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-   -   Official Rythmik Audio Subwoofer thread (https://www.avsforum.com/forum/113-subwoofers-bass-transducers/1214550-official-rythmik-audio-subwoofer-thread.html)

chucky7 07-24-2019 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58335368)
I think there is one other aspect that plays a huge part in a lot of peoples speaker decision making and it has nothing to do with which has better sound quality. Most, if not all of the compression driver speakers being discussed are not very pleasing to look at. That fact unfortunately, really limits where someone can or would be willing to use them. In most cases it would have to be a dedicated home theater and maybe even behind a theater screen. I can't think of many people who would put them in a study or main living area and think they add to the aesthetics. I believe most feel speakers in those areas need to sound good but also look good. There is a reason as speakers ramp up in price that speaker makers go to great lengths to make them look like furniture/art.

Not all compression driver speakers are created equal. :D
https://i.imgur.com/PaTSvdH.png
https://i.imgur.com/GA2YN65.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/GewSYq5.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/P356WsW.jpg

rcohen 07-24-2019 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58335368)
I think there is one other aspect that plays a huge part in a lot of peoples speaker decision making and it has nothing to do with which has better sound quality. Most, if not all of the compression driver speakers being discussed are not very pleasing to look at. That fact unfortunately, really limits where someone can or would be willing to use them. In most cases it would have to be a dedicated home theater and maybe even behind a theater screen. I can't think of many people who would put them in a study or main living area and think they add to the aesthetics. I believe most feel speakers in those areas need to sound good but also look good. There is a reason as speakers ramp up in price that speaker makers go to great lengths to make them look like furniture/art.

Very true, and nothing wrong wrong with selecting speakers based on aesthetics. Many are works of art, like an Italian sports car, and nothing wrong with that contributing to your enjoyment.

rcohen 07-24-2019 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58335552)
Not all compression driver speakers are created equal. :D

It's in the eye of the beholder, I guess. JTR speakers won't win many beauty contests. Sure, you can put lipstick on them, but it's easier to find prettier speakers per $, if that's your priority.

Speaking of that, the Rhythmik piano gloss subs are very pretty. It seems the matte finish is more popular, though.

dinamigym 07-24-2019 10:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58335552)

Chucky,

I honestly love and respect your passion for the JTR brand brother! I also believe, by all accounts, they probably make one of the finest sounding compression driver speakers. I myself really wanted to pull the trigger and see, first hand, what they had to offer. Just, in my opinion, no matter how you slice it they are not something I, more over, my wife would ever want in a main living area. Painting the boxes just isn't enough. I understand, Jeff is probably handcuffed a bit in design options based on the internals of the speaker but I could never make it work. I am, in no way judging anyone's aesthetic tastes, but I know how hard everyone tries to hide subwoofers. My wife told me it be like trying to hide 7+ subwoofers.

chucky7 07-24-2019 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58335742)
Speaking of that, the Rythmik piano gloss subs are very pretty. It seems the matte finish is more popular, though.

Piano lacquer finish is definitely very pretty to look at. It's the additional cost (BTW, @ $250, very reasonable for the FV15HP) and upkeep that shy customers away. The finish is a fingerprint magnet and eventually becomes swirl mark galore.

dinamigym 07-24-2019 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58335970)
Piano lacquer finish is definitely very pretty to look at. It's the additional cost (BTW, @ $250, very reasonable for the FV15HP) and upkeep that shy customers away. The finish is a fingerprint magnet and eventually becomes swirl mark galore.

I have the Matte finish. That being said I, hands down, prefer piano black. You are 100% correct... it is a giant upkeep nightmare and no matter how careful swirl city!

chucky7 07-24-2019 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58336010)
I have the Matte finish. That being said I, hands down, prefer piano black. You are 100% correct... it is a giant upkeep nightmare and no matter how careful swirl city!

I saw the FV25HP's matte finish at tuner1129's. It reminded me of Hsu Research's matte black finish, which I am a big fan of.

I think you just don't like how the waveguide or horn look on HE speakers. :D

rcohen 07-24-2019 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58336158)
I saw the FV25HP's matte finish at tuner1129's. It reminded me of Hsu Research's matte black finish, which I am a big fan of.

I think you just don't like how the waveguide or horn look on HE speakers. :D

They say sometimes ugly is sexy. For speakers that sound like that, I have to agree. :)

dinamigym 07-24-2019 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58336158)
I saw the FV25HP's matte finish at tuner1129's. It reminded me of Hsu Research's matte black finish, which I am a big fan of.

I think you just don't like how the waveguide or horn look on HE speakers. :D

You are probably dead on! The only thing I can compare, which I have no doubt the JTR performs better, is a Klipsch speaker. Those I can make work aesthetically. Maybe it's not possible from an engineering standpoint. I'm absolutely not qualified to say, but if the JTR could approach the look of a Klipsch I, my wife, would find it 100% workable.

rcohen 07-24-2019 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58336262)
You are probably dead on! The only thing I can compare, which I have no doubt the JTR performs better, is a Klipsch speaker. Those I can make work aesthetically. Maybe it's not possible from an engineering standpoint. I'm absolutely not qualified to say, but if the JTR could approach the look of a Klipsch I, my wife, would find it 100% workable.

Klipsch sounds totally different, although I've heard they have improved recently.

There are lots of pretty speakers out there to choose from. Some of them sound great, too.

dinamigym 07-24-2019 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58336480)
Klipsch sounds totally different, although I've heard they have improved recently.

There are lots of pretty speakers out there to choose from. Some of them sound great, too.

I'm talking hypothetically. Not interested in Klipsch, however, I'd argue you can easily have both great sound and great looks. No need to sacrifice either. Unless your implying that nothing that looks good sounds as good as JTR then I'd have to disagree...

Again, not in any way bagging on the JTR speakers. I'm just saying, for me and many I know, the aesthetics are a sticking point. As they say though..."Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."

rcohen 07-24-2019 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58336490)
I'd argue you can easily have both great sound and great looks. No need to sacrifice either.

Totally, particularly if you're willing to pay for both. Those pretty enclosures are $ and labor intensive.

JTR speakers are beautiful on the inside. If that's where you want all the $ to go, perfect. If not, there are much prettier speakers to choose from.

I used to have some Sonus Faber Amatis. Those were pretty speakers! Beautiful curved cherry lacquer wood. My (young) daughter cried when I sold them and bought the ugly JTRs. What an improvement in sound, though! My daughter doesn't get a vote. :)

Soulburner 07-24-2019 01:15 PM

The comments I've heard regarding the sound of JTR are due to time alignment and the BMS annular compression driver being second to none, but very expensive. Maybe I'll get to hear them this year. I know a guy who owns them and swears by them for most things - however he says his Vapor Sundogs (with ribbons) are his reference for music.

As far as aesthetics: would a veneer and a cloth grille be enough to get the wife on board?

rcohen 07-24-2019 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58336490)
I'm talking hypothetically. Not interested in Klipsch, however, I'd argue you can easily have both great sound and great looks. No need to sacrifice either. Unless your implying that nothing that looks good sounds as good as JTR then I'd have to disagree...

Budget? Listening material? Music/movies mix? Room size? What types of speakers do you like?

Enrico's suggestion for Sierra RAALs might be perfect for your living room, particularly with subs.

dinamigym 07-24-2019 01:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58336562)
Totally, particularly if you're willing to pay for both. Those pretty enclosures are $ and labor intensive.

JTR speakers are beautiful on the inside. If that's where you want all the $ to go, perfect. If not, there are much prettier speakers to choose from.

I used to have some Sonus Faber Amatis. Those were pretty speakers! Beautiful curved cherry lacquer wood. My (young) daughter cried when I sold them and bought the ugly JTRs. What an improvement in sound, though! My daughter doesn't get a vote. :)

Ha! I think the hardest part of this hobby in many respects is it seems it's always a compromise. When we are single and can live in a cave we are broke and then well...you know! :)

anjunadeep 07-24-2019 01:34 PM

If aesthetics are an issue and you want JTRs, just get veneered Single 8 HTs and put a grill on. The output on them is plenty to fill a huge room as LCRs. I hear people talk about bigger speakers as though they'll give more "midbass slam", but super sensitive small JTRs are going to be able to produce reference volume and then some all through the midrange. The rest is just going to go unused.

No sense to rattle the wife when you don't have to. Save the battles for something that makes a difference.

Madmax67 07-24-2019 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58334588)
I have to disagree that all compression drivers have an inherent sound character that isn't warm, or isn't ideal for certain types of music. Many specific speakers certainly do, but some speakers using compression drivers have spectacular neutral and smooth sound, just with superior dynamics. Some examples are JTR 3-way speakers (210RT, 215RT, 212HTR, etc) and JBL M2, 708, 4367. Those speakers lack nothing in terms of sound quality.


Quote:

Originally Posted by enricoclaudio (Post 58329564)
Again, this is my personal experience



Quote:

I have heard Sierras w/RAAL and I agree that they are great sounding and beautiful looking speakers. They can't match the dynamics of great sounding speakers using high end compression drivers and an order of magnitude more output capability, though.
Dynamics in a speaker isn't just about output.

Quote:

I used to blame my audiofooledya speakers for being "too revealing" for "bad recordings" and making them sound dull. It turned out that those speakers lacked dynamics and didn't have a flat frequency response.
Fixed that for ya[emoji6].

Quote:

I think it's more accurate to say that non-neutral speakers that favor certain frequencies will sound "more clear" or "more revealing" to certain recordings. It's just a trick where they are emphasizing key parts of certain recordings, and not something I want in my speakers.
Neutral doesn't have to mean flat as Harman's research as shown but I understand the type of speaker sound you are referring to.

Quote:

I haven't heard PSAs, but I understand that they deliver impressive dynamics and a great value, although I don't believe they are neutral sounding speakers.
Looks pretty neutral to me. Does to the reviewer as well but definitely highly placement sensitive.

Quote:

I will give you this...compression driver speakers that match or beat the Sierra RAAL sound quality tend to be more expensive. They generally require more expensive components and very talented designers. The compression drivers and horns are flexible tools, though, and can be used to achieve lots of different types of results.
Horns are extremely placement sensitive but I doubt that a sound engineer didn't properly place his in a well treated room. Every speaker design is a compromise period end of story. There is no speaker designed with a budget in mind that isn't a compromise for some type of content. You just have to try to minimize those compromises as much as that budget allows.

Best thing with those PSA speakers is they roll off at 400HZ necessitating a good subwoofer. That's where Rythmik or PSA itself can both come in for the win! See what I did there[emoji57].

EDIT: For some reason that link keeps going to the preview of the actual review and not the review itself for the PSA MTM-210 with actual measurements so here's the link to the reviewer and all his reviews.

dinamigym 07-24-2019 01:54 PM

Official Rythmik Audio Subwoofer thread
 
I believe we all can agree if we could buy our “end game” gear and design/build a room for it after it would be a lot simpler. When it happens the other way around like it does for most of us it becomes a whole lot of compromises. For example, in my room my FV25s...I have one place to put them and one place only. Doesn’t matter how much I sub crawl. [emoji23] Some of the performance sacrifices that come with that I just have to live with. I throw speakers into that mix also...pretty much anything you can’t hide in a closet from a spouse! :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Madmax67 07-24-2019 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dinamigym (Post 58336710)
I believe we all can agree if we could buy our “end game” gear and design/build a room for it after it would be a lot simpler. When it happens the other way around like it does for most of us it becomes a whole lot of compromises. For example, in my room my FV25s...I have one place to put them and one place only. Doesn’t matter how much I sub crawl. [emoji23] Some of the performance sacrifices that come with that I just have to live with. I throw speakers into that mix also...pretty much anything you can’t hide in a closet from a spouse! :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yeah but with the modal region you're hearing mostly the room. With full range speakers you hear the speakers pretty much regardless of the room. What's different is our ears and our personal biases/ preferences in sound and genre.

rcohen 07-24-2019 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58336670)
Dynamics in a speaker isn't just about output.

When I use that word, I'm talking about the ability to play clean at high volume. No compression or other distortion. Real life audio has surprisingly high dynamic range. Movies have high dynamic range. Radio music is generally lower, but it varies a lot, depending on the recording.

In general, I find that great dynamics contribute to a more lifelike sound, and less of a speaker sound. Also, I find that speakers with great dynamics seem to be able to make a lot of radio recording still sound fun and dynamic - particularly stuff like rock, dance, rap, techno, etc. I'm not sure why on that one.

Another factor here is that the more controlled directivity means less ambiance and more micro-dynamics. Aside from playing flat and clean, I think the RAAL's very narrow directivity may contribute to the impression of detail.

Narrow directivity also helps with speech intelligibility - nice for movies.

There is some personal taste involved here, because some people prefer more ambiance.

JTR directivity is on the more narrow side of the spectrum, with an emphasis on consistent off-axis response particularly for the 3-way models - a benefit of the coaxial compression driver + horn. The M2 uses a sort of similar dual diaphragm compression driver (doesn't go quite as low), but a different horn design, of course. The M2 also has a wider directivity.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58336670)
Neutral doesn't have to mean flat as Harman's research as shown but I understand the type of speaker sound you are referring to.

It depends on whether we're talking about anechoic response or in-room response. Neutral=Flat for anechoic, not flat for in-room.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58336670)
Looks pretty neutral to me. Does to the reviewer as well but definitely highly placement sensitive.

I don't have any experience with PSAs, so I'll take your word for it. Never mind any of my PSA comments. That said, I didn't see any measurements in your link. Did I overlook them?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58336670)
Horns are extremely placement sensitive but I doubt that a sound engineer didn't properly place his in a well treated room.

Hmm...that's interesting. My experience is that the best sounding locations for my JTRs are different than they were for other speakers. I chalked that up to the more controlled directivity. Maybe?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58336670)
Best thing with those PSA speakers is they roll off at 400HZ necessitating a good subwoofer. That's where Rythmik or PSA itself can both come in for the win! See what I did there[emoji57].

400hz...wow. Did you mean 40hz?

drh3b 07-24-2019 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58336794)
400hz...wow. Did you mean 40hz?

The bookshelf version starts rolling off at 80 Hz, and the tower version at 70 iirc.

gadgtfreek 07-24-2019 04:15 PM

Since it was brough up, I went from Klipsch Rf7II's and RC64II's to PSA MTM210 LCR's. The Klipsch would wear on me over the course of a movie, it seems the older I got, and I loved the MTM's. I needed space when I moved so I went to the new RP line, and they are outstanding, and do not wear on my ears. Whatever Klipsch changed with the new line works for me.

Madmax67 07-24-2019 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58336794)
When I use that word, I'm talking about the ability to play clean at high volume. No compression or other distortion. Real life audio has surprisingly high dynamic range. Movies have high dynamic range. Radio music is generally lower, but it varies a lot, depending on the recording.

I'm aware of all that but it's not purely output that dictates how well that will sound.

Quote:

In general, I find that great dynamics contribute to a more lifelike sound, and less of a speaker sound. Also, I find that speakers with great dynamics seem to be able to make a lot of radio recording still sound fun and dynamic - particularly stuff like rock, dance, rap, techno, etc. I'm not sure why on that one.
Don't disagree with any of this. Just disagree that it's mostly based on output. You need both micro and macro dynamics.

Quote:

Another factor here is that the more controlled directivity means less ambiance and more micro-dynamics. Aside from playing flat and clean, I think the RAAL's very narrow directivity may contribute to the impression of detail.
I believe their narrow directivity is mostly vertical meaning lining your ear up with the tweeter is more important. Horns just load a room completely differently than ribbons do. I like how both sound in different ways. Would love to hear both the PSA and JTR's versions.

Quote:

Narrow directivity also helps with speech intelligibility - nice for movies.
Agree. Also movies handle dialogue so badly these days it's criminal. It's like they're intentionally trying not to let us hear the actors talk anymore.

Quote:

There is some personal taste involved here, because some people prefer more ambiance.
And add in the personal taste involved in sighted listening tests. Taste for a driver design, taste for a brand, taste for a cabinet type etc....

Quote:

It depends on whether we're talking about anechoic response or in-room response. Neutral=Flat for anechoic, not flat for in-room.
Since quasi anechoic in the consumer world probably means either being in an extremely large warehouse or outdoors mic'd 15 feet up in the air I'm talking in room where the rising bass response helps based on how we perceive sound. The circle of confusion as to what's an accurately reproducing speaker aside.

Quote:

I don't have any experience with PSAs, so I'll take your word for it. Never mind any of my PSA comments. That said, I didn't see any measurements in your link. Did I overlook them?
Yeah, I don't know what's up with that as I'm not linking to the pre review article. Changed browsers twice and it still goes to the wrong page so something's wrong with HTS's URL linking. I added a link directly to the reviewer's list instead. The PSA is included along with other interesting reviews of all types. I haven't ever heard them either. I've just followed them out of interest in speakers in general. They're unfortunately not in my audio budget. Plus my room is too small for an LCR of them across my front soundstage. Maybe the books would fit better but I don't personally like books as mains.

Quote:

400hz...wow. Did you mean 40hz?
It's mentioned in the review. I never said it's -3dB point was 400 HZ[emoji6]. Those are still bass regions and it's a sealed design. Anyways good discussion but back to discussing Rythmik sub's and maybe their own speakers in the future? Who knows.

darthray 07-24-2019 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chucky7 (Post 58335970)
Piano lacquer finish is definitely very pretty to look at. It's the additional cost (BTW, @ $250, very reasonable for the FV15HP) and upkeep that shy customers away. The finish is a fingerprint magnet and eventually becomes swirl mark galore.


+1

True enough if you have curious finger, like kids. Somehow my Cats paws, barely leave a mark on my aperion piano finish. While dust can be taken care of quickly, using some Lemon Pledge with a soft cloth. Since dust show-up quickly on this type of finish. Fingers prints, require more work to bring them back to their original shine.


Darth

rcohen 07-24-2019 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Madmax67 (Post 58337462)
Agree. Also movies handle dialogue so badly these days it's criminal. It's like they're intentionally trying not to let us hear the actors talk anymore.

This is an interesting point. I used to fill the same way before the JTR speakers, bumping up the center gain, constantly adjusting the volume control., etc.

After those speakers, the problem vanished. Voice sounds like someone is in the room with you, crystal clear. I was really surprised. Perhaps it's a matter of those horns reducing wall reflections.

There were actually a couple other contributing factors...

I disabled DynamicEQ, since that was causing havoc with my frequency response, cutting mids. There may be a way to get that anchored properly, but it was too frustrating to calibrate everything to a moving target.

I also had a problem setting sub gain so that I would get satisfying bass in music without making male voices sound unnatural and boomy. No sub gain and crossover setting would give me what I wanted. Once I switched to Dirac, which would gave precise control over the target curve, I was quickly able to find a curve that gave me satisfying bass for music and movies, while still maintaining very natural sounding male voices. Now that new versions of Audyssey gives you this kind of control, I'd encourage everyone to give that a try. With the right curve, you can have you cake and eat it too! (Glad I was able to get a little more on topic.)

Soulburner 07-24-2019 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58337516)
This is an interesting point. I used to fill the same way before the JTR speakers, bumping up the center gain, constantly adjusting the volume control., etc.

After those speakers, the problem vanished. Voice sounds like someone is in the room with you, crystal clear. I was really surprised. Perhaps it's a matter of those horns reducing wall reflections.

I would be curious to see if just adding a narrower directivity center speaker like a JTR, PSA, or even Klipsch or an HSU HC-1 MK2 on a budget, would boost dialogue clarity in most systems for the reason you stated. It makes sense, letting your other speakers handle the big job of filling the room.

I would hope the mismatch wouldn't become distracting at any point.

rcohen 07-24-2019 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soulburner (Post 58338200)
I would be curious to see if just adding a narrower directivity center speaker like a JTR, PSA, or even an HSU HC-1 MK2 on a budget, would boost dialogue clarity in most systems for the reason you stated. It makes sense, letting your other speakers handle the big job of filling the room.

I would hope the mismatch wouldn't become distracting at any point.

If your LCRs aren't a set, you can end up with group delay (frequency dependent phase) differences between speakers when sound pans between them, causing cancellation. Not ideal. I wouldn't recommend it.

A few more ideas:

1) Make sure your LCRs are time-aligned at the main listening position. Audyssey does a good job at that.
2) Add absorption at first reflection points.
3) If you have coffee table, change it to a cushioned ottoman, and just use trey tables when you need a surface for food or drinks. Coffee tables are the worst for dialog clarity.
4) If you have a hard floor, try a rug.
5) As I said before, disable Audyssey DynamicEQ, if you have that on. It cuts midrange, which is bad for dialog clarity.
6) Try phantom center, to see if that's better. Lots of people would be better off with a phantom center, but never try it.
7) Look closely at EQ, and make sure you're not attenuating mids.
8) Take a measurement with REW, so you can see if anything odd is going on with your frequency response.
9) Are your speakers angled at the MLP? More sound aimed at you and less sound aimed at the walls and floor will help.
10) Turn off any sound "enhancing" features in your receiver.

It's usually an issue with reflections or frequency response.

javan robinson 07-25-2019 01:20 PM

Eye just wanted to pop in and say that for my MTM-210's +MT-110's, paired with my Rythmik FV25hp, for movies, and yes music sounds great. The speakers themselves do not have much bass, but that's what the FV25hp is for ;).

And I listen to a wide variety of hip hop, electronica, synth, etc. I came from a pair of Paradigm Monitor 9 v7's which were dome tweeters.

Listening to them now at low volume, and all is well :)

Soulburner 07-25-2019 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcohen (Post 58338218)
If your LCRs aren't a set, you can end up with group delay (frequency dependent phase) differences between speakers when sound pans between them, causing cancellation. Not ideal. I wouldn't recommend it.

A few more ideas:

1) Make sure your LCRs are time-aligned at the main listening position. Audyssey does a good job at that.
2) Add absorption at first reflection points.
3) If you have coffee table, change it to a cushioned ottoman, and just use trey tables when you need a surface for food or drinks. Coffee tables are the worse for dialog clarity.
4) If you have a hard floor, try a rug.
5) As I said before, disable AudysseyEQ, if you have that on.
6) Try phantom center, to see if that's better. Lots of people would be better off with a phantom center, but never try it.
7) Look closely at EQ, and make sure you're not attenuating mids.
8) Take a measurement with REW, so you can see if anything odd is going on with your frequency response.
9) Are your speakers angled at the MLP? More sound aimed at you and less sound aimed at the walls and floor will help.
10) Turn off any sound "enhancing" features in your receiver.

It's usually an issue with reflections or frequency response.

This is a good list. A couple of issues, though.


0a) How often do these LCR pans occur, though? In my experience, not often, but there are a lot of films I haven't seen.
2a) If you have speakers that measure really well off-axis, adding absorption at the first reflection points will reduce spaciousness and make your system/room sound smaller. Is it worth the tradeoff?
9a) Normally, you would position your speakers for best imaging and the perfect spot can be a very precise location and angle. I wouldn't start compromising that in the name of movie dialogue, but that's me.

rcohen 07-25-2019 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soulburner (Post 58341892)
This is a good list. A couple of issues, though.


0a) How often do these LCR pans occur, though? In my experience, not often, but there are a lot of films I haven't seen.
2a) If you have speakers that measure really well off-axis, adding absorption at the first reflection points will reduce spaciousness and make your system/room sound smaller. Is it worth the tradeoff?
9a) Normally, you would position your speakers for best imaging and the perfect spot can be a very precise location and angle. I wouldn't start compromising that in the name of movie dialogue, but that's me.

0a) By pans, I mean audio positioned between two speakers, not a dynamic pan. It happens every time the source isn't 100% centered on the screen.

2a) Yes, there is a tradeoff between ambiance and dialog clarity - up to you.

9a) I'm not sure why there would be an imaging vs dialog clarity tradeoff. Why can't you have both?

p.s. I meant Audyssey DynamicEQ, not MultiEQ. MultiEQ often helps dialog clarity.


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