What's Up With ATSC 3.0? - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 26 Old 10-29-2016, 12:59 PM - Thread Starter
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What's Up With ATSC 3.0?

Rich Chernock, CSO of Triveni Digital and chair of Technology Group 3 of the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), talks about the next generation of terrestrial television broadcasting called ATSC 3.0, including its capabilities and features, its combination of RF and IP delivery, why ATSC 2.0 was never deployed, why there is more than one audio standard for ATSC 3.0 around the world, the functional layers of the system, the importance of standards, the timeline from conception to rollout, the experimental broadcast of the World Series by Cleveland station WJW, answers to chat-room questions, and more.

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post #2 of 26 Old 11-02-2016, 10:49 AM
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Thanks for the program on ATSC 3.0. It appears that not too many folks are interested in the topic.

I look forward to the adoption of this new transmission standard. A principal reason is that it is expected to provide more reliable reception in many circumstances. I'm in a high-rise condominium in Chicago where many other buildings block a direct view of the transmission towers. So reflections and multi-path make reception with an indoor antenna difficult.
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post #3 of 26 Old 11-03-2016, 10:39 AM
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I'm interested in the new standard, as I use a rooftop antenna currently. Mostly I was interested in the "when is it coming". Hopefully the tuners are not too expensive and there are some good DVR options available, but most seem to just go with cable to avoid dealing with reception issues.
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post #4 of 26 Old 11-03-2016, 12:25 PM
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My main concern is if I will be able to watch broadcast TV on my NTSC set when ATSC 1.0 broadcasts are discontinued.

I doubt if there will be an adapter box with an NTSC antenna (RF) output (or composite video and analog L/R audio outputs) to connect to my NTSC TV.

I also doubt if there will be an adapter box with an ATSC 1.0 antenna (RF) output to connect to the antenna input on my existing ATSC 1.0-to-NTSC converter box.
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post #5 of 26 Old 11-04-2016, 09:59 AM
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I use an antenna that is in my attic. Though I am in an area where there are several ATSC 1.0 stations, I am in somewhat of a valley. Rain, leaves on trees, and wind all affect my reception. IMHO, getting multiple channels clearly was, I thought, one of the promises of ATSC 1.0.

As I understand it, ATSC 1.0 was built on a modulation scheme that still had the multipath problems that analog broadcast had. Essentially, I have multipath reception problems, and when those are present, the reception is, IMHO, worse than analog reception since the signal will pixelate or simply drop out completely.

There are other people in other parts of the country that have more stations than I do in my area, and they also suffer from this same multipath reception problem.

I heard that there was a test of ATSC 3.0's mobile reception where watchable picture and sound were still received in a tunnel. That, IMHO, sounds impressive. However, I hope that the promise of superior reception in any circumstance is actually achieved with ATSC 3.0. If I were not in this valley, I could probably also receive several distant stations, too.

With the true promise great reception of ATSC 3.0 signals both local and distant, I would expect that cable and satellite companies will fight against ATSC 3.0, however, I do hope that it actually does hit the air at some time in the not so distant future.

Edit: I was only able to overcome most of the problems that I had with multipath reception by adding an extremely low noise preamp. The description in the video of the single-frequency network sounds interesting, especially if the tuners live up to the promise of ignoring one of the signals. I wonder how many broadcasters will take advantage of this.

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post #6 of 26 Old 11-06-2016, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by joeinmilwaukee View Post
My main concern is if I will be able to watch broadcast TV on my NTSC set when ATSC 1.0 broadcasts are discontinued.

I doubt if there will be an adapter box with an NTSC antenna (RF) output (or composite video and analog L/R audio outputs) to connect to my NTSC TV.

I also doubt if there will be an adapter box with an ATSC 1.0 antenna (RF) output to connect to the antenna input on my existing ATSC 1.0-to-NTSC converter box.
It is much easier to get a 4K TV rather than looking for something that doesn't exist anymore, Do you still watch VHS tapes and play 8 track in your car?
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post #7 of 26 Old 11-07-2016, 04:58 PM
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It is much easier to get a 4K TV rather than looking for something that doesn't exist anymore, Do you still watch VHS tapes and play 8 track in your car?
It's certainly easier to buy a new UHD TV but not less expensive than an external tuner.

I never owned a VHS player or tapes (or an 8-track player or tapes); for me, laser disc provided a much higher quality picture and sound than VHS or Beta. I had the LD player and discs until May 2013 when the player finally stopped working and I sold all the discs. I skipped DVD completely. I now have a BD player with a composite video output; it provides a serviceable connection to my existing NTSC television. Considering that I only watch BDs during the cold weather season and I rarely watch broadcast TV (I don't have cable, satellite, or a fast enough internet connection for streaming), it doesn't make sense at this point to invest in a new TV (HD or UHD).

Maybe I should buy cheaper equipment that only lasts a few years.
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post #8 of 26 Old 11-07-2016, 11:05 PM
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It's certainly easier to buy a new UHD TV but not less expensive than an external tuner.

I never owned a VHS player or tapes (or an 8-track player or tapes); for me, laser disc provided a much higher quality picture and sound than VHS or Beta. I had the LD player and discs until May 2013 when the player finally stopped working and I sold all the discs. I skipped DVD completely. I now have a BD player with a composite video output; it provides a serviceable connection to my existing NTSC television. Considering that I only watch BDs during the cold weather season and I rarely watch broadcast TV (I don't have cable, satellite, or a fast enough internet connection for streaming), it doesn't make sense at this point to invest in a new TV (HD or UHD).

Maybe I should buy cheaper equipment that only lasts a few years.
What's the point of skipping VHS and DVD and going straight to blu-ray when still using a tube TV, You are not enjoying the Blu-ray quality, You are just seeing a slightly better than VHS quality on your TV with a deformed aspect ratio, Man you missed a lot from the last movie made on LD till now, I bet when you see an UHD blu-ray playing on a 4K TV your jaw will drop.
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post #9 of 26 Old 11-08-2016, 10:24 AM
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What's the point of skipping VHS and DVD and going straight to blu-ray when still using a tube TV, You are not enjoying the Blu-ray quality, You are just seeing a slightly better than VHS quality on your TV with a deformed aspect ratio, Man you missed a lot from the last movie made on LD till now, I bet when you see an UHD blu-ray playing on a 4K TV your jaw will drop.
I skipped VHS because LD blew it away and because widescreen movies on VHS were typically pan-and-scan or unmatted full frame, whereas the presentations on LD usually preserved the original aspect ratios. When DVD came out I was surprised that it was only standard definition and not HD. I decided to sit it out because I had already amassed enough of a LD collection and besides, seeing close to 200 movies per year theatrically kept me plenty busy. Plus repurchasing a collection of movies every time the next "format of the decade" comes out is expensive!

The aspect ratio of BD images on my NTSC set is not deformed. The 1.78:1 image from BD is letterboxed on my TV's 1.33:1 screen. Right now I only have the original Star Trek episodes on BD. (I had to take into account how much I actually watched many of the other LDs; most I hadn't watched in YEARS.) Unfortunately, 1.33:1 images from Star Trek TOS are pillarboxed within the 1.78:1 letterbox window, so the entire image is windowboxed on my TV's screen. But keep in mind that even with this image I'm probably seeing it in better quality than the original broadcasts or my LDs (although there are some moire patterns visible from time-to-time).

I would not consider buying a UHD set right now. If you've been monitoring AVS Forum or watching Scott Wilkinson's podcasts, you know that the HDR standard is still in flux.
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post #10 of 26 Old 11-08-2016, 01:03 PM
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I skipped VHS because LD blew it away and because widescreen movies on VHS were typically pan-and-scan or unmatted full frame, whereas the presentations on LD usually preserved the original aspect ratios. When DVD came out I was surprised that it was only standard definition and not HD. I decided to sit it out because I had already amassed enough of a LD collection and besides, seeing close to 200 movies per year theatrically kept me plenty busy. Plus repurchasing a collection of movies every time the next "format of the decade" comes out is expensive!

The aspect ratio of BD images on my NTSC set is not deformed. The 1.78:1 image from BD is letterboxed on my TV's 1.33:1 screen. Right now I only have the original Star Trek episodes on BD. (I had to take into account how much I actually watched many of the other LDs; most I hadn't watched in YEARS.) Unfortunately, 1.33:1 images from Star Trek TOS are pillarboxed within the 1.78:1 letterbox window, so the entire image is windowboxed on my TV's screen. But keep in mind that even with this image I'm probably seeing it in better quality than the original broadcasts or my LDs (although there are some moire patterns visible from time-to-time).

I would not consider buying a UHD set right now. If you've been monitoring AVS Forum or watching Scott Wilkinson's podcasts, you know that the HDR standard is still in flux.


For somehow I don't get your weird thinking, First, you don't have to re buy all your movie collection in a new format, just buy the new movies in the new format, Second, you kept an NTSC TV for over 30 years trying to save few hundred bucks and you missed all the joy that you could have had over that period of time if you kept your gear up to date, Here is a fine print for you, There is no such perfect TV or settling format that is going to last forever, in 2 to 3 years we are heading towards 8K are you going to wait for that too, Life is short just enjoy it, Every year passes is not coming back.
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post #11 of 26 Old 11-08-2016, 06:11 PM
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For somehow I don't get your weird thinking, First, you don't have to re buy all your movie collection in a new format, just buy the new movies in the new format, Second, you kept an NTSC TV for over 30 years trying to save few hundred bucks and you missed all the joy that you could have had over that period of time if you kept your gear up to date, Here is a fine print for you, There is no such perfect TV or settling format that is going to last forever, in 2 to 3 years we are heading towards 8K are you going to wait for that too, Life is short just enjoy it, Every year passes is not coming back.
I have certainly saved more than a "few hundred bucks" over the years by not having "the latest and greatest" equipment. My NTSC TV, a 27-inch Proton VT-296, was purchased in December 1990 for the sum of $1500. I'm keeping it because it works and the picture is quite acceptable (for a SD picture).

I prefer to replace components as they break. If you have the money to upgrade your system to the latest every few years, then by all means go for it. I agree that life is short, but remember that there's more to life than sitting in front of the TV!
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post #12 of 26 Old 11-09-2016, 12:45 AM
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I have certainly saved more than a "few hundred bucks" over the years by not having "the latest and greatest" equipment. My NTSC TV, a 27-inch Proton VT-296, was purchased in December 1990 for the sum of $1500. I'm keeping it because it works and the picture is quite acceptable (for a SD picture).

I prefer to replace components as they break. If you have the money to upgrade your system to the latest every few years, then by all means go for it. I agree that life is short, but remember that there's more to life than sitting in front of the TV!
Since the 90's I had an SD TV that I got from dump for free than after that I Bought 3 TV's and they are all under $1500 combined, The latest is a LG 4K for $440 from Frys, I do enjoy life besides TV but I'm not going to keep a piece of hardware for 30 years trying to save few bucks.
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post #13 of 26 Old 11-10-2016, 11:25 AM
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If South Korea actually starts regular consumer ATSC 3.0 OTA broadcasting in early 2017, we should get fast performance feedback on [draft standard compliant] ATSC 3.0 TVs--albeit equipped with MPEG-H immersive|interactive audio rather than Dolby AC-4 as is the US national plan. But it still seems like a big step from there to $399 mass market models on the shelves at Costco!


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post #14 of 26 Old 11-11-2016, 03:54 AM
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If you have the money to upgrade your system to the latest every few years, then by all means go for it. I agree that life is short, but remember that there's more to life than sitting in front of the TV!
True, sitting in front of your projector is much better.
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post #15 of 26 Old 11-11-2016, 10:14 PM
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If South Korea actually starts regular consumer ATSC 3.0 OTA broadcasting in early 2017, we should get fast performance feedback on [draft standard compliant] ATSC 3.0 TVs--albeit equipped with MPEG-H immersive|interactive audio rather than Dolby AC-4 as is the US national plan. But it still seems like a big step from there to $399 mass market models on the shelves at Costco!


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There is no content off the air it is not worth it and it is not like it use to be, It's mostly local news and boring TV shows filled with commercials to a point where you can't even stand it, The last time I watched over the air programming in my house was like 8 years ago except when I go to doctor or dentist waiting room that I have to watch whatever they have there not because I like it but because I have to wait there to be called.
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post #16 of 26 Old 11-12-2016, 11:44 AM
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There is no content off the air it is not worth it and it is not like it use to be, It's mostly local news and boring TV shows filled with commercials to a point where you can't even stand it, The last time I watched over the air programming in my house was like 8 years ago except when I go to doctor or dentist waiting room that I have to watch whatever they have there not because I like it but because I have to wait there to be called.
98% of the time I would tend to agree with you but I find NFL games, some live events and PBS programming worth it. And I certainty don't think much better of cable/satellite content (I miss TCM though), hence I'm not a subscriber. But regardless of what we may think, it's not the point of this thread.
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post #17 of 26 Old 11-12-2016, 01:56 PM
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My main concern is if I will be able to watch broadcast TV on my NTSC set when ATSC 1.0 broadcasts are discontinued.

I doubt if there will be an adapter box with an NTSC antenna (RF) output (or composite video and analog L/R audio outputs) to connect to my NTSC TV.

I also doubt if there will be an adapter box with an ATSC 1.0 antenna (RF) output to connect to the antenna input on my existing ATSC 1.0-to-NTSC converter box.
Over the years I have learned that there is not one bleeding edge to technology, but two: the leading edge with its extra expenses, bugs and potential abandonment before it gets its foothold, and the trailing edge of obsolescence where replacement parts get expensive and eventually unavailable, where support becomes non-existent, and it becomes more and more expensive to integrate with the rest of the system.

Generating an ATSC 1.0 signal is too expensive for the consumer marketplace. It is more likely that the ATSC 3 converter boxes will output HDMI, with the possibility that there may be specialized boxes (think mail-order-only) that might also have composite output.

If one then has an ATSC-3.0-to-HDMI converter box that doesn't have a composite video output, one would need a HDMI-to-composite-video converter, most likely with a rescaler to maintain the correct aspect ratio and avoid cropping, and that would jump up the price of the HDMI-to-composite converter.

But at some point the price may get high enough that the cost difference may not justify an expensive adapter vs. buying a HDTV (possibly a used one from a AVSFORUM member) that already accepts 1080p over HDMI, so one can either use the TV tuner for ATSC 1 stations or use the converter box for ATSC 3 stations. One would also have the advantages of higher resolution of the new-to-you TV.

I wouldn't necessarily buy the first ATSC 3 TV on the marketplace (unless it was within my price range and I needed a TV), but a HD TV with HDMI ports is definitely mainstream today and that is what many manufacturers are targeting as their potential customers. Generally I let the early adopters enjoy the price premium and teething problems.

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I never owned a VHS player or tapes (or an 8-track player or tapes);
Not a VHS player, but I have owned a number of VCRs and I have rented a fair number of VHS cassettes and purchased a few movies on VHS. I had used VCRs mostly for time-shifting TV shows and skipping past commercials and had purchased a pretty good number of blank VHS cassettes over the years for that purpose.

Comcast did me a favor on October 9, 2012, when they killed all the remaining analog channels and I had to upgrade to digital. I knew the days of VCR were numbered (both by no more VCRs, one had to get a combo DVD player / VCR and most didn't have a tuner, and by fewer places selling blank VHS cassettes), so I had already done some preliminary research so when I had to pull the trigger and do something, I went with a HD DVR from the cable company and on the way home from the cable company's store front I purchased a small (32-in) HDTV. Before it was dark I already had the DVR programmed to capture that night's shows. The next day I was wondering why I didn't make the jump earlier!

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I skipped DVD completely.
Not me. For a while I subscribed to some movie channels but on July 15, 2002, I tried an experiment: I cancelled the premium channels, purchased a DVD player, and subscribed to Netflix. While I would still occasionally rent a VHS tape and was time-shifting using VCRs (and this was a decade before Comcast dropped my analog channels), I watched and still watch many shows and movies on DVD (and now also on Blu-ray), thanks to Netflix.

While it is true that most of those older DVDs were pan-an-scan 4:3 (and that is what looked best on a 21-in SD TV from seven feet away), I had noticed that in more recent years, now that more people have larger screens, many of the newer DVDs Netflix have are "anamorphic", not just 16:9 for TV shows, but often movie DVDs having the movie's original aspect ratio. (But, as you can imagine, the image isn't as sharp as one desires an anamorphic DVD has a 2.35:1 feature, so on a HDTV Blu-ray discs are quite noticeably superior.)


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I now have a BD player with a composite video output; it provides a serviceable connection to my existing NTSC television.
To me, it sounds like a waste of a Blu-ray player.

On your 27-in SD TV,
Show's ARDisplayed DimensionsComments
4:321.6 in(w) x 16.2 in(h)Old SD show on your SD TV (Your TV's aspect ratio)
16:921.6 in(w) x 12.1 in(h)New TV show on your SD TV
1.85:121.6 in(w) x 11.7 in(h)1.85.1 movies (film: comedies, dramas), letterboxed
2.35:121.6 in(w) x 9.2 in(h)2.35:1 movies (anamorphic film: action, epics), letterboxed

(The movie categories are a rough rule of thumb; the directors may make decisions based on artistic intent that don't match general trends. And the really old movies, including the famous The Wizard of Oz (1939), were typically in the Academy Aspect Ratio of 1.375:1, pretty close to the old TV standard.)

I tend to watch a lot of TV, so for me it makes sense to have a larger TV. In fact, I have two TVs larger than yours, one for my bedroom connected to the HD DVR/cable and to a Blu-ray player, and the other in my "man cave" that is connected to a Blu-ray player and the TV can stream Netflix.

Show's ARMan Cave DisplayBedroom DisplayNotes
4:332.7 in(w) x 24.5 in(h)20.9 in(w) x 15.7 in(h)Pillar bars
16:943.6 in(w) x 24.5 in(h)27.9 in(w) x 15.7 in(h)TV's aspect ratio--fills the whole screen
1.85:143.6 in(w) x 23.6 in(h)27.9 in(w) x 15.1 in(h)Tiny letterbox bars
2.35:143.6 in(w) x 18.6 in(h)27.9 in(w) x 11.9 in(h)Larger letterbox bars

I have found that the larger screen in HD makes many shows and most movies far more enjoyable than the small screen I had before I purchased my first HDTV, jumping from about 21-in to 46-in (the predecessor to my 50-in "man cave" TV), so much so that my theater-going days has dropped to near zero.

I had opted for a "small" (32-in) screen in the bedroom, partly to avoid bright light when falling asleep, and partly because compression artifacts and other video flaws are less visible on a small screen than on a large screen (great for some of those old TV shows with lots of video artifacts, and I do watch some of those old shows on a couple of the multicast networks like MeTV).

Actually, I think some of the complaints about Standard Definition isn't so much about the resolution but the quality of the signal using the technology of those days because shows like ST (TOS) and Mission: Impossible look like near HD quality. However, for the sharpest detail one really does need a HD source.

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Considering that I only watch BDs during the cold weather season and I rarely watch broadcast TV (I don't have cable, satellite, or a fast enough internet connection for streaming), it doesn't make sense at this point to invest in a new TV (HD or UHD).
It depends on how much you watch Blu-ray discs and whether a HD TV, particularly a bigger screen, would increase your enjoyment. For some people, spending money for a larger or higher definition screen doesn't make sense.

However, the typical AVSFORUM member tends to spend money for larger and better systems, tend to be closer to the leading edge of technology than the trailing edge, and tend to be curious about upcoming developments (and thus the podcasts we enjoy), or just want to get a bit more enjoyment out of the equipment we do have.

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The aspect ratio of BD images on my NTSC set is not deformed. The 1.78:1 image from BD is letterboxed on my TV's 1.33:1 screen. Right now I only have the original Star Trek episodes on BD. (I had to take into account how much I actually watched many of the other LDs; most I hadn't watched in YEARS.) Unfortunately, 1.33:1 images from Star Trek TOS are pillarboxed within the 1.78:1 letterbox window, so the entire image is windowboxed on my TV's screen. But keep in mind that even with this image I'm probably seeing it in better quality than the original broadcasts or my LDs (although there are some moire patterns visible from time-to-time).
Yes, Star Trek (The Original Series) was framed for the 1.33:1 aspect ratio of TVs at that time. Fortunately, both Star Trek (TOS) (1966-9) and Mission: Impossible (1966-73) (but not the relaunched Mission: Impossible (1988-90)) were filmed on 35mm film and the DVD transfers of both shows look great! And, yes, they are far better than what we could have received over the air when they were originally aired. Even now on MeTV Star Trek looks great!

My understanding is that when the studio considered a Blu-ray release of ST (TOS), they redid many of the special effects. While principal photography is great (35mm film has better resolution than HD), the special effects were originally done for the "small screen" of the time and some just didn't hold up well to HD on larger modern HD TV screens.

If you contrast that to, say, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour or the relaunched Mission: Impossible (1988-90), which were recorded on video tape, one can see that the picture is inferior with ringing artifacts and (for Mission: Impossible) lacking fine detail. I don't know if mastering on video tape caused the problems, but there is a vast difference between what was mastered on film vs. mastered on video tape, even though the final result was suppose to be SD.

Now, as to why ST appears windowboxed on your system, you might look in your Blu-ray player for a possible configuration option that you might want to adjust, at least for 1.33:1 content, to display full screen on your TV.

On my HDTVs, it would display just fine since a Blu-ray player is designed to output to a 16:9 screen and both of my current TVs are 16:9.

However, I still come across an old DVD from Netflix that wasn't mastered correctly so they letterbox a widescreen feature into 4:3 aspect ratio for the DVD which the Blu-ray player or TV then pillerboxes, producing windowboxing ("postage stamp") instead of mastering the widescreen feature as an anamorphic DVD and letting the DVD player or Blu-ray player do the letterboxing if required. Fortunately, both my TVs have a zoom option that would take that windowboxed image and zoom it out, though by then the lack of resolution becomes obvious.

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Originally Posted by latreche34 View Post
There is no content off the air it is not worth it and it is not like it use to be, It's mostly local news and boring TV shows filled with commercials to a point where you can't even stand it, The last time I watched over the air programming in my house was like 8 years ago except when I go to doctor or dentist waiting room that I have to watch whatever they have there not because I like it but because I have to wait there to be called.
My live TV watching tends to be minimal. I have used VCRs for time shifting and FF past commercials, and show DVDs from Netflix tend to lack commercials. Starting October 9, 2012, I have been using a HD DVR quite extensively, again for time shifting and FF past commercials, but no longer worrying about swapping VHS cassettes because they are filling up and not having to watch shows in the order that a particular VCR had recorded them. And it's really nice watching shows on disc or streaming shows from Netflix, commercial free. Also, some premium channels on cable don't have commercials during the show; I'm thinking of channels like HBO, Starz, Encore.

But then I have been a TV addict from way back, from the late 1950s, almost six decades of TV addiction.

Pardon me as I go select another input to my TV ...

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
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post #18 of 26 Old 11-15-2016, 11:29 AM
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And why are we still using 59.94 fields per second scheme, It was needed when black and white broadcast was used but now it is useless why don't we just use 60 fields/s? freaking regulators.
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post #19 of 26 Old 12-24-2016, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeinmilwaukee View Post
My main concern is if I will be able to watch broadcast TV on my NTSC set when ATSC 1.0 broadcasts are discontinued.

I doubt if there will be an adapter box with an NTSC antenna (RF) output (or composite video and analog L/R audio outputs) to connect to my NTSC TV.

I also doubt if there will be an adapter box with an ATSC 1.0 antenna (RF) output to connect to the antenna input on my existing ATSC 1.0-to-NTSC converter box.

An ATSC 3.0 Converter STB should fix any issues you have. I feel confident that it will have the necessary outputs to accomodate a wide range of TV's.
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post #20 of 26 Old 08-27-2017, 07:23 PM
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I'm assuming that we may see ATSC 3.0 tuners in HDTV's in late 2018 or early 2019.
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post #21 of 26 Old 10-10-2017, 09:20 AM
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I'm assuming that we may see ATSC 3.0 tuners in HDTV's in late 2018 or early 2019.
any response?
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post #22 of 26 Old 01-09-2018, 05:29 PM
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any response?
I haven't seen any at CES 2018. Have you?
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post #23 of 26 Old 04-15-2018, 09:14 AM
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Thumbs up Phoenix, AZ ATSC 3.0 Roll Out

4K FLAT PANEL, 4K LED LCD, CONNECTED TVS, HDR, LG ELECTRONICS, NEWS, OVER-THE-AIR BROADCASTS, UHDTV
LG TO SUPPLY ATSC 3.0 RECEIVERS FOR PHOENIX MODEL MARKET TESTS
Greg Tarr, 1 week ago 0 3 min read 534
In advance of this week’s National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) 2018 Convention in Las Vegas, LG Electronics revealed that it has agreed to become a cornerstone technology partner in the ATSC 3.0 “Model Market” project in Phoenix, Az.

This model market, which is to begin testing new digital TV services soon, will serve as the first real test for the forthcoming voluntary market-by-market implementation of the next-generation digital terrestrial television broadcasting system.

ATSC 3.0 promises to deliver a host of advanced capabilities, including 4K Ultra HDTV resolution, advanced digital surround sound formats, emergency alert systems and the integration of IP technology into the broadcasting ecosystem.

As a technology partner, LG will provide receivers to play a key role in project that is being spearheaded by Pearl TV in collaboration with E.W. Scripps Company, Fox Television Stations, Meredith Local Media Group, Nexstar Media Group, TEGNA Inc., Telemundo Station Group, Univision Communications and providers of professional broadcast equipment.

In its role, LG is to be the first manufacturer to provide ATSC 3.0 receivers to be used to acquire the new digital signals as well as existing ATSC 1.0 channels.

The test is being supported by 10 TV stations in the Phoenix market to show how these next gen TV stations can be deployed without disruption to the existing digital TV services currently in use by viewers.
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post #24 of 26 Old 04-26-2018, 06:52 AM
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so, still testing.

no ATSC 3.0 receivers available consumers for at least another year? (probably 2)
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post #25 of 26 Old 04-26-2019, 03:02 PM
 
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so, still testing.

no ATSC 3.0 receivers available consumers for at least another year? (probably 2)
New old technology? Tv broadcasting transmission of Rf the only difference is nothing
If you have the the antenna to Receive the Rf and tunners to decod e
The and what about white space ?
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post #26 of 26 Old 05-03-2019, 06:16 PM
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https://www.nextgentvinfo.com/news/2...presentations/

Here is a collection of ATSC 3.0 related videos from NAB 2019.

And one more

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

Last edited by BigJeff; 05-16-2019 at 07:08 PM.
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