Television: Past, Present, and Future - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 7 Old 03-31-2017, 01:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Television: Past, Present, and Future

Technology consultant and historian Mark Schubin talks about the history of television, including how opera inspired the idea of remote listening and viewing. Next, he traces the development of TV technology, starting in 1843 with Alexander Bain's patent for a mechanical image scanner. Other topics include George Carey's early work on scanning cameras, the Siemens Artificial Eye from 1876, Boris Rosing's picture tube from 1906, Alan Campbell-Swinton's end-to-end system in 1912, and television demonstrations at the 1939 World's Fair. We end up discussing the current state of TV and what we might expect in the future, plus answers to chat-room questions and more.

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post #2 of 7 Old 03-31-2017, 04:08 PM
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I remember in grade school reading Radio Physics Course, the 1953 edition. Some of those old schemes for television, such as the spinning disc with a spiral of holes, was mentioned in the "brand new technology" section. So some of those pictures brought back some fond memories!

It's hard to realize that from my birth until about 4.5 years ago I was watching "high definition", according to one of the definitions mentioned on the show! Amazing how word definitions have changed in about half a century! According to the current definition of "high definition", I arrived late to the high definition world!

You're a great interviewer, Scott!

I hope we can have that guest on again sometime in the future!

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
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post #3 of 7 Old 04-02-2017, 06:31 PM
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Coincidentally, I just began browsing through the First Quarter 2017 issue of Marquee magazine (published by the Theatre Historical Society of America) and it contains an article ("If Not For Pittsburgh...") written by Mark Schubin!
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post #4 of 7 Old 04-03-2017, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post
Technology consultant and historian Mark Schubin talks about the history of television, including how opera inspired the idea of remote listening and viewing. Next, he traces the development of TV technology, starting in 1843 with Alexander Bain's patent for a mechanical image scanner. Other topics include George Carey's early work on scanning cameras, the Siemens Artificial Eye from 1876, Boris Rosing's picture tube from 1906, Alan Campbell-Swinton's end-to-end system in 1912, and television demonstrations at the 1939 World's Fair. We end up discussing the current state of TV and what we might expect in the future, plus answers to chat-room questions and more.

https://www.avsforum.com/television-past-present-future/
Wonderful interview.

When I was a kid (a long time ago, in the north of England), there were no TV broadcasts where I lived. I heard of television and became fascinated, reading every book my local library had (maybe 2 or 3), and waiting for a BBC transmitter in our area. My interest never flagged. And I was lucky enough to get a job in this amazing medium - my entire career until I retired a few years back. I thought I knew most of TV's history, but today's interview with Mark Schubin proved me wrong. There are details here I'd never heard before, and many "facts" debunked.

Thanks Scott. Thanks Mark.
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post #5 of 7 Old 04-08-2017, 04:29 PM
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I was very glad to see Mark Schubin on the show. I've been particularly interested in his work with the Metropolitan Opera. "The Live in HD" presentations have been shown for about 10 years now. IIRC, I went to the first one -- Julie Taymor's production of the Magic Flute.

In its early days the movie theaters were still mostly showing film, so the digital projectors used for pre-show advertising were used for the Met. It's much better now.
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post #6 of 7 Old 04-08-2017, 06:13 PM
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Especially liked the explanation about HDR standards being too dark. One needs to be able to brighten it according to the lighting in the room.

Last edited by Bill; 04-08-2017 at 06:55 PM.
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post #7 of 7 Old 04-14-2017, 08:09 AM
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This was one of my favorite HTGeeks episodes. Very very interesting stuff.

Setup:
Spoiler!
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