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post #1 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 01:02 AM - Thread Starter
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please, help me.

Hello. I want to calibrate the SAMSUNG QN82Q80R with i1pro2. Let me know how you can do it for free. Have a nice day.
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 03:30 AM
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Use HCFR.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/hcfr/
Learn SDR rec709 calibration first.
Follow this guide:
http://www.curtpalme.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=10457
Use patterns from this thread:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...libration.html

Learn how to set up color range full/limited correctly first. (if source outputs full (0-255) TV has to be set to accept full, if source outputs limited (16-235), TV has to be set to limited. YCbCr ususally is outputting limited, RGB usually can be set to limited or full.

Recommended:

Instead of always using video file patterns, buy a Raspberry Pi and create a Pi PGenerator ( https://www.lightillusion.com/pgenerator.html ). The Software and the Download is free, even though you press on something like a buy button on that website to aquire it. The PI PGenerator defaults to outputting RGB full (because it only is bit accurate in that mode), so for calibration with that device, your TV has to be set to expect color range RGB full.

Patterns in HCFR should still be set to output color range limited (Pi PGenerator will do the conversion (a PC usually does not, so if you are calibrating with a PC, and are using RGB full as an output, also set output range in HCFR to full)).

You could also use your PCs HDMI port as an output (with HCFR generating the patterns), but you dont know if the colors displayed are bit accurate (when leaving your PCs hdmi port). While still learning, this is probably sufficient though.
-

To calibrate HDR later on, use either a HD Fury Linker or HD Fury Integral (buying them used is fine) to insert the corresponding metadata into the signal (either HDR10 (metadata for HDR10 https://www.liftgammagain.com/forum/...nd-more.11644/ ) or DV (use google.. ) ), or use a HDR compatible PC with madTPG as the pattern generator. Do this later. (When you already feel confident in creating SDR calibrations with HCFR.)
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 03:54 AM
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As the i1pro2 might not be that accurate on near black patterns, and not that fast either - you'd usually also buy a i1Display Pro (i1d3) (buying it used should be fine), or a i1Display Pro Plus (HDR capable up to 2000+ nits).

You dont have to do this immediately - but if you do more, and more extended calibrations, a colorimeter helps, as it is faster (and more stable near black).

And use the i1pro2 (spectroradiometer) to calibrate the i1 Display Pro (colorimeter) on your screen, and then only use the i1Display Pro afterwards (which now should measure pretty much exactly like your i1pro2).

A colorimeter cant detect what type of display you are measuring (the displays spectral response), so a spectroradiometer (much more expensive) is used either in combination with a colorimeter, or alone (as you might use it at first).


In HCFR you do this by conneting the i1pro2, opening a new project, measuring a greayscale run (11 patterns), an then measuring red, green and blue at 100% saturation (3 color patterns) run selecting "create correction matrix(profile) from exiting(/current) measurement". Then closing HCFR, reopening it, and connecting the i1d3 and selecting that correction matrix during meter select/configuration.

With the i1pro2 alone - you probably cant configure HDR reliably.

Also the i1pro2 shifts over time. So if its older, or you got it used, a recalibration might be in order. (But dont be concerned with that while still learning, only much later - if at all.. )

Last edited by harlekin; 01-30-2020 at 04:17 AM.
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 04:31 AM
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On your TV start with the most accurate picture mode (usually warm2 color temperature in movie, or expert, or 'creator' mode.), and deactivate most image post processing (this can be done later as well).

Also, in SDR rec709 you can calibrate powerline 2.2. or 2.4 gamma, or BT1886 gamma. When learning, usually start with 2.2 (TV has to be set to 2.2 gamma as well (usually)). Thats sRGB web standard.
(Bright room, web content.)

SDR brightness target for white is 80-120 nits (usually 100 (80 mostly for web content (sRGB standard), or if 100 is too bright for you subjectively), 120 nits in a very bright room. HCFR will suggest 120 nits as a target by default - but the orient itself alongside your measured brightness (luminance) level of your actual white point (100 IRE). What you set it to (usually using the contrast and LCD backlight settings) is up to you. If in doubt choose 100 (nits).

Powerline 2.4 would be "the movie standard", except for when it wasn't and 2.2 was (postprocessing studios agreed on that midway through the Bluray era. ) (Dark room viewing).

BT.1886 is supposed to be 'near 2.4, but with some black compensation, if your TVs black level is not great'. It "emulates CRT" behavior. That said, on devices with a very bright black level its a flawed standard, as it will do WAY too much black compensation and overbrighten an image. So start with 2.2 and 2.4, and then maybe also look into doing a BT1886 calibration.
(You manipulate gamma using 20 point greyscale controls on your TV as well (using the luminance part of the control) - if needed (f.e. if your TV doesnt have a BT1886 gamma preset).

If your black level is 'abolute black' (indefinite contrast), BT1886 == powerline 2.4 - so in that case there is no difference between the two.

And thats all you should know to get going. .)

Last edited by harlekin; 01-31-2020 at 01:51 PM.
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harlekin View Post
On your TV start with the most accurate picture mode (usually warm2 color temperaature in movie, or expert, or 'creator' mode.), and deactivate most image post processing (this can be done later as well).

Also, in SDR rec709 you can calibrate powerline 2.2. or 2.4 gamma, or BT2020 gamma. When learning, usually start with 2.2 (TV has to be set to 2.2 gamma as well (usually)). Thats sRGB web standard.
(Bright room, web content.)

SDR brightness target for white is 80-120 nits (usually 100 (80 mostly for web content (sRGB standard), or if 100 is too bright for you subjectively), 120 nits in a very bright room. HCFR will suggest 100 nits as a target by default - but the orient itself alongside your measured brightness (luminance) level of your actual white point (100 IRE). What you set it to (usually using the contrast and LCD backlight settings) is up to you. If in doubt choose 100 (nits).

Powerline 2.4 would be "the movie standard", except for when it wasn't and 2.2 was (postprocessing studios agreed on that midway through the Bluray era. ) (Dark room viewing).

BT2020 is supposet to be 'near 2.4, but with some black compensation, if your TVs black level i not great'. It "emulates CRT" behavior. That said, on device with a very bright black level its a flawed standard, as it will do WAY to much black compensation and overbrighten an image. So start with 2.2 and 2.4, and then maybe also look into doing a BT2020 calibration.

If your black level is 'abolute black' (indefinite contrast), BT2020 == powerline 2.4 - so in that case there is no difference between the two.

And thats all you should know to get going. .)
Harlekin,
From a person who has been calibrating since 2011, THAT "help" answer was absolutely the BEST I've seen in a long, long time! BIG TIME Kudos to YOU!
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post #6 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 08:30 AM
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One more thing. I actually told him/her how to set up a spectral correction (.ccss file in HCFR). When using both a colorimeter and spectroradiometer.

Dont know why...

The better way to do it of course is to create a matrix correction (spectral correction (.ccss file) can be shared with other users (it profiles the display not meter difference), matrix correction maybe less so, but its more accurate).

To create a matrix correction in HCFR - open two windows, do a 11 'colors' greyscale and a 3 colors (primaries) colors measurement, one with each meter.

The i1 Display Pro has to be set up in Raw mode (Non refresh display - in HCFR), which equals meter readings with no corrections applied.

Select "reference measurement" (on the window on the default greyscale view) on the window where your i1pro2 measurements are in, leave that checkbox on the other one unchecked, then select create correction using reference measurements. That time it should allow you to create a matrix correction. You can also do it simultaneously using one of the other options on that menu (not in settings, its an actual menu in HCFR), while both meters are connected and on the screen next to each other.

Then close down HCFR, open it up again with only the i1d3 connected, select the correction matrix file during meter set up (in a slightly different place, search around), and you should have a better correction.

When in the project go to meter setting, select the second slider, and you hould see the active matrix correction there as well as a 3x3 matrix (long strings of numbers from 0 to 1).

Last edited by harlekin; 01-30-2020 at 08:55 AM.
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-30-2020, 08:59 AM
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Oh and I forgot the most important part.

For the i1pro2 to be recognized in HCFR, you have to uninstall the default windows drivers (device manager), and install the Argyll drivers instead. (The Argyll drivers come with HCFR, they are in a subfolder in its install directory. Once you uninstalled the default driver, point the windows driver install procedure to that directory - that should install the drivers you need for HCFR. (Maybe you also have to disable driver signature enforcement. See 'reference' link below.))

For reference, read:
https://www.avsforum.com/forum/139-d...1-pro-2-a.html

The Argyll drivers already are in a HCFR subfolder in its install directory. You dont have to copy them there first (as might be indicated in the Curt Palme tutorial (old.. )).


The i1d3 will be recognized automatically.
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Last edited by harlekin; 01-30-2020 at 09:24 AM.
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post #8 of 14 Old 01-31-2020, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harlekin View Post
BT2020 is supposet to be 'near 2.4, but with some black compensation, if your TVs black level is not great'. It "emulates CRT" behavior. That said, on devices with a very bright black level its a flawed standard, as it will do WAY too much black compensation and overbrighten an image. So start with 2.2 and 2.4, and then maybe also look into doing a BT2020 calibration.
You probably meant BT.1886.
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post #9 of 14 Old 01-31-2020, 01:25 PM
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Thank you, corrected.
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post #10 of 14 Old 02-02-2020, 03:32 AM
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Can correction tables for the same TV (Samsung Qled) be used from other users ? Or do you have to make one yourself ?
I ask because i dont have a spectroradiometer, only a a i1Display Pro Plus.
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post #11 of 14 Old 02-05-2020, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by harlekin View Post
Use HCFR.
Learn how to set up color range full/limited correctly first. (if source outputs full (0-255) TV has to be set to accept full, if source outputs limited (16-235), TV has to be set to limited. YCbCr usually is outputting limited, RGB usually can be set to limited or full.
I was about to make a new post, but this is my exact question, so I hope you don't mind me tagging on.

What you've written above is exactly what I'm trying to make sure I've done right. TV is a Samsung QN82Q90RA. I am using HCFR to generate test patterns on the TV. I'm using a Surface Pro 3, mini displayport to HDMI converter, and then into HDMI 2. It recognizes the input as "PC" but that does not give me access to the Movie screen mode, which means I can't access 20 point WB. So, I set it to "Home Theater" and then I can select Movie.

I'm running 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz with Input Signal Plus set to ON (which should enable 0-255). I then have HDMI black level set (ugh can't remember whether it's low or normal) so the black on the screen is black and not grey, which I'm assuming is the right way to do it. From there I do my calibration. I'm using the HCFR signal generator and have my laptop display set to "Extended" so I'm running a separate screen.

Is this the Right Way to go about things? I know that when I recalibrated with this method, (I also went to 2.2 gamma, not the stock BT setting) I ended up with a much more richer picture.
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post #12 of 14 Old 02-05-2020, 07:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleebus.jones View Post
I was about to make a new post, but this is my exact question, so I hope you don't mind me tagging on.

What you've written above is exactly what I'm trying to make sure I've done right. TV is a Samsung QN82Q90RA. I am using HCFR to generate test patterns on the TV. I'm using a Surface Pro 3, mini displayport to HDMI converter, and then into HDMI 2. It recognizes the input as "PC" but that does not give me access to the Movie screen mode, which means I can't access 20 point WB. So, I set it to "Home Theater" and then I can select Movie.

I'm running 3840 x 2160 at 60 Hz with Input Signal Plus set to ON (which should enable 0-255). I then have HDMI black level set (ugh can't remember whether it's low or normal) so the black on the screen is black and not grey, which I'm assuming is the right way to do it. From there I do my calibration. I'm using the HCFR signal generator and have my laptop display set to "Extended" so I'm running a separate screen.

Is this the Right Way to go about things? I know that when I recalibrated with this method, (I also went to 2.2 gamma, not the stock BT setting) I ended up with a much more richer picture.
Unless you’re using your PC to play back videos, you should calibrated the TV in 16-235 mode.
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post #13 of 14 Old 02-05-2020, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Dominic Chan View Post
Unless you’re using your PC to play back videos, you should calibrated the TV in 16-235 mode.
Thanks for the quick response, Dominic. Ok, so I did set set HCFR to 0-255, I will set that back to 16-235. Should I still set the HDMI Input Signal Plus ON and the HDMI black level set to (low/normal) give me black as opposed to grey?
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post #14 of 14 Old 02-05-2020, 10:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sleebus.jones View Post
Thanks for the quick response, Dominic. Ok, so I did set set HCFR to 0-255, I will set that back to 16-235. Should I still set the HDMI Input Signal Plus ON and the HDMI black level set to (low/normal) give me black as opposed to grey?
Actually, your current setting may be correct, depending on what the graphics card is doing.

Between the two (graphic card and HCFR GDI), only one should be set to 16-235. The preferred one is HCFR, but you will have to override the graphics card (as most likely it defaults to Limited when connected to the TV).

Of course the TV should be set to the black setting. The terminology low/normal is quite confusing.
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