Mastering Movie Audio for the Home - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Forum Jump: 
 134Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 04:14 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Scott Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 3,257
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1880 Post(s)
Liked: 4895
Mastering Movie Audio for the Home



Brian Vessa, Executive Director of Audio Mastering at Sony Pictures, discusses the process of mastering movie audio for home consumption, including the challenge of creating a home mix that sounds good on a wide variety of sound systems, dynamic compression, EQ and the X-Curve, volume levels, reducing the front imaging width, the promise and problems of immersive audio, the differences between the various immersive formats, having to create a separate mix for each immersive format, the impact of streaming on the audio mix, answers to chat-room questions, and more.


Like AVS Forum on Facebook
Follow AVS Forum on Twitter
+1 AVS Forum on Google+
Scott Wilkinson is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 06:40 PM
Member
 
MaxTemp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Sydney
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 53
Thanks for your work Scott.
It seems to me its a waste of time and resources to do a separate mix for home. As even Brian Vessa acknowledges there's multiple setups and he tests about two extremes (TV speakers, near-field multiple speaker setup) so it hopefully covers everything else. He gave examples of bad setups where speakers are too far from the TV and it doesn't follow the picture.
So the best case scenario, by remixing the audio track, he has improved the experience slightly on certain bad setups. I don't see how those people will even know the difference.
I agree with Anthony Grimani where one mix as intended by the director should also be used for the home. People watching movies using TV speakers (or bad sound bars) cannot experience the audio as intended no matter how much they tinker (ruin) the original audio. The AVR should take care of the rest with bad speaker positioning or limited speakers.
With the immersive formats, this should be even more true, no matter how many speakers the original mix was. DTS X even claims if your position of the speakers isnt ideal, it will still take care of it. Having the original audio for the home will cut down costs and time and allow releases with Atmos soundtracks get released without changes as there's already a decent catalogue available for the studios.
MaxTemp is offline  
post #3 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 07:40 PM
Senior Member
 
boguspomp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxTemp View Post
Thanks for your work Scott.
It seems to me its a waste of time and resources to do a separate mix for home. As even Brian Vessa acknowledges there's multiple setups and he tests about two extremes (TV speakers, near-field multiple speaker setup) so it hopefully covers everything else. He gave examples of bad setups where speakers are too far from the TV and it doesn't follow the picture.
So the best case scenario, by remixing the audio track, he has improved the experience slightly on certain bad setups. I don't see how those people will even know the difference.
I agree with Anthony Grimani where one mix as intended by the director should also be used for the home. People watching movies using TV speakers (or bad sound bars) cannot experience the audio as intended no matter how much they tinker (ruin) the original audio. The AVR should take care of the rest with bad speaker positioning or limited speakers.
With the immersive formats, this should be even more true, no matter how many speakers the original mix was. DTS X even claims if your position of the speakers isnt ideal, it will still take care of it. Having the original audio for the home will cut down costs and time and allow releases with Atmos soundtracks get released without changes as there's already a decent catalogue available for the studios.
The most important point he made - which I support - is that you would not hear the dialog, if you would use the cinema mix. I think it is a good idea to mix the movies for this very different environment.

@Scott - Too bad you didn't ask him which movies he worked on/is working on creating the new Atmos/DTS mixes.
boguspomp is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 08:20 PM
Senior Member
 
WayneJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 333
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked: 105
I would still like original theatrical mixes included on disc as an option even if it is lossy DD.
WayneJoy is offline  
post #5 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 10:36 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
FilmMixer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Los Angeles Area, CA. USA
Posts: 8,604
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2183 Post(s)
Liked: 2757
Just to clarify somethings Brian said....

1. Theatrical Atmos supports 118 objects, not 128.

2. Home Atmos can have a maximum of 20 objects. The encoder defaults to 12.

As mentioned, Dolby uses spectral coding to combine objects when they are co located, share frequency spectrum, etc.

I don't know what the DTS solution is.

3. If the bed is 7.1 (and for the great majority of time moving forward mixes will be reliant on beds since that is a necessity in commercial theaters) the following is true..

Atmos at its default can provide 7.1 + 12 objects.

DTS can have a 7.1 bed + 9 objects. Or 7.1 + 3.0 dialog if they want to enable dialog level control... Or ????
Dan Hitchman, IgorZep and stampol like this.
FilmMixer is offline  
post #6 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 10:48 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
FilmMixer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Los Angeles Area, CA. USA
Posts: 8,604
Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2183 Post(s)
Liked: 2757
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxTemp View Post
Thanks for your work Scott.
It seems to me its a waste of time and resources to do a separate mix for home. As even Brian Vessa acknowledges there's multiple setups and he tests about two extremes (TV speakers, near-field multiple speaker setup) so it hopefully covers everything else. He gave examples of bad setups where speakers are too far from the TV and it doesn't follow the picture.
So the best case scenario, by remixing the audio track, he has improved the experience slightly on certain bad setups. I don't see how those people will even know the difference.
I agree with Anthony Grimani where one mix as intended by the director should also be used for the home. People watching movies using TV speakers (or bad sound bars) cannot experience the audio as intended no matter how much they tinker (ruin) the original audio. The AVR should take care of the rest with bad speaker positioning or limited speakers.
With the immersive formats, this should be even more true, no matter how many speakers the original mix was. DTS X even claims if your position of the speakers isnt ideal, it will still take care of it. Having the original audio for the home will cut down costs and time and allow releases with Atmos soundtracks get released without changes as there's already a decent catalogue available for the studios.
Except your still overlooking the main point for why remixing is desirable.

The SPL reference at home is completely different. Which changes the specral balance in significant ways. That is the whole point of doing these mixes.

Trust me.... If you took our theatrical mix of "Fury" vs what we delivered on BR (which I did alongside Brian for Sony) you would have a difficult time understanding the dialog without blowing yourself out of your room when the action kicked in without constantly riding the volume. While I appreciate your and Mr Grimani's idealistic craving for purity and simplicity, IMO it is a naive point of view that lacks real world experience to back it up.

Cost, effort and time aren't what is holding up the roll out of Dolby Atmos BRs.... IMO many studios are holding off at this point until UHD comes to market.

Regardless, you must spend the time to master Atmos for the home... Same will be the case as DTS:X rolls out.... It's a great deal more involved than taking a 5.1 or 7.1 PCM master and crunching it with a lossless encoder. Object number reduction and other considerations require mixer supervision. Lossless encoding does not.

Brian might not have articulated this clearly, but we don't monitor the 5.1 near field master through TV speakers..... We use those to qc the rarely used 2.0 delivery .... Almost all broadcast, optical disc and streaming 5.1 delivery is derived from the main 5.1 near filed mix.

If you want examples of my mixes that have been "ruined" by going through this process, please check out the near field mixes on "Fury," "Riddick," "Anchorman 2" or "The Heat..."

Last edited by FilmMixer; 06-12-2015 at 10:56 PM.
FilmMixer is offline  
post #7 of 480 Old 06-12-2015, 11:51 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Dan Hitchman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 14,084
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4310 Post(s)
Liked: 2438
Better tell Brian that he can use more than 12 simultaneous objects for home Atmos mixing!

Also, when they monitor a near field immersive mix and only use a 7.1.4 configuration... what happens to the mix when it is played back on a Trinnov (or other high end processor) with 32 or so rendered outputs? Did the near field version somehow get dumbed down since it was rejiggered on an 11.1 system?

Wouldn't you want to also play the soundtrack back on a 32/34 speaker system to make sure it sounds great at its maximum home capabilities?

Listen up, studios! Dolby Atmos Lite™ print-outs must stop!!
Dan Hitchman is online now  
post #8 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 03:16 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmMixer View Post
Trust me.... If you took our theatrical mix of "Fury" vs what we delivered on BR (which I did alongside Brian for Sony) you would have a difficult time understanding the dialog without blowing yourself out of your room when the action kicked in without constantly riding the volume.
You co-remixed Fury for BD? How much dB gain do dialogues have over the theatrical mix? BTW, I think studios should put the original mix in lossless and default the disc with the home re-mix in a lossy track, because, if I'm not mistaken, this near-field re-mix thing is not performed by all studios, right? So, how does one know which discs have theatrical mix and which near-field? Doesn't this practice create confusion, especially since instead of giving different mixes in additional tracks, studios put foreign languages (and I'm not american) of US movies, wasting disc space.

Last edited by Optimus_Fine; 06-13-2015 at 04:22 AM.
Optimus_Fine is offline  
post #9 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 04:26 AM
Member
 
MaxTemp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Sydney
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmMixer View Post
Except your still overlooking the main point for why remixing is desirable.

The SPL reference at home is completely different. Which changes the specral balance in significant ways. That is the whole point of doing these mixes.

Trust me.... If you took our theatrical mix of "Fury" vs what we delivered on BR (which I did alongside Brian for Sony) you would have a difficult time understanding the dialog without blowing yourself out of your room when the action kicked in without constantly riding the volume. While I appreciate your and Mr Grimani's idealistic craving for purity and simplicity, IMO it is a naive point of view that lacks real world experience to back it up.

Cost, effort and time aren't what is holding up the roll out of Dolby Atmos BRs.... IMO many studios are holding off at this point until UHD comes to market.

Regardless, you must spend the time to master Atmos for the home... Same will be the case as DTS:X rolls out.... It's a great deal more involved than taking a 5.1 or 7.1 PCM master and crunching it with a lossless encoder. Object number reduction and other considerations require mixer supervision. Lossless encoding does not.

Brian might not have articulated this clearly, but we don't monitor the 5.1 near field master through TV speakers..... We use those to qc the rarely used 2.0 delivery .... Almost all broadcast, optical disc and streaming 5.1 delivery is derived from the main 5.1 near filed mix.

If you want examples of my mixes that have been "ruined" by going through this process, please check out the near field mixes on "Fury," "Riddick," "Anchorman 2" or "The Heat..."
If important elements like dialog are the main reasons for a new mix, wouldnt having it as an 'object' fix the that issue with the immersive formats so the consumer has full control of the volume?
MaxTemp is offline  
post #10 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 05:19 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NYC
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Is there a link to the PDF that Brian wrote and referred to in this video?

Thanks.

-paul.
pnMedia is offline  
post #11 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 07:04 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
saprano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bronx NY
Posts: 4,118
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Liked: 598
Why can't we get both the theatrical and home mix on bluray? Some home mixes are done very well (Transformers 3 by Greg P Russell- Though imo he didn't do as good of a job with 4. Too much droning bass and too loud) but it would be great if we were able to choose and see what sounds best in our rooms.

home theater addict
saprano is offline  
post #12 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 07:09 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
saprano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bronx NY
Posts: 4,118
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Liked: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmMixer View Post
Except your still overlooking the main point for why remixing is desirable.

The SPL reference at home is completely different. Which changes the specral balance in significant ways. That is the whole point of doing these mixes.

Trust me.... If you took our theatrical mix of "Fury" vs what we delivered on BR (which I did alongside Brian for Sony) you would have a difficult time understanding the dialog without blowing yourself out of your room when the action kicked in without constantly riding the volume. While I appreciate your and Mr Grimani's idealistic craving for purity and simplicity, IMO it is a naive point of view that lacks real world experience to back it up.

Cost, effort and time aren't what is holding up the roll out of Dolby Atmos BRs.... IMO many studios are holding off at this point until UHD comes to market.

Regardless, you must spend the time to master Atmos for the home... Same will be the case as DTS:X rolls out.... It's a great deal more involved than taking a 5.1 or 7.1 PCM master and crunching it with a lossless encoder. Object number reduction and other considerations require mixer supervision. Lossless encoding does not.

Brian might not have articulated this clearly, but we don't monitor the 5.1 near field master through TV speakers..... We use those to qc the rarely used 2.0 delivery .... Almost all broadcast, optical disc and streaming 5.1 delivery is derived from the main 5.1 near filed mix.

If you want examples of my mixes that have been "ruined" by going through this process, please check out the near field mixes on "Fury," "Riddick," "Anchorman 2" or "The Heat..."
Does Interstellar bluray use the theatrical mix? If you read through the review thread some are having to do exactly that.

home theater addict
saprano is offline  
post #13 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 07:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Somebody should put down a list of BDs with theatrical vs near-field mixes, even better if technical differences are detailed, like dB gain.
Optimus_Fine is offline  
post #14 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 09:18 AM
Senior Member
 
boguspomp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Liked: 122
Whatever they do with their mixes, I still add 3-4dB to the center channel when watching a movie. Very often that is the amount needed to have a well balanced mix for enjoying AND understanding the dialog. When listening to music in 5.1 I dial back the center to have a well balanced sound.
Dave in Green likes this.
boguspomp is offline  
post #15 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 11:17 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: NYC
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by saprano View Post
Why can't we get both the theatrical and home mix on bluray? Some home mixes are done very well (Transformers 3 by Greg P Russell- Though imo he didn't do as good of a job with 4. Too much droning bass and too loud) but it would be great if we were able to choose and see what sounds best in our rooms.
Is there a particular release version of TF3 (Dark of the Moon) Blue-ray that includes this Home Theater mix that you are referring to?

thanks.

-paul.
pnMedia is offline  
post #16 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 11:47 AM
Senior Member
 
speavler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Danville, CA
Posts: 319
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked: 43
Best job I ever had..
speavler is offline  
post #17 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 12:03 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Blacklightning's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Edmonton,AB Canada
Posts: 2,074
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 996 Post(s)
Liked: 842
I forgot to ask why so many Blu-rays are in 5.1.
Blacklightning is offline  
post #18 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 12:35 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Gooddoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,573
Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3612 Post(s)
Liked: 3201
There are folks with cinema speakers in their homes that kind of get the short end of the stick here. Oh well, the masses drive policy, not the 1%'ers.
Gooddoc is offline  
post #19 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 12:42 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
saprano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bronx NY
Posts: 4,118
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Liked: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnMedia View Post
Is there a particular release version of TF3 (Dark of the Moon) Blue-ray that includes this Home Theater mix that you are referring to?

thanks.

-paul.
There are no different versions. It's the main mix

He talks about it here starting at 2:10-


It sounds so much better than T4 imo. Everything is so even. I don't know what went wrong with part 4. Maby Dolby Atmos has something to do with it. Some parts sound compressed too.

home theater addict

Last edited by saprano; 06-14-2015 at 05:58 AM.
saprano is offline  
post #20 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 12:46 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Scott Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 3,257
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1880 Post(s)
Liked: 4895
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnMedia View Post
Is there a link to the PDF that Brian wrote and referred to in this video?

Thanks.

-paul.
I'll post it on AVS as soon as I can...please stand by...

Last edited by Scott Wilkinson; 06-13-2015 at 02:27 PM.
Scott Wilkinson is offline  
post #21 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 02:26 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
Orbitron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,274
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked: 522
Brian mentioned the inclusion of soundbars as part of the evaluation process with immersive mixing - curious, what brand and model is being used?

Last edited by Orbitron; 06-13-2015 at 04:41 PM.
Orbitron is online now  
post #22 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 08:36 PM
Senior Member
 
WayneJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 333
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked: 105
FilmMixer,


If I calibrate my system with Audessey, set the volume to -10dB from "THX reference", disable THX and Audessey re-eq, and watch Fury, would I be getting close to the ideal results for your home theater mix?
WayneJoy is offline  
post #23 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 08:52 PM
Advanced Member
 
pitviper33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Eastern TN
Posts: 690
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 267 Post(s)
Liked: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmMixer View Post
Except your still overlooking the main point for why remixing is desirable.

The SPL reference at home is completely different. Which changes the specral balance in significant ways. That is the whole point of doing these mixes.
To clarify: Are you stating that systems like Audyssey Dynamic EQ, which most of us turn on when we choose to play back at below cinema reference volume, do not adequately correct the spectral balance shifts that come with the lower SPL?


As far as I know, the entire point of a REFERENCE playback level is knowing how much to compensate for different playback levels. If the home remix doesn't have a defined (and publicized!) reference level, how are we to know how to compensate for spectral balance at the level we choose to watch on any particular day?
pitviper33 is offline  
post #24 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 09:11 PM
AVS Forum Addicted Member
 
Dan Hitchman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 14,084
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4310 Post(s)
Liked: 2438
Quote:
Originally Posted by pitviper33 View Post
To clarify: Are you stating that systems like Audyssey Dynamic EQ, which most of us turn on when we choose to play back at below cinema reference volume, do not adequately correct the spectral balance shifts that come with the lower SPL?


As far as I know, the entire point of a REFERENCE playback level is knowing how much to compensate for different playback levels. If the home remix doesn't have a defined (and publicized!) reference level, how are we to know how to compensate for spectral balance at the level we choose to watch on any particular day?
The near-field remixers are balancing every element from the original stems, so it's not a global audio adjustment. It's much finer tuned than something from an auto calibration tool.

Listen up, studios! Dolby Atmos Lite™ print-outs must stop!!
Dan Hitchman is online now  
post #25 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 09:26 PM
Advanced Member
 
CinemaAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimus_Fine View Post
Somebody should put down a list of BDs with theatrical vs near-field mixes, even better if technical differences are detailed, like dB gain.
If your BD lists 6.1 you have the theatrical mix, anything else you have the afterlife mix. All studios mix for home, not just Sony/Columbia. Cinema DCP can do full 24 bits uncompressed @ 192Khz multi channel WAV file. Most movies are Linear PCM audio set at 24-bit 48kHz resolution or 20-bit 48kHz resolution, either in 5.1 or 7.1 channel layouts. 16-bit audio is sometimes used. ATMOS info is too much to type. BD as follows,
LPCM (lossless) 27.648 Mbit/s
Dolby Digital 640 kbit/s
Dolby Digital Plus 4.736 Mbit/s
Dolby TrueHD (lossless) 18.64 Mbit/s
DTS Digital Surround 1.524 Mbit/s
DTS-HD Master Audio (lossless) 24.5 Mbit/s
ATMOS substream is added to Dolby TrueHD or Dolby Digital Plus, so that is your speed respectively for ATMOS.
DTS:X is also added similar to ATMOS, so same applies there.

Second the theatrical mix is more for volume of a large building, so a theatrical mix would not sound better than a near field mix on a HT.

Third the biggest problem BD faces is lack of storage, no 3D UHD/4K, there is only so many things you can put on a 50GB DL BD, then you have to include the backwards compatibility with it, as not ever BD player is hooked to a 7.1 AVR, the vast majority, the speakers that came with the tv the player is connected to, most often by RCA cables.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.

Some servers can do non-encrypted playback to an A/V projector, but it's just a ridiculously expensive media player if you don't have a cinema projector.
CinemaAndy is offline  
post #26 of 480 Old 06-13-2015, 09:27 PM
Advanced Member
 
pitviper33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Eastern TN
Posts: 690
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 267 Post(s)
Liked: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post
The near-field remixers are balancing every element from the original stems, so it's not a global audio adjustment. It's much finer tuned than something from an auto calibration tool.
I mean no offense, but I'd love to hear something more specific than "finer tuned". That sounds like fluff. I would expect that anyone doing the work could be quite specific about the differences, since he would presumably be using the result of the standard issue correction that most of us use as a baseline to compare against his "finer tuned" alternative.


And to nitpick just a little, we aren't talking about an auto calibration tool. We're talking about a spectral balance correction based on fairly well understood perceived loudness curves.
pitviper33 is offline  
post #27 of 480 Old 06-14-2015, 02:34 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaAndy View Post
If your BD lists 6.1 you have the theatrical mix, anything else you have the afterlife mix. All studios mix for home, not just Sony/Columbia.
I know all the specs. And I read once that some studios don't (or didn't) remix for near-field, like Paramount, but now they probably remix too, I wish I knew. I don't think the number of channels is an accurate enough spec to make us sure if a track is theatrical or near-field.
What I want to know is at how many dB below theatrical reference do near-field get remixed? Is it a standard too or is it like the music CDs where every mixer does whatever the f*** they want?
What I'm pissed about is, why should we bear to get the "don't scare the lady remix" in f***ing lossless when they could give a damn about audio bitrate. Just make the disc default to a lossy track with near-field remix and we select the theatrical mix in lossless.
I still haven't bought Jurassic Park because I read that they replaced the theatrical mix with a dynamic compressed one.
We should have the choice.
saprano and matty1137 like this.
Optimus_Fine is offline  
post #28 of 480 Old 06-14-2015, 09:27 AM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
mo949's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 1193
Disappointing that this practice is still going on.
mo949 is offline  
post #29 of 480 Old 06-14-2015, 11:20 AM
Advanced Member
 
CinemaAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optimus_Fine View Post
We should have the choice.
You will have no choice on Blu-Ray this year, or any other year. By the time video and multiple security encryptions are added to the disk, there is not much room left for 2 or 3 different audio formats. Blu-Ray is Lie Ray has always been like that.
tubetwister likes this.

And the payoff is never certain: Some observers contend that a generation has already been trained to be content with the small screen.

Some servers can do non-encrypted playback to an A/V projector, but it's just a ridiculously expensive media player if you don't have a cinema projector.
CinemaAndy is offline  
post #30 of 480 Old 06-14-2015, 12:40 PM
AVS Forum Special Member
 
saprano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Bronx NY
Posts: 4,118
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Liked: 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaAndy View Post
You will have no choice on Blu-Ray this year, or any other year. By the time video and multiple security encryptions are added to the disk, there is not much room left for 2 or 3 different audio formats. Blu-Ray is Lie Ray has always been like that.
"Uncompressed bit for bit identical from the studio master"

Heh.
mo949 likes this.

home theater addict
saprano is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply AVS Forum® Podcasts

Tags
frontpage , Home Theater Geeks

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off