How many movies are actually 16x9? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 43 Old 03-15-2014, 03:47 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
So I've been looking at changing to a CIH screen and I cringe at not being able to watch Avengers on my full sized 1.78:1 screen but I wondered how many of my 590 Blu Ray/DVD titles were actually in that ratio.

Well the short answer is 30. Yes 30! and around 10 of those were animated.

According to my DVD profiler, here's the break down on how many of my titles have which aspect ratio, (I didn't include TV series, kids movies except for major animated pictures, or 1.33:1)

1.66:1 - 1

1.75:1 - 1

1.78:1 - 30

1.85:1 - 92

"16x9" movies - 124 out of 453

2.20:1 - 1

2.35:1 - 174

2.39:1 - 9 (Mostly Disney)

2.40:1 - 143

2.55:1 - 2

"Scope" movies - 329 out of 453

This really is a no brainer!

If I had more blu ray titles there would probably be more 2.40:1 titles. Many of my duplicate titles are 2.35 on DVD and 2.40 on Blu Ray.

Here's my collection for anyone who wants see what type of movies are included, http://www.invelos.com/dvdcollection.aspx/Dragon's%20Lair

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 43 Old 03-15-2014, 11:51 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
blastermaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sunny Okanagan
Posts: 2,103
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 601 Post(s)
Liked: 765
Jump in. The water's warm. smile.gif

Gear: The Brains: Anthem MRX 720. The Brawn: Outlaw 7700. The Fun: Custom PC w/ Logitech 27 & reverse mount pedals, Nintendo Switch, Playstation PS4 Pro. The Visuals: Oppo 203, Darbee Darblet, Optoma HD3300, Panamorph UH480, DIY 138" Curved screen using Semour Centerstage XD AT material. The Audio: 7.1.4: LCR: Tannoy DC12i. Sides: Tannoy IW63DC. Rears: Tannoy DC8i. Ceilings: Tannoy CMS 603/601 DCBM. Subs: 3X Micro Marty and 1X Full Marty.
blastermaster is offline  
post #3 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 10:00 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
DVDProfiler's aspect ratio specs are submitted by users, and I'm sure that almost all of them are copied from the disc packaging. As far as that goes, the distinction between 2.35:1, 2.39:1 and 2.40:1 is unlikely to be very accurate. Countless Blu-rays and DVDs are mislabeled in that respect. You can lump these three numbers together into one "scope" category. (More detailed explanation here.)

As for "1.78:1" or "16:9" movies, no feature films are actually produced at that ratio. The theatrical standard is 1.85:1. However, Warner Bros and Paramount open the mattes on all 1.85:1 movies to 1.78:1 for home video. Some of the smaller labels do this as well, though not always as consistently. Again, the specs on the packaging are often inaccurate.

Each year, about half the feature films made are photographed at 1.85:1 and half are 2.40:1. It's been that way for decades and shows no signs of changing. Which aspect ratio dominates your personal movie collection will depend on your taste in movies. If you favor big-budget, blockbuster type movies, more of those tend to be 2.40:1. If you favor comedies and indie dramas, those are frequently 1.85:1. These are not immutable rules, however. Exceptions exist for both types (e.g. The Avengers).

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 10:37 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

DVDProfiler's aspect ratio specs are submitted by users, and I'm sure that almost all of them are copied from the disc packaging. As far as that goes, the distinction between 2.35:1, 2.39:1 and 2.40:1 is unlikely to be very accurate. Countless Blu-rays and DVDs are mislabeled in that respect. You can lump these three numbers together into one "scope" category. (More detailed explanation here.)

Actually many DVD profiler contributions are made by inserting the disc as well, so a lot will have the actual encoded information from the disc listed. And yes they are still all user submitted so to be taken with a grain of salt for sure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

As for "1.78:1" or "16:9" movies, no feature films are actually produced at that ratio. The theatrical standard is 1.85:1. However, Warner Bros and Paramount open the mattes on all 1.85:1 movies to 1.78:1 for home video. Some of the smaller labels do this as well, though not always as consistently. Again, the specs on the packaging are often inaccurate.

Strange why the majority of projector screens and all tv's are made for that ratio.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

Each year, about half the feature films made are photographed at 1.85:1 and half are 2.40:1. It's been that way for decades and shows no signs of changing. Which aspect ratio dominates your personal movie collection will depend on your taste in movies. If you favor big-budget, blockbuster type movies, more of those tend to be 2.40:1. If you favor comedies and indie dramas, those are frequently 1.85:1. These are not immutable rules, however. Exceptions exist for both types (e.g. The Avengers).

Clearly my movie tastes are dominated by action, adventure, war, western, sci-fi, and epics etc. which is also reflected by my aspect numbers, but oddly my drama's and rom com's were nearly half and half 16:9 to scope.

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
post #5 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 12:24 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

Actually many DVD profiler contributions are made by inserting the disc as well, so a lot will have the actual encoded information from the disc listed. And yes they are still all user submitted so to be taken with a grain of salt for sure.

There are currently no aspect ratio flags for 2.35:1 on DVD or Blu-ray. The metadata on a disc will only tell you whether a DVD is encoded as 4:3, non-anamorphic letterbox, or anamorphic 16:9. Since all Blu-rays are encoded as 16:9, you won't even get that much info about the aspect ratio.
Quote:
Strange why the majority of projector screens and all tv's are made for that ratio.

16:9 was chosen as the HDTV standard because it's halfway between the narrowest common ratio (4:3) and the widest (2.35:1). The screen is 1.78:1 rather than 1.85:1
primarily for engineering reasons. You'll notice that 16:9 is a precise square of 4:3. The was important in the early days of HDTV, when most TVs were still CRT tubes.
Quote:
Clearly my movie tastes are dominated by action, adventure, war, western, sci-fi, and epics etc. which is also reflected by my aspect numbers, but oddly my drama's and rom com's were nearly half and half 16:9 to scope.

Not uncommon. Regardless, the overall number of movies made each year is approximately 50% 1.85:1 and 50% 2.35:1.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #6 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 02:30 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
John Schuermann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 5,729
Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2001 Post(s)
Liked: 2497
While what Josh said is true (the overall number of movies made each year is approximately 50% 1.85:1 and 50% 2.35:1), it is also true that the vast majority of the most popular films are 2.35:1 / 2.40:1. Just check the list of the top grossing movies of all time. Out of 100 films, 76 are Scope. It's pretty consistent year to year in the box office results too.

John Schuermann
The Screening Room Home Theater Sales and Design
JS Music and Sound Film Scoring and Sound Design
John Schuermann is offline  
post #7 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 08:51 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
All interesting stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

As for "1.78:1" or "16:9" movies, no feature films are actually produced at that ratio..

With the exception of Avatar and Voyage of the Dawn Treader perhaps?

What's also interesting if you watch the Iron Man deleted scenes they're in 16:9 or 1.85 which would make you think that's how the whole movie was filmed and then cropped to scope?

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
post #8 of 43 Old 03-17-2014, 09:21 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

All interesting stuff.
With the exception of Avatar and Voyage of the Dawn Treader perhaps?

The standards for theatrical projection are 1.85:1 and 2.40:1. Those are the ratios that filmmakers compose for.

Avatar was released to theaters in multiple aspect ratios, with instructions that it should be projected at whichever ratio would be largest on the screen. As far as I'm aware, Voyage of the Dawn Treader only played at 2.40:1 theatrically. The Blu-rays for both movies are open-matte transfers, exposing more picture information than was seen in theaters.
Quote:
What's also interesting if you watch the Iron Man deleted scenes they're in 16:9 or 1.85 which would make you think that's how the whole movie was filmed and then cropped to scope?

Iron Man and Iron Man 2 were photographed on Super 35 film with the intention that they be matted down to a final aspect ratio of 2.40:1. Iron Man 3 was shot digitally, but with the same intent for matting. The "OAR" for all three movies is 2.40:1.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #9 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 07:43 AM
Senior Member
 
Kevin Snyder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Shorewood, MN
Posts: 341
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 33
Good information. Thank you.
Kevin Snyder is offline  
post #10 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 08:29 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
IMAX throws a wrench in the works. IMAX screens have their own proprietary aspect ratios. The old film-based IMAX theaters have a super-tall 1.43:1 ratio. These are being phased out. The newers digital IMAX screens are 1.9:1. Most Hollywood movies that play in IMAX theaters maintain their Original Aspect Ratio and are projected letterboxed onto the screens. However, a handful of movies such as Avatar and Life of Pi were released with specially modified copies to fill the IMAX screens. Then there are the few movies like The Dark Knight that incorporate IMAX footage and have variable aspect ratios.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #11 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 10:04 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
John Schuermann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 5,729
Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2001 Post(s)
Liked: 2497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

The standards for theatrical projection are 1.85:1 and 2.40:1. Those are the ratios that filmmakers compose for.

Geez, not to get all particular and nitpicky and all, but you should probably amend that to say "Hollywood" or "Big Budget" filmmakers. Lots and lots of independent films these days are shot 16:9. Of course, many of them don't end up in theaters, they just end up on cable, Blu-ray, VOD, or DVD (if anywhere at all). When they do end up in theaters, they just get (very slightly) cropped.

John Schuermann
The Screening Room Home Theater Sales and Design
JS Music and Sound Film Scoring and Sound Design
John Schuermann is offline  
post #12 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 10:16 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
An interesting excerpt from blu-ray.com from a James Cameron interview on Avatar,

James Cameron informed that Avatar was being shot in "a 16:9 ratio." 3D theatrical exhibition would be in 1.78:1 in the theaters that could project it at that ratio; for 2D theatrical exhibition, a cinemascope-ratio (2.39:1) picture was being extracted from the 1.78:1 frame.

Cameron explained: "I actually think that the extra screen height really works well in 3D. It really pulls you through the screen. So I'm actually going back on years of kind of eschewing the kind of 1.85 format, now saying 1.85 – or actually, it's 1.78:1 – actually works really well in 3D. But only in 3D. I still like the scope ratio compositionally for flat projection."

Ultimately, 1.78:1 is also being used for the Blu-ray (which, at least in this edition, is only 2D). Note that, as the picture was originally shot in 1.78:1, no image information is being lost; on the contrary, the 1.78:1 frame shows more information on the top and bottom than the scope-ratioed image.

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
post #13 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 12:50 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Schuermann View Post

Geez, not to get all particular and nitpicky and all, but you should probably amend that to say "Hollywood" or "Big Budget" filmmakers. Lots and lots of independent films these days are shot 16:9. Of course, many of them don't end up in theaters, they just end up on cable, Blu-ray, VOD, or DVD (if anywhere at all). When they do end up in theaters, they just get (very slightly) cropped.

I did say that those were the standards for theatrical projection. smile.gif

I'm sure that most of those indie filmmakers compose for 1.85:1 in the hopes (however futile) of getting a theatrical release. The difference beween 1.85:1 and 1.78:1 is so small that it doesn't really matter anyway.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #14 of 43 Old 03-18-2014, 12:54 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

An interesting excerpt from blu-ray.com from a James Cameron interview on Avatar,

James Cameron informed that Avatar was being shot in "a 16:9 ratio." 3D theatrical exhibition would be in 1.78:1 in the theaters that could project it at that ratio; for 2D theatrical exhibition, a cinemascope-ratio (2.39:1) picture was being extracted from the 1.78:1 frame.

Cameron explained: "I actually think that the extra screen height really works well in 3D. It really pulls you through the screen. So I'm actually going back on years of kind of eschewing the kind of 1.85 format, now saying 1.85 – or actually, it's 1.78:1 – actually works really well in 3D. But only in 3D. I still like the scope ratio compositionally for flat projection."

Ultimately, 1.78:1 is also being used for the Blu-ray (which, at least in this edition, is only 2D). Note that, as the picture was originally shot in 1.78:1, no image information is being lost; on the contrary, the 1.78:1 frame shows more information on the top and bottom than the scope-ratioed image.

There are no theaters that will project a movie at 1.78:1. The projection standard is 1.85:1. Cameron is using those terms interchangeably in the interview because the difference between the two ratios is negligible.

The native capture ratio of the cameras that Cameron used for Avatar was indeed 1.78:1, and the Blu-ray is fully open-matte. However, when the movie was released to theaters in multiple aspect ratio options, the choices were either 1.85:1, 2.40:1, 1.43:1 (for IMAX 15/70) or 1.9:1 (for IMAX digital).

As a side note, James Cameron actually composed Avatar for 2.40:1 during photography. He made the decision to open the mattes only after-the-fact during post production. The 16:9 Blu-ray is very awkwardly framed, with a little excess headroom above the actors and a whole lot of dead space at the bottom of the frame. The English subtitles for the Na'Vi dialogue are positioned way high up in the middle of the screen.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #15 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 09:52 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
stanger89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Marion, IA
Posts: 23,130
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4156 Post(s)
Liked: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

Actually many DVD profiler contributions are made by inserting the disc as well, so a lot will have the actual encoded information from the disc listed. And yes they are still all user submitted so to be taken with a grain of salt for sure.

FWIW, DVD Profiler doesn't scan the disc for information. When you insert the disc and let DVD Profiler scan it, what it's doing is looking for the Disc ID, so it can find the profile associated with that ID. All of the data in DVD Profiler (that I'm aware of) is entered/submitted by users, none is read from the disc other than the Disc ID.
stanger89 is offline  
post #16 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 10:03 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

FWIW, DVD Profiler doesn't scan the disc for information. When you insert the disc and let DVD Profiler scan it, what it's doing is looking for the Disc ID, so it can find the profile associated with that ID. All of the data in DVD Profiler (that I'm aware of) is entered/submitted by users, none is read from the disc other than the Disc ID.

Hmm, not sure about that? I have actually submitted titles that weren't in the DVD Profiler database and the easiest way to do it is by inserting the dvd which adds all the data, UPC code, actors, directors and cover scans automatically. Unless it's pulling the data from another source but I wouldn't know how or where that would happen.

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
post #17 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 10:55 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
stanger89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Marion, IA
Posts: 23,130
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4156 Post(s)
Liked: 2384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

Hmm, not sure about that? I have actually submitted titles that weren't in the DVD Profiler database and the easiest way to do it is by inserting the dvd which adds all the data, UPC code, actors, directors and cover scans automatically. Unless it's pulling the data from another source but I wouldn't know how or where that would happen.

I've never seen it do that.
stanger89 is offline  
post #18 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 10:58 AM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
Kamikaze13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Liked: 51
Haven't done it for a while so I'll pay more attention on the next one to see for sure.

VIDEO: JVC DLA-RS57U Projector / 122″ EluneVision Reference Studio 4K Cinemascope Screen - Oppo BDP-103 Blu-Ray Player - PlayStation 3 AVR: Anthem MRX-1120 SPEAKERS: Paradigm Monitor 11 Mains - Paradigm Monitor CC-390 Center - Paradigm Monitor ADP-390 Surrounds x 4 - Polk MC60 Atmos Ceiling x 4 SUBWOOFERS: SVS PB2000 / Velodyne DPS-12
Kamikaze13 is offline  
post #19 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 11:14 AM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
DavidHir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 14,266
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2532 Post(s)
Liked: 2198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

So I've been looking at changing to a CIH screen and I cringe at not being able to watch Avengers on my full sized 1.78:1 screen but I wondered how many of my 590 Blu Ray/DVD titles were actually in that ratio.

Well the short answer is 30. Yes 30! and around 10 of those were animated.

According to my DVD profiler, here's the break down on how many of my titles have which aspect ratio, (I didn't include TV series, kids movies except for major animated pictures, or 1.33:1)

1.66:1 - 1

1.75:1 - 1

1.78:1 - 30

1.85:1 - 92

"16x9" movies - 124 out of 453

2.20:1 - 1

2.35:1 - 174

2.39:1 - 9 (Mostly Disney)

2.40:1 - 143

2.55:1 - 2

"Scope" movies - 329 out of 453

This really is a no brainer!

If I had more blu ray titles there would probably be more 2.40:1 titles. Many of my duplicate titles are 2.35 on DVD and 2.40 on Blu Ray.

Here's my collection for anyone who wants see what type of movies are included, http://www.invelos.com/dvdcollection.aspx/Dragon's%20Lair

I did a very rough estimate of my Blu-ray collection and about 55% are scope; 45% mostly 1:85 or so which are largely drama and to a lesser extent comedies. That number surprised me it was this large. However, I still decided to go scope based on my comments in the other threads. smile.gif
DavidHir is online now  
post #20 of 43 Old 03-19-2014, 08:12 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
blastermaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sunny Okanagan
Posts: 2,103
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 601 Post(s)
Liked: 765
I got curious, so I did a roundup of my movies and came up with:

1.85: 1 movies - 40

2.35: 1 movies - 147

Yup, it's a no brainer going scope for me!

Gear: The Brains: Anthem MRX 720. The Brawn: Outlaw 7700. The Fun: Custom PC w/ Logitech 27 & reverse mount pedals, Nintendo Switch, Playstation PS4 Pro. The Visuals: Oppo 203, Darbee Darblet, Optoma HD3300, Panamorph UH480, DIY 138" Curved screen using Semour Centerstage XD AT material. The Audio: 7.1.4: LCR: Tannoy DC12i. Sides: Tannoy IW63DC. Rears: Tannoy DC8i. Ceilings: Tannoy CMS 603/601 DCBM. Subs: 3X Micro Marty and 1X Full Marty.
blastermaster is offline  
post #21 of 43 Old 12-29-2017, 10:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Killer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 434
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked: 51
% of 16:9 to 2:35 aspect ratio in films?

I tried google and haven't found what I'm looking for yet.
Is there a source that identifies what the % of 2:35 vs % of 16:9 (or other aspect ratio) is found in Nolan films (and others)?

Thanks
Killer is offline  
post #22 of 43 Old 12-29-2017, 04:08 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Erie Pa
Posts: 7,592
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2030 Post(s)
Liked: 1022
In general I think about 50/50 new releases are in scope. Almost all of the blockbusters are in scope though. Nolan films are known for their changing aspect ratios and they go between scope and IMAX1.89 during parts of the movie he wants you to feel totally immersed by. That is quite different than watching scope and or flat movies where they are best shown at a constant height.

Bud
bud16415 is online now  
post #23 of 43 Old 12-29-2017, 08:06 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Josh Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Planet Boston, source of the spice, Melange.
Posts: 24,589
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3873 Post(s)
Liked: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killer View Post
I tried google and haven't found what I'm looking for yet.
Is there a source that identifies what the % of 2:35 vs % of 16:9 (or other aspect ratio) is found in Nolan films (and others)?
For Christopher Nolan specifically:

Following - 1.37:1
Memento - 2.40:1
Insomnia - 2.40:1
Batman Begins - 2.40:1
The Prestige - 2.40:1
The Dark Knight - variable 2.40:1 / 1.78:1 (Blu-ray presentation)
Inception - 2.40:1
The Dark Knight Rises - variable 2.40:1 / 1.78:1
Interstellar - variable 2.40:1 / 1.78:1
Dunkirk - variable 2.20:1 / 1.78:1

For the wider range of movies in general, the overall ratio is about 50/50 2.40:1 vs. 1.85:1. However, big-budget studio tentpole movies are heavily weighted to 2.40:1 (70% or more each year), while indie dramas and comedies are more often 1.85:1. Depending on your viewing habits, you may see one of these aspect ratios a lot more often than the other.

Josh Z
Home Theater Writer/Editor, High-Def Digest

My opinions are my own, and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers.
Josh Z is online now  
post #24 of 43 Old 12-30-2017, 07:15 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Erie Pa
Posts: 7,592
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2030 Post(s)
Liked: 1022
It is important to note for newcomers to this the distinction between variable aspect ratios and expanding and or expanding variable aspect ratio movies. In Nolan movies that change AR they do not go from scope to 1.78:1 by displaying black bars to the sides of the scope frame, as would be the case if they shifted between scope and flat or 1.85:1.

They maintain their width of scope and expand in height as if IMAX. The only difference between the IMAX1.89 in theaters and the home release on BD 1.78 is small but to see it as intended at home you need a screen sized for IMAX not flat.

The true and original IMAX AR is 1.43:1 and what you would have seen say Dunkirk on if you viewed it at a true IMAX 70mm theater. Those versions are not available for home use. If you were to have such a copy it should be presented as wide as scope and let to expand even taller than what we get to see in the BD version. That’s the intent of this one particular director and how he is suggesting you view his movies. Other directors play with AR changing within movies also as an artistic effect.

As to the OP question I like to look at movie reviews on IMDb and often click on “More” and then click on “Technical Specs”. Here is an example of the information on the latest Nolan film Dunkirk.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5013056/...ef_=tt_ql_dt_6

Bud
bud16415 is online now  
post #25 of 43 Old 12-30-2017, 11:30 PM
Advanced Member
 
CinemaAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked: 141
The North American standards for aspect ratio projection are, Flat(masked) Widescreen 1.85:1, CinemaScope or Scope is 2.39:1, Panavision is 2.40:1. IMAX 1.43:1 film and IMAX Digital Format(IDF) 1.89:1. Yes, there is other oddball or classic ratios out there, namely Quentin's Hateful eight filmed on Ultra Panavision 70 and projected as 2.76:1, and various others. Aspect ratios are a tool in the toolbox for producers/directors.

List of motion Picture film formats https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...motion_picture)

Color motion picture film https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_motion_picture_film

List of film sound systems https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._sound_systems

The American Film Institute (AFI.com) does not categorize movies by aspect ratio. They are categorized by, Production Studio, Distribution company, Actor/Actress or Year of theatrical release.

However, http://www.blu-ray.com/ does list the aspect ratio on each title released. However, Blu-Ray does not include the "original" aspect ratio. Yes, it may show 2.35:1 for the disk, but the feature was released in 2.40:1. Anything over 2.35:1 on disk is huge black bars on the top and bottom of the picture. This is referred to as TV widescreen(16.9) format fitting. You will see this notice on the bottom back cover of most Blu-ray cases,

Widescreen version presented in a "letterbox" widescreen format preserving the "Scope" aspect ratio of its original theatrical exhibition. Enhanced for widescreen TV.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.

Some servers can do non-encrypted playback to an A/V projector, but it's just a ridiculously expensive media player if you don't have a cinema projector.

Last edited by CinemaAndy; 12-30-2017 at 11:42 PM.
CinemaAndy is offline  
post #26 of 43 Old 12-31-2017, 12:27 AM
Advanced Member
 
CinemaAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
It is important to note for newcomers to this the distinction between variable aspect ratios and expanding and or expanding variable aspect ratio movies. In Nolan movies that change AR they do not go from scope to 1.78:1 by displaying black bars to the sides of the scope frame, as would be the case if they shifted between scope and flat or 1.85:1.
I like Nolan's movies, but they are a PITA on initial setup for the exhibition. With Dunkirk, the active image is 3996x1818 (2.2:1) within a 3996x2160 (1.85:1) container. The film plays in a FLAT presentation. Everything is wrong with that setup.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.

Some servers can do non-encrypted playback to an A/V projector, but it's just a ridiculously expensive media player if you don't have a cinema projector.
CinemaAndy is offline  
post #27 of 43 Old 12-31-2017, 08:24 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Erie Pa
Posts: 7,592
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2030 Post(s)
Liked: 1022
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaAndy View Post
I like Nolan's movies, but they are a PITA on initial setup for the exhibition. With Dunkirk, the active image is 3996x1818 (2.2:1) within a 3996x2160 (1.85:1) container. The film plays in a FLAT presentation. Everything is wrong with that setup.
With being unburdened with a screen I guess I was unaware of any of that and my setup was quite simple. I put the BD in my player and zoomed the image to as wide as I liked and shifted the image to place the center of the image as high as I wanted, checked focus and hit play.

I do the same thing with a BD screening of Avatar. It is presented as flat but my setup is IMAX as that’s the way that version should be watched.

Bud
bud16415 is online now  
post #28 of 43 Old 12-31-2017, 10:55 AM
Advanced Member
 
CinemaAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
With being unburdened with a screen I guess I was unaware of any of that and my setup was quite simple. I put the BD in my player and zoomed the image to as wide as I liked and shifted the image to place the center of the image as high as I wanted, checked focus and hit play.

I do the same thing with a BD screening of Avatar. It is presented as flat but my setup is IMAX as that’s the way that version should be watched.
True IMAX on a 16x9 widescreen TV is constant height with the black bars on the sides, and tiny black bars top and bottom the same with a projected 16x9 IMAX movie. All IMAX content is to be played in flat, they have made nothing or used scope for any film. To me, an IMAX feature is messed up when they stretch and crop the original to fill a 16x9 screen. Just my opinion.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.

Some servers can do non-encrypted playback to an A/V projector, but it's just a ridiculously expensive media player if you don't have a cinema projector.
CinemaAndy is offline  
post #29 of 43 Old 12-31-2017, 12:04 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Erie Pa
Posts: 7,592
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2030 Post(s)
Liked: 1022
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaAndy View Post
True IMAX on a 16x9 widescreen TV is constant height with the black bars on the sides, and tiny black bars top and bottom the same with a projected 16x9 IMAX movie. All IMAX content is to be played in flat, they have made nothing or used scope for any film. To me, an IMAX feature is messed up when they stretch and crop the original to fill a 16x9 screen. Just my opinion.
The keyword in your post is “TV” you are correct with a TV you are set in stone as to your options. The beauty of projection is you have zoom. With zoom you can watch content year in and year out as CIH (flat and scope) and when Nolan pops out an expanding IMAX1.89 blockbuster you can easily watch that also. Do I wish I could get the true IMAX feature somehow for home? I sure do. Do I wish a movie like Sully would have been released the way Avatar was giving me the IMAX1.89 version? I sure do.

With TV all you can do is slide your seating around.

Bud
bud16415 is online now  
post #30 of 43 Old 12-31-2017, 09:46 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
CAVX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 8,942
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 372 Post(s)
Liked: 179
Slightly OT but watching shows on Netflix on a new UHD TV and I noticed some weird stuff going on with the letter boxing.

Great to see how many shows are now scope and a heap of other programming is a ratio somewhere between Scope and 16:9. Almost like 2.00:1?

The strangest one is the vertical offset of The Fifth Element where the bottom bar was half thickness of normal letter boxing and the balance added to the top bar. This means it would not work on my CIH setup.



Sent from my CPH1701 using Tapatalk

Mark Techer

I love my Constant Image Height system!
CAVX is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply 2.35:1 Constant Image Height Chat

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off