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-   -   My DIY, Ambient Light, Non-dedicated Room, Budget, "Anti-screen" Build (https://www.avsforum.com/forum/110-diy-screen-section/2448850-my-diy-ambient-light-non-dedicated-room-budget-anti-screen-build.html)

thebard 05-09-2016 04:27 PM

My DIY, Budget, Ambient Light, Non-dedicated Room, Stealth, "Anti-screen" Build
 
10 Attachment(s)
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463342478

https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463342478


Video link:




Hi all, first off please excuse the lengthy post and the plethora of pictures (and photo quality; all were taken on my iPhone).


I've been hanging around the forums awhile, but I've just finished a (for me) big AV project. This is the first time I've taken on a build this ambitious, so I thought I'd post & document, on the off chance that others would find something helpful in my efforts.


My situation: we just purchased (yay!), and down-sized (aww) to an 800-sq foot home. We have an open floor plan, living room with attached galley kitchen (see sketch & photos). This acts as our TV/Movie/entertainment space, and is outfitted accordingly: small speakers, single subwoofer, living room & counter-style seating.


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1462836356


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1462836356
The space I have to work with. Pardon the mess, that's the AV outlet box! And I know the TV is off-center, that's just temporary.



The wall I chose to project on is only 9 ft wide, and the room length is 16 feet. There are a total of four windows: two north-facing, plus a small one in the front door. Walls are a light off-white/gray/tan color. There is also a ceiling soffit/beam cutting into the screen wall, and a low-hanging ceiling fan centrally placed. Given these restrictions, there was no way my (relatively) long-throw 720p Optoma was going to cut it, so I decided it was time to upgrade the projector, and (since we now own) put in a setup that really works for us.





I wasn't sure how I wanted to integrate the pj & screen into our living space, but I knew what I *didn't* want:
  • I didn't want something that would look completely washed out in daylight viewing
  • I didn't want a screen smaller than the 78" we had at our last place
  • I didn't want a manual pull-down screen that would develop waves/wrinkles
  • I didn't want a big, empty wall or screen when we weren't projecting
  • I didn't want something that would come down in front of the TV, since I often have both screens running at the same time
  • I didn't want an AT screen that would cut into the already small room footprint
And of course, with a mortgage, we are on a budget. That said, I chose the Epson 2040 pj; it has the light output for our room, and while the negative throw offset might not work for everyone, I knew I would be mounting my screen a bit high to accommodate both the TV under it and the bar-height seating at the galley kitchen. The Epson also had keystone adjustment which I would, unfortunately, need for my placement. The inexpensive bulbs would help too. I figured I could combine the 2040 with a gray screen and have something very serviceable.






My initial thought, seeing as this is not a dedicated room, was to get some nice artwork for the wall and a motorized screen that could drop down in front of it. A couple problems immediately presented themselves:
  • The soffit would need to be dealt with for either a wall or ceiling mount. This would mean mounting lower than I wanted to, or shrinking the screen even further.
  • As I looked at tab-tensioned screens, of course the prices went up.
Then I thought of those automated/motorized frames that use roller shade art to conceal flat-screen TVs. I could get something like that, only covering up a DIY screen. But looking at the prices... sheesh! They started at several hundred $ for just a 45" screen; moving up to the 90" or so I wanted pushed the cost into the thousands. And that didn't include an actual projection screen.

Then I thought: why don't I build my own? I know how to use a saw, spray paint, program an IR remote... how hard could it be? Well thanks to the internet, and resources found here at AVS, I was able to do just that.

The whole build took me about three weeks, but admittedly the majority of this consisted of waiting for paint to dry and temporarily mounting the frame for testing/sizing purposes. I plan on posting pics of the process... but for starters, following is a quick series of the finished product (Note: These and the pictures above are daylight photos):




Next: Frame & Motor Assembly

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thebard 05-09-2016 04:28 PM

Frame & Motor Assembly
 
17 Attachment(s)
Ok, so I know my way around basic power tools, but I am by no means a handy man. But I figured this would be a modular setup consisting of three parts (from the wall outward): screen, frame and moulding. Already this was breaking a couple "rules":
  • A frame in front of the screen risks casting shadows on the image. I got away with this not happening because of a few things: the Epson's throw offset meant that it didn't need to be above the screen line, so the image wouldn't get clipped; the moudling I chose is beveled slightly inward; and I chose to inset the image within the frame and not try to run it edge-to-edge.
  • A frame without interior cross-bracing risks bowing. I was hoping that my smaller screen size, use of 2x2 furring strips and the add-on moulding would prevent this.
I know that bordered screens are viewed by some as passé, but in my case the moulding and border are essential to hiding the motor mechanism and creating the "artwork". Having a few inches of matte black around the image would help in an ambient light situation too. Since I hadn't done this before, my first purchase was the motor; I would build the rest around that.



I ordered a Somfy LT30 IR kit with a 1.5" roller bar from AV Outlet, since it could be easily integrated with my universal remote:
http://www.avoutlet.com/index.php?di...roduct_id=1481


I called them first to ask some questions; a real person answered the phone, and they were very helpful. They knew all the answers to my questions without having to look things up or put me on hold. They helped me confirm sizes, make sure I had the correct remote, roller bar, and all the accessories I would need.


To calculate what I would need for lumber, I measured the width & depth of the Somfy assembly when it arrived. I then added the height of the furring strips, added a bit for the roller fabric, and that gave me the size I would need for the moulding (since it would need to conceal the rolled up artwork & mechanism). I then subtracted that (for the left & right sides of the frame) from the width I wanted to take up on the wall, and that gave me my allowable screen size: 77" wide, or 88" diagonal. Good enough.


I used 2x2 poplar all around, except for the top, where I used a strip with a pre-cut channel. This would give me a space to conceal wires & the ir emitter. I used a circular saw for the straight cuts, but a used a mitre box & hand saw to get nice, clean cuts for the 45s on the moulding. Also, the 1.5" roller bar meant I would need a spacer piece on the back of the moulding, so it didn't impede the moving parts.



I didn't want the moulding to be permanently attached (I wanted to be able to get at the frame & motor parts without taking the whole thing down), so I fitted each moulding span with two keyhole hangers, and a carefully placed screw on the equivalent frame span. Then, to really snug things up, I attached a swing hook to the back of each moulding corner seam:



I thought I could maybe get away with the canvas free-hanging, but when testing at floor level it became obvious I would need some kind of guide track. Some cheap plastic corner guards from Home Depot worked really well; they are only "L" shaped, but they come with adhesive strips already applied, so they nest to form a perfect "U" track, and are easily cut to size & rounded. I attached with Velcro for the time being, until I finalized the spacing & position:



A few up & down tests, & I was ready to move on to the next step...




Next: Wall-Mounting & Testing




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thebard 05-09-2016 04:29 PM

Wall-Mounting & Testing
 
8 Attachment(s)
Moment of truth... I would attach the frame & motor assembly to the wall, affix the moulding, and run the IR setup through its paces. No screen surface, no artwork, just check for function & sizing.


The first thing I realized is that I was going to need some space between the frame and the wall, to make sure the roller shade had enough room to function. I used ashesive felt tabs to accomplish this, but one concern was the potential for light leakage behind the frame, so I would want to watch for that.


You can see in the following pictures that I used keyhole hangers again, at the top of the frame assembly, to attach to screws driven into wall studs. I went this route instead of typical D-hooks because of the added weight, and I wanted to be really sure there was no shifting when the motor engaged. At the bottom, I used 1" L-brackets to keep the frame straight & snug. The power was temporarily hooked up to a nearby outlet:




Moulding spans were attached bottom to top:




And then the whole thing was tested (note that I haven't calibrated or positioned the projected image yet):




A few notes on mounting the motor & bar:
  • The roller bar comes pre-cut at 1-ft increments. so if you need ~78 inches as I did, you order a 7-ft span & cut it down. It's aluminum and cuts fairly easily with a hand saw.
  • The motor has an option for battery power or ac; I opted for the powered solution, so I didn't need to worry about battery changes, but this meant a power brick at the wall end.
  • The power cable comes in a variety of lengths, up to 10 feet. Get the longest one; it is thin/easily concealed except for the power brick.
  • There are two remote controls; single-channel and multi-channel. If you plan on adding more devices (additional screens, window shades, etc.) get the multi, otherwise save a few bucks and get the single. Either way, the only real buttons on the thing are up/down/stop and program.
  • Both power and IR have small, proprietary 2/4-pin connectors. They were *very* inconvenient to plug in once my roller bar was in place, so the next time I mounted I made sure to rotate the ports toward the front of the assembly.

One nice feature of the roller motor is that the start/stop limits when programmed are memorized in the hardware, so there's no need to deal with IR timings. They are pretty accurate too; unless you remove the roller shade they are pretty "set it and forget it". I did notice however, that if I set the "up" limit too high, the roller shade had a tendancy to jump off the track, which caused problems... more on this later.



Next: Painting & Hardware




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thebard 05-09-2016 04:29 PM

Painting & Hardware
 
6 Attachment(s)
Now came time to bring everything down & make it a nice, satin, light-absorbing color. I went with Rust-oleum flat black Ultra Cover, available at Home Depot. I did one coat & touch-up on the back, two coats anyplace that would be visible. The whole thing took I think 2-3 cans.


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1462928426


I also painted the guide tracks, but only on the outer surface, as I didn't want anything to impede the roller fabric. When everything was dry, I would attach these to the inner frame with double-sided tape, though I ended up eventually reinforcing this with wood screws set flush in each channel.




I had also realized, due to my wall-mounted test, that the guide tracks needed a bit of tweaking. They were set too low, so to keep the roller from dislodging I raised them about 1/2". I also noticed that they were not *quite* deep enough relative to the width of the fabric; strips of hobby board were just the right thickness to fix this. Here you can see (left to right) the whole system: base frame, hobby board, double-sided tape, guide track:




I covered the moving parts & most of the fittings during painting. Here you can see some of the keyhole hanger hardware. I had not noticed any light leakage from behind the frame while it was on the wall, but I added some inexpensive weather-stripping all the way around, just to be sure:








Next: The Artwork






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thebard 05-09-2016 04:29 PM

The Artwork
 
17 Attachment(s)
So now it was time to decide on some artwork. Going with a professionally printed roller shade would be cost-prohibitive, so I decided to paint the piece myself. This is an area I'm actually a bit more comfortable in, since I've done some oil & acrylic painting before. But, as you'll see, you don't need to be a professional to get something nice done with this setup.


We have a good deal of Asian (and "pseudo-Asian") decor in our living room: - a temple rubbing, batique, some small statues - so I thought something in keeping with this theme would be good. I scoured the internet for traditional Japanese landscape paintings, still lifes, etc. I finally settled on a silk/watercolor/ink painting of Cherry Blossoms I found at the link below, and decided to copy liberally:


http://oriental-decor.com/product/3311.html


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463077434


For the "canvas", I would need to experiment. Art canvas and rice paper in the size I wanted ranged in the $50 - $80 range, so I started instead by picking up a basic paper drop cloth and canvas drop cloth from Home Depot, $3.98 and $11.48 respectively, figuring to return whatever I didn't use:


http://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-4-ft-...2-HD/100178093
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-...9CV8/202029402

I actually ended up going with the cheapest option, the paper drop cloth. Now, admittedly this probably wouldn't work if I were imitating, say, a Monet or Picasso, but by appropriately "distressing" the paper, I should end up with a kind of rice paper look that would be very effective. The wrinkles in the folded paper might actually work to reinforce the effect.

Now to eliminate the bright-white look of the drop cloth and achieve something a bit more "aged". I experimented with a few standard spray paints, but most of the stuff the hardware stores stocked was too dark, even the ivory and tan shades. I finally found a couple candidates at Michael's. One was a Krylon shade called "Almond Satin"; it had a bit of a yellow push, and I felt it went on a bit to "regular" for the effect I wanted. I was also concerned that it was a hardware paint, designed to bond to plastic, and since the back of the drop cloth was lined with plastic I wasn't sure it was a good choice. The other option seemed to have a bit of a pink push, but it was designed for fabric and it could be applied in light coats to give a varied stain. It's called "TintIt", and the "Sepia" shade worked really well. I went through about two cans to get the texture I wanted:
http://www.michaels.com/design-maste...86_color=Sepia




Now to get the picture transfered. The nice thing about installing an art piece directly over your projector screen is that you don't need to be a pro at freehand graphic design to create a painting. I transfered the Cherry Blossom .jpg into Photoshop and resized it to 1920x1080. Then I re-mounted my frame & roller, along with the newly tinted roller shade, and projected the image onto the roller shade "canvas". Then it was just a question of using some Sharpies or fabric markers to trace an outline of the image onto the paper.
When I disassembled the frame and laid the roller shade out flat, I had a "paint-by-numbers" version of the artwork that I could fill in with acrylics. The hardest part was actually mixing the paints to the shade & darkness I wanted. The paints I used were a brand called "Cheep" purchased at a local art supply store; I got six or seven colors for around $20.





Following is a sequence of the artwork being filled in. It's important to remember not to go too thick at this stage - and I would recommend acrylic or latex as opposed to oils - since the shade will need to roll smoothly without the paint cracking once it is dry.





https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463077434




And finally here is a comparison of the original, scaled .jpg, to a photo of my shameless knock-off:









Next: Projector Screen Surface





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thebard 05-09-2016 04:30 PM

Projector Screen Surface
 
17 Attachment(s)
This is the part I would spend more time on if I had it to do again... and indeed, I'm less than satisfied with the results, so I probably *will* do it again!


My fist instinct was to use the wall behind the frame as a projection surface, but I was unhappy with both the color (really made the whites looks dingy) and texture (it's a typical orange-peel drywall paint job, but anytime there was a solid color it would really stand out). I didn't want to deal with smoothing the wall, so I opted to go with either a fabric or a painted/mounted substrate.


For starters, I got some test swatches from both Carl's and Elite. I really had high hopes for the Carl's ARL, due to some of the positive reviews I'd read. When I tried it out though, it was evident even from the 8x11 sample that it wasn't going to work for my room. On the plus side, when viewed on axis it was great... blacks were deeper, the image "popped", very impressive. However, the viewing cone was just too narrow... if you look at the sketch of my room layout in the first post, you'll see there's quite a bit of off-axis viewing from the counter/bar area, and the drop-off from this angle was just too severe to be watchable. Also, I could tell just from moving the small sample around the screen that there would be hot-spotting.


After evaluating all the samples, my top choices as far as fabric were the CineGray (which had nice, deep blacks but seemed to push the whites a bit blue) and the FlexiGray (which was very neutral, but didn't reinforce the blacks quite as much). However, since I would be mounting to a thin frame or substrate anyway, and since I have quite a bit of latex paint around the house, I decided to experiment.


For a painting surface, I decided to go with the Parkland Plastics Plas-Tex.


http://www.lowes.com/pd_72405-44905-...1&Ntt=polywall


I know that this material is pretty much deprecated as a ready-made projection surface since they changed the texture, but after evaluating it firsthand at Lowe's I decided it met my needs, since 1) I would be painting over it anyway, 2) the smooth side was *much* more low-profile than my existing wall surface, 3) the 4x8 sheet would more than accommodate my screen size, 5) it could be rolled & transported easily in my car, 6) it was thin enough to mount easily behind my frame, and 7) it was cheap. :)


For the painting (again, starting with what I had around the house), I first combined Dunn-Edwards Evershield semi-gloss deep base with some Dunn-Edwards Suprema semi-gloss white, and blended to a shade that approximated the FlexiGray. Those are the results you see here, compared to my wall: did wonders for the blacks, and the image looked great from head-on, but off axis there was an unacceptable sheen.





Then I tried some really low-grade off-brand flat white instead of the semi-gloss; this fixed the reflectivity, but it really made the whites look dirty. The stuff was really thick, so I can imagine there was quite a bit of clay content. Lastly, & what I finally settled on, was the Dunn-Edwards ultra deep gray mixed with Killz 2 Latex flat white primer, roughly matching the FelxiGray in shade. Put on top of a primer coat, this really seemed to do the trick, and honestly I very satisfied with the color for now, it's mostly my paint job that I'm unhappy with. I don't really have a good place for spraying where I am, so I was stuck with rolling, so I do notice some roller-marks when viewing off-axis, particularly on the window side of the screen.


In the future, I think I would go with a single-can solution medium gray, as I think I would have gotten similar results with a lot less work.





Next, since the projection area would be slightly inset in the frame, I applied a 2-inch strip of Carl's black felt tape around the perimeter (less than an inch of this would be visible once the frame was in place, but hopefully it would give a nice sharp border). I left the adhesive backing on at the corners, and then by slipping a sheet of cardboard behind the overlap and cutting corner-to-corner I was able to get a nice clean 45-degree cut that disappeared when applied:





Lastly, I mounted just the screen portion of the project for testing:


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463268249


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463268249






Next: Finishing & Final Mounting





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thebard 05-09-2016 04:30 PM

Finishing & Final Mounting
 
9 Attachment(s)
So now the whole thing comes together! Again, the modular system went up in three stages:

  • The projector screen surface
  • The motorized frame & art
  • The moulding
Here you can see where the keyhole hangers line up with wood screws driven into studs to secure the top of the frame. To the left is evidence of me fishing the cables through the wall so they'll be invisible once the frame is hung. You can also see the false crown moulding at the top of the picture, which is used to hide the cables running to the projector itself.




At the bottom I used L-brackets to keep the frame flush to the wall:





Important reminder notes to myself are always a good idea too...




I also decided to line the inner edge of the frame bevel with Carl's felt. This helped frame the image with a bit more contrast, and mitigated any unforeseen overspill as well:





A line of felt along the bottom of the artwork for good measure:


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463349426


And finally, the finished, mounted product:


https://www.avsforum.com/forum/attach...1&d=1463349709


Video:







Next: Summary and Expenses




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thebard 05-09-2016 04:31 PM

Summary & Expenses
 
In all, I'm happy with the finished product, and how it can be displayed unobtrusively in our living space. Any installation in an ambient light / multi-use room IMO will include some compromises. For instance, I wouldn't mind the image a little larger while projecting; but at the same time I'd like the frame a little smaller when I'm not! So I guess I have the best possible arrangement for accommodating both. I definitely think the pros outweigh the cons:



Cons

  • While the Epson does a great job of projecting an acceptable image in even fairly strong ambient light, it is lacking in deep blacks, and the image does not rival that of a dedicated room. The dark border helps, but the image still struggles with the limitations of the light-colored room.
  • The Somfy motor is rather noisy, especially in a small room like ours, But... at least it's only noisy for the short time it's moving!
  • The open-frame solution works without bowing for this relatively small screen, but may pose issues for larger screen sizes.
  • Unless you settle for a tapestry-style hanging, you are going to have a frame with this setup (and then the roller would still be visible at the top). So, not for you if you want a floating / borderless screen.


Pros


  • Dramatic and impresive when the painting rolls up to reveal an 88" screen!
  • Met all my goals of having a completely stealth screen that is invisible when not in use, without leaving a blank wall in its place.
  • Modular; if I change my mind about the screen substrate, or the moulding, or the art, or whatever down the line, I can tackle just that component.
  • IR controlled, so easily integrated into home AV setups.
  • Our neighbors assume we have the largest flat screen on the block... :)
  • Cost was *much* less than equivalent commercial solutions (see expenses, below).
  • Have I mentioned... drmatic and impressive? :cool:


Still, had I known some things going in, there are things I would have done differently:



  • I would have foregone the 2x2 at the top of the frame and replaced it with something like an aluminium strut. I was concerned about stability, mounting and potential bowing, but none of these were problems, and going with a lower-profile top brace would have let me shrink the required thickness of the frame overall, for a more sleek look.
  • I would have gone with a 1.25" diameter roller bar instead of 1.5". Since I was not sure what type of fabric I was using for the art, I was concerned about the weight of the canvas and the strength of the motor, so I went with AV Outlets recommendation for the thicker bar. But with a paper canvas, I think I could have easily used the 1.25, which would have lowered the needed profile against the wall.
  • I would have worked more on the guide tracks. They work fine, but I cut the front and back rails to the same height, and the roller shade really only tends to "jump" off the front track if it's too short. I fixed this by applying an extension tab to the top on each side, but it would have been simpler & more effective just to cut it correctly in the first place.
  • I would have spent more time & thought on the projector screen surface. I did a lot of reading on the forums here, and they were very helpful. But I assumed I would need to use rollers; in hindsight, I probably could have tarped off my carport to create a good spraying area. Even if rolling, I would have opted for a single-can solution, instead of striving for consistency with a mix.


Expenses



So how did I make out on the costs? Well, the cheapest commercial flat screen art cover I could find ran about $800, and that only covered up to about 45". Once in the 80" - 90" range, I was up to $1,100 without a frame, and $1,500 with a basic frame.


Here are my cost breakdowns (keep in mind, this assumes one already has on hand some basic tools such as: tape measure, hand tools, drill & bits, circular saw, mitre box, etc. Also, I listed no paint costs for the screen surface since I used what was on hand, so add $25-$50 accordingly).


Spoiler!


TOTAL: $428.09
So, when you factor in the projector, for about $1k I get a 1080p, 88" 3D-capable setup with a remote-controlled, motorized drop down piece of art which overall looks - I think - much more expensive than the price I paid.

Thank you all for tuning in; hopefully some info here will help someone else moving forward with a similar project. Feel free to post or PM any questions or comment!

WereWolf84 05-09-2016 04:36 PM

Wow, I like your pj screen, people won't know it's pj screen until you roll up the picture :cool:

thebard 05-09-2016 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WereWolf84 (Post 43906658)
Wow, I like your pj screen, people won't know it's pj screen until you roll up the picture :cool:

Thanks!
Now I just have to resist the urge to say something like "Take a look here at the view screen, Mr. Bond..." every time I hit the remote. Starting to annoy my wife... :p

Mrjmc99 05-09-2016 07:44 PM

This looks like something I could be interested in for my AT screen that I am considering building in my living room, and being a 120 inch screen it would need to be a larger scale, but seems doable, my wife would like the room to look normal when not watching a movie, which is why I have a roll up screen now. I will be keeping an eye on this build.

Sent from my STV100-2 using Tapatalk

khurramtm 05-12-2016 12:21 AM

Two thumbs up. Motivational stuff.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

thebard 05-12-2016 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mrjmc99 (Post 43911098)
This looks like something I could be interested in for my AT screen that I am considering building in my living room, and being a 120 inch screen it would need to be a larger scale, but seems doable, my wife would like the room to look normal when not watching a movie, which is why I have a roll up screen now. I will be keeping an eye on this build.


Quote:

Originally Posted by khurramtm (Post 43966778)
Two thumbs up. Motivational stuff.

Thank you all for the kind comments! I'm hoping to get the photos of my efforts on the artwork uploaded today.

action_jackson 05-16-2016 06:44 AM

Very impressive!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

WarHorse 05-16-2016 02:44 PM

Beautiful. Excellent workmanship.

Thanks for the well-told story.

thebard 05-17-2016 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by action_jackson (Post 44056626)
Very impressive!

Quote:

Originally Posted by WarHorse (Post 44067850)
Beautiful. Excellent workmanship.

Thanks for the well-told story.

Thank you both.
I plan on getting some video shot & linked shortly.

coaxy 05-17-2016 02:45 PM

Impressive work. Congrats

Enviado desde mi A0001 mediante Tapatalk

thebard 05-18-2016 08:33 PM

Thanks all!
Video link added:










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thebard 07-07-2016 10:33 AM

Hi all,



Well, I've been using my screen happily for a couple months now, and have a couple updates for anyone still following this thread.
  • First, I opted to go with the Elite CineGrey material for my screen surface. I was not happy with the reflective property of either my painting attempts or the various ALR samples I tested. The CineGrey I thought had the best blacks of the non-ALR grey screen materials I evaluated, and in my screen size I was able to pick it up rolled for $35. It was actually my second overall choice; the Carl's FlexiGrey seemed more neutral color-wise (though the blacks weren't quite as strong), so it looked marginally better... but not $50 better.
  • Next, I had to adjust the mounting of the Carl's black felt tape. We had record heat here in California in June, and frankly the adhesive was not up to the task. The top border started slipping, and at one point even peeled enough to impede the roller mechanism! I addressed this with some gorilla tape along the top edge, out of view behind the frame. But I would advise anyone undertaking something like this to 1) find a different tape with a better adhesive, 2) add a stronger adhesive when mounting, or 3) plan on securing the border with additional tape/staples. Upshot: I would encourage you to test it in the summer months before you consider yourself truly "done"! :p

That's all for now, thanks!

MississippiMan 07-07-2016 10:50 AM

You must not use your air conditioning much to have the ambient room temperature be high enough to loosen the aggressive adhesive Carl's Tape provides.

I've somewhat recently done 2 applications, one in Central LA and another well away from the coast in San Diego, and neither have gone bogus "Tape-wise" in over a couple years of use.

Of course they set their Thermostats at 76-78. Considering the cost of utilities in YaYa Land, I can see where watching Movies in the Nude might be an acceptable option. :p


BTW, any temps high enough to affect the Tape must be hell on a Ceiling mounted PJ :eek:

thebard 07-07-2016 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MississippiMan (Post 45210753)
You must not use your air conditioning much to have the ambient room temperature be high enough to loosen the aggressive adhesive Carl's Tape provides.

I've somewhat recently done 2 applications, one in Central LA and another well away from the coast in San Diego, and neither have gone bogus "Tape-wise" in over a couple years of use.

Of course they set their Thermostats at 76-78. Considering the cost of utilities in YaYa Land, I can see where watching Movies in the Nude might be an acceptable option. :p


BTW, any temps high enough to affect the Tape must be hell on a Ceiling mounted PJ :eek:

Yeh, no AC in our li'l California bungalow. But we're close to the water, and it's actually pretty rare that it gets that hot.
The pj is under a ceiling fan, & I've gone up there and "hand-temped" it a few times, no problems yet (fingers crossed!).

MississippiMan 07-07-2016 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thebard (Post 45211009)
Yeh, no AC in our li'l California bungalow. But we're close to the water, and it's actually pretty rare that it gets that hot.
The pj is under a ceiling fan, & I've gone up there and "hand-temped" it a few times, no problems yet (fingers crossed!).

I have a another friend who lives in town in San Diego, about a mile from the Beach. He too has no A/C because in that location it seldom hits 85 degrees because of off-shore breezes. But of course the Valley heat, it always does come in from the east when I come to visit in the Summer. :mad:

.........and even when that happens, and he has a valued House Guest...........he REFUSES to use it!:(

So I wind up drinking a massive quantity of ice cold Green Flash beer. :cool:

Growlers of the stuff!

thebard 07-07-2016 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MississippiMan (Post 45215161)
So I wind up drinking a massive quantity of ice cold Green Flash beer. :cool:

So, there is an up side... :p










Ps, if you're ever in SoCal, pm me, I'll hook you up with a few cold ones as well.
I'll even turn on the ceiling fans...

MississippiMan 07-07-2016 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thebard (Post 45217233)
So, there is an up side... :p


Ps, if you're ever in SoCal, pm me, I'll hook you up with a few cold ones as well.
I'll even turn on the ceiling fans...

To quote the Former Governator: "I'll be Baaaack." :cool:


(...probably sooner than you think! :eek: )

Danonano 07-07-2016 06:15 PM

Downright impressive. Thanks for posting. I'm in an apartment and have spent months trying to find a solution to the same problems that you face.

alb killjoy 07-07-2016 06:54 PM

That looks great. Nice job.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

thebard 07-07-2016 08:21 PM

Thanks all.

topcat2001 07-12-2016 10:41 AM

Inspirational
 
Looks great and very inspirational for me. I am just getting back into the projector game after several years and have a very similar situation with a small home and was thinking of doing something similar so it is great to see a step-by-step from someone so I know it is doable before starting. Did you get the roller bar from AVOutlets as well? I am thinking of getting a bar from Home depot and avoiding the shipping charge.

thebard 07-12-2016 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by topcat2001 (Post 45308225)
Looks great and very inspirational for me. I am just getting back into the projector game after several years and have a very similar situation with a small home and was thinking of doing something similar so it is great to see a step-by-step from someone so I know it is doable before starting. Did you get the roller bar from AVOutlets as well? I am thinking of getting a bar from Home depot and avoiding the shipping charge.

Thank you!
Yes, I got the bar at AV outlet. It's really just an aluminum tube that you cut to size, so Home Depot would save some $$.
Again, if your material isn't too heavy or large, consider going with the 1.25" instead of the 1.5", it will provide more clearance on the wall. And if you do, make sure to get the end caps in the correct size.


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