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post #31441 of 31554 Old 08-16-2019, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Mullen View Post
Sure it's a good idea. I've seen polarity reversals in amplifiers (rare) and also in XLR cables (more common).


I believe Emotiva all reverse polarity with their amps via XLR. No issue with RCA.


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post #31442 of 31554 Old 08-16-2019, 06:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post
I believe Emotiva all reverse polarity with their amps via XLR. No issue with RCA.


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Here's what I learn about XLR polarity

Many years ago, there was two different standard. The north America one, and the European one. And yes they were reverse to each other. But as time pass on, one standard was a adapted. Way before Emotiva became a company. Unless having very old equipment using XLR connection, using reverse polarity before it became standard. I think most of us are very safe and worry free, with XLR connections just has RCA.


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post #31443 of 31554 Old 08-16-2019, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darthray View Post
Here's what I learn about XLR polarity

Many years ago, there was two different standard. The north America one, and the European one. And yes they were reverse to each other. But as time pass on, one standard was a adapted. Way before Emotiva became a company. Unless having very old equipment using XLR connection, using reverse polarity before it became standard. I think most of us are very safe and worry free, with XLR connections just has RCA.


Darth

Someone can correct me if I’m wrong but
the European standard with pin 2 hot has become the accepted standard but for some reason Emotiva has stuck with the old North American configuration while everyone else has moved on.


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post #31444 of 31554 Old 08-17-2019, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by CBdicX View Post
Hi, is a frontfire subwoofer a better and more powerfull (pushes more air into the room) subwoofer setup then a downfire ?
I ask this because all the "big" subwoofer brands use frontfire.
The brands that look to optical solutions use often downfire or something else then frontfire.

Hi,

FWIW, I honestly don't think that one is better than another. The biggest advantage to front-firing ports, in my opinion, is for people who enjoy feeling the port wind that may be palpable at high SPL's, with frequencies playing somewhat close to the port tune.

For instance, PSA has recently introduced a new line of subwoofers called TV36's. They are very large and powerful, dual 18" subwoofers, with a port pointing downward on the bottom of a tall cabinet. In a few months, that same company will be introducing even taller, dual 21" subs, with a down-firing port. They will be called TV42's.

The point I am making with the above example is that different designers find different ways to get the port length they are looking for, while minimizing port turbulence. Some bend the port right at the bottom, to point in the same direction as the driver, or they curve the port gently and gradually, as Nathan Funk has just done in a recent 24" driver design. Or, they may maintain a straight front-firing port (which aligns with the driver), as the SVS PB subs do. Or, they maintain a straight down-firing port, as the SVS cylinders and the new PSA subs do.

As long as the port length and port diameter provide the tuning point required, and the port turbulence (laminar flow) is minimized, there doesn't seem to be any inherent design advantage to front-firing versus down-firing, other than the potential one mentioned in the first paragraph. I believe that everyone would agree that it is easier to get a smooth air flow, with less internal turbulence, with a straight port. But, clever designers seem to be able to work around that issue in different ways.

In other words, it really doesn't make much difference (other than some potential tactile response) which way drivers or ports point.

Regards,
Mike
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post #31445 of 31554 Old 08-17-2019, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post
Someone can correct me if I’m wrong but
the European standard with pin 2 hot has become the accepted standard but for some reason Emotiva has stuck with the old North American configuration while everyone else has moved on.


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Straight from an Emotiva amp manual:

"The XLR Balanced inputs on all of the XPA Gen3 amplifier modules are wired according to the
European polarity/phase standard.
"
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post #31446 of 31554 Old 08-17-2019, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mthomas47 View Post
Hi,

FWIW, I honestly don't think that one is better than another. The biggest advantage to front-firing ports, in my opinion, is for people who enjoy feeling the port wind that may be palpable at high SPL's, with frequencies playing somewhat close to the port tune.

For instance, PSA has recently introduced a new line of subwoofers called TV36's. They are very large and powerful, dual 18" subwoofers, with a port pointing downward on the bottom of a tall cabinet. In a few months, that same company with be introducing even taller, dual 21" subs, with a down-firing port. They will be called TV42's.

The point I am making with the above example is that different designers find different ways to get the port length they are looking for, while minimizing port turbulence. Some bend the port right at the bottom, to point in the same direction as the driver, or they curve the port gently and gradually, as Nathan Funk has just done in a recent 24" driver design. Or, they may maintain a straight front-firing port (which aligns with the driver), as the SVS PB subs do. Or, they maintain a straight down-firing port, as the SVS cylinders and the new PSA subs do.

As long as the port length and port diameter provide the tuning point required, and the port turbulence (laminar flow) is minimized, there doesn't seem to be any inherent design advantage to front-firing versus down-firing, other than the potential one mentioned in the first paragraph. I believe that everyone would agree that it is easier to get a smooth air flow, with less internal turbulence, with a straight port. But, clever designers seem to be able to work around that issue in different ways.

Regards,
Mike
Hi Mike,

thanks for your reply.
I am not talking about the ports, just the driver.
I have now a Magnat sub with the driver on the front and the ports on the back.
They also make a simmeler model, same driver size, but then the driver as downfire and also the ports on the back.
(just like what BK subs are doing)

Will this make any differents in performance (pressure) one over the other ?

Thanks,
Dick

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post #31447 of 31554 Old 08-17-2019, 05:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milt99 View Post
Straight from an Emotiva amp manual:

"The XLR Balanced inputs on all of the XPA Gen3 amplifier modules are wired according to the
European polarity/phase standard."
Thanks for looking this-up
Make sense, if not there equipment could not be mix with other brands like many of us do. Using XLR connections on our Subs and AVP/Amps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post
Someone can correct me if I’m wrong but
the European standard with pin 2 hot has become the accepted standard but for some reason Emotiva has stuck with the old North American configuration while everyone else has moved on.

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While last night I was 99% sure it was the European standard, that became the new norm.
I was missing the 1%, and tonight pull my manual from my AV7702mkII. Since it was using the European standard, to check my notes.
So Yes the European standard was the one adopted.


Darth

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post #31448 of 31554 Old 08-17-2019, 10:13 PM
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Official SVS Owners/Support Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Milt99 View Post
Straight from an Emotiva amp manual:



"The XLR Balanced inputs on all of the XPA Gen3 amplifier modules are wired according to the

European polarity/phase standard.
"


From the “Emotiva Updates XPA Amplifiers to Generation 3” thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by DOC1963 View Post
The Emotiva owners manual in not correct. Emotiva has never followed the "European/Japanese" standard (which is "the" industry wide EIA standard for audio).



For their amps, Emotiva does not wire pin 2 hot, but instead uses the old "pin 3 hot" USA configuration which, when mixed with XLR components that do follow the correct "standard", results in reversed polarity at the speaker outputs.



If you are using one Emotiva branded amp to drive your entire system, then there is no big concern as your speakers are all still in "relative" phase to each other. Your bigger concern will be whether your subwoofer is "in phase" with your mains. The easiest way to check this is to download (or generate) a tone specifically made for your crossover frequency (for example... a 80Hz tone for an 80Hz crossover point), play the tone and (using an SPL meter) adjust the phase control on your subwoofer until it reads the loudest.



If you were using multiple amps made by different manufacturers, then the problem becomes a little more complicated. If those manufacturers follow the correct "pin 2 hot" EIA standard (and they obviously should... and would), then your speakers have now lost "relative phase". To regain relative phase, simply reverse the +/- speaker wire polarity at the back of the EMOTIVA amp or at the back of the speakers being driven by that amp.



FWIW, this has been Emotiva's design choice going all the way back to their very first generation of amps. At that time, "pin 2 hot" was the adopted standard. They say they have their reasons for doing this, but, IMO, this should have been corrected years ago. What's more interesting is that all of their preamps and processors use the correct EIA pinout standard. Go figure.



Hope this helps...





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post #31449 of 31554 Old 08-18-2019, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by jima4a View Post
I believe Emotiva all reverse polarity with their amps via XLR. No issue with RCA.

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All electronics using balanced connections should comply with AES (Audio Engineering Society) convention. It’s been the standard in the USA for over 30 years now and was specifically written to avoid polarity reversal in the signal chain when using balanced connections. Here is the preview of the actual AES standard. The full document is available from the AES website for $30 (free to members).

The AES adopted a standard of 'pin 2 hot' and 'pin 3 cold' back in 1992. While some of the earliest American companies had used Pin 3 hot, many others had already adopted Pin 2 hot long before the AES standard was issued. It is virtually a universal standard now for both USA and Europe.

I'm not sure what amps the OP is using - but it's definitely worth checking (both amp and cables) if he is using XLR.
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post #31450 of 31554 Old 08-18-2019, 03:35 PM
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Funny, I emailed SVS about what their pinout config was on subs with XLR inputs.
I'm buying 2 SB-4000s this fall and wanted to know
He replied almost verbatim to his post above.
Replying to random, piddling emails on a Sunday is commendable.

Using terms like Euro\Japanese\American standards for this, unless you've read them, is non-specific to me.

Like Ed posted, the AES standard is Pin 2 + & Pin 3 -.

Emotiva front-end gear, pre-amps, processors etal., is Pin 2 +.
All of their power amps are Pin 3 +, to which a rep said "There were good engineering reasons for this choice originally; and we have continued it so all of our amps are consistent."

For me, the point is I make make own cables and whether it makes an audible difference or not, I'd prefer to be consistent throughout the audio chain with the polarity of the cabling.
Yeah, I'm a bit OCD & freely admit to it.

Everything in my current system has XLR connections, all of them with the exception of the Emotiva amps is configured with Pin 2 +.
That is all I really wanted to find out when the topic seemingly came out of nowhere

 

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post #31451 of 31554 Old 08-18-2019, 08:15 PM
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Interesting. All my speakers are powered by Emotiva amps through RCA not XLR, so it seems unlikely that would be the issue.
I'll take my power amps out of the equation and measure again to see if anything changes.

Besides that how would I test for signal inversion, an oscilloscope?

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post #31452 of 31554 Old 08-18-2019, 09:44 PM
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Official SVS Owners/Support Thread.

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Originally Posted by DarkEnigma View Post
Interesting. All my speakers are powered by Emotiva amps through RCA not XLR, so it seems unlikely that would be the issue.

I'll take my power amps out of the equation and measure again to see if anything changes.



Besides that how would I test for signal inversion, an oscilloscope?


RCAs would not be an issue, only XLRs. TMK the outer conductor is negative and the inner positive which is consistent with rest of industry.


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post #31453 of 31554 Old 08-18-2019, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkEnigma View Post
Besides that how would I test for signal inversion, an oscilloscope?
I use the Speaker Polarity test of AudioTools. It generates a pop signal at line level, and you record the polarity with a mic near the speaker. Once you have verified the speaker’s polarity with the battery test, a thus observed polarity inversion must originate somewhere at line level.

A good idea and understanding lies at the base of every successful project.

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post #31454 of 31554 Old 08-19-2019, 02:57 AM
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I would appreciate any comments /opinions on the possible two options: duel SB2000's verse one SB3000 paired with an anti-mode unit. Either will be used a a 1000 cubic foot room watching movies only at low to moderate levels using a Yamaha 1080. Thanks in advance.
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Originally Posted by maikeldepotter View Post
I use the Speaker Polarity test of AudioTools. It generates a pop signal at line level, and you record the polarity with a mic near the speaker. Once you have verified the speaker’s polarity with the battery test, a thus observed polarity inversion must originate somewhere at line level.
Most AVRs, (in my case Denon 3500), report if one of the speakers is wuth reverse polarity. Does anyone know how AVRs do it?
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post #31456 of 31554 Old 08-19-2019, 02:24 PM
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I would appreciate any comments /opinions on the possible two options: duel SB2000's verse one SB3000 paired with an anti-mode unit. Either will be used a a 1000 cubic foot room watching movies only at low to moderate levels using a Yamaha 1080. Thanks in advance.
In the mid/upper bass octave of 40-80 Hz, the dynamic output capability of both options is about the same. In the deep bass octave 18-36 Hz, dual SB-2000 will outperform a single SB-3000.

Dual SB-2000 will also provide smoother bass in more room locations (via higher modal density), provided they are placed strategically. This will make them easier to EQ with the anti-mode unit.

All things considered - I think a pair of SB-2000s is the best choice.

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post #31457 of 31554 Old 08-20-2019, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Mullen View Post
In the mid/upper bass octave of 40-80 Hz, the dynamic output capability of both options is about the same. In the deep bass octave 18-36 Hz, dual SB-2000 will outperform a single SB-3000.

Dual SB-2000 will also provide smoother bass in more room locations (via higher modal density), provided they are placed strategically. This will make them easier to EQ with the anti-mode unit.

All things considered - I think a pair of SB-2000s is the best choice.
Question for another AVS member.

In a small/medium sized room would he be better off with a PB1000 or an SB2000?

Does the smaller more powerful SB2000 match the PB1000 in terms of output?

The smaller cabinet size would seem to make sense for that size room as money is not the issue.

Movie watching is his main focus.

Thanks.

Geoff A. J., California
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post #31458 of 31554 Old 08-20-2019, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by gajCA View Post
Question for another AVS member.

In a small/medium sized room would he be better off with a PB1000 or an SB2000?

Does the smaller more powerful SB2000 match the PB1000 in terms of output?

The smaller cabinet size would seem to make sense for that size room as money is not the issue.

Movie watching is his main focus.

Thanks.
In a smaller enclosed room, the SB-2000 has the potential to extend very deep with room gain included - deeper than the PB-1000.

The SB-2000 will outgun the PB-1000 in the mid/upper bass ranges, but will fall a bit short in the 18-36 Hz octave. With that said, room gain will augment the low-end output capability, making this mostly a moot point.

If floor space is at a premium and the playback level isn't super high - the SB-2000 usually makes more sense in the smaller enclosed rooms and can deliver a no-compromise experience in all respects.
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post #31459 of 31554 Old 08-20-2019, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Mullen View Post
In a smaller enclosed room, the SB-2000 has the potential to extend very deep with room gain included - deeper than the PB-1000.

The SB-2000 will outgun the PB-1000 in the mid/upper bass ranges, but will fall a bit short in the 18-36 Hz octave. With that said, room gain will augment the low-end output capability, making this mostly a moot point.

If floor space is at a premium and the playback level isn't super high - the SB-2000 usually makes more sense in the smaller enclosed rooms and can deliver a no-compromise experience in all respects.
Thanks for the quick response.

Geoff A. J., California
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post #31460 of 31554 Old 08-22-2019, 03:32 AM
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Quote:
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Most AVRs, (in my case Denon 3500), report if one of the speakers is wuth reverse polarity. Does anyone know how AVRs do it?
It is done when the Audyssey calibration, do it's sweep from the results it get.
That said some MTM are design with one mid driver, with a reverse polarity from one mid driver to the other due by the speaker design.
Giving you a false reading. Happen to me once, and when I contacted my Costumer Service for my Aperion. They explain the design, and to just ignore-it.

Since then, I have made many calibration, done with my Marantz AV7702mkii. And the warning never did show-up again.
My guess is maybe an inch or so, for the mic positions. Will either say in polarity or reverse, depending what driver it get most reading from (for a case like this).

False reading or not, it is always wise to verified your connections.


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post #31461 of 31554 Old 08-23-2019, 04:16 AM
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Is it possible to mix a SB3000 with a SB1000? This would be in a small / 1000cu ft room listening at low to moderate levels. Comments / opinions appreciated!

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post #31462 of 31554 Old 08-23-2019, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abba1 View Post
Is it possible to mix a SB3000 with a SB1000? This would be in a small / 1000cu ft room listening at low to moderate levels. Comments / opinions appreciated!
Possible, yes. Advisable, maybe not. Your room is small and your listening habits are moderate, both of which play in your favor. However, the disparity in capability between the two models is significant enough to likely be audible. Think weakest link in the chain.
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post #31463 of 31554 Old 08-24-2019, 04:30 AM
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Possible, yes. Advisable, maybe not. Your room is small and your listening habits are moderate, both of which play in your favor. However, the disparity in capability between the two models is significant enough to likely be audible. Think weakest link in the chain.
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Is it possible to mix a SB3000 with a SB1000? This would be in a small / 1000cu ft room listening at low to moderate levels. Comments / opinions appreciated!
I very much agree with Jim on this one.

Now a day, most AVR have some sort of automated calibration. Some higher end model can figure out two subs, while others use an internal Y-splitter or have only one sub outputs. But either way, your SB3000 will be brought down to what your SB1000 can do. If I were you. I would try-it for now, and sell the SB1000 if you do not like the results. To start saving for another SB3000, while using a single SB3000 by it-self.


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post #31464 of 31554 Old 08-24-2019, 05:53 AM
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^^^

I agree with both Jim and Darth that it is rarely advisable to mix subwoofers which have very different capabilities. That is partly because their maximum output will be very different and partly because their inherent frequency response will be very different. Even sealed subwoofers exhibit differences in the shape of the frequency response.

Improved frequency response, in a room, occurs when two or more very similar subwoofers engage room modes in mutually supportive ways. For instance, one fills-in dips for another at certain frequencies. Where the subwoofers start with different frequency responses, that helpful interaction with room modes becomes much more difficult to achieve. In fact, the subwoofers may actually work against each other, causing cancellation at some frequencies.

Automated room correction cannot really help with any of that, since it EQ's all subwoofers in a system as one, based on their combined frequency response. It doesn't EQ them individually, to separately correct their individual interaction with room modes. After all, it is their combined sound that really matters, since all the subwoofers in an audio system are playing exactly the same material. They aren't being sent separate sounds from an audio track the way our speakers are. The subwoofers all play exactly the same content, so it's their combined sound that needs improving with automated room EQ.

One clarification to what Ray said needs to be made, however. Automated room EQ won't pull-down the performance of a stronger subwoofer to match the performance of a weaker subwoofer. The weaker subwoofer will just run out of gas sooner. That will be especially noticeable for lower frequencies. And when the weaker subwoofer starts to run out of gas, and its SPL rolls-off in the room, by 3db (that's called the F3 point), room EQ will simply stop doing any EQ at all. That is to protect the weaker sub from being inadvertently over-driven by the filters that the room EQ is setting.

So, room EQ won't pull-down the stronger sub to match the weaker sub, although if you want both subs to play at the same volume, that can't really happen when one sub is much weaker. But, room EQ (such as Audyssey) will simply stop doing anything at all to your frequency response at the low-frequency where the weaker sub starts to roll-off and lose SPL.

The idea that Audyssey (or some other automated system) EQ's based on the limitations of the weaker sub is correct. The idea that the stronger sub is somehow pulled-down to the performance of the weaker sub is not correct. Room EQ just stops at the F3 point of the weaker sub, and we don't get the benefit of any helpful room EQ for those lower frequencies. This may seem like a technical distinction, but it's an important one for people who really want to, or have to, mix subwoofers in their HT's.

The bottom line, though, is that we are usually much better off matching identical subwoofers in our systems, when we can.

Regards,
Mike
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GUIDE TO SUBWOOFER CALIBRATION AND BASS PREFERENCES

* The Guide linked above is a comprehensive guide to Audio & HT systems, including:
Speaker placements & Room treatments; HT calibration & Room EQ; Room gain; Bass
Preferences; Subwoofer Buyer's Guide: Sealed/ported; ID subs; Subwoofer placement.
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post #31465 of 31554 Old 08-24-2019, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by mthomas47 View Post
^^^

I agree with both Jim and Darth that it is rarely advisable to mix subwoofers which have very different capabilities. That is partly because their maximum output will be very different and partly because their inherent frequency response will be very different. Even sealed subwoofers exhibit differences in the shape of the frequency response.

Improved frequency response, in a room, occurs when two or more very similar subwoofers engage room modes in mutually supportive ways. For instance, one fills-in dips for another at certain frequencies. Where the subwoofers start with different frequency responses, that helpful interaction with room modes becomes much more difficult to achieve. In fact, the subwoofers may actually work against each other, causing cancellation at some frequencies.

Automated room correction cannot really help with any of that, since it EQ's all subwoofers in a system as one, based on their combined frequency response. It doesn't EQ them individually, to separately correct their individual interaction with room modes. After all, it is their combined sound that really matters, since all the subwoofers in an audio system are playing exactly the same material. They aren't being sent separate sounds from an audio track the way our speakers are. The subwoofers all play exactly the same content, so it's their combined sound that needs improving with automated room EQ.

One clarification to what Ray said needs to be made, however. Automated room EQ won't pull-down the performance of a stronger subwoofer to match the performance of a weaker subwoofer. The weaker subwoofer will just run out of gas sooner. That will be especially noticeable for lower frequencies. And when the weaker subwoofer starts to run out of gas, and its SPL rolls-off in the room, by 3db (that's called the F3 point), room EQ will simply stop doing any EQ at all. That is to protect the weaker sub from being inadvertently over-driven by the filters that the room EQ is setting.

So, room EQ won't pull-down the stronger sub to match the weaker sub, although if you want both subs to play at the same volume, that can't really happen when one sub is much weaker. But, room EQ (such as Audyssey) will simply stop doing anything at all to your frequency response at the low-frequency where the weaker sub starts to roll-off and lose SPL.

The idea that Audyssey (or some other automated system) EQ's based on the limitations of the weaker sub is correct. The idea that the stronger sub is somehow pulled-down to the performance of the weaker sub is not correct. Room EQ just stops at the F3 point of the weaker sub, and we don't get the benefit of any helpful room EQ for those lower frequencies. This may seem like a technical distinction, but it's an important one for people who really want to, or have to, mix subwoofers in their HT's.

The bottom line, though, is that we are usually much better off matching identical subwoofers in our systems, when we can.

Regards,
Mike
This is what I came looking for, thanks.

I had a power surge kill one of a pair of Polk psw505's giving me prime opportunity to step up to a PB2000, I was on the fence about keeping the good Polk in the mix for the time being until I recoup funds for a 2nd SVS. (just bought the wife a new fridge last night)

My room is fairly open and the two Polks I had seemed to fill it much better than a single one, but I feel like the SVS will over shadow the single last Polk standing.

If I did try to use them both for "research" would I run my Onkyo accueq with both going or should I do it with the SVS alone and then just pop the Polk in when it's finished?



Thanks Guru's I'm very limited in my knowledge on this and appreciate all the help you guy's give.
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post #31466 of 31554 Old 08-24-2019, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by SlashOverkill83 View Post
This is what I came looking for, thanks.

I had a power surge kill one of a pair of Polk psw505's giving me prime opportunity to step up to a PB2000, I was on the fence about keeping the good Polk in the mix for the time being until I recoup funds for a 2nd SVS. (just bought the wife a new fridge last night)

My room is fairly open and the two Polks I had seemed to fill it much better than a single one, but I feel like the SVS will over shadow the single last Polk standing.

If I did try to use them both for "research" would I run my Onkyo accueq with both going or should I do it with the SVS alone and then just pop the Polk in when it's finished?

Thanks Guru's I'm very limited in my knowledge on this and appreciate all the help you guy's give.

Hi,

I will try to answer your question, but it's difficult to know in advance what will work best. I have heard mixed reports on Onkyo's AccuEQ, so I'm not sure how much it is actually going to EQ your lower-frequencies, anyway. But, here is how I would probably approach the process, in the absence of a way to actually measure the frequency response.

First, I would EQ with only the PB2000 in the system, and I would listen to that for a few days, with a variety of material, and try to get a good listening baseline established. Once I was pretty familiar with how things sounded, I would add in the remaining Polk sub. If you Y-connect both subs into the same sub out, AccuEQ will never know that you added a second sub.

At that point, it will help if you can independently level-match the two subs with an SPL meter, and it will help if they are the same distance from your listening position. (Edit: I just realized that the internal microprocessor delay in the Polk sub will probably be a little different from that of the SVS sub, so equal distance may not help as much as it otherwise would with a Y-connector.)

Then, you can listen to both subs with AccuEQ engaged, and with it off. Did the sound improve with the addition of the second sub, or did it get worse? Is it worth EQing again with both subs already Y-connected this time, or perhaps in separate sub outs? (If you had separate sub outs, you might consider trying your Polk right next to your chair.) Or, are you better off just using your PB2000 by itself, until you can get another one?

Measuring your frequency response with REW would make it much easier to determine whether adding in the Polk helps or hurts your frequency response, and the resulting sound quality. But, I suspect that you may still be able to tell just by listening. That's why I would start by establishing a familiar listening baseline with only the PB2000 in your system.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Mike
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GUIDE TO SUBWOOFER CALIBRATION AND BASS PREFERENCES

* The Guide linked above is a comprehensive guide to Audio & HT systems, including:
Speaker placements & Room treatments; HT calibration & Room EQ; Room gain; Bass
Preferences; Subwoofer Buyer's Guide: Sealed/ported; ID subs; Subwoofer placement.

Last edited by mthomas47; 08-24-2019 at 05:02 PM.
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post #31467 of 31554 Old 08-24-2019, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by SlashOverkill83 View Post
This is what I came looking for, thanks.

If I did try to use them both for "research" would I run my Onkyo accueq with both going or should I do it with the SVS alone and then just pop the Polk in when it's finished?
You already got great advice, but I'll add a twist. I'm running two subs, but still have a few nulls. I found that adding a third sub a few feet off the floor fills them in. But it hasn't been worth buying a 3rd matching sub (so far), and I'm just using an older lesser sub to do this. The trick that worked for me was to EQ the two SVS subs first, then add the third one in with gain turned down about 3dB so it's not really interfering with the others and just filling in the nulls. I've confirmed this before/after on REW and no bad behavior, also sounds fine to me. Call it a poor man's way to smooth out the bass response, though eventually I'll get a "real" matching 3rd sub so I get a little more headroom too.

In your case, you're only working with a single "main" sub so doing this with a 2nd may not give a good result, but it's worth trying out.

HT: OLED65E6P (ChadB cal'd), STR-DN1080, UBP-X800, 7 Take Classics, Dual SB2000's
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post #31468 of 31554 Old 08-25-2019, 04:29 AM
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You already got great advice, but I'll add a twist. I'm running two subs, but still have a few nulls. I found that adding a third sub a few feet off the floor fills them in. But it hasn't been worth buying a 3rd matching sub (so far), and I'm just using an older lesser sub to do this. The trick that worked for me was to EQ the two SVS subs first, then add the third one in with gain turned down about 3dB so it's not really interfering with the others and just filling in the nulls. I've confirmed this before/after on REW and no bad behavior, also sounds fine to me. Call it a poor man's way to smooth out the bass response, though eventually I'll get a "real" matching 3rd sub so I get a little more headroom too.

In your case, you're only working with a single "main" sub so doing this with a 2nd may not give a good result, but it's worth trying out.

This is exactly what I was thinking with a SB3000 / SB1000 combo although I hadn't thought about dropping the weaker 1000 3 dB. Thanks to SVS's 45 trial period I might give it a shot. Besides I'm not sure I have the ears to tell the difference between good and excellent bass.
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post #31469 of 31554 Old 08-25-2019, 09:10 AM
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Great advice guys thanks!
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post #31470 of 31554 Old 08-26-2019, 01:20 AM
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Is it possible to mix a SB3000 with a SB1000? This would be in a small / 1000cu ft room listening at low to moderate levels. Comments / opinions appreciated!
Just tried for the last month or so and no I could not get them to play nicely, even with the help of true dual subwoofer outputs on my Marantz 8805. I kept getting phase issues and just extreme bulls and frequency cancelation issues.

I ordered a second sb-3000 yesterday. Found a buyer for my sb-1000 a couple days ago. Now just need to find a buyer for my three brand new svs prime satellites and svs ultra center channel...

Do it all or don't do it at all.
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