Official OPPO BDP-83 Owner's Thread [technical talk only] - Page 1359 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #40741 of 41488 Old 01-11-2016, 12:03 PM
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Thanks again. Is there a way to use the digital signal that leaves the laptop then to go directly to the Oppo 83?

Obviously, my hope was to use the IPad to control JRiver and use the Oppo to create an analog signal to send to my Outlaw Audio 990. In order to use the Room 2 feature on the 990 for music for the rest of the house I need it an analog signal.
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post #40742 of 41488 Old 01-11-2016, 12:08 PM
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Thanks again. Is there a way to use the digital signal that leaves the laptop then to go directly to the Oppo 83?
Inputs on the -83 are:
  • optical disc
  • USB (requires a FAT-formatted mass storage device)
  • Ethernet (the player is a DLNA client)

I can't think of any others.

-Bill

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post #40743 of 41488 Old 01-14-2016, 12:07 PM
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Was there a linear power supply available in the BDP-83?
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post #40744 of 41488 Old 01-15-2016, 12:15 PM
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Was there a linear power supply available in the BDP-83?
The power supply is internal. Not sure what you're asking(?)

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post #40745 of 41488 Old 01-15-2016, 01:13 PM
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The power supply is internal. Not sure what you're asking(?)
IN the unit, as a factory upgrade. Not external. I take it the "SE" upgrade included a better switching-mode power supply, not a linear power supply, but thought I would ask here for the definitive answer.
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post #40746 of 41488 Old 01-15-2016, 01:58 PM
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There is no other power supply available from OPPO.

Back in the day, multiple 3rd party hardware mod shops offered "improvements" to the player. For a price.

It is quite possible some of those will still sell their 83 player mods. Some of which undoubtedly feature "improved" power supplies.

Keep in mind it is far easier to claim something is an improvement, than to deliver on such a claim.
--Bob
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post #40747 of 41488 Old 01-15-2016, 08:23 PM
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Keep in mind it is far easier to claim something is an improvement, than to deliver on such a claim.
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You misunderstand. Its the process of being separated from your money that makes it sound better, not the hardware itself.
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post #40748 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 05:30 AM
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My 83 has started to hang up on power up. Sometimes i only get to HELL instead of HELLO and the player just locks up. I had sent this player in around 3 years to OPPO for the same prob and not sure it is worth fooling with anymore. My 83 had been trouble free.

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post #40749 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post
There is no other power supply available from OPPO...
From Feb 8 2010 "Home Theater" review... "BDP-83 Special Edition.. modifications are internal and center on the use of ESS Technology DACs in the special edition in place of the Cirrus Logic units in the standard version and an upgraded power supply."

Seems there was the first version power supply, then later a second one for the SE. I wondered if that was a linear power supply with a power transformer, rather than just a redesign of the usual switch-mode power supply. Reason I ask, a linear power supply should be more reliable over the years.
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post #40750 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by CHASLS2 View Post
My 83 has started to hang up on power up. Sometimes i only get to HELL instead of HELLO and the player just locks up. I had sent this player in around 3 years to OPPO for the same prob and not sure it is worth fooling with anymore. My 83 had been trouble free.
And speaking of power supplies, that symptom of locking up during startup sounds like electrolytic capacitor failure in the power supply.
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post #40751 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by CHASLS2 View Post
My 83 has started to hang up on power up. Sometimes i only get to HELL instead of HELLO and the player just locks up. I had sent this player in around 3 years to OPPO for the same prob and not sure it is worth fooling with anymore. My 83 had been trouble free.
Disconnect everything from the player but the power, does it still hang? If so contact Oppo. The 83 is well worth the small cost of repair.
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post #40752 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 09:53 AM
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Disconnect everything from the player but the power, does it still hang? If so contact Oppo. The 83 is well worth the small cost of repair.
I have held in the power button and unplugged it a few times and that will do the trick. Just not sure why i have had so much trouble with this 83 while my other 83 has been perfect.

Once it goes for good i will throw it out. I need to get rid of 4 BD players anyways.

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post #40753 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by CHASLS2 View Post
I have held in the power button and unplugged it a few times and that will do the trick. Just not sure why i have had so much trouble with this 83 while my other 83 has been perfect.

Once it goes for good i will throw it out. I need to get rid of 4 BD players anyways.
non-working BDP-83 units sell on eBay for up to $200.
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post #40754 of 41488 Old 01-16-2016, 11:36 AM
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Guess i will sell it for parts when the day comes.

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post #40755 of 41488 Old 01-17-2016, 07:08 PM
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Guess i will sell it for parts when the day comes.
Or just get it fixed, sell it for more at some time and get use from it until then.
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post #40756 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 11:04 AM
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Well, my 83 has developed the "Won't Open" syndrome. I don't use it very often anymore (maybe twice in the last year) and have listed it in the Classifieds if anyone is interested.
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post #40757 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 11:17 AM
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Well, my 83 has developed the "Won't Open" syndrome. I don't use it very often anymore (maybe twice in the last year) and have listed it in the Classifieds if anyone is interested.
If you'd like to get it repaired (perhaps before you sell it), give OPPO Tech Support a call. They have been very accommodating with these.
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post #40758 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 12:17 PM
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If you'd like to get it repaired (perhaps before you sell it), give OPPO Tech Support a call. They have been very accommodating with these.
--Bob


Thanks. I assume it would be the cost $79 or so to get it fixed + checked out by Oppo. Figured for my low price, someone else could either perhaps fix it or send it in for repair. So for about $305 they would have a great player.
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post #40759 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 12:20 PM
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^ Depending on what's actually needed, OPPO might even do the repair for free -- meaning you'd only be out shipping.
--Bob
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post #40760 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 01:04 PM
 
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Last night, my '83 froze and locked up as I selected an episode to watch from the Star Trek: The Original Series - Season 1 Blu-ray; while this has happened in the past with normally new BD rentals, it was the first time for this title. I had to subsequently shut power down and then reload the disc for the player to work again.
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post #40761 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 04:15 PM
 
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Can Someone Answer This for Me?

In my BDP-83's setup menu, under "Aspect Ratio," I have it set for "16:9 Wide" because (as I understood it in the manual) I prefer my full-screen DVDs (I still have a few in my collection from before I got into widescreen HDTV) to stretch and fill the 16:9 display without pillarboxing. When full-screen discs play, the '83 automatically stretches these films with a bit of "elongated fatness" in the characters (which I can deal with) to fit my screen. However, when full-screen BLU-RAYS play, the '83 does NOT stretch these discs to fit the screen, instead leaving the side pillarboxing; I confirmed this by watching such full-screen 1080p material as Casablanca, the original Omega Man and my Season 1 set of Star Trek: The Original Series. What's weird is that with certain titles like Casablanca, I can't even use the Oppo's zoom function to "blow up" the film to fit the screen -- it's locked in with the pillarboxing. But just last night, I experimented with an episode from the Star Trek: The Original Series Blu-ray set, and when watching this episode I used the remote to engage the zoom mode's "FULL" setting...and this DID blow the Trek episode up to fill my screen. However, because I noted that the top and bottom of characters were chopped off during key sequences, I didn't care for the zoomed-in Star Trek episode, and just went back to watching it with the pillarboxing to preserve the original 4:3 presentation...

Why is this happening, does anyone know? Why does the '83 automatically stretch full-screen standard definition (DVD) material when the aspect ratio setup is on "16:9 Wide" but not native 1080p Blu-ray full-screen material? And why would I be able to manually zoom in on full-screen Blu-rays to fill the screen but not on all discs? Is it because of the way some Blu-rays are authored?
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post #40762 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 04:23 PM
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DVDs and Blu-rays are authored differently for 4:3 content. DVD's actually allow 4:3 title to use all available space in the video frame, whereas Blu-ray does not. For DVDs the black bars are not encoded on the disc; for Blu-rays they are.

So with "16:9" Wide you are getting the DVD data untampered and the TV has so handle any aspect ratio adjustment (or not). For Blu-ray there is nothing to adjust; you are getting the 4:3 image embedded with pillarbox bars to make it a 16:9 image.

As for zooming: my memory fades. On some players Java programming on the Blu-ray interferes with zooming, but I thought the -83 got around that. All DVDs should be zoomable.

-Bill

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post #40763 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 04:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post
DVDs and Blu-rays are authored differently for 4:3 content. DVD's actually allow 4:3 title to use all available space in the video frame, whereas Blu-ray does not. For DVDs the black bars are not encoded on the disc; for Blu-rays they are.

So with "16:9" Wide you are getting the DVD data untampered and the TV has so handle any aspect ratio adjustment (or not). For Blu-ray there is nothing to adjust; you are getting the 4:3 image embedded with pillarbox bars to make it a 16:9 image.

Thanks very much, Bill -- that's what I thought, that this was an "authoring" thing...


But what do you mean by 4:3 Blu-rays getting the pillarboxing to "make it a 16:9 image"? The image ends up being centered in the middle of the screen with the black pillarboxing on the sides during these presentations...

Quote:
As for zooming: my memory fades. On some players Java programming on the Blu-ray interferes with zooming, but I thought the -83 got around that. All DVDs should be zoomable.

Yes -- all DVDs are zoomable, and the only time I do this is when I'm watching a non-anamorphic disc so I can "blow" the image up to at least the proper ratio it should be at (2.35:1 or 2.40:1)...


But, for whatever reason, I noted that some full-screen Blu-ray material -- like the aforementioned Casablanca -- WON'T zoom in on the '83 using the remote's zoom function, while others will (such as with the Star Trek episode I watched last night)...


Weird. Must be a Java thing on varying discs, as you said...
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post #40764 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 04:49 PM
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But what do you mean by 4:3 Blu-rays getting the pillarboxing to "make it a 16:9 image"? The image ends up being centered in the middle of the screen with the black pillarboxing on the sides during these presentations...
Yes, that's what I mean. Blu-ray native titles are always 1920x1080. A 4:3 program could be 1080 high but would be only 1436 wide. The rest of the width has black bars encoded as part of the image, half on each side. DVDs are different.

-Bill
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post #40765 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by IntelliVolume View Post
In my BDP-83's setup menu, under "Aspect Ratio," I have it set for "16:9 Wide" because (as I understood it in the manual) I prefer my full-screen DVDs (I still have a few in my collection from before I got into widescreen HDTV) to stretch and fill the 16:9 display without pillarboxing. When full-screen discs play, the '83 automatically stretches these films with a bit of "elongated fatness" in the characters (which I can deal with) to fit my screen. However, when full-screen BLU-RAYS play, the '83 does NOT stretch these discs to fit the screen, instead leaving the side pillarboxing; I confirmed this by watching such full-screen 1080p material as Casablanca, the original Omega Man and my Season 1 set of Star Trek: The Original Series. What's weird is that with certain titles like Casablanca, I can't even use the Oppo's zoom function to "blow up" the film to fit the screen -- it's locked in with the pillarboxing. But just last night, I experimented with an episode from the Star Trek: The Original Series Blu-ray set, and when watching this episode I used the remote to engage the zoom mode's "FULL" setting...and this DID blow the Trek episode up to fill my screen. However, because I noted that the top and bottom of characters were chopped off during key sequences, I didn't care for the zoomed-in Star Trek episode, and just went back to watching it with the pillarboxing to preserve the original 4:3 presentation...

Why is this happening, does anyone know? Why does the '83 automatically stretch full-screen standard definition (DVD) material when the aspect ratio setup is on "16:9 Wide" but not native 1080p Blu-ray full-screen material? And why would I be able to manually zoom in on full-screen Blu-rays to fill the screen but not on all discs? Is it because of the way some Blu-rays are authored?
SD-DVD is a transitional format between original, 4:3 TVs and widescreen 16:9 TVs. The content on the DVD is made up of frames which are 720x480 pixels. THIS IS TRUE WHETHER YOU ARE WATCHING A 4:3 MOVIE OR A WIDESCREEN MOVIE.

If you do the math you will find that 4/3 is 1.333... and 16/9 is 1.777... But 720/480 is neither of those. It is 1.5, exactly. Kind of in between.

So, umm, how does this work? It works with magic called "non-square pixels". Each pixel off the SD-DVD disc is INTERPRETED -- when the image is being rendered for your TV screen -- as either a rectangle which is taller than it is wide or a rectangle that is wider than it is tall. Non square.

The disc includes a piece of data telling which to use. If you are playing a 4:3 movie, then each and every one of those 720x480 pixels is interpreted as a rectangle which is taller than it is wide. If you are playing a 16:9 (or other widescreen shape) movie, then each pixel is interpreted as a rectangle which is wider than it is tall.

------------------------------------------

Set that fact aside a moment, and lets look at the output video from the player. 1080p output is made up of a matrix of 1920x1080 pixels. Which, if you do the math, is the same shape as 16:9. Since these pixels are destined for a 16:9 display, that means each of those HD pixels is SQUARE.

When you play an SD-DVD, the 720x480 NON-square SD pixels coming off the disc for each frame get rendered into those 1920x1080 square HD pixels for output. Using that flag I just mentioned, and also using the aspect ratio setting you've selected in the player.

The setting "16:9 Wide" means treat the SD pixels as if you are playing a widescreen movie. The setting "16:9 Wide Auto" means treat the SD pixels according to the aspect ratio flag from the disc.

So if you play a 4:3 SD movie using 16:9 Wide, the upscaling to 1080p treats each of those pixels as wider than they are tall, meaning they fill the 16:9 output frame. They aren't "stretched". Rather, nothing is done to them except rendering them into the more pixels needed for the HD output.

If you play the SAME 4:3 SD movie using 16:9 Wide Auto, the upscaling to 1080p sees the 4:3 flag for the disc and renders each of those SD pixels as a rectangle that is taller than it is wide. The result is that the SD image fills the output from from top to bottom, but does NOT fill it left to right. Instead, you get a 4:3 image embedded in the 16:9, HD output frame. The space on either side is output as black pixels -- called "pillar box bars".

So 16:9 Wide does nothing to the data but scale it to 1080p. But 16:9 Wide Auto adds pillar box bars to preserve the 4:3 aspect ratio of the original content frame.

If you play a 16:9 SD movie then 16:9 Wide and 16:9 Wide Auto do the same thing. They both upscale that to 1080p output interpreting each SD pixel as a rectangle that is wider than it is tall.

-------------------------------------------------------

Now suppose you are playing a blu-ray disc. The content coming off the Blu-ray disc is already 1080p. It is made up of frames that each have 1920x1080 HD -- square -- pixels. If you happen to be playing a Blu-ray disc of an older, 4:3 movie, that means the folks who authored that disc have to build pillar box bars into the data for each frame on the disc. The image coming off the disc is a movie frame that fills the 1920x1080 from top to bottom, but does NOT fill it left to right. Black padding pixels are added to the content -- ON DISC -- to account for the rest of the pixels on either side.

The point being, what's coming off the Blu-ray disc is 16:9, even if it happens to contain an embedded 4:3 movie.

And as stated above, 16:9 Wide and 16:9 Wide Auto both do the same thing when playing 16:9 content. Nothing whatsoever.

-----------------------------------------------

As Bill pointed out, disc authors have the option to author their discs in ways that prevent you from accessing certain player functions. These are called Prevented User Operations or PUOs. One of the operations they can prevent is the Zoom function. Disc authors probably believe they have a good reason when they prevent access to the Zoom function. Perhaps they want to overlay graphics on the image -- part of the "BD Java" programming of the disc -- and that won't be visible (properly) if the user has Zoomed in on the content. Nobody really knows what drives disc authors to do what they do. But there it is. Some discs won't let you Zoom.
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post #40766 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 05:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post
SD-DVD is a transitional format between original, 4:3 TVs and widescreen 16:9 TVs. The content on the DVD is made up of frames which are 720x480 pixels. THIS IS TRUE WHETHER YOU ARE WATCHING A 4:3 MOVIE OR A WIDESCREEN MOVIE.

If you do the math you will find that 4/3 is 1.333... and 16/9 is 1.777... But 720/480 is neither of those. It is 1.5, exactly. Kind of in between.

So, umm, how does this work? It works with magic called "non-square pixels". Each pixel off the SD-DVD disc is INTERPRETED -- when the image is being rendered for your TV screen -- as either a rectangle which is taller than it is wide or a rectangle that is wider than it is tall. Non square.

The disc includes a piece of data telling which to use. If you are playing a 4:3 movie, then each and every one of those 720x480 pixels is interpreted as a rectangle which is taller than it is wide. If you are playing a 16:9 (or other widescreen shape) movie, then each pixel is interpreted as a rectangle which is wider than it is tall.

Thanks very much for your detailed explanation, Bob; while much of this goes a bit over my head, I believe I understand a good chunk of what you're saying here...so let me get to this:

Quote:
Set that fact aside a moment, and lets look at the output video from the player. 1080p output is made up of a matrix of 1920x1080 pixels. Which, if you do the math, is the same shape as 16:9. Since these pixels are destined for a 16:9 display, that means each of those HD pixels is SQUARE.

When you play an SD-DVD, the 720x480 NON-square SD pixels coming off the disc for each frame get rendered into those 1920x1080 square HD pixels for output. Using that flag I just mentioned, and also using the aspect ratio setting you've selected in the player.

The setting "16:9 Wide" means treat the SD pixels as if you are playing a widescreen movie. The setting "16:9 Wide Auto" means treat the SD pixels according to the aspect ratio flag from the disc.

Think I'm following you here...

Quote:
So if you play a 4:3 SD movie using 16:9 Wide, the upscaling to 1080p treats each of those pixels as wider than they are tall, meaning they fill the 16:9 output frame. They aren't "stretched". Rather, nothing is done to them except rendering them into the more pixels needed for the HD output.

Gotcha -- I just use the term "stretched" because it seems like the characters on screen in these full-screen DVDs appear to be slightly "squashed and fat" when played back using this aspect ratio in the Oppo...that, plus the fact that according to the manual, the 16:9 Wide setting plays full-screen DVDs back "without letterboxing" unless I'm mistaken, which also led me to use the term "stretched"...

Quote:
If you play the SAME 4:3 SD movie using 16:9 Wide Auto, the upscaling to 1080p sees the 4:3 flag for the disc and renders each of those SD pixels as a rectangle that is taller than it is wide. The result is that the SD image fills the output from from top to bottom, but does NOT fill it left to right. Instead, you get a 4:3 image embedded in the 16:9, HD output frame. The space on either side is output as black pixels -- called "pillar box bars".

So 16:9 Wide does nothing to the data by scale it to 1080p. But 16:9 Wide Auto adds pillar box bars to preserve the 4:3 aspect ratio of the original content frame.

I think I got it...

Quote:
If you play a 16:9 SD movie then 16:9 Wide and 16:9 Wide Auto do the same thing. They both upscale that to 1080p output interpreting each SD pixel as a rectangle that is wider than it is tall.

When watching widescreen standard DVDs, the player renders them in the correct aspect ratio -- whether that's the screen-filling 1.85/1.78 or the letterboxed 2.35/2.40 -- with no "alterations" of any kind...unless I watch a non-anamorphic title, in which case I need to use the player's remote to zoom in on the image in order to get it to its proper ratio (if this makes any sense).


Interestingly enough, my previous BD player -- Panasonic's first-generation DMP-BD10A -- automatically detected non-anamorphic DVDs and blew them up to proper ratio size without me having to go into the menu to do so...the Oppo does not.

-------------------------------------------------------

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Now suppose you are playing a blu-ray disc. The content coming off the Blu-ray disc is already 1080p. It is made up of frames that each have 1920x1080 HD -- square -- pixels. If you happen to be playing a Blu-ray disc of an older, 4:3 movie, that means the folks who authored that disc have to build pillar box bars into the data for each frame on the disc. The image coming off the disc is a movie frame that fills the 1920x1080 from top to bottom, but does NOT fill it left to right. Black padding pixels are added to the content -- ON DISC -- to account for the rest of the pixels on either side.

The point being, what's coming off the Blu-ray disc is 16:9, even if it happens to contain an embedded 4:3 movie.

...thus why the black pillarboxing to "fill in" the rest of the widescreen "space" on the screen, right? This is why I see the pillarboxing on my Star Trek Blu-rays...

Quote:
And as stated above, 16:9 Wide and 16:9 Wide Auto both do the same thing when playing 16:9 content. Nothing whatsoever.

Right; because, essentially, you're telling the player in these modes that it's CONNECTED to a widescreen display device, correct?

-----------------------------------------------

Quote:
As Bill pointed out, disc authors have the option to author their discs in ways that prevent you from accessing certain player functions. These are called Prevented User Operations or PUOs. One of the operations they can prevent is the Zoom function. Disc authors probably believe they have a good reason when they prevent access to the Zoom function. Perhaps they want to overlay graphics on the image -- part of the "BD Java" programming of the disc -- and that won't be visible (properly) if the user has Zoomed in on the content. Nobody really knows what drives disc authors to do what they do. But there it is. Some discs won't let you Zoom.
--Bob

Well, that answers the question of why Casablanca wouldn't allow zooming when Star Trek does; I had assumed EVERY full-screen Blu-ray (or widescreen, for that matter, with its letterboxing) wouldn't allow zooming because it's "locked in" to a 1080p encode (something I read about or something someone told me on a forum; may have been here).


Thanks very much, Bob, for taking the time to explain this -- as it stands, and just so I understand, when I watch the Trek DVDs and the episodes fill my screen (leaving the Oppo on 16:9 Wide), they're not actually "stretching" even though the characters look a bit so....it's merely taking the full-screen image and "laying it in" to the widescreen frame?

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post #40767 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 07:00 PM
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^ Yes. The 1.5 aspect ratio content pixels on the SD-DVD are being rendered into the 1.78 aspect ratio, HD output frame, even though the original content authored on the SD-DVD is 1.33 aspect ratio.

Non-anamorphic SD-DVDs are different. They are designed for playback on traditional, 4:3 TVs, and the content on disc is *ALWAYS* flagged as 4:3. That means when you play a widescreen movie what you have on disc is the widescreen (e.g., 16:9 or wider) movie image EMBEDDED in a 4:3 frame on disc. To do that, black "letter box" pixels are included in the content -- ON DISC -- top and bottom to pad the widescreen image into a 4:3 shape.

Such discs are not really intended to be viewed on 16:9 TVs. If you do so, without zooming, the widescreen movie will float in the middle of the screen with black around all 4 sides. If you Zoom in, you'll utilize the size of your TV better, but the content will look pretty bad. SD resolution imagery can't stand zooming like that without artifacts becoming visible.

The Full Zoom mode on the OPPO takes a 4:3 frame and Zooms into it so that it fills the 16:9 screen left to right. This discards part of the image off the top and bottom of the screen. But if you have a widescreen movie (16:9 or wider) embedded in that frame, the stuff that's discarded is just all or a portion of the black "letter box" bars which have been authored in above and below the embedded movie image.

The best answer of course is that you should never buy non-anamorphic SD-DVD discs. These will typically be labeled as "Full Screen" or "4:3 Letter Boxed".

Instead, buy discs labeled, "anamorphic", or "enhanced for 16:9 TVs". These embed a widescreen movie in a 16:9 frame -- using the non-square pixels approach I described.

This can be particularly tricky if you are not careful. Suppose you have a 4:3 Letter Boxed SD-DVD disc and you play it with 16:9 Wide (not Wide Auto). The result of interpreting the pixels as 16:9 pixels instead of 4:3 pixels means the image will fill the screen left to right. But that's NOT THE SAME THING as zooming in to the 4:3 frame embedded in that content.

Pay careful attention to circles in the imagery. Things like car tires. If they look like ovals -- either wide ovals or tall ovals -- you've got the aspect ratio screwed up.
--Bob
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post #40768 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 07:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post
^ Yes. The 1.5 aspect ratio content pixels on the SD-DVD are being rendered into the 1.78 aspect ratio, HD output frame, even though the original content authored on the SD-DVD is 1.33 aspect ratio.

I understand the process now, but doesn't this "rendering" still "enlongate" (for lack of a better term other than "stretch") the 4:3 image? It sure seems that way, what with the way characters look "wide and crunched" a bit on full-screen DVDs...

Quote:
Non-anamorphic SD-DVDs are different. They are designed for playback on traditional, 4:3 TVs, and the content on disc is *ALWAYS* flagged as 4:3. That means when you play a widescreen movie what you have on disc is the widescreen (e.g., 16:9 or wider) movie image EMBEDDED in a 4:3 frame on disc. To do that, black "letter box" pixels are included in the content -- ON DISC -- top and bottom to pad the widescreen image into a 4:3 shape.

Such discs are not really intended to be viewed on 16:9 TVs. If you do so, without zooming, the widescreen movie will float in the middle of the screen with black around all 4 sides. If you Zoom in, you'll utilize the size of your TV better, but the content will look pretty bad. SD resolution imagery can't stand zooming like that without artifacts becoming visible.

The Full Zoom mode on the OPPO takes a 4:3 frame and Zooms into it so that it fills the 16:9 screen left to right. This discards part of the image off the top and bottom of the screen. But if you have a widescreen movie (16:9 or wider) embedded in that frame, the stuff that's discarded is just all or a portion of the black "letter box" bars which have been authored in above and below the embedded movie image.

The best answer of course is that you should never buy non-anamorphic SD-DVD discs. These will typically be labeled as "Full Screen" or "4:3 Letter Boxed".

Instead, buy discs labeled, "anamorphic", or "enhanced for 16:9 TVs". These embed a widescreen movie in a 16:9 frame -- using the non-square pixels approach I described.
--Bob

I think you may have misunderstood me here; of course I wouldn't buy any non-anamorphic DVDs (unless there was an old title I was looking for that came in no other format) and I understand the difference between them and the "enhanced for 16 x 9 televisions" media...what I was saying is I ALREADY OWN some non-anamorphic discs that have to be "adjusted" in order to look right on my screen...


Let me give you an example, because what's happening on my specific display isn't really what your describing (with the non-anamorphic image "floating" in the middle): Let's say I put in an old DVD title without anamorphic enhancement like, say, Dimension's DVD release of From Dusk Till Dawn. In this case, the film was framed at 1.78:1 (or 1.85:1, I can't recall) and because it is non-anamorphic, it shows up on my display with black bars that make the image look "strange" because the DVD SHOULD fill my screen, given its aspect ratio. In THIS case, I need to zoom the image in using the Oppo's remote so that the image fills up the screen (hence the 1.85 or 1.78 OAR)...


Perhaps a better example is with the "scope" films shot in 2.35 or 2.40 that are non-anamorphic. Let's say I take a disc like the original Taking of Pelham One Two Three, or Meteor (both released by MGM) -- these films are supposed to be presented in 2.35 widescreen, but because they're non-anamorphic, they show up on my display with massive black areas on top and bottom, with the main picture looking like a thin "strip" across the center. But, the image isn't "windowboxed" like you describe above -- it's just letterboxed in the center of the screen but with massive black areas to the top and bottom. Now, to bring the films up to their proper 2.35:1 presentation, I use the BDP-83's zoom mode and switch it to "FULL," which blows the image up to look like a CORRECTLY PLACED 2.35:1 image (with smaller letterboxing bars on top and bottom)...


Does this make sense?
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post #40769 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 07:24 PM
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^ The best answer here is to get an SD-DVD calibration disc with both 4:3 and 16:9 charts so you can see exactly what is happening with the combination of 16:9 Wide vs Wide Auto and the Zoom modes. (I use the Avia Pro SD-DVD calibration disc set, but alas that is no longer in print.)

If you wan't to retain aspect ratio when playing SD-DVD discs, you should stick with "16:9 Wide Auto". Then add the Full Zoom mode if you find that leaves you with a widescreen image that floats in the middle of the screen (black around all 4 sides).

If you use "16:9 Wide" and then add a Zoom mode you are going to lose some image off the left and right sides, and will likely STILL end up with incorrect aspect ratio of what's left.
--Bob

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post #40770 of 41488 Old 01-19-2016, 07:31 PM
 
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Oh Jesus...my desktop PC must be coming down with a virus or something...I see that my original reply to you actually posted...


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