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post #1 of 7 Old 02-12-2020, 05:16 AM - Thread Starter
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Power Requirements in Reference to Listening Volume

Hi all,

I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?

I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.

Some background info -
Movies only
Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling
Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).
Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position
Most interested in bass quality over quantity

Thanks for the help!
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-12-2020, 05:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joegeeze View Post
Hi all,



I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?



I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.



Some background info -

Movies only

Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling

Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).

Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position

Most interested in bass quality over quantity



Thanks for the help!


Sitting that close and not blasting at ear-killing levels you wont use much power at all. Very short version is each 3dB volume increase is a doubling of power(in room a bit less) so you can get somewhat high with very little power drawn. Distance and volume costs power and you have very short distance and probably moderate volume.
The millisecond(s) peak wattage is not really drawn instantly from the wall, its “reserves” in the amp.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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post #3 of 7 Old 02-12-2020, 05:33 AM
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A thick rug would probably help a lot with acoustics if you have a lot of echo.
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post #4 of 7 Old 02-12-2020, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joegeeze View Post
Hi all,

I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?

I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.

Some background info -
Movies only
Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling
Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).
Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position
Most interested in bass quality over quantity

Thanks for the help!
Short answer, no.

The PB-2000 frequency response is spec'd at 17-260 Hz +/- 3 dB .

That specification tells you that the unit will maintain that frequency bandwidth within a +/- 3dB variation.

The actual frequency bandwidth is typically greater than what is reported but so will the +/- variation.

The +/- 3dB” spec is used when referencing the frequency response as a standard of sorts. The theory is that a 3dB difference is a barley perceptible change relative to ones hearing ability. So a speaker whose response curve lies within that tolerance window is considered to be a reasonably accurate speaker with regards to frequency response.

Volume or Gain is different and is a relative value. In other words, your PB-2000 should maintain that frequency response curve regardless of the volume playback level within the practical limits of the unit.

Again, watts used and the volume or sound pressure level desired or required is a relative issue. Sound pressure level is subject to the Inverse Square Law. If you double the distance from the source/speaker, the SPL would drop by 6dB. To compensate for the lower SPL at the increased distance, you would increase the signal gain or volume from the amplifier to reach the same SPL that was measured at the shorter distance.

In typical listening situations, you're using very few watts of power and often only fractions of a watt. You'll almost never use the "1100 peak watts" Your 120v 15A circuit should be fine.
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post #5 of 7 Old 02-12-2020, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joegeeze View Post
Hi all,

I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?

I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.

Some background info -
Movies only
Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling
Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).
Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position
Most interested in bass quality over quantity

Thanks for the help!
Which AVR are you using?
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post #6 of 7 Old 02-13-2020, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Which AVR are you using?[/QUOTE]

Sony STR-DH740
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post #7 of 7 Old 02-13-2020, 07:22 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeliemix View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by joegeeze View Post
Hi all,



I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?



I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.



Some background info -

Movies only

Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling

Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).

Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position

Most interested in bass quality over quantity



Thanks for the help!


Sitting that close and not blasting at ear-killing levels you wont use much power at all. Very short version is each 3dB volume increase is a doubling of power(in room a bit less) so you can get somewhat high with very little power drawn. Distance and volume costs power and you have very short distance and probably moderate volume.
The millisecond(s) peak wattage is not really drawn instantly from the wall, its “reserves” in the amp.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Quote:
Originally Posted by b curry View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by joegeeze View Post
Hi all,

I have a question involving wattage, Hz and dB for a sub. The SVS PB-2000 (not the new Pro model), for example, can reach down to 17Hz and its amp has 1100 peak wattage. Is that peak wattage required to reach down to 17Hz no matter what dB the content is playing at? In other words, if I don't listen at reference level will all 1100 watts still be required to reach down to 17Hz during those peak moments?

I'm asking because I want to buy the PB-2000, but I don't know if there is enough free space amps wise on the circuit that it has to be plugged into in terms of peak wattage. I know the peak wattage is only needed for a split second or two, but I'd still like to know I am within that constraint. There is enough space on the circuit for the 500 continuous wattage that's needed. I don't know what volume level I listen at because my receiver shows volume as an absolute value. But if anyone knows how absolute volume equates to relative volume, I have never turned it up past 30.

Some background info -
Movies only
Listening area is in the basement with linoleum on top of a concrete floor, sheetrock on the walls and ceiling
Listening position is less than 5 ft from my front 3 speakers (classified as Small in the receiver).
Sub placement will be less than 3ft from the listening position
Most interested in bass quality over quantity

Thanks for the help!
Short answer, no.

The PB-2000 frequency response is spec'd at 17-260 Hz +/- 3 dB .

That specification tells you that the unit will maintain that frequency bandwidth within a +/- 3dB variation.

The actual frequency bandwidth is typically greater than what is reported but so will the +/- variation.

The +/- 3dB” spec is used when referencing the frequency response as a standard of sorts. The theory is that a 3dB difference is a barley perceptible change relative to ones hearing ability. So a speaker whose response curve lies within that tolerance window is considered to be a reasonably accurate speaker with regards to frequency response.

Volume or Gain is different and is a relative value. In other words, your PB-2000 should maintain that frequency response curve regardless of the volume playback level within the practical limits of the unit.

Again, watts used and the volume or sound pressure level desired or required is a relative issue. Sound pressure level is subject to the Inverse Square Law. If you double the distance from the source/speaker, the SPL would drop by 6dB. To compensate for the lower SPL at the increased distance, you would increase the signal gain or volume from the amplifier to reach the same SPL that was measured at the shorter distance.

In typical listening situations, you're using very few watts of power and often only fractions of a watt. You'll almost never use the "1100 peak watts" Your 120v 15A circuit should be fine.
Thanks for the info!
joegeeze is offline  
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