try with one of these DL discs the machine just tells me to insert a recordable disc.


So my options are to swap the optical drive, but I would like to preserve the recordings on the HDD. I assume that that swapping the board of the option drive is still the suggested way to achieve this?


Can anyone advise where I could get copies of the service manual for this machine - ideally both the Sony & Pioneer versions and maybe the optical drive also? I've searched online but haven't found these.


Any help much appreciated
[email protected] is offline  
post #18 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 02:56 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
jjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 11,349
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 874 Post(s)
Liked: 338
I'm not really familiar with Sony DVDRs but if your DVDR is based off the Pioneer operating system you may have the ability to use the most recent version of IsoBuster. Jwillis84 and a programmer have been slowly adding supported DVDRs, I know they support most Panasonics, Funai built DVDRs, LiteON DVDRs and Pioneer DVDRs which if your Sony is based on the Pioneer operating system may just work for you. You remove the drive and mount it to your computer and use the program to easily read the contents. Hopefully, SuperEye will chime in as he knows the Pioneer/Sony model numbers, that or Jwillis84 might know.
jjeff is online now  
post #19 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 04:32 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
I’m not that familiar with the RDR-HXD995 as this model is newer than anything that made it to North America. Appeared in spring 2010 I believe.


Re the dual-layer problem – it could be a degraded laser it also be a good laser slightly off alignment.
The optical drives for these units are still available in the UK but cost a bit.


Re the “service manual” I have one how can I e-mail it to you?
Super Eye is offline  
post #20 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 07:15 PM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
IsoBuster released its official "Beta" with DVR support, yesterday, June 3, 2019

Release Notes - IsoBuster Beta 4.4

Download

The RDR-HXD995 is not one I could test directly, but it is "estimated" to be auto-detected and supported as a Pioneer model DVR-550 or DVR-560.

What makes IsoBuster different from previous scripts and do it yourself python coding, is IsoBuster is a windows program that runs on everything from Windows XP to Windows 10, and on Wine on OS X. It can read the DVR hard drive even though Windows does not understand its format. The user interface is more or less like the windows File Manager, with right click options for "extracting" recordings, that allows you to copy the recording to another drive or places connected to the PC. Finding a particular recording is made easier because IsoBuster "associates" the Titles and Names the DVR recorder displays for playback with the recordings in the file manager interface. If a recording has no Title or a Duplicate title as some manual recordings through a Line Input tend to, you can find a recording by its approximate date and time of creation. IsoBuster will also helpfully offer to append sequential numbers to multiple recordings with the same name to make them unique on the destination file system.

It is not a free program, but the trial does allow you to attach a drive to the PC and browse its contents to see if extraction is possible. DVR support is a premium feature so it requires the Professional license.

You have to remove the hard drive from the recorder and that takes a few tools, and you need a way to attach it to your PC.

The HXD995 has a parallel or PATA IDE drive, which is uncommon today, but a USB drive dock or adapter that supports a full size 3.5 inch IDE hard drive is more than adequate. The docks or adapters that connect using a parallel cable or don't require you to remove the recorder hard drive from its carrier are best. The recorder carrier often has plastic melted in its threads called "Lock-tite" to prevent removing the drive mount screws.

When its first attached, Windows often offers to "FORMAT" or "INITIALIZE" the drive for you.. do not do that! It will also harshly warn you won't be able to "use" the drive until Windows Formats the drive.. Do Not Do That. IsoBuster does not need to do any of that, it by-passes windows and only reads the bits off the drive.

You should also be forewarned that SONY and Pioneer have to "authorize" drives they do not recognize, and require a service remote to "re-authorize" a drive if its "tampered with" while its removed from the recorder. Windows "writing" to the drive qualifies as "tampering".

This use of a service remote is unique to the SONY and Pioneer brands, other brands have different "pairing" procedures.. some easier, some harder to do. - Its generally not a problem, unless you slip on the keyboard, or allow Windows to write to the drive.. do not allow windows to "Initialize, Format" or do anything else "helpful or automatic" while its attached to a PC.. and everything generally works.

That is the recorder will work as before when you reinstall the hard drive back into the recorder.

Never write to the recorder hard drive or allow any program to write to the recorder hard drive while its attached to a PC. Only make changes to the recorder hard drive (such as deleting recordings, or re-formatting the recorder hard drive) with the recorder itself.

This should be somewhat obvious, but the ease with which this works, makes you overconfident really fast.

Some people get overly eager and (think) they can upload video or make changes on the hard drive like it is a PC hard drive while its outside the DVR recorder.. with certain late model Game Capture recorders that is true.. but for anything "Professional or Prosumer" like these older DVRs it is not true.. do not try it, you will brick the DVR and require a great deal of help to salvage the unit.. if its even possible.

Last edited by jwillis84; 06-04-2019 at 07:58 PM.
jwillis84 is offline  
post #21 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 08:07 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwillis84 View Post
The HXD995 has a parallel or PATA IDE drive,

The 995 should have a SATA Hard Drive as even my much older 780 has SATA.


Re the burner.

The part number is

DVR-U13HDD ASSY

Original manufacturers part A-154-392-0A or A-1543-920-A
Super Eye is offline  
post #22 of 34 Old 06-04-2019, 08:18 PM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post
The 995 should have a SATA Hard Drive as even my much older 780 has SATA.
Entirely possible, I have never actually had one in my hands to test.

There are a number of upsides and downsides to extracting recordings direct from the hard drive.

On the upside, it does not require editing or slicing and dicing to fit on DVDs. The recording can be copied as is, no matter how long it is to its new destination. And at "faster than real time" speeds.

On the downside, it requires physically removing the drive and using a piece of software on a computer.

Other options are playing back recordings and "re-capturing" the recording with a different DVR, or a PC capture device like a USB video grabber or PC video capture card.. at real time speeds.

Repairing the DVR is also still a possibility, but blank media availability and compatibility may become an issue in years to come.. its nice to have a different set of options to consider.

I do not know of anyone offering recording recovery as a "service" yet.. but at some point that might also become a possibility since the feasibility of direct copy has now been accomplished.

.. I guess I should mention you can also use ImgBurn to burn copies of the extracted recordings direct to DVD or Blu-ray after they arrive on the PC. But for traditional Menus and Navigation features old style Authoring software will still be required.. but that kind of gets into the weeds.. and exits my wheel house.

Last edited by jwillis84; 06-04-2019 at 08:29 PM.
jwillis84 is offline  
post #23 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 04:19 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 0
I really appreciate the quick followup to my question from so manyh people. All of the posts have been realy helpful.
I think I will firstly adopt the IsoBuster extraction process as I can easily connect the drive to my PC whether it is a SATA or parallel IDE type drive as I have the USB adapter that will work for that.


I'll post back here to confirm which interface this unit actually uses. If IsoBuster can read the contents of this drive I will let you know as it's one that you can then include in the list.





Great advice to prevent windows from initialising or writing to the drive in any way, having said that I do have a Sony Service remote on it's way to me. Is re-pairing the drive possible without erasing the contents if an accident should occur? It seems that Sony didn't consider preserving the contents of the HDD if the DVD drive is replaced, which seems crazy, I am guessing it's too much to expect re-pairing without erasing.



I will be using Windows 10 - in the past if Windows can actually read the partition I have seen it write out files like Thumbs.db etc But I am guessing the format these recorders use is totally unintellagable to Windows so unless I let it init the drive, Windows will leave alone.


Longer term I think I will replace the DVD drive, as you say they are still available here in the UK, the ability to write o DL discs will be welcome. The weird thing about this unit is it hasn't written may DVDs - maybe 30-40 over it's life, but this is the first time I have tried a DL disc with it. It can still write to single layer discs without any problem at all.


Super Eye - I tried to PM you but I am not allowed to do that havign not made enough posts as yet. However thank you very much for your offer of any of the Sony, Pioneer or Optical drive service manuals - my email is actually my display name on here - I seem unable to change it when I signed up.....







In Japan Sony have a current range of a recorders, supporting newer DVB-T2 and HD capabilities using a Blu Ray drive, but here in the UK they have nothing in their line up now, so keeping this unit running as long as I can will be useful.


Panasonic have a BD version but no line in/out as far as I am aware so cannot be used to copy recordings from another box - such as a Sky Receiever etc.
[email protected] is offline  
post #24 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 05:35 AM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Re-pairing is not usually something that will preserve the recordings, it might.. but what causes it to un-pair is a kind of damage. Pairing is usually done for authorizing "new" or blank drives. (Its also another reason to find out if IsoBuster can read your drive.. it can read damaged recorder hard drives the recorder can no longer read.)

Pairing is also done for new OEM DVD replacement drives, switching out the control board for the drive so you keep the old control board is how to avoid that.. it maintains the pairing of the DVD drive with the recorder.

A lightly used DVD burner suddenly failing, could be a problem with the DL media being too new or incompatible. DVD media went through several evolutions as its burning speed got faster and faster, and the older DVD drives would not recognize or refuse to burn properly with the newer DVD blank media. There are some recommended brands and specific lines of brands of DVD media that often have better success than newer media.. but its usually "new old stock".. DL media in particular is harder to source since it was rarer to begin with.. though some people swear by it.. not at it.

DL media does depend on higher power coming from the diode, so if its aging your assessment could be correct that its simply loosing the ability to deliver enough power to the layer underneath. You should probably try a brand and type from that brand that has worked for you before.. and also seek out advice here regarding the most compatible DL varieties still available. I "think" verbatim may be the only company still making any DL media.. but I could be wrong.

SuperEye and Citibear are the best advisers on all things SONY and Pioneer. Searching for their postings on SONY and DL recorders would provide the best information.

The UK and Australia Blu-ray recorders are mostly gone, unless bought used. They have basically become time shifting device with hard drives without inputs. The models that did burn to DVD or Blu-ray did so only as .m2ps or DVD compatible streams.. so they were never HD. the only advantage they had was longer program length on a Blu-ray for SD video. (IsoBuster supports the BS750, BS780 and BS785 and probably their larger cousins.. but none of the truly expensive models that are going for crazy prices on auctions sites these days).

Last edited by jwillis84; 06-05-2019 at 05:51 AM.
jwillis84 is offline  
post #25 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 05:59 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 0
I have made some progress. Having removed the HDD I can confirm ist is a SATA drive.


Connecting to my PC I can also confirm that IsoBuster 4.4 can read the contents. It identifies it as a Pioneer x50H/x60H.


I have been able to extract the entire contents of the drive and the recordings play back fine. What I did notice is that entries appeared for deleted recordings. Where they were recent deletes the programme was intact, but where they are older deletes sometimes the extracted file woudl be some random portion of another recording. That's fine I can just delete the PC copies of those. I suspect the deleted entry is pointing to an area of the drive that has been used by a subsequent recording.


Interesting about the DL media - I have always had a lot of success with Verbatim DVD-R single layer discs, so tried the Verbatim DVD-R DL discs, as well as Philips DVD+R DL neither of which worked. I had hoped Verbatim would work well.


If anyone does have any suggestions on DL media to try I can do that before contemplating replacing the DVD drive. Having opened the machine - removing the DVD drive does look a challenge that will need careful studying of the service manual!
[email protected] is offline  
post #26 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 07:19 AM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
DVD recorder hard drives tend to accumulate errors over time. Finding a recording that appears deleted available is not unusual. Sometimes its a recording that should be available but the recorder no longer lists due to a glitch or damage. Eventually these add up to having to erase or reformat the hard drive using the recorder itself. Those invisible recordings continue to consume drive space in many cases. So eventually you can end up up a Full drive with no recordings.

It was not unusual during testing to see lots of strange behavior.

Generally however from a fresh start, with few on recorder edits recordings are very easy to see and extract.. a drive with years of usage and errors can behave very unpredictablly.

The great thing however is IsoBuster makes them available.. they are not simply lost or gone.

True sometimes you have to reconcile, but as far as possible it is reassembling and stitching recordings back together as whole files.

I do not doubt you know whether it was a deleted recording, but usually truly deleted recordings are not found by IsoBuster unless a full Drive Scan and salvage mode is initiated

Most of the the time it only displays recordings the recorder should be making available to you.. why it does not is generally due to invisible damage.
jwillis84 is offline  
post #27 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 03:49 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Super Eye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked: 47
I emailed you the service manual.

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
The weird thing about this unit is it hasn't written may DVDs - maybe 30-40 over it's life, but this is the first time I have tried a DL disc with it. It can still write to single layer discs without any problem at all.
The laser should not be degraded from burning 30 to 40 single layer discs. Could of been faulty from the factory or as I said slightly misaligned. Your recorder should have a firmware date of 2010 or newer I would think a new Verbatim DL should work. That said I don’t use DL discs in my Sony 780 because I also believe as jwillis84 stated DL discs take a lot of extra power to burn. I save DL burns for my PC. I did burn hundreds of SL discs in my Sony 780 and any brand I tried burns but I stick with the Verbatim AZO discs.

You can check your laser hours with the service remote – it explains how in the service manual. Personally I would not go through the trouble and money to replace the burner. I would just keep it as a single layer recorder and burn any DL stuff on the computer.

I’m glad that you confirmed that the IsoBuster 4.4 works with the Sony RDRHX line.

Let me know if you recieved the manual.
jwillis84 likes this.
Super Eye is offline  
post #28 of 34 Old 06-05-2019, 07:36 PM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
Verbatim AZO +R DL blank media is usually recommended as the last best hope for DL burning.

There are a "few" strong sentiments that attempting DL burning on a DVD recorder is unwise at best, destructive at worst to the longevity of a DVD burner.

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/106-d...-dl-discs.html
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/106-d...r-message.html
jjeff likes this.
jwillis84 is offline  
post #29 of 34 Old 06-06-2019, 01:22 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked: 0
Hi Super Eye - service manual received with thanks - really apprecaite it.
Thanks again to you & jwillis84 for continued advice. You are making me re-think my plans - as moving the drive to my PC and using IsoBuster is simple to do and I can use the DVD drive there to create DVDs as needed.


That's a good point about a DL disc takign more power and perhaps weighing in more on the life of the laser.
When I get a service remote I can check the life of the laser just out of interest. THe place I ordered a remote from refunded me to say it's out of stock and no longer available, so need to search some more for one.
[email protected] is offline  
post #30 of 34 Old 06-06-2019, 05:33 AM
Member
 
jwillis84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked: 38
The Service Remote is a dual edged sword and you can harm yourself with it.

I do have one for the SONY, but Citibear warned me there are ways of pressing buttons to lock it in a loop which you cannot exit and essentially "brick" the recorder. So never, ever "randomly" press buttons (especially) on a SONY. Do not go exploring looking for other functions.. or (especially) do not assume all Pioneer Service Functions are available.. they are not.. and some of the simplest Pioneer functions can lock up your SONY such that it cannot be recovered. There is no soft or hard reset that will bring the SONY back. So beware.

That said the remote is essentials for some things, just know that SONY left some dangerous holes in the service remote menus.

Also the Harmony Remote cannot really be reprogrammed to behave as a SONY Service Remote, the codes seem to brick a lot of the Harmony remotes and manufacturer of the Harmony has removed uploaded profiles for imitating the service remotes.

A few third party LP1 or replacement remotes might take the place of an original Service Remote, but they are getting harder to find. And they are not as easy to use. Some very cheap china made replacements for the service remotes show up on eBay.. but I've never tried one of those.

The IsoBuster method is very good, and there are SATA to eSATA cables and adapters that will bring that small number of wires out the back of the case.. to which you can hook up an external drive enclosure.. but the appearance is not all that pleasing, and its a bit much compared to how the recorder looks normally. Also I have not tried with a SONY, but I have had some success with SDXC flash cards in an adapter with some recorders to replace the hard drive.. its not a really comprehensive finished project yet.. my focus has been on testing IsoBuster, this is a hobby for me.

Last edited by jwillis84; 06-06-2019 at 05:37 AM.
jwillis84 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply DVD Recorders (Standard Def)

Tags
burner , hdd , p.run , sony hxd , sony rdr

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off