Industry Insiders Master Q&A thread III: ONLY Questions to Insiders - Page 12 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #331 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 10:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by darinp2 View Post

This isn't an important question, but I'm wondering what HD DVD insiders think the "HD" in HD DVD stands for. Kjack mentioned that it stands for "High Density" and that makes sense to me given that they really are higher density DVDs and can contain HD or SD. But the www.thelookandsoundofperfect.com site claims that HD DVD stands for "High-Definition Digital Versatile Disc". Has it been defined as anything officially?

--Darin

DVD Forum's official position is that HD does not stand for anything . It is simply part of the format name. As to the point that SD content can also live in HD DVD, well, I could say the same thing about upconverted SD content in ATSC. But I don't see people wanting to call HD TV "High Density" Television. Most TV programming lack enough intelligence to be called High Density anything .
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post #332 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 10:19 AM
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This question is for HD DVD insiders, especially those like Amir, who have promoted the import of HD DVD's as a plus for US HD DVD owners.

After watching The Prestige last night, I read the copyright warning that follows at the end of the credits. I noticed that it included a statement that basically states that the disc can't be exported, sold, or traded to locations outside of the European Union, without special permission from Warner Brothers.

Maybe Amazon UK and other UK exporters have special permission. I'm not sure if they do or don't, but it seems unlikely that so may would, or there would be no need for the statement to be included in the warning.

So to HD DVD insiders best knowledge, is it actually legal for places like Amazon UK to export, or for places like Xploited Cinema to import and resell HD DVD's from the European Union?
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post #333 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by amirm View Post

DVD Forum's official position is that HD does not stand for anything . It is simply part of the format name. As to the point that SD content can also live in HD DVD, well, I could say the same thing about upconverted SD content in ATSC. But I don't see people wanting to call HD TV "High Density" Television. Most TV programming lack enough intelligence to be called High Density anything .

I remember when we all thought DVD stood for Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc, and it ended up officially meaning nothing.

Recently, I began thinking instead of HD DVD, they should have just gone with "HDVD" because it's easier to say (and could make sense if you thought of it as "high definition video disc", since I think most people could still easily believe dvd was digital video disc and HD is inherently digital, making HD DVD redundant with that mindset). It occurred to me it's a lot easier to ask somebody how many blu-rays they bought than it is to ask how many HD DVDs they bought.

Maybe that's why Disney went with blu-ray. They already had enough D's going with Disney DVD. Disney HD DVD would have been a killer.

And yes, this is what I think about during my free time.

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post #334 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by wnorris View Post

This question is for HD DVD insiders, especially those like Amir, who have promoted the import of HD DVD's as a plus for US HD DVD owners.

After watching The Prestige last night, I read the copyright warning that follows at the end of the credits. I noticed that it included a statement that basically states that the disc can't be exported, sold, or traded to locations outside of the European Union, without special permission from Warner Brothers.

Maybe Amazon UK and other UK exporters have special permission. I'm not sure if they do or don't, but it seems unlikely that so may would, or there would be no need for the statement to be included in the warning.

So to HD DVD insiders best knowledge, is it actually legal for places like Amazon UK to export, or for places like Xploited Cinema to import and resell HD DVD's from the European Union?

Is this a warning to consumers? Does Warner think distributors don't have lawyers? Will this be enforced by the EU? FBI?
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post #335 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 07:14 PM
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Amirm/HD insiders,
When will Toshiba update players for all region SD playback? I have just purchased a HD-E1 here in Hong Kong & am stuck with R3 playback making combos (SD Side R1)pretty worthless but still none the less expensive !
Thanks
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post #336 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by WayneL View Post

Is this a warning to consumers? Does Warner think distributors don't have lawyers? Will this be enforced by the EU? FBI?


All good questions for an insider. Also, could Warner Brothers contact someplace like the USPS and say, Xploited Cinema is illegally shipping imported discs, and then have the USPS/Customs seize all of Xploited's shipments?
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post #337 of 3651 Old 06-11-2007, 10:19 PM
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The best information I can find (I admit highdefdigest or another site could be wrong, but I'll go with it) is that the HD DVD part of Breach doesn't have Spanish subtitles, but the DVD does. If this is the case, can any HD DVD insider give us any idea as to why Universal would leave them off the HD DVD? Would it have to do with some kind of psuedo-region coding, since they can't use real region encoding? If not, subtitles don't take up enough space to think that is the reason, so what incentive would Universal have to employ this tactic?

--Darin

This is the AV Science Forum. Please don't be gullible and please do remember the saying, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."
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post #338 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by wnorris View Post

This question is for HD DVD insiders, especially those like Amir, who have promoted the import of HD DVD's as a plus for US HD DVD owners.

I have promoted the fact that without region coding, you don't have to worry about the player or the title complaining if you mix the two from different regions. Indeed, when people ask me if they can buy a player from here, if none is offered in their region, I say yes.

Quote:


So to HD DVD insiders best knowledge, is it actually legal for places like Amazon UK to export, or for places like Xploited Cinema to import and resell HD DVD's from the European Union?

I cannot give you legal advice. No one can on this forum. Not unless I can charge you $500/hour!
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post #339 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 05:25 AM
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Amir,

Can you comment on this statement:

Quote:


If Microsoft has its way, DVD, Blu-Ray Disc and HD DVD will all be rendered obsolete within 10 years, according to Richard Doherty, Microsoft's program manager for Media Entertainment Convergence.

I don't know that [HD] will be delivered on an optical disc in five to 10 years, he said, pointing to downloads and broadband delivery. At Microsoft, we'd rather it wasn't [on a disc].

It sounds like Doherty is saying Microsoft wants HD DVD and Blu-ray to fail. How do you interpret this statement?
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post #340 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshd2012 View Post

It sounds like Doherty is saying Microsoft wants HD DVD and Blu-ray to fail. How do you interpret this statement?

Amir can correct me if he wishes, but I wouldn't read animosity toward any format into that so much as an inevitable progression of technology beyond spinning-disc content distribution. We're already seeing music drift away from physical distribution methods. Heck, we're seeing a LOT of entertainment circumvent traditional distribution methods. I think it'll happen sooner than ten years, too. Microsoft would much rather distribution not involve something they have to pay a licensing fee for.

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post #341 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 05:49 AM
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Doc,

While I appreciate your comments, I also must direct you to the first post which states, "Industry Insiders only may answer questions or make comments".

I guess I was just more concerned about the 5 year statement. If these formats are dead in 5 years, they will have a much shorter shelf life than LD, a format which is considered by most a commercial failure.
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post #342 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 07:02 AM
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If the HD DVD group and DVD Forum struggle to gain industry support why would they charge 5 thousand dollars for the specs to learn the HDi programming needed to support the format?

I would think it would be the opposite, with all the campaign money spent trying to bring in supporters for the format, surely training business professionals and giving them the ability to also support the format would be among the top priorities.
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post #343 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 11:57 AM
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Amir,

What with Universal's releases lately being sub par? We know the slamming that Sony received with TFE and their early titles (right fully so) but now Universal seams to be doing the same after having such beautiful titles prior. Clearly we can't blame Mpeg2 this time around since they're all VC-1.
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post #344 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 12:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Amir can correct me if he wishes, but I wouldn't read animosity toward any format into that so much as an inevitable progression of technology beyond spinning-disc content distribution. We're already seeing music drift away from physical distribution methods. Heck, we're seeing a LOT of entertainment circumvent traditional distribution methods. I think it'll happen sooner than ten years, too. Microsoft would much rather distribution not involve something they have to pay a licensing fee for.
Doc

Thanks Doc . Indeed, that is, and has been our position for a long time. I have been on the record here for probably 3 years stating that if the only way to get high quality HD to consumers in 10 years time, then we have failed in doing our job . Optical is a means to an end and not the end itself.

I think everyone would agree that if you could get the same quality experience as HD DVD/BD without making a trip to the store, or waiting for a package to arrive in mail, it would lead to more enjoyment of that content. We have however as an industry, failed to deliver on this promise for video but as Doc mentions, we are almost there for music. But that doesn't mean we should ignore the revolution around us.

For people who want to spin this as us not wanting HD media, well, they can mislead themselves all they want . But it won't make it true or make for good reporting. Until last year, I managed the Windows Media Player yet the team working on HD DVD player/HDi was twice as big as that group was! If that doesn't show how committed we are to HD DVD, I don't know what will. So I hope people don't read the wrong message into these statements. We are simply being realistic about what could happen, even if it goes against our high level of investment in some areas.

If you want to be concerned about policies of companies involved in this field, you need to worry more about people who want to stay with a single way of doing things, rather than being open to whatever customers ultimately want - whether that aligns with their current interests or not. Case in point is my ex-employer who put up a huge fight, claiming Tape is not dead when non-linear, hard disk based editing revolution was started by Avid. Year after year you would go to NAB conference and hear the same pitch. How NLE (non-linear editing) would not have the quality needed, etc. With a highly profitable $1B business in tape recorders, I could see why they didn't want people to edit with computers. But edit with computers they did and Avid went on to write the book here. How many of you think of using two tape recorders when you think of editing your video?

I worked for a high-end video company at the time who was also threatened by NLE. But instead of defending the old, we sold the company to someone who didn't know any better . And we moved on to work for companies who embraced the revolution (e.g. I moved to run engineering at Pinnacle where we provided the 3-D effects engine for Avid). My ex-employer suffered the same with CRT vs flat panels and MP3 players.

There is always the worry that the new thing is not as good as the old. But one has to keep an eye on what is coming, even if that other thing doesn't seem competitive yet with the best of current technology. Yes, digital downloads are not as good as HD optical today and the whole experience of delivering commercial content to consumers is well below where it needs to be. But that should not deter us from investing to make these new things better. There is a great line uttered by Michael Douglas's character in the movie Wall Street, Gordon Gecko, that says, the last guy who made a buggy whip, probably built the best one there ever was! Yes, digital delivery has many problems today. We are not blind to it. But the day its time comes, and that time will come, we want to be prepared for it. We don't want to be the best at playing bits from a mechanical device.

Do people realize where DVD came from btw? Its genesis was in the failure to deliver VOD in Orlando during Time Warner trials. Instead of packing their bags, TW and Toshiba realized that the whole business was about a better way to deliver content than VHS tape. So the DVD was born. Now I have VOD on my Comcast cable box and the economics finally make sense in that respect. If one gets fixated on spinning an optical disc as the only means of delivering pristine audio/video experience, they just might miss the next DVD revolution.

And we are not the only ones thinking this way even if you put aside companies like Apple, Comcast, etc. Take Toshiba for example. They not only make optical technology but also hard disks (think iPod), and flash memory. On the latter, they are sitting pretty as 64 gigabyte flash cards start to replace hard disks in laptops. Can you think of anything more horrifying than spinning a sensitive platter with all of your media in a portable computer? Yet that is what we are doing today. Think back 5 years ago where the typical MP3 player had 256 MB of flash memory. If you talked about 64 gigabyte laptops then, people would just laugh at you. But here we are on the verge of this revolution. This doesn't mean they stop working on hard disks and optical media but does show that they are a forward looking company in this manner and will help to create solutions for you that enrich your life more.

As to time frames, my favorite saying is that people overestimate the nature of change in the short term, and underestimate it in the long term. As such, I think it is very much true that digital delivery is not going to take anyone by the storm in the next few years, no matter how much some people may wish it to move quicker. But move out past that period, and it will have to be there and bigger than people think. So while 5 years is probably on the short end of this period, 10 years is way past the point of when the revolution would be in full swing.

For customers afraid of change, you should not be. First, you have all the control. You pay for it, we build it. If you don't, we won't (not for long anyway). So no one is going to force you to go in any direction. So if you are in love with optical and want to have nothing to do with digital delivery, then vote with your pocketbook that way and the history will be written the same way.

Second, if you are BD fan, then you should really be in love with digital delivery. With digital delivery running off hard disk, we have no limitations of any sort. In our Silverlight demos, we show 10 simultaneous videos playing with full interactivity. I am proud of interactivity in HD DVD but we don't hold a candle to this with two video decoders. You want to do 3-D? We can do it today. You want to play video at 100 mbit/sec? No problemo. You want to have 50 lossless tracks? You can download all you need, when you need it, in the language you need it. You want to have 10 channels of audio, you can have that too. Given all of this, I find it so curious that it is the BD companies, fans and bloggers who seem more concerned about people talking about digital delivery. If you want bigger and badder specs, believe it or not, digital delivery is more your friend than BD. Without committee decisions, those technology can also move faster to adopt to your needs.

There is no question that the world of digital media is changing. That is one constant we all know and must believe in. For a company our size, it is expected that we invest in broad set of technologies related to it. This is why I have two other businesses that I manage which deal with other forms of delivery. I would not have it any other way. Hopefully, you wouldn't either.

So any other rants you want me to go on about?
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post #345 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

So any other rants you want me to go on about?

Truly Priceless Insight.

Amir - you certainly put pain and effort into that posting. I hope the
AVS community understands how long it takes to write such a great
statement like that.

I know I read every word and thoughtfully appreciated every bit of your effort.

5 Happy Cheers for Amir

I'm an industry insider on Telecommunications and Networking. Hopefully
the project I'm involved in will help bring the future content delivery to
reality.

Thanks Again.
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post #346 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drhankz View Post

Truly Priceless Insight.

Amir - you certainly put pain and effort into that posting. I hope the
AVS community understands how long it takes to write such a great
statement like that.

I know I read every word and thoughtfully appreciated every bit of your effort.

5 Happy Cheers for Amir

I'm an industry insider on Telecommunications and Networking. Hopefully
the project I'm involved in will help bring the future content delivery to
reality.

Thanks Again.

Thanks a bunch. I wish I was not so jetlagged so that I could get the grammar right. Oh, wait, I make the same mistakes when I am not jetlagged.
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post #347 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

Thanks a bunch. I wish I was not so jetlagged so that I could get the grammar right. Oh, wait, I make the same mistakes when I am not jetlagged.

I'm no ENGLISH major myself - But I didn't see any grammar problems.
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post #348 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

Yes, digital downloads are not as good as HD optical today and the whole experience of delivering commercial content to consumers is well below where it needs to be. (...)
For customers afraid of change, you should not be. First, you have all the control. You pay for it, we build it. If you don't, we won't (not for long anyway). So no one is going to force you to go in any direction. So if you are in love with optical and want to have nothing to do with digital delivery, then vote with your pocketbook that way and the history will be written the same way. (...)
You want to do 3-D? We can do it today. You want to play video at 100 mbit/sec? No problemo. You want to have 50 lossless tracks? You can download all you need, when you need it, in the language you need it. You want to have 10 channels of audio, you can have that too. Given all of this, I find it so curious that it is the BD companies, fans and bloggers who seem more concerned about people talking about digital delivery. If you want bigger and badder specs, believe it or not, digital delivery is more your friend than BD. Without committee decisions, those technology can also move faster to adopt to your needs.

So, you essentially believe that digital delivery will eventually give us everything that Blu-ray/HD-DVD give us today - and more? I have to say I'm very sceptical.

1. Don't you think there will always be an incentive for the companys delivering the content to make it just "good enough" to a) keep cost down and b) reach as many customers as possible (the higher the needed bandwith, the less potential customers you have)?

2. Don't you agree that "the customer" is quite different from AV enthusiasts? If the majority of consumers vote with their wallets for convenience over quality, we're screwed. Just look at mp3 download services. It's "good enough" for most customers, but the HD video equivalent of that level of quality would certainly not be ok for most of us. Do you think CD-quality audio downloads will ever take off? If not, why should HD-DVD-quality video downloads? So IMO we should very much continue to care about HD on optical media, especially as...

3. ...optical media does not stand still either. Don't you think that holographic storage (or other innovations) will raise the bar much higher long before digital delivery even catches up with Blu-ray/HD-DVD?
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post #349 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by amirm View Post

...So any other rants you want me to go on about?

No request for ranting, maybe answer this question I posted twice already, since you have time now:
https://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&#post10612698
Thanks.
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post #350 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 03:00 PM
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my question is why is: Without naming studios, do you feel that your experience with studios in getting their content on Xbox Live Marketplace has in the past, or seems to be now, changing some minds in the Optical media realm? This can be with codecs or disc formats.

Thanks in advance.

Proud to always support Blu-Ray studios through Xbox Video Marketplace.
The "High Road" is a pretty boring place.
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post #351 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meatpopsicle View Post

my question is why is: Without naming studios, do you feel that your experience with studios in getting their content on Xbox Live Marketplace has in the past, or seems to be now, changing some minds in the Optical media realm? This can be with codecs or disc formats.

Thanks in advance.

In general, the relationship between the two domains remains rather loose. Of course, to the extent one generates good results in one area, it might have an impact on the other. But there is nothing concrete that I can report right now.
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post #352 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meatpopsicle View Post

my question is why is: Without naming studios, do you feel that your experience with studios in getting their content on Xbox Live Marketplace has in the past, or seems to be now, changing some minds in the Optical media realm? This can be with codecs or disc formats.

Thanks in advance.

Sorry, missed it before .

Quote:


It would be nice to have a MC equal for games. I took very good care of my game discs, yet I often have disc unreadable problem in the middle of a game, it would be nice if Xbox can save game progress, and when the disc becomes readable in next try, re-store the game to the point of reading error. Amir, please pass this suggestion to Xbox team. I wrote to them before, but never got a reply.

Oh, asking us to eat our own dog foode, eh? Yes, I will be happy to pass on the request.

Quote:


Now HD DVD addon question, I noticed I couldn't bookmark Planet Earth, but it works for Phantom of Opera, is this an authoring issue ?

Yes, it is an unauthoring choice. We are disappointed in not seeing bookmarks there as if there is one title where you want to bookmark the key scenes, this is it.

Quote:


Also, can bookmarking be made available on one of HD DVD menus ? Right now it seems only accessible through addon remote control. I don't mind using xbox remote control for playing HD DVD (too many remote controls), but then I couldn't access bookmarking. Thanks.

Ah, good request. Let me pass this one on too.
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post #353 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:20 PM
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Excellent post amir, I just have a few questions.


I think the MP3 revolution analogy fails for two reason.

1)Music is inherantly portable and consumers like to take it EVERYWHERE. We all have carried around Walkmans, CD Players, and those giant CD wallets. The MP3 player consolidated all that into a single device. On the other hand, video is used almost entirely at home. The PMP market never really took off. When is the last time you saw someone with a portable DVD player at the gym?

2) The bandwith required to download a BR/HD disc is 10,000x that of a typical 128kbps MP3. (30GB vs 3 MB). That puts MP3s in the reach of anyone with an internet connection regardless of speed. Do you believe the infastructure is there or can even be put into place to deliever high speed internet to enough people to deliver this content?

A lot of people still don't have access to even Cable or low speed DSL service even though services have been going online for more than a decade. Those people that have access to HSI still prefer the cheaper $14.99/month 768K plans over the higher tierd services. That level of bandwith is certainly more than enough for them to check their mail and surf the web so what aout VOD will compell them to pay two or three times as much a month for a faster teir serivce?

On the other hand, these same people will have a Wal Mart with in spitting distance where they can just run out an pick up the movie without having to pay higher broadband bills. Can Verizon, MSFT, Comcast, etc compete with the potential bandwith available in the back of a Walmart truck?

Speaking of Verizon and Comcast. VOD to the masses is going to force net neutrality. If Microsoft is using their bandwith to send a product to the consumer, won't Verizon want their cut? If I call up Microsoft and ask to buy a copy of Windows and pay, you would have to pay FedEx to mail it to me. FedEx won't do it for free as they have to pay for gas. I imagine the same analogy will be used for VOD services using Verizon FIOS lines as delivery service where Verizon is paying for the bandwith. If they can't charge Microsoft, then they will turn around and increase prices on the consumer.

Piracy built the downloadable MP3 market. High schoolers, College students, and Napster put it on the map showing the world a new way to aquire their music. I'm not sure if legitimate avenues like XBL Video market place or even bitorrent downloads have the same effect mainly because their target market is very small compared to that of, say, DVD movies.

Finally, I think it is a smart move for MSFT to innovate in the area of VOD/IPTV as a faliure only means a faliure while success could turn XBL into the video version of iTunes. I think VOD/IPTV will reach a certain amount of success in the future but i seriously doubt it can replace optical media without clearing a tremendous amount of hurdles that MP3s did not have.

Sorry for spelling and grammer. But i'm in bit of a rush
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post #354 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Eternal_Sunshine View Post

So, you essentially believe that digital delivery will eventually give us everything that Blu-ray/HD-DVD give us today - and more? I have to say I'm very sceptical.

I didn't say I believe in that. I said that from technology point of view, it can do even more. Whether you all pay enough money for it to convince the studios to offer you that level of quality, is another matter. But this is no different than optical media is.

Quote:


1. Don't you think there will always be an incentive for the companys delivering the content to make it just "good enough" to a) keep cost down and b) reach as many customers as possible (the higher the needed bandwith, the less potential customers you have)?

I was not talking about streaming where actual bandwidth available may be an issue. We are talking about digital downloads. Here, you will probably download the stuff in the background as we do today with Xbox.

Quote:


2. Don't you agree that "the customer" is quite different from AV enthusiasts? If the majority of consumers vote with their wallets for convenience over quality, we're screwed. Just look at mp3 download services. It's "good enough" for most customers, but the HD video equivalent of that level of quality would certainly not be ok for most of us. Do you think CD-quality audio downloads will ever take off? If not, why should HD-DVD-quality video downloads? So IMO we should very much continue to care about HD on optical media, especially as...

I think you are making an implicit assumption that studios will publish high quality content on optical media even if consumers don't care about the extra quality. They will not. If the market does not grow here, it will actually die faster that digital since there is a real cost to distributing physical goods which sit on a shelf collecting dust. To use your music example, people did not care about better than CD quality so SACD/DVD-A died. If your worry is right, then HD DVD/BD have no chance either so the question is moot.

Here is the other perspective on this. Today, you can go to Music Giants and download lossless CD audio tracks (in our WMA/WMA Pro format ). The process is easy. They go to the same content owners and license the same bits us and Apple do for distribution. The studios don't care that someone wants to target higher fidelity. After all, CD is the highest fidelity of them all. So by the same token, if there is a real market for enthusiasts wanting better than typical download quality, then specialty distributors can offer them. And with power of internet, they could have a similar access to customers that the big guys do. Yes, they won't work on your Video iPod but I don't think that is where you want to experience them, is it?

Quote:


3. ...optical media does not stand still either. Don't you think that holographic storage (or other innovations) will raise the bar much higher long before digital delivery even catches up with Blu-ray/HD-DVD?

I think there is zero chance of another optical media coming to us for movies. We have trouble selling people 6X the resolution of DVD in the form of BD/HD DVD. What will be the selling proposition of larger optical media if that value proposition didn't work? Rolling out a new optical format would require hefty investments in the form of new factories (running into billions of dollars). Who would want to chase that over meager consumer interest? You see, we don't have to build factories to distribute new digital formats.

So while I have no doubt that people will build higher density optical formats, they will not be for mass production of movies. Heck, we have all suffered enough, and folks lost enough money on this one as to not have much appetite for the next version of this thing .
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post #355 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:36 PM
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Amir,

What with Universal's releases lately being sub par? We know the slamming that Sony received with TFE and their early titles (right fully so) but now Universal seams to be doing the same after having such beautiful titles prior. Clearly we can't blame Mpeg2 this time around since they're all VC-1.

Amir,

Would you please address the Universal subpar release issues when you get a chance?

Thanks,
Robert.
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post #356 of 3651 Old 06-12-2007, 06:48 PM
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Heck, we have all suffered enough, and folks lost enough money on this one as to not have much appetite for the next version of this thing .

I enjoy reading your posts and this is in no way a jab at you. I hope, however, that the "folks who lost money on this one" blame themselves for not finding a way to come out with one format which makes sense. Regardless of what either side says or does people wont buy into a HD format with any great numbers until one single format is offered.

If I had a nickel for every story in the media targeted at the masses which said "wait until the HD DVD/BD side battle it out..."
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post #357 of 3651 Old 06-13-2007, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

Today, you can go to Music Giants and download lossless CD audio tracks (in our WMA/WMA Pro format ).

I've a follow up question on that: What source are companies like Music Giants using? Are they getting the audio tracks from normal audio CDs? I'm asking because (as you probably know) "ripping" CD audio tracks in the best possible way needs some knowledge and good tools. See e.g. here:

http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/en/inde...on-technology/

If you use just "any" tool to do the ripping, the final audio file is likely to be suboptimal. So can we be sure that we'll get really bit identical audio information from e.g. Music Giants - compared to the original studio masters?

Thank you!
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post #358 of 3651 Old 06-13-2007, 12:27 AM
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Dear paidgeek,

I almost forgot to report a real annoying issue/oversight with the new PS3 1.8 firmware.

Why is it that the (excellent) SD/"DVD" upscaling is not enabled while playing SD content (like 480i special features) from a BRD?
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post #359 of 3651 Old 06-13-2007, 12:47 AM
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Originally Posted by amirm View Post

I was not talking about streaming where actual bandwidth available may be an issue. We are talking about digital downloads. Here, you will probably download the stuff in the background as we do today with Xbox.

Isn't the time it takes to download the program (and thus the convenience of this process) in direct correlation to the bandwith? In other words, doesn't the company delivering the content still have the incentive to use files as small as possible to make downloading fast and convenient for as many potential customers as possible?

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Originally Posted by amirm View Post

I think you are making an implicit assumption that studios will publish high quality content on optical media even if consumers don't care about the extra quality.

Quite the opposite, I fear the studios won't continue to publish high quality content on optical media if enough consumers settle for the "good enough" quality and higher convenience of downloads. Which may or may not be Microsoft's goal in all of this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

We have trouble selling people 6X the resolution of DVD in the form of BD/HD DVD. What will be the selling proposition of larger optical media if that value proposition didn't work? (...) Heck, we have all suffered enough, and folks lost enough money on this one as to not have much appetite for the next version of this thing.

Well, the starting point of this discussion was that Microsoft supposedly does not want HD on optical media (HDOM) to succeed, wasn't it? Don't you agree that this "trouble selling" HDOM is very much a result of this format war - which Microsoft prolonged by supporting the underdog HD-DVD? Wouldn't it be very helpful for a potential provider of HD downloads to the masses, i.e. Microsoft, to paint the picture that the "value proposition [of HDOM] didn't work" like you just did? Or asked in a more simple manner: Would Microsoft like HD downloads to be the dominant form of HD distribution? If the answer is yes - wouldn't HDOM failing make this scenario much more likely and would thus be in Microsoft's best interest?

Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

I think there is zero chance of another optical media coming to us for movies.

We'll see. I happen to love the current "version of this thing" (HDOM) and think you shouldn't underestimate neither the collector's satisfaction of owning a physical object nor the studios' desire to sell us the same movies over and over again...
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post #360 of 3651 Old 06-13-2007, 01:10 AM
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This is a question for paidgeek:
I live in Spain, and It looks like titles like "Ghost Rider" are getting only the PCM track, not the TrueHD, and the other languages are plain DD. When does Sony plan to encode 2-3 truehd tracks in european releases? It´s one of the biggest advantages over HDDVD (sorry Amirm, it´s true) but we hardly see it used (not only Sony is to blame, and don´t get me started on Paramount, they haven´t released anything...) Thanks for your time.
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