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post #1 of 17 Old 03-03-2019, 02:46 PM - Thread Starter
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Get into calibration - cheap :)

One of the other recent threads had me thinking about the best cheap solutions to learn calibration for the ambitioned novice. So I wrote it up in case others in here were interested.

- Get a i1 Display Pro (i1d3) colorimeter, thats manufactured after 02/2014, can be used, those things dont drift. Currently they are selling on ebay for 180 USD
Get an OEM version from 2017 forward instead, if you need 1001+ nits accuracy and not only 1000 nits. (See: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...nce-range.html )

- Get a Colormunki Photo (spectrophotometer) if you are lucky, you'll get them on ebay for 120 USD (because most people dont know, what they are capable of), thats about what I payed for mine.

They have a white ceramic tile inside to "recalibrate" on their own. Mine was bought in 2014 by a marketing agency and sold to me in 2017, and I still get very close to presumed accurate readings on both LCDs and WOLEDs (WRGB OLEDs) out of it. More on that in the verification section below.

- Get HCFR. The i1d3 will work out of the box, the Colormunki Photo needs unsigned drivers from the HCFR install folder installed. Use google, it shouldnt take more than a few minutes (to find out how to onetime disable windows driver signature check). Set the Colormunki Photo to work in HiRes mode (meter setting in HCFR), that way you'll get 5nm resolution. Price for HCFR: Free

- Get a PGenerator RaspPi based pattern generator (https://www.lightillusion.com/pgenerator.html - https://www.lightillusion.com/devicecontrol.html - https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...cy-thread.html) Price: 60 USD

And you'll have everything that you'll need for 360USD which is probably below the price of one of those new fancy pattern generators.

If you want to calibrate HDR (why ) get a HD Fury integral (used for 120 USD) - use these values ( https://www.liftgammagain.com/forum/...nd-more.11644/ ) for metadata injection.

And thats it, you are now a pro calibrator.
--

Verification

Get access to a Macbook Air 2018, disable automatic brightness adjustment in monitor settings, and you have a reference screen to test your meters agains... (use option+shift + Brightness keys to fine adjust to 100 nits)

Read the following thread to get an indication on how to use a Macbook Air 2018 screen as a reference screen: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...enerators.html

You'll have my i1 Display Pro white LED LCD values as reference (you can orient yourself around the fact, that my colormunki Photo agrees with a 0.2 dE error margin. ), also you have https://www.notebookcheck.net/Apple-....357481.0.html for a reference value of 0.6 dE2000 on max nits white (look at the pre calibration image) which was taken with a i1 Pro.

If you rely on HCFR its easiest to get it running in Parallels or VMware Fusion (Solutions to run Windows on a Mac) to get a pattern generator/calibration program to run on the Macbook Air, if you have Calman you could use Spectracals "Client 3" pattern generator on MacOS instead (its a free download).

Or use any other good known good reference screen.

Use Zoyds B7 HCFR Oled correction with the i1 Display Pro on an LG Oled, to also have a WOLED screen reference for your meters. It should not deviate by more than dE2000 0.5 from the Colormunki Photo measurements, ideally less (It does in my case).

In the future you could borrow a version of Calman or buy Lightspace *gasp* But HCFR is excellent and still better than Calman.
--

If you ever want to generate images of spectral curves use the Colormunki Photo in hires mode in HCFR and create a spectral correction file (.ccss). Open that in a texteditor, replace all single spaces with the space that comes into existence between items, when you copy a row of Excel data into a textfile. If european replace all . with , in the .ccss file, then you can copy the four data rows into this Excel (xls) template: https://mirrorace.com/m/Pecd

Voila:
--

If you dont know how to operate HCFR, find a tutorial that teaches you..

If you have questions, I dont have a HD Fury, but I have the rest of the "setup" - and ample experience with it over the last couple of months. I'll stick around to answer questions for a few days - should they arise - ask away if you have them.

edit Reference for Calman users: i1d3 with LCD (LED) correction on the Macbook Air 2018 using Client 3 as pattern generator (make sure the Macbooks default color profile is active, make sure range 0-255 is set in Calman (in HCFR as well, btw. for verification on an Air)) - again, this is the factory default calibration, just with automatic brightness sensor disabled. This is posted for reference.


edit: Here is a second one, taken at a slightly different screen position with a warmed up screen and meter - better results. (Same settings as above.)
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Last edited by harlekin; 03-04-2019 at 05:35 AM.
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-03-2019, 10:43 PM - Thread Starter
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I think () you can use any color profile on MacOS with Spectracals Client 3, by simply "adding a new profile" in Client 3 naming it whatever you want - having Client 3 use it, and then change the monitor profile in monitor settings after it.

Because the new profile will be "blank" essentially, it will allow you to switch to a different color profile afterwards. Or something along those lines..

I checked with profiles that had white heavily off, and the differences showed up in Calman, when measuring Client 3 generated patterns this way.

Just a detail.

Of course we dont use pattern disks anymore - we use known good pattern generators. If you know what to look for, they are comparatively inexpensive as well (find the corresponding AVS thread linked in the previous posting. ), and allow for so much more convenience.

edit: Potentially get one of those USB hubs ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plugable-2-...dp/B005HKIDF2/ ) and a USB extension cord of a length you prefer.
Again, just detail stuff.

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post #3 of 17 Old 03-04-2019, 04:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Here is a thread on how the Colormunki Photo usually stacks up to other colorimeters:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...-how-much.html

Answer - quite well.

Inter probe difference is actually a good way of looking at the probes. If you have a calibrated reference display available, buy 5 used Colormukis, and pick the best one available. Test on different display technologies preferably.

Still less expensive than buying a i1 Pro spectro.

Also use hires mode because that way with HCFR you double the resolution, essentally for free. (Custom built driver).

In terms of stability over time, as I've said, mine was manufactured in 2014, and derivation from what are presumed to be know good calibrations is always less than 0.5dE 2000 in my case, already with multiple factors in place (where error margins could accumulate).

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post #4 of 17 Old 03-04-2019, 05:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Added a second (better in terms of dE2000) i1d3 reading done using Calman with Spectracals Client 3 (again default screen profile). Simply because it showed better values... (Closer to what It measured in HCFR.)

So that way you can gauge what difference probe positioning on screen, and warming up meter and screen can make.

Also - to reach 100 nits on a Macbook Air 2018 - turn brightness down until the screen turns off, then up by 10 normal ticks, then up by 2 option+shift + brightness up ticks. Easy to remember. Might be slightly different on your device.

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post #5 of 17 Old 03-04-2019, 10:32 AM
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This is a great guide and starting point for someone who is interested in learning about calibration but has no interest in making money out of it. One quick question though. What about a windows based laptop instead of Macbook? Is there anything special to remember?
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-04-2019, 11:02 PM - Thread Starter
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The Macbook Air 2018 just serves the purpose of a "reference display" to check the spectrophotometer (Colormunki Photo) against.

Here are its advantages.

1. You have measurements from other people with i1 pros (not display, but the spectrophotometer variant) out there for it ( https://www.notebookcheck.net/Apple-....357481.0.html )

They didn't deactivate auto brightness, and therefore got the entirely wrong gamma curve (display adjusted brightness during the measurement) out of it, but you can still use the 100% white point measurement they did.

And that was dE 2000: 0.6 out of the box. In my case as well (in my case 0.3 to 0.6 depending on the probes positioning, max 0.8 when using the default i1d3 white LCD correction profile).

2. It seems to come perfectly calibrated out of the box (power line gamma 2.2 SDR calibration), which means, you take your probes (spectrophotometer, and the colorimeter), make sure to set pattern color range to 0-255, disable auto brightness (monitor settings in Macos), make sure the default color profile is active (monitor settings in Macos), and tick brightness to 100 nits (press minus screen brightness key on the laptop until the screen turns off, then plus brightness for 10 ticks, plus two option+shift brightness up (fine adjustment) ticks.

At that point you should have a display with 'perfect' greyscale, perfect gamma (for most of the line), perfect brightness curve. At least in theory (factory variance).

3. It is a white LED LCD, so "pretty standard" in terms of technology and color range (99% standard color gamut), thats why you can use it for testing your i1d3 (from now on I'm using the abbrevation, because its easier to type.. its the i1 Display Pro) in white LED LCD mode (close to its default capabilities) as well.
---

In theory - even though "multi factor" of stuff that can go wrong, all those aspects should line up pretty well, with what your Colormunki Photo and i1d3 are measuring.

Here is the short version of why we do it: You take a display thats pretty much perfectly calibrated out of the box, and you use that to check how accurate the meters you just bought are. That the Macbook Air 2018's display is pretty "standard" by all aspects (nothing fancy - see spectral graph above) helps in that regard.

Now - this is one display (tech). So if those values line up pretty well for you - next step would be to test the i1d3 with zoyds WRGB OLED correction in HCFR on a LG OLED, and compare it to the Colormunki Photo readings on that device. The results shouldnt differ by more than 0.5 dE 2000 on white ideally (thats the difference in my case).

This step basically is used, to get an idea of how your two meters behave on a different screen technology.

0.5 dE 2000 difference could be introduced by the fact, that .ccss corrections (the correction zoyd provides in HCFR for the i1d3 and WRGB OLED screens) arent that accurate fore example, so we dont know where its coming from. But the fact, that this is very low as well - on a different screen technology, with zoyd using entirely different meters. Is encouraging.
--

That whole thing is there to basically give you confidence in your meters.

Because thats mostly whats being sold at higher pricepoints. Confidence in your meter. (Inter meter variability out of the factory gets lower.)

We try to sidestep that by putting multiple factors of uncertainty together, and still ending up with only small error margins. Ideally.

Thats basically "not paying for a recalibration of your meter".

The i1d3 and the Colormunki Photo in practice also dont seem to drift very much. The i1d3 simply because it doesnt. The Colormunki Photo, probably because it has a recalibration process (it meassuring a white ceramic tile) built in it - and that seems to work quite well even after 5 years of use on the meter - at least in my case.

This is also "not paying for a recalibration of your meter".
--

Why am I using a Macbook Air 2018 and an LG OLED TV for this suggested method?
Because they are widely available to any calibration enthusiast. At least in theory. Available to borrow even.

In the case of the Macbook Air 2018 you have basically a perfectly calibrated display out of the box. With the brand Apple attached to it (people believe in that.. ).

With the LG OLED TV and HCFR you have zoyds .ccss correction done with a Jeti spectrometer (the best of the best), towards his i1d3 probe. 0.5 dE 2000 towards your i1d3 vs Colormunki Photo is still comparatively small - all things considered. (Ideal outcome "hey, they dont differ by much" thought in your mind).
---


Thats all that the Macbook Air 2018 and the LG OLED are for.

For calibration itself - you can use, own or buy any laptop - it doesnt matter.

For "verification" of your meters I encourage you to "borrow" or get access to those devices, after you've bought the meters (probably used in some cases.).

Thats all.

Macbook Air 2018 display may drift over time, I'll look at that as well. Currently I use it for about a month, and to everything I have at hand - it measures "reference quality" (even in colors, but that doesnt matter so much for our purposes), maybe apart from blacklevel, but we arent so much interested in that...

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post #7 of 17 Old 03-05-2019, 09:42 AM
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OK. Now it makes sense. Thanks for a very detailed explanation. From this explanation, I gather I can skip buying a Macbook air 2018 if I have access to IPro 2(spectro). I will keep a close eye on this thread. Thanks for your efforts in providing these clear and succinct explanations.
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-05-2019, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Thats almost cheating...

But yes. Although for professional calibrators the doubt sets in some time later, and then they look at more expensive meters to get reference results. So those moments, when a screen measures perfectly out of the box, are good in general because it gives you another option to verify how your equipment is doing, without relying on one single point of failure. (Reference meter.)

For me it was just the moment of measuring my Macbook Airs screen and realizing, hey - that screen is calibrated. And then realizing - hey, THAT SCREEN IS CALIBRATED.

Lets measure the i1d3 with white LED LCD correction against it, hey - it agrees within 0.3 dE error margin. Lets look at the spectral graph. Yep, thats a pretty normal LED LCD screen.

Lets find reviews - look that guy with a i1 Pro agrees on the same low dE on white.

So things all of a sudden lined up. And thats a pretty rare moment in calibration.

Of course, if you've got access to a reference meter, use that to verify what you are buying.

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post #9 of 17 Old 03-05-2019, 07:25 PM
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Fantastic thread!

i am just getting into this whole calibration lark and still rather confused. Currently have Ted's Calibration disk for SDR & Ryan's HDR patterns.

Playing around with CalMAN but what would be really good is to get AutoCal working for my Q9FN using a pattern generator. The OP says RPi based one but how do you use it with Calman as it's not supported? Very confused

Cheers

EDIT : Nvm,found this : https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...l#post57566636

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post #10 of 17 Old 03-05-2019, 09:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Yes, it is supported by all major calibration platforms (Calman, Lightspace, HCFR), with calman you address it as Universal pattern generator interface. Supply it the IP adress, and you are good.

The only thing "problematic" is, that PGenerator 'only' is bit accurate in RGB full mode (afair), so your TV has to transform RGB full into its internal signal processing (usually YCbCr (limited)) correctly, most do but some (noticeably LG B6) dont).


The resulting error on the B6 f.e. is, that 5 ire (5% grayscale) is slightly off (shown "too bright") - apart from that, everything is great on that 60 USD combo. Riccardo Biasiotto did a remarkable job on it.

(TV has to be set to RGB range full, patterns supplied should be 16-235 range.) You can look at the other cheap pattern generators in the cheap PGenerator thread, or use Riccardos PGenerator to evaluate your PCs HDMI output... As soon as you have one known good pattern generator, evaluating other signal sources becomes easy.
--

As for the meters you are buying, Calman (for sure), and Lightspace (not so sure) both support them as well. But if you are a little lazy, such as me - you will always have the Colormunki Photo set up to work with HCFR (only). Because HCFR uses it, addressing it with a different (reverse engineered) driver (that allows 5nm enhanced resolution mode), at least Calman wont detect it being installed that way.

Thats not a big issue though, because the i1d3 will be recognized by whatever calibration solution you'll use - on the fly. And you can share correction matrixes (matrices written correctly) between the programs.

In HCFR the "default, uncorrected" i1d3 mode will be called 'non refresh display' (or refresh display, if you are working with Plasmas or CRTs). In Calman it will be called RAW, in Lightspace not sure atm - but you'll figure it out.

You always apply your matrix correction to those default modes. This is what a matrix correction looks like, btw:

Code:
0.986409 0.00566953 -0.00615632 
-0.00300009 0.978069 0.000580134 
0.00174857 -0.00154958 0.951494
src: Random matrix correction.

You might have to replace all . with , again - depending on which 'format' your calibration program expects - when transfering matrix corrections.

In HCFR you'll find them in meter settings in the second tab. Once you've profiled one meter to the other. (Tick reference box in one set of measurements, tell calman to profile meter - and the other set of measurements (done with a different meter) will get a matrix correction calculated and applied for.)

Or you could make your life easy and just stick to HCFR for all your calibration needs. Did I mention, that it is free...

When evaluating correction matrices of the i1d3 between software solutions. Please take note, that HCFR usually measures 100% saturation 100% luminance patterns by default, and Calman uses 100% saturation 75% luminance patterns in most scenarios, by default. So match those to evaluate, if the matrix correction you got out of HCFR for your i1d3 "did take correctly" in f.e. Calman.
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Last edited by harlekin; 03-05-2019 at 11:11 PM.
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post #11 of 17 Old 03-07-2019, 07:52 PM
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Thank you! That is incredibly helpful - appreciated.

Noted re RGB calibration - but I am planning to use PGenerator & AutoCal for the initial fast calibration and then fine tune using Ted's disk.

Well, that's the plan anyway
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post #12 of 17 Old 03-08-2019, 01:38 AM
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If you are looking for manual display calibration, as well as calibration verification, LightSpace DPS is free.
Could be worth a look.
It also works with DeviceControl.

https://www.lightillusion.com/lightspace_dps.html

Works with a range of probes, including most different variants of the i1D3 - Retail, HP, ColorMunki Display, C6, NEC, etc.
(As well as Discus, K10, CR-100, Jeti, etc, etc...)

Also works with a range of patch generators, including Ted's LightSpace Disc, LightSpace Connect, PGenerator, direct HDMI.

Steve
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post #13 of 17 Old 03-08-2019, 05:19 AM
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@harlekin
Buddy, you should specify that CalMAN Home will not support Raspberry PGenerator. Which means that it doesn't support any accurate economical TPG. So if you have a Sony/Samsung TV or you don't have a 2019 LG/Panasonic TV and you are thinking to buy CalMAN Home, you have two options: 1) buy a DVDO AVLab TPG + HDFury Integral (both discontinued); 2) use your laptop in RGB mode and HDFury Integral for HDR (only for Intel/nVidia GPU).

TVs: Pioneer PDP-LX5090H, LG OLED55C8PLA | SintoAmp: Pioneer VSX-921 | BD Player: Panasonic DMP-BDT260EG | External LUT box: Entertainment Experience eeColor | Softwares: Light Illusion Lightspace HTP, Portrait Displays CalMAN Home Enthusiast 2018 R3, HCFR, DisplayCAL | Probes: x-rite i1 Pro 2 - i1 Display Pro OEM B-02, basICColor DISCUS | Test Pattern Generator: DVDO AVLab TPG
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post #14 of 17 Old 08-22-2019, 10:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anger.miki View Post
@harlekin
Buddy, you should specify that CalMAN Home will not support Raspberry PGenerator. Which means that it doesn't support any accurate economical TPG. So if you have a Sony/Samsung TV or you don't have a 2019 LG/Panasonic TV and you are thinking to buy CalMAN Home, you have two options: 1) buy a DVDO AVLab TPG + HDFury Integral (both discontinued); 2) use your laptop in RGB mode and HDFury Integral for HDR (only for Intel/nVidia GPU).
Thank you for mentioning that, and thinking along.

I'm just in here to mention that I recently bought a used HDFury Linker 4K60 for 85 USD (can be used instead of a HD Fury integral or vice versa, both can do the job) and did my first HDR10 calibration.

It was as straight forward as can be.

Used Calman with the pi test pattern generator (I dont have the home version. ) set up as usual. Chose HDR 10 workflow. After getting the first test pattern to display, inject the HDR10 infoframe (Metadata and AVI (I chose ones for a 1000 nits calibration, force bt2020 checkbox checked, make sure thats also what calman expects (it does by default in this workflow)).
(edit: Also make sure the HDFury is in passthrough mode and not upscaling. This caused me some time troubleshooting (inaccurate color, acurate grayscale).)

Then do a 'blind' 20 point calibration, because LGs menupoints arent labled as ire (40 and the first fourhundredsomething line up, max. has an influence on 100 IRE equivalent). Meaning, many sweeps.

Use pattern insertion (with a black frame) for quite a few seconds after every pattern, or you will end up with an afterglow on the high luminance test images (i freaked, it was temporary though.. ), at least on a WOLED.

I cant imagine that it would be much harder in HCFR, in fact, probably faster - as usual. (I chose Calman mainly, because I didn't update my version of the piPG, and the current version of HCFR didnt pick it up. )

Ended up with max dE (2000) of 4.3 on a 2016 B6 Oled (on greyscale). On small color checker it was 5.7 i think, average of 2.5.

Watched Aquaman, Sneezed because it was so bright. Then decided I was right not to buy into the HDR craze quite yet. (Many movies use it as if it was something that automatically makes every scene better.. Even if scenes dont need it. There you go. My impression of HDR. )

edit: Oh yes, and I used Teds preset recommendations for HDR options on the LG, but then again they where very straight forward as well. For reference: https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...lg-oled-5.html

(EOTF lined up instantly, brightness 51 lined it up even better. LGs 2016 OLEDs still crush near black in HDR like a mofo. )

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post #15 of 17 Old 08-23-2019, 01:21 AM
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Well done. It looks like I was wrong (or PD changed its mind), RPi PGenerator is supported with any CM Home version.
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TVs: Pioneer PDP-LX5090H, LG OLED55C8PLA | SintoAmp: Pioneer VSX-921 | BD Player: Panasonic DMP-BDT260EG | External LUT box: Entertainment Experience eeColor | Softwares: Light Illusion Lightspace HTP, Portrait Displays CalMAN Home Enthusiast 2018 R3, HCFR, DisplayCAL | Probes: x-rite i1 Pro 2 - i1 Display Pro OEM B-02, basICColor DISCUS | Test Pattern Generator: DVDO AVLab TPG
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post #16 of 17 Old 08-23-2019, 06:59 AM
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Get into calibration - CHEAP

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10 Bit Gradient Test Patterns (HEVC) - Free Download
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post #17 of 17 Old 08-23-2019, 09:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Whatever it was, I still like HCFR more. *just kidding*

edit: Thank you for the Calman HDR10 video tutorial from 2016, btw (now on youtube). The first time you come across a greyscale curve of a TV that rolls off before its limit, its very odd looking. Thank you for explaining the cause of the v-shaped dip (rolloff) in the video.

Also - the AVI metadata has to be black level specific (RGB full or YCbCr 4:2:2, and actual blacklevel). The one in the thread linked in here already is RGB full (default mode of PiPG) so 'it just works' - but thats important to know as well.

Last edited by harlekin; 08-24-2019 at 04:31 AM.
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